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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Pink )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
8:12 PM

Post #1621547

Meadow Pink, Rose Gentian, ( Sabatia campestris ) Gentian family, Native plant, annual,
bloom period March--July, forms large colonies.
For more information see the Plant Files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62373/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
8:26 PM

Post #1621573

Showy Primrose, Mexican Primrose, ( Oenothera speciosa )
Evening Primrose family. Native perennial, bloom period March--July
covers large areas in lovely pink. For more information see the Plant Files
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/236/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:37 PM

Post #1623055

Showy Primrose, Mexican Evening Primrose (Oenothera speciosa)
Another photo ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:45 PM

Post #1623065

Pigeon Berry, Bloodberry, Rouge Plant, Baby Pepper, Coral Berry (Rivina humilis), Phytolaccaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring through mid-fall, has beautiful berries after the first blooms fade and then throughtout the blooming period. For more information see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58615/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:48 PM

Post #1623074

Pigeon Berry, Bloodberry, Rouge Plant, Baby Pepper, Coral Berry (Rivina humilis)
A view of the tiny pink, white and whitish pink blooms which occur on racemes that can reach 8 inches in length ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
1:52 PM

Post #1623078

Pigeon Berry, Bloodberry, Rouge Plant, Baby Pepper, Coral Berry (Rivina humilis)

A view of the small berries which birds love and which keep developing together with the new blooms until the middle of the fall ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
3:48 PM

Post #1623318

Scarlet Gaura, Scarlet Wandflower, Scarlet Appleblossum Grass (Gaura coccinea), Onagraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall. For more information see in the PlantFiles http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31901/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
3:52 PM

Post #1623328

Scarlet Gaura, Scarlet Wandflower, Scarlet Appleblossum Grass (Gaura coccinea)
A view of another bloom which has aged and has a lovely rose color ...
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2005
11:58 PM

Post #1624403

Cluster of 3 Salt Marsh Morning Glories.

Ipomoea Sagittata

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 7:03 PM
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2005
12:00 AM

Post #1624409

Cluster of 4 Salt Marsh Morning Glories.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2005
12:02 AM

Post #1624412

Cluster of 4 Salt Marsh Morning Glories.

Ipomoea Sagittata.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
3:18 PM

Post #1625580

Eastern Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-summer through fall
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
9:14 PM

Post #1628250

Smartweed, Big Seeded Smartweed (Persicaria pensylvanica), Polygonaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms late spring to early fall, may be a noxious weed or invasive

The blooms as shown here are a very pale lavenderish pink. They may be pink, rose or a light rose colored mauve. Blooms are in clusters in terminal spikes at the ends of the stems. Although this plant may be highly invasive in cultivated gardens, it provides life support for lots of wildlife.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/73068/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
9:16 PM

Post #1628251

Smartweed, Big Seeded Smartweed (Persicaria pensylvanica)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
9:20 PM

Post #1628255

Smartweed, Big Seeded Smartweed (Persicaria pensylvanica)

The 2 to 6 inches long and 1.25 inches wide leaves can have a purple splotch in the middle. A closer view of the maroon stem and leaves ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:41 PM

Post #1639216

Native Texas plant, Purple Cone Flower, ( Echinacea purpurea ) Prairies and open woods, northeast Texas to Virginia. Lovely long lasting perennial, drought tolerant. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/26/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:43 PM

Post #1639220

A group of Cone Flowers on my wildflower garden.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
6:44 PM

Post #1639223

Cone Flower seedlings, one month old.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 21, 2005
6:48 PM

Post #1639227

Wild Guara. Ours start Pink and fade to white.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 27, 2005
5:41 PM

Post #1653544

Callirhoe alcaeoides, Plains Poppy-Mallow, Pink Wine Cup, Pink Poppy-Mallow, Pale Poppy-Mallow, Malvaceae Family, Texas native, perennial.

An herbaceous low growing plant up to 20" long and usually around 6" tall. Flowers pale pink or white about 1" in diameter. Leaves at the base are very lobed and divided into 5 to 7 lobes. Leaves closer to the flowers are very slender.

The photo on this native is in the Texas Native Plant Pictures by Color (Purple) to keep it with the other Callirhoe species.

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/528718/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
2:48 PM

Post #1662069

Carolina Cranesbill (Geranium carolinianum), Geraniaceae Family, Texas native, annual/biennial, blooms in early spring through mid-summer, may be considered a weed by many

IThe deeply lobed foliage is more attractive than the insignificant and small cream, pale pink to pale purple flowers.

It appears iin my flowerbeds, but is easily removed if I want to eradicate them.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55196/index.html

The foliagae and growth habit ...

This message was edited Mar 1, 2006 2:38 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
2:50 PM

Post #1662073

Carolina Cranesbill (Geranium carolinianum)

The bloom with a bud behind it ... the pale pink color of the bloom does not show up well in this photo.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 8, 2005
7:23 PM

Post #1679526

( Native ) Carolina Phlox, ( Phlox carolina ) Beautiful perennial, very scented, long lasting flowers, a favorite of mine.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2081/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 8, 2005
7:24 PM

Post #1679529

A close up of the flower cluster.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2005
7:31 PM

Post #1699603

( Native ) Bull Thistle, ( Cirsum horridilum) one of the many impressive Thistles native to Texas.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2737/index.html

This message was edited Aug 17, 2005 2:33 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2005
7:32 PM

Post #1699605

A close up of the amazing flower.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 14, 2005
3:40 PM

Post #1758849

We have literally millions of Purple Gerardia blooming right now. They are everywhere you look, in vast clumps. Most close by noon. In spite of the name, almost all of mine are pink.
Some are even growing in the edge of the pond mixed with Cattails.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 14, 2005
3:45 PM

Post #1758856

The early blooms were small but now the blooms are about an inch long and 3/4 inch wide. I stopped counting when I reached 50 clumps, each with thousands of flowers. Selective mowing works! I have done battle to prevent their early mowing all year, and finally everyone knows what they are and how beautiful they are.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 14, 2005
3:49 PM

Post #1758866

One of hundreds of clumps.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 1, 2006
7:48 AM

Post #2078789

Pink Smartweed (Persicaria bicornis), Polygonaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms June through October, is considered to be a noxious weed by many

Pink Smartweed (Persicaria bicornis) is a native wetlands plant that inhabits moist disturbed places, marshes, edges of ponds, rivers and reservoirs, ditches and moist cultivated fields. Many times it is included in Persicaria pensylvanica. However, it can be distinguished easily by its heterostylous flowers. Its exserted stamens and styles give it a more fringed appearance. The blooms are more "open"; whereas, the Persicaria pensylvanica blooms are more cupped. Also, its fruit (achenes) usually have an obscure or prominent hump in the center of one face. which typically ruptures the side of the perianth upon fruiting. In addition, the Persicaria bicornis leaf blades are narrower than the leaf blades of Persicaria pensylvanica.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/127476/index.html

Two bloom spikes that are criss-crossed growing near a pond in Northwest Bexar County ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

July 1, 2006
7:54 PM

Post #2455374

Rock Rose or Rose Pavonia, Pavonia lasiopetala, a perennial deciduous native shrub-like plant with beautiful pink flowers. It belongs in the Malvaceae family. It's drought-tolerant, available in many nurseries and can be grown from seed. It can flower most of the year and is hardy enough to grow through most of the state.
butterflybyrob
Spring, TX

July 1, 2006
9:37 PM

Post #2455693

heart leaf hibiscus, native small shrub for well drained soil..likes it dry
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

October 4, 2006
4:59 AM

Post #2783984

Barbados Cherry, Malpighia glabra. It's a perennial evergreen or deciduous shrub, depending on the winter climate. It can be 3 to 4 feet or as even as much as 9 feet tall. Sally Wasowski says it's evergreen above 25 degrees and can be grown as far north as Austin. Otherwise, it can be grown in a pot and protected during winter. The pink to whitish flowers are lovely and the foliage is also very attractive. It makes small sweet red fruits, which are eaten by wildlife, in many cases.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
10:46 PM

Post #2811510

Rosy Palafox, Rose Palafoxia (Palafoxia rosea), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms June through October

Rosy palafox is a sandy soil native annual of the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau. In its native habitats, it can be found growing on brushlands, plains, prairies, open hillsides and edges of woodlands. It is a thin, erect, usually solitary stemmed, much branched plant that has glandular hairs on all its structures. The slender leaves are up to 3 inches long and 1/4 inch wide and are alternate, stalked and firm. The 5/8 inch across flower head is made up of 12-25 pink to rose disk flowers with no ray flowers and black stamens. The young palafoxia flower heads turn white with age. It is a nectar and pollen source for insects, especially butterflies. Seeds must be sown in the fall.

Native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PARO

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/983/index.html

The younger head to the left has only black stamens while the older head has stigmas which appear after the stamens have shed their pollen (an adaptation against self-pollination).
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
10:51 PM

Post #2811517

Rosy Palafox, Rose Palafoxia (Palafoxia rosea)

Palafoxia rosea is a hermaphroditic plant (has both male and female parts). A view of a flower showing the black stamens which appear before the stigmas so that the flowers won't self-pollinate ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 15, 2007
5:13 AM

Post #3190869

Pink Thoroughwort (Fleischmannia incarnata, aka: Eupatorium incarnatum), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms October through December

It is found growing in moist loamy soil areas of the South Texas Plains. It natively grows in thickets, ditches, bottomlands, swamps, wet fields and woods as well as along roads and stream banks. The stems are lax so the branches tend to bend down giving it a sprawling type growth habit. The leaves are triangular or deltoid in shape and are up to 2 inches in length. The blooms are mostly whitish, but can be pink to lilac on the tips; however, they are rarely totally white. They are a nectar source for the rounded metalmark butterfly. Dried plants have an odor similar to vanilla.

For more informatio, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140240/index.html

Bloom buds just starting to open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 15, 2007
5:15 AM

Post #3190871

Pink Thoroughwort (Fleischmannia incarnata, aka: Eupatorium incarnatum)

Bloom buds starting to open and fully opened bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 15, 2007
5:17 AM

Post #3190872

Pink Thoroughwort (Fleischmannia incarnata, aka: Eupatorium incarnatum)

Blooms more fully opened ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
9:50 PM

Post #3341448

Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana), Polemoniaceae Family, Texas endemic native, annual, blooms February through May

Golden-eye phlox may be a plant that goes unnoticied all year until it blooms (if it can fight its way through other plants). It can be found growing natively in the dry well-drained limestone soils of central Texas in the Edwards Plateau and in the adjacent High Plains Regions. Although it usually grows in clay or clay loam on rocky slopes and limestone barrens or more commonly in grasslands on uplands, it occasionally grows in sandier substrates. It is common on roadsides where fall mowing reduces shading by taller warm-season grasses.

It is very low growing typically reaching a height of three to five inches, but sometimes it may grow as tall as twelve inches. The slender 2 long and 3/8 wide leaves are covered with fine hairs and have longer hairs along the margins. The leaves sre alternately arranged on the stem.

Although the bloons are small, they standout in a crowd. Usually the bloom is a bright to magenta pink with a lighter pink to white center and a yellow or golden eye. However, the bloom may be a light purple or rarely white. It has pinkish purple lines pointing to the corolla tube which are called nectar guides. These assist insects with locating the center of the bloom, thereby, helpong the bloom become pollinated and helping the insect locate nectar quickly. Blooms of some plants (usually visited by bees) have low ultraviolet reflectance near the center of each petal. These nectar guides can not been seen by the human eye. The fruit are very small, ball-shaped capsules.

I just have to add this interesting report:

"FOILED BY SPIDERS The arrival of an insect-hungry crab spider (Misumenops celer) on a golden-eye phlox blossom (Phlox roemeriana) often spells misfortune for this central Texas wildflower. The spider is a sit-and-wait predator, but before sitting, it remodels its host. By tying together two of the five phlox petals to form a bower, the spider may perhaps be shading itself from the sun or concealing itself from its insect prey. Whatever its purpose, the bower significantly reduces the flower's chances of getting pollinated and setting seed, according to biologist James Ott and his colleagues at Southwest Texas State University. It's not because the spider's handiwork blocks access to the flower's reproductive organs; failure is just as likely even when the bower doesn't cover carpels and stamens. Ott says the next question he wants to answer is what prevents pollination: Do pollinators learn to avoid flowers with bowers or do they get eaten before they can deposit any pollen? ("The effect of spider-mediated flower alteration on seed production in golden-eye phlox," as published in The Southwestern Naturalist 43, 1998.

I couldn't find any information about whether or not he ever found the answer to his question.

Distirbution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/endemics_map_page2?code=K4852100

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55482/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
9:53 PM

Post #3341456

Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana)

The blooms on this Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana) do not have white around their centers, just a slightly lighter color. The "yellow" is more of a gold than that of the previous specimen of which I posted a photo. They do have guide lines. This plant is so short that debri was splattered onto its petals during a heavy rain.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
9:55 PM

Post #3341464

Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana)

A closeup of a bloom about to open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
10:00 PM

Post #3341480

Golden-Eye Phlox, Roemer Phlox (Phlox roemeriana)

A view of the leaves which are usually hidden by the foliage of other plants when the phlox is blooming (unless, of course, it does not have other plants by it) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
5:11 PM

Post #3347979

Small Flower Gaura, Lizardtail (Lizard Tail, Gaura, Velvetleaf Gaura, Velvetweed, Downy Gaura, (Gaura mollis), Onagraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms April through October (sometimes November)

Lizardtail Gaura has erect stems and usually attains a height of between 4-6 feet (usually shorter than 6 feet); however, it can grow up to 9 feet tall. It natively grows on dry, disturbed sites, roadsides, rocky prairie hillsides, waste areas and in open woods. The hairy (velvety) leaves are entire, very green, lanceolate to oblanceolate and up to 8 inches long. They have an ivory colored midvein. The stems have longer and thicker hairs on them than the leaves do. The tiny pink blooms are about 1/4 inch wide with the petals being about 1/8" long. The blooms open at night or before dawn and really show up backlit by early morning or late afternoon sunlight. The flower tubes (hypanthiums) are red. Apex flower stalks (flower spikes) are about1 2" long and have small, tightly packed buds. The blloom stalks are bent or nodding; hence, the common name "lizardtail gaura". The 4-sided fruits are about 1/4" long and they taper to both ends. Some Native American Tribes used the roots to treat snakebites.

Texas Native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=GAMO5

For more information and lots more photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/78310/index.html

Blooms closup ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
5:14 PM

Post #3347995

Small Flower Gaura, Lizardtail (Lizard Tail, Gaura, Velvetleaf Gaura, Velvetweed, Downy Gaura, (Gaura mollis)

"Lizardtail" bloom stalk ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
5:16 PM

Post #3348003

Small Flower Gaura, Lizardtail (Lizard Tail, Gaura, Velvetleaf Gaura, Velvetweed, Downy Gaura, (Gaura mollis)

Another view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
5:19 PM

Post #3348012

Small Flower Gaura, Lizardtail (Lizard Tail, Gaura, Velvetleaf Gaura, Velvetweed, Downy Gaura, (Gaura mollis)

As seen farther back ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 10, 2007
11:27 PM

Post #3377751

Wild Garlic, Drummond's Onion, Drummond Wild Onion, Prairie Onion (Allium drummondii), Alliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, bulb, blooms March through May

This is the most widely distributed wild onion species in Texas growing natively in various soils and vegetative areas. The 3/4 inch wide blooms have tepals not petals, appear on a slender flower stem, are clustered in an umbel and may be a variety of hues from white to pale pink to dark rose. They produce shiny black seeds. An asexual form produces tiny bulbets at the tips of the flower stalks. This species may be distinguished from Allium canadense by examining the underground bulbs. The outer covering of Allium drummondii bulbs are papery; wheras, Allium canadense bulbs have a criss-cross fiber-type coating surrounding them. Both smell oniony and both types of bulbs are edible. Just do not confuse them with crow-poison, false garlic (Nothoscordum bivalve) which neither smells like garlic nor onion and is poisonous.

Caution: Crow-poison shown at the link below is poisonous:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55467/index.html

Drummond wild onion Texas county distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=ALDR

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55460/index.html

Very closeup view of blooms in different stages of maturity with small critters visiting them ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 16, 2007
5:14 AM

Post #3396643

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis ) Legume family, ( Fabaceae ) Annual, native plant endemic to Texas, bloom period, March---May.The state flower of Texas.

For the first time in my life (60 years), I have seen pink bluebonnets growing in a native environment. I found 2 plants today in a field in Northwest San Antonio. These are very rarely found occurring naturally. According to Texas A&M University, "In the wild it occurs only once in every ten million bluebonnets. And the chance of finding a pink bluebonnet, well its one in a hundred million." I hit the jackpot finding 2 plants. :o) There is an 'Abbott Pink' cultivar that has been developed through selective breeding.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/754/index.html

A bloom cluster of a pink blooming specimen (observed in northwest Bexar County, Texas):
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 16, 2007
5:16 AM

Post #3396644

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )

A closer view:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 16, 2007
5:18 AM

Post #3396645

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )

The second specimen I found of the rarely see (in the wild) pink blooming bluebonnet. (observed in northwest Bexar County, Texas):


This message was edited Apr 16, 2007 4:31 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 16, 2007
6:00 AM

Post #3396658

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )

"The Legend of the Pink Bluebonnet" by Greg Grant can be found at the link below:
http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/flowers/bluebonnet/pinkbluebonnet.html

Warning: Do not read the next paragraph if religion offends you. We are all entitled to our own beliefs. This post will probably be pulled and I am expecting my first "warning".

If you read the legend, you discovered/will discover that the legend states that the pink bluebonnet symbolizes the struggle to survive. Finding these 2 rare specimens has much meaning for me. My Mother and my husband's ex-mother-in-law were called by their Father to join Him recently within 2 weeks of each other. They both struggled to survive ... I would like to think these 2 specimens were meant for me to find during my time of grief as a symbol that they experienced joyous release from their physical bodies and the struggles that they were experiencing. As I found these beautiful plants, I realized what gifts I had been given. The pain of my 2 losses lessened as I realized that they indeed had been given the promised gift and they no longer need to struggle to survive. I should be rejoicing for them.

The second specimen of the rare pink bluebonnet next to a "regular" bluebonnet as seen from the top. I noticed how the open blooms touch each other appearing to form a circle. The bloom petioles radiate out making the blooms look like a wagon wheel. Unfortunately, the wind was so strong, I could not capture a "perfect" view of this. The pink bloom clusters seems to be a bit more compact than the blue bloom cluster.


This message was edited Apr 16, 2007 11:46 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2007
8:22 AM

Post #3396895

Hazel, your post is beautiful and I am so glad that you found such rare plants and they helped you to make sense of your loss and gave you peace and joy.
If they delete your post, we will have to have a big protest, but I don't think they will do it.
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2007
9:36 AM

Post #3397094

I read the Legend Hazel, very neat, it must have been a terrible time they went through, but hope springs eternal.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
2:05 PM

Post #3401673

Foxglove, Fairy Thimbles, Dewflower, Wild Belladonna, Beardtongue, Showy Beardtongue, Balmony (Penstemon cobaea), Scrophulariaceae Family, native, short lived herbaceous perennial, blooms April through June

Foxglove is found on dry open prairies and eroded pastures and hillsides, slopes, bluffs and edges of creeks on chalk loam, limestone loam, gypsum loam or sandy loam soils. It is an upright, hairy perennial that has a thick, tuberous root. This root assists with its surviving scorching dry summers. In the summer, it whithers down and appears to be dead. In late winter, a thick, compact clump of leaves and a tall stem laden with buds emerges. It produces very large, 2" long, tubular white to violet to deep purple flowers (largest blooms of any native penstemon).and is pollinated by large bees which need to crawl inside the corolla tube. That is why the filaments of the four stamens are curved and rigid in order to prevent the corolla tube from collapsing. The long style sticks out past the lip of the corolla. This penstemon attracts a variety of moths and nectar insects, hummingbirds and butterflies. It is a larval host for the dotted checkerspot butterfly. Collect seed in summer when capsules are brown and seeds are black. Germination is best with cold-moist stratification. It may be propagted from herbaceous stem cuttings also. Foxglove is suitable for rock gardens, native plant gardens, wildscapes and other cultivated areas. Root rot can occur in wet, poorly-drained soils.

Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=2,3,4,5,6,7,8&name=Penstemon cobaea Nutt.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/65167/index.html

Plants swaying in a brisk April breeze; the blooms are large and highly visible:


This message was edited Apr 17, 2007 1:21 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
2:10 PM

Post #3401689

Foxglove, Fairy Thimbles, Dewflower, Wild Belladonna, Beardtongue, Showy Beardtongue, Balmony(Penstemon cobaea)

Plant as seen highlighted with late afternoon sunlight ... note the orange flags in the far background that mark this road for expansion; all the lovely native plants will be destroyed. I am trying to save them in photos. I did dig up 5 plants to put in my landscape. Digging them up without damaging their roots was difficult in the limestone laden soil.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
2:12 PM

Post #3401695

Foxglove, Fairy Thimbles, Dewflower, Wild Belladonna, Beardtongue, Showy Beardtongue, Balmony(Penstemon cobaea)

A bloom cluster with bloom buds and 2 blooms just about to open; notice that the structures are highly pubescent:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
2:14 PM

Post #3401703

Foxglove, Fairy Thimbles, Dewflower, Wild Belladonna, Beardtongue, Showy Beardtongue, Balmony(Penstemon cobaea)

A bloom which is large and is pollinated by large bees which need to crawl inside the corolla tube. That is why the filaments of the four stamens are curved and rigid in order to prevent the corolla tube from collapsing. The long style sticks out past the lip of the corolla.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
2:16 PM

Post #3401711

Foxglove, Fairy Thimbles, Dewflower, Wild Belladonna, Beardtongue, Showy Beardtongue, Balmony(Penstemon cobaea)

The leaves are glabrous, serrate, shiny dark green above and dull shiny green below.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2007
4:25 AM

Post #3431972

Texas Bluebonnet, ( Lupinus texensis )

The pink bluebonnets are producing seeds ... the mowers were there today, oh no!
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 26, 2007
7:53 AM

Post #3432154

Is there a State law that says "If any flower appears in any ditch, it must be mowed at once"?
We just had a large patch of Wine Cups near our mailbox that got to bloom for two days.
They mowed down to bare earth yesterday.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2007
8:09 AM

Post #3432198

Rats!!! They are terrible, those mowing guys wouldn't know a flower from a snake.
They mowed some shrubs at the wildscape that we had been nurturing for a long time.
Good to hear from you Trois.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 26, 2007
9:58 AM

Post #3432559

We even put up signs requesting no mowing until July. They mowed the signs also.
We tried talking to them, they don't speak English.

trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2007
10:53 AM

Post #3432776

How sad Trois, you would think that at least there would be someone with them who does speak English, it is a shame.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2007
2:02 AM

Post #3461344

Sunshine Mimosa, Powderpuff, Herbaceous Sensitive Plant, Verguenza, Herbaceous Mimosa(Mimosa strigillosa), Mimosaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms from early spring through early fall

Usually growing 3 to 4 inches tall (can grow taller), this plant is a legume that fixes nitrogen in addition to functioning as a fast growing, mat-forming, evergreen groundcover and can even be substituted for lawn grass. I It spreads by rhizomes, can be mowed, usually has soft bristles (but no spines) and tolerates foot traffic. It grows in sun and light shade and adapts to a wide range of soil acidity levels as well as moisture levels.

Performing best in loamy or sandy soils, it can adapt to about any type of soil. It has excellent salt and drought tolerance and is a great xeriscape plant. Its tiny, fern-like leaves fold back when touched or when there is a strong vibration near them. Showy, globe-shaped (sometimes a little oblongish instead of a ball), reddish-pink to lavender-rose colored, 1 inch wide blooms are held straight up above the foliage.

In its natural habitats, it can be found in open areas in sandy woodlands, along stream or lake banks, mixed in with brush and along roadsides. It serves as a larval food source for the Little Sulphur, White-striped Longtail Skipper, Mimosa Yellow and Reakirt's Blue butterfly caterpillars. The foliage is browsed by white-tailed deer and cattle.

Note: I want to emphasize that this plant does not have thorns (has soft prickles) so do not confuse it with a young sensitive briar (Mimosa malacophylla) plant. You don't want to plant senstive briar in places you want to walk through. Ouch!

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=MIST2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1873/index.html

Was on the ground for this photo ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2007
2:12 AM

Post #3461348

Sunshine Mimosa, Powderpuff, Herbaceous Sensitive Plant, Verguenza, Herbaceous Mimosa(Mimosa strigillosa)

Blooms had been been rained upon so the filaments were squashed down a bit instead poking out in all directions in their usual starburst shape. Because of this, you are able to see into the bloom's center very well. The leaves have folded up because I touched the stem to better position the bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 26, 2007
3:43 AM

Post #3537029

Drummond's Gaura (Gaura drummondii), Onagraceae Family, native, perennial, blooms April through October

Drummond's Gaura (Gaura drummondii) is also known as sweet gaura and scented gaura. It spreads by rhizomes and is 8" to 36" tall by 2 feet wide. Sweet gaura is multi-branched at the base and its one to three inches long leaves are narrow (up to 7/8 inch wide) and lanceolate to elliptic in shape. Its stem typically has hairs, but not always. Its 6-10 mm long flower petals are white and fade to pink or reddish-pink. It blooms in the late afternoon or evening and the blooms stay open through the next morning. It is pollinated by small moths and butterflies. It has erect, reddish-brown, 7-13 mm long, 4-sided (4-ridged, furrowed between the ridges), nut-like fruit that do not open to release seeds. They are ovoid in shape. The fruit contains 2 to 8 seeds. The seeds must be surface sown. It genarally is not considered a serious noxious weed.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=GADR

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32108/index.html

The blooms usually open white or very pale pink and fade to a darker color. These blooms have closed.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 26, 2007
3:46 AM

Post #3537039

Drummond's Gaura (Gaura drummondii)

It is also known as Drummond's Beeblossom, Sweet Gaura, Scented Gaura.

The blooms open in the late afternoon or early evening and stay open through the next morning.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2007
4:30 AM

Post #3709697

I took this on July 4th along the side of the road in Johnson County. Can someone ID it here?

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2007
4:32 AM

Post #3709701

Here is a closer shot. Couldn't get real close because of a ditch between us.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2007
5:06 AM

Post #3709760

Sheila, I think what you have is Mountain Pink, Centaurium beyrichii
Check this link and see.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CEBE
Josephine.

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2007
4:14 PM

Post #3710964

Yes that is the one, thanks Josephine!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 8, 2007
5:01 PM

Post #3711172

I think it is gorgeous, I have never been lucky enough to see it in the wild, maybe some day!!!

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
2:24 AM

Post #3713129

There was quite a few clumps on the roadside. Very eye catching site, just had to stop and take a picture.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
3:29 AM

Post #3713417

Sheila, that is just sooo neat!!! thank you for the pictures.
TARogers5
Kingston, OK
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2007
5:54 PM

Post #3715332

First time the Medow Pink has been in my yard. All this heavy rain must of triggered it to bloom
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2007
6:07 PM

Post #3715385

Maybe our excessive rain causes them to bloom so much here. They have been blooming since March.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2007
7:22 PM

Post #3715617

Congratulations Ted and Trois, Meadow pinks are so pretty.
renatelynne
Boerne new zone 30, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2007
3:33 AM

Post #3740913

saw a bunch of mountain pinks on the back roads from austin to marble falls. So pretty... I don't remember seeing those before... I just love them...

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2007
11:14 AM

Post #3741392

Maybe this rainy year was good for them. Hopefully they will reseed more this year.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2007
2:44 PM

Post #3741981

Some pinks are all over my back driveway. They seem to like the loose gravel.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

July 16, 2007
4:26 PM

Post #3742396

Very pretty! Mine have slowed a bit lately.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2007
1:22 PM

Post #3792082

Speaking of all the rain triggering...I found this little bloom in my back yard. It looks like a type of verbena. Anyone have an ID while it is still in bloom?

:-Deb

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2007
1:34 PM

Post #3792108

Deb, it is hard to tell which leaves belong to it, but the little cluster looks more like the flowers of Bladderpod except yours are pink;
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=LEDE2
I am not sure. Check it out and see what you think.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
12:12 AM

Post #4003411

I have a plant that has come up beside the marker for Agalinis.. When I looked at the edwardsiana the septals are different from my plant... the tenufolia has purple flowers and darker foliage... So many Agalinises!! LOL. Some didn't even show the pics or the pics did not reveal the septals...

So I need some help before I enter this one in the files. I want to make sure it's 100% correct

debnes

Pic 1>
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
12:24 AM

Post #4003452

pic 2

By the way, I planted these seeds last fall. I noticed the slender plant coming up but with no blooms, I waited until I had blooms to post.

I am so thrilled to see this little sweetie. :-S

debnes
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
12:30 AM

Post #4003466

Here is a pic of the foliage last week.. 9-14-07 (pics above taken today)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #4003672

I believe what you have is Agalinis tenuifolia, Slender Gerardi mine is blooming too.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2001
Josephine.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
1:50 AM

Post #4003744

Okay Josephine wonderful!!
So they were the seeds you gave me!! The ones from Native didn't make it.
Double thank you!! I sowed those in spring then, not last fall... (duh, lol)

They have lots of little buds ready to bloom more.. This was just the first blooms.
Aren't they beautiful?

debnes

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
3:30 AM

Post #4004035

Yes they are, too bad they are not perennials, but I guess we can't have everything.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2007
4:12 AM

Post #4004157

Josephine, I have several thousands of this type plant, and I think at least 3 of the several Agalinis types. My problem is collecting seeds.
Can you show some seeds and the pods they are in?
I would like to gather quite a few to take to the swaps and RUs. So far, the seed pods and bloom pods seem to look the same, or I am completely off.
Thanks, trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
4:29 AM

Post #4004195

Hello Trois, the way I gathered mine was after the plant started to turn yellow and dry out I pulled the plant out of the ground very carefully and put it upside down in a paper sack and shook the the seeds out. They are very fine and hard to handle otherwise. The seed pods and the bloom buds look almost the same, but the seedpods are a little smaller and light brown when mature.
Good luck with your seed gathering.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2007
1:34 PM

Post #4004520

Thank you. I will give it a try.

trois
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2007
3:06 PM

Post #4004723

Josephine, this is the type growing nearest the house. Some of these are about 4 feet tall and covered with blooms. Can you determine the type of this one? The leaves shown are typical for the whole plant.
Thanks, trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #4004960



http://www.missouriplants.com/Pinkopp/Agalinis_tenuifolia_page.html
I think it is Tenuifolia

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/agalinispurp.html
Tis one says the leaves have purple tinge

http://www.centerforplantconservation.org/ASP/CPC_ProfileImage.asp?FN=6601a
This one has roundish leaves.

http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/oro/agalinis_heterophylla.htm
Heterophyla is similar

http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/oro/agalinis_edwardsiana.htm
Edwardsiana is another choice

http://www.lib.ksu.edu/wildflower/gerardia.html
Agalinis aspera is another choice.

There are so many, I counted 21 that are Texas native on our search engine, and I haven't seen them or been able to compare them, so take your pick Kid.
Josephine.

trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2007
6:02 PM

Post #4005394

Thanks, Josephine. My guess on this one is none of the above, based on the two yellow stripes inside the flower. I do have the Purple Gerardia and some others. I guess I need to print out pictures of everything and take them outside and do a lot of comparing
trois.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2007
6:14 PM

Post #4005438

Please let us know if you are able to find out what it is.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2007
6:27 PM

Post #4005495

Will do. Nothing very close yet, except the ones you linked. It might be a sport of the several growing in close proximity.

trois
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
11:40 AM

Post #4007516

Hi Trois~ & Josephine
Look at the septals in pic of Post #4003411 , They are longer than any I have seen in any of the "edu" pictures.

When you take pics of yours, could you get a profile so the septals show?

The closest thing I have seen to mine, are yours Josephine's in the PF http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/131075/
That would figure since you i give me the seeds.

debnes

Here is what I am referring to>
sepal: a member of the (usually green) outer whorl of non-fertile parts surrounding the fertile organs of a flower,

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
12:41 PM

Post #4007619

Deb, I will take a picture of mine, and also look in Flora of North Central Texas book
they have sketches and sometimes that helps with that sort of detail.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
2:28 PM

Post #4007941

I took a couple this morning. Let me know if these help.

trois
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
2:29 PM

Post #4007943

Another.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
3:30 PM

Post #4008147

Are those two from different plants?
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
4:52 PM

Post #4008408

Yes, a few feet apart. A ways on down there are mostly Purple Gerardia.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
5:07 PM

Post #4008445

Are the seeds about the size of finely ground black pepper?
Are they dark brown?

If so, I have a few million seeds.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
5:20 PM

Post #4008479

Yes, they are very small and brown.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
6:31 PM

Post #4008766

Thanks, Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
7:39 PM

Post #4008956

I found this one Agalinis tnuifolia var. tenuifolia and the sepals look like the ones we have, I looked at mine and they are like Trois and Debs, so it looks like Tenuifolia.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
7:50 PM

Post #4008981

This one is listed as having the yellow stripes in the flower.
Agalinis fasciculata

trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
8:07 PM

Post #4009029

Is this the one you mean Trois?
http://www.missouriplants.com/Pinkopp/Agalinis_fasciculata_page.html
it could be that is the one you have.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
8:23 PM

Post #4009076

That is the one I was relating to but the leaves and stems are different.
I think mine have been hybridizing since there are several types near each other, and the bees are working them without checking their ID.
I have been trying to unravel these for about 3 years and have found conflicts everywhere I look, except for the Purple Gerardias.

trois

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
8:27 PM

Post #4009084

Oh well, let us just be happy thankful that God sent them our way.
Josephine.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
8:35 PM

Post #4009112

I have certainly enjoyed the flowers as of about 5 years ago their were few. Selective mowing and stopping late season mowing has caused a massive spreading of these little beauties. And it looks like I will have a lot of seeds to share, if anyone wants some.

trois
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
9:52 PM

Post #4009309

me me trois!

Put me down for some please. :-S

ty
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 23, 2007
10:36 PM

Post #4009408

OK, will do. Maybe you can figure out what they are.

trois
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2007
11:27 PM

Post #4009598

I'll be happy to try, lol~

ty again!

If you're going to the Arlington swap,(:-S) I will get them then. If not let me know I will send you an envelope.

debnes
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 24, 2007
12:19 AM

Post #4009761

We will try to go, health permitting.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

September 24, 2007
12:38 AM

Post #4009850

The A. edwardsiana grow here normally. They're just trying to come back now after the drought almost wiped them out. In San Antonio, A heterophylla is seen in some locations. Also I've seen what I believe was A. densiflora in just one location in San Antonio. I'd love to have some of your Agalinis, if you don't mind, trois. I plan to collect some seed from the A. heterophylla when it's ready and could trade you that if you want it. I doubt if there will be enough A. edwardsiana to even try to collect any seed this year.
trois
Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 24, 2007
1:26 AM

Post #4010051

Let me collect a couple of more million seeds and I will send you some. Most of these grew up very wet, some in standing water. I will send a mixture.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
6:44 AM

Post #4645132

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reine
(Nicotiana tabacum), Solanaceae Family, naturalized, annual/perennial, blooms midsummer through first hard freeze

Distribution: Present in the Texas flora and known locally as: Common tobacco
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=1&name=Nicotiana tabacum L.

"Three important species of tobacco grew wild in Texas, one of which, Nicotiana tabacum, is the species to which most modern commercial tobaccos belong. The consumption of tobacco, by means of cigarette and pipe smoking, was a universal custom among the Indians of Texas before the arrival of the Spaniards. The Indians gathered and cured the wild tobacco and also cultivated it in small patches." (Copyright Texas State Historical Association, From the website: The Handbook of Texas Online) Tobacco was first found and cultivated in the Americas, perhaps as early as 6000 B.C. After the discovery and colonization of North and South America, Nicotiana tabacum was exported widely to continental Europe and the rest of the civilized world.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/112106/

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reine
(Nicotiana tabacum) 'Rose 36' - Although may be considered a cultivar, it is the "rosey" form of the plant. I am listing it here so that people are aware of how beautiful tobacco plant blooms are and to serve as an identification reference. I grew 'Rose 36' (Nicotiana tabacum) from seed as a cultivated ornamental plant in a container this past year. It provided blooms until the first hard freeze. Its container was placed under an evergreen tree which provided some protection. This winter, the plant has withstood many freezing nights and still remains alive with new growth occurring as the temperatures begin to warm. It has been a carefree plant and has only required occassional extra water when temperatures soared. The bloom clusters are very appealing. The sweet scent of the blooms is usually released in the evening. The plant attracts butterflies and moths. Spent flowerheads should be removed to keep the plant blooming. If this is not done, the plant can become weedy and eventually die. Seed need to be surface sown.

Caution:
All parts of this plant are highly poisonous. Not recomended for planting where young children are able to access the plant. Especially when the leaves are eaten, death can occur.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/166322/

Bloom as seen in very bright afternoon sunlight ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
3:31 PM

Post #4646086

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reine
(Nicotiana tabacum)

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) flower ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
3:36 PM

Post #4646103

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reina (Nicotiana tabacum)

Flowers and leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
3:38 PM

Post #4646113

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reina (Nicotiana tabacum)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
3:40 PM

Post #4646120

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reina (Nicotiana tabacum)

Leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 10, 2008
3:42 PM

Post #4646127

Tobacco, Cultivated Tobacco, Smoking Tobacco, Herbe a La Reina (Nicotiana tabacum)

Drying leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2008
10:51 PM

Post #4675976

This cluster of blooms is on the edge of our yard surrounded by trees. I think these blooms were delivered by blooms as they are new within the past 3-5 years.

I believe I have ID'd them as Oenothera speciosa thanks to Htops' photos above... similar don't you think?

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=1623055
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 17, 2008
10:54 PM

Post #4675989

Now, my uneducated question is this. These stands of blooms are only 4 to 6 inches tall. All the Oenothera speciosa listed in the PlantFiles show a height of 18-24 inches if I recall. Am I barking up the wrong tree?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2008
2:54 AM

Post #4676931

Pod, I am sorry to tell you, but it is not Oenothera speciosa, the petals are too narrow.
Can you show us a picture of the foliage?
I am trying to think what it is but haven't found it yet, maybe Hazel will know, it does look like Carolina geranium, but not sure, it surely is an adorable flower.
Josephine.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2008
10:22 AM

Post #4677571

Yes, I will try to get a foliage photo this morning. Won't be able to post till evening. I know it is difficult to tell by a photo but the markings and the shape of the petal looked similar, the height was what confused me. Thank you Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 18, 2008
11:23 AM

Post #4677638

podster, my bluebonnets are only a few inches tall and blooming. They should be much taller by now, however, the lack of rain in my area has stunted them. My larkspur are dwarfed also. . They are only about 5 inches tall and are starting to bloom. I think y'all have had more rain though. I was thinking that maybe the plants have been dwarfed. However, I agree with Josephine because the petals should be wider.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2008
11:59 AM

Post #4677707

So far, I think our rainfall is pretty normal even though it seems like more.

I have watched these blooms for the past few years and the height has remained the same... waiting on daylight here for a photo of foliage ~ hopefully!

Seems early for bluebonnets those here bloom later.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
1:54 AM

Post #4680680

Pod, I have been looking for you, but so far this is the closest i have come, what do you think?
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/9402/
Josephine.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
2:07 AM

Post #4680731

It could also be this one.
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=2521
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
2:08 AM

Post #4680745

Those do seem similar although the markings on the petals resemble those on Htops' photo from above.

Now, I am going to throw a curve here. But first, if I shouldn't use this thread to ID a plant, please let me know and I will move it elsewhere. I'll not be offended.

I went out for a photo this a.m. It was around 8 before I left for work. With cloud cover and I was surprised to see the blooms had not opened yet. I took a few photos in an attempt to get the foliage and I do believe it is like blades of grass. There are a few other weeds mixed in and I need to uproot one to look at it with bloom attached.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
3:43 AM

Post #4681122

It is fine to do it here, we will keep trying, I bet Hazel has some ideas.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
4:03 AM

Post #4681177

I just found this one, what do you think?
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=6441
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
10:46 AM

Post #4681527

I do think Carolina Spring Beauty ~Claytonia caroliniana is the closest in description and appearance. I need to dig one up and look closely at the root and leaf structure. Will try to do that today.

You have assembled many good resources to search through. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and effort. pod

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2008
12:20 PM

Post #4681678

You are welcome, I love the native plants and it gives me great joy to find them and identify them, they are so much fun!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 21, 2008
2:12 AM

Post #4688929

This site indicates tubers. http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CLCA

The plants I dug up don't have any sign of tubers. but definitely a long tap root. Perhaps I didn't dig deep enough. The root in this photo broke off...


The above ground portion of the plant is 3 inches tall. The roots are 3-4 inches deep.
The two leaves resemble blades of grass.






podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2008
10:40 AM

Post #4706653

Making a correction on the ID of this plant... With the blades of grass for leaves, it has been determined to be Spring Beauty as determined. Claytonia virginica

Thanks all for your assistance! pod

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2008
12:10 PM

Post #4706799

Thank you for the correction Pod.
Josephine.
Caliche
Hill Country, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2008
7:31 PM

Post #5173850

I can't resist showing this picture of my Mountain Pinks. Maybe they should go in the white flower section, but there is a pink one in the picture also.
The backside of our hill is covered with them each year, and usually there are two or three white ones. I have never seen white ones anywhere else. There were two this year, and I planted some seed from one of them. Hopefully they will germinate and grow for me.
Caliche
Hill Country, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2008
7:34 PM

Post #5173866

Here is the area where they are growing. It is a very rocky hillside, and overrun with deer, but thankfully they don't browse the Pinks.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #5173935

That is really beautiful Caliche, thank you for showing them to us.
Josephine.

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