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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Red )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
8:40 PM

Post #1621600

Swamp Hibiscus, Texas Star Hibicus, ( Hibiscus coccineus ) Native plant, Brilliant red fowers last one day, Perennial,likes water but can live ouside a swamp.
I have these grwoing on a slope with regular watering.
For more information see the Plant Files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1872/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2005
8:52 PM

Post #1621631

Autumm Sage, Cherry Sage ( Salvia greggii ) Native perennial, blooms Spring till frost, attracts hummingbirds,
very easy to grow and propagate.
For more information see the Plant Files
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1074/index.html
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2005
11:03 PM

Post #1621971

Here is one of my Salvia Greggii's.

Mel
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
3:24 PM

Post #1623257

Cedar Sage, Roemer's Sage (Salvia roemeriana), Lamiaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, can bloom from spring until early frost, but mostly at the end of the summer and in the fall; one of the salvias that can spice up a shady area; found "in the wild" growing under cedar trees.
For more information see the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1918/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 14, 2005
3:26 PM

Post #1623265

Cedar Sage, Roemer's Sage (Salvia roemeriana)
A view of the beautifully scalloped leaf ...
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2005
5:24 AM

Post #1627163

Drummond Phlox, Phlox drummondii, Polemoniaceae Family, annual endemic to Texas, scarlet red to deep velvety red, , 8" to 18" growing prostrate, may bloom bloom almost year round, prefers deep sandy soil, named after Thomas Drummond who gathered seed near Gonzales in 1834 to take back to England. There are six subspecies of P. drummondii, difficult to differentiate between them.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1094/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2005
5:37 AM

Post #1627178

Drummond Phlox, Phlox drummondii.
Flower and leaves. Leaves are 1 - 3 inches long, about 7 times longer than wide.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2005
8:07 PM

Post #1648961

(Native ) Drummond Phlox, ( Phlox drummondii )
See previous postings and plant files
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77702/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2005
8:14 PM

Post #1648975

( Native ) Standing Cypress, ( Ipomopsis rubra ) Phlox family. Slender upright biennial, with beautiful red flowers, blooms June- August.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62372/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 30, 2005
11:19 PM

Post #1660993

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March through June, fragrant

Fragrant gaillardia is also known as gyp Indian blanket and rayless blanket flower. It grows in sand, loam, shallow gravelly soil or clay on open, dry and rocky sites. Not requiring much water, it prefers and does best when planted in sandy or gypsum soils. I have found sites that recommend a soil acidity level of above 6.8; however, I have have found them happily growing in limestoney soils that have an alkaline ph. It will grow in full sun or partial shade; but, has see more blooms in full sun.

In a cultivated environment, adequate moisture and removal of mature flowerheads will encourage flowering until fall. I find them quite beautiful. Enjoy their beauty and fragrance by planting them in thick clumps near an entranceway or where you walk frequently. Also, they are useful in xeriscapes, wildscapes and rock gardens.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62370/index.html

The blooms have few petals, if any, that are common to other species in the genus. It provides a strong fragrance similar to gardenias.


This message was edited Jul 30, 2005 7:49 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 30, 2005
11:21 PM

Post #1660999

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

This wildflower has a single ball-shaped bloom which appears at the top of a very tall flowerstalk. Several petals are starting to emerge from this one. The petals will fall off quickly leaving just the ball-shaped flowerhead.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:16 PM

Post #1662112

Texas Betony, Scarlet Hedgenettle (Stachys coccinea), Lamiaceae Family. Texas native, perennial, evergeen, blooms in mid-spring through the first frost

One of my favorites because it is evergreen, very heat and cold tolerant and disease and insect free. It has withstood 113 degree and 17 degree weather! At 17 degrees it experienced some freeze burn on young leaves. It blooms almost constantly except during extreme cold. Tender young leaves turn a crimson in cold weather. It performs wonderfully in sun or partial shade. It makes a great landscape plant and can be used in rock gardens (give it plenty of room because it tends to have a wide spread), xeriscapes and wildscapes.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1292/index.html

I had recently pruned this betony back. It has put on new growth and is starting to rebloom. The colors in the photo did not upload well. The blooms are a much prettier color.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:19 PM

Post #1662123

Texas Betony, Scarlet Hedgenettle (Stachys coccinea)

Not a good photo and the bloom colors did not upload well ... still blooming profusely in early October.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:21 PM

Post #1662128

Texas Betony, Scarlet Hedgenettle (Stachys coccinea)

(Photo taken with my then new camera) Even the stems of the Texas Betony turn to beautiful shades of dark purple, burgandy, mauve and mottled greens when cold weather arrives. It provides interest all year long. Shown here at the end of February.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:23 PM

Post #1662134

Texas Betony, Scarlet Hedgenettle (Stachys coccinea)

Shown here in February with new spring growth emerging ... the foliage will gradually revert back to a beautiful green.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2005
10:27 PM

Post #1671612

( Naturalized ) Corn Poppy, ( Papaver rhoeas ) Introduced from Europe.
Annual, blooms March-April, pictures taken at Pappy Elkins Park.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/237/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2005
10:28 PM

Post #1671615

Close up of Corn Poppy, so beautiful.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
6:25 PM

Post #1719247

Devil's Bouquet, Devil's-Bouquet, Devil's Boutonniere, Scarlet Muskflower, Scarlet Musk-Flower (Nyctaginia capitata), Nyctaginaceae Family, Texas native, blooms from March or April through November, listed as a perennial in most references (some online references state that it is an annual), deciduous

Devil's bouquet, scarlet musk-flower (Nyctaginia capitata) is the only species in the Nyctaginia genus. It is an upright to sprawling, tuberous rooted (parsley-like) perennial that attains a height of between 6 and 18 inches. It is a native to New Mexico, Texas and northern Mexico (Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León). In Texas, it can be found in loamy, sandy or calcareous soils of the Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains regions in full to partial sun. It is usually observed growing on arid grasslands, old fields, upland woodlands, shrub-lands, rocky slopes and roadsides. Devil’s bouquet prefers dry soil, but also prospers in soils that are medium moist. Hummingbirds are attracted to the blooms which appear in large clusters and are quite showy and impossible to miss. I screeched my car to a halt when I spotted them as I drove by a construction site. Devil's bouquet would make a great rock garden, xeriscae, wildscape or cultivated garden plant (even though the fragarnce of the blooms might offend some people; it didn't bother me at all).

For more photos and information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/108253/index.html

The gorgeous blooms ...

This message was edited Aug 25, 2005 1:31 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
6:27 PM

Post #1719252

Devil's Bouquet, Devil's-Bouquet, Devil's Boutonniere, Scarlet Muskflower, Scarlet Musk-Flower (Nyctaginia capitata)

The leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
6:29 PM

Post #1719256

Devil's Bouquet, Devil's-Bouquet, Devil's Boutonniere, Scarlet Muskflower, Scarlet Musk-Flower (Nyctaginia capitata)

Growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2005
1:43 PM

Post #1746942

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla), Lamiaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early fall

Coss-referenced in the Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) thread

For more informatio, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60119/index.html

The bloom ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2005
1:45 PM

Post #1746947

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla), Lamiaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early fall

The sepals around the blooms of the Mountain sage (Salvia regla) are a sort of bronze which adds more color when it is in bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2005
1:47 PM

Post #1746952

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla)

A view of the heart-shaped leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
1:29 PM

Post #1750714

Scarlet Flax (Linum grandiflorum rubrum), Linaceae Family, naturalized, annual

Scarlet flax is a wildflower that is indigenous to North Africa and Southern Europe, but has become naturalized in other desert areas. It can be grown successfully in all regions in the United States in Zones 3 -10 and has escaped cultivation in some areas becoming a naturalized plant. Scarlet flax perfers loose sandy soils; however, it is highly adaptable to other types of soils as well as long as the soil is fast draining. It is drought tolerant and can be grown in full sun or light shade (blooms better in full sun). The cup-shaped, satiny sheened blooms are a brilliant velvety red and the petals are sometimes outlined in black and appear on long stalks. It reseeds itself and is easily started from seed. Plant the seeds in the fall or spring in the desired location. The plants do not transplant well. This wildflower can be used successfully in wildscapes, xeriscapes and rock gardens.

For more photos and information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/228/index.html

A closeup view of the center of the bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
1:31 PM

Post #1750717

Scarlet Flax (Linum grandiflorum rubrum)

The blooms are quite showy.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
1:33 PM

Post #1750720

Scarlet Flax (Linum grandiflorum rubrum)

The plants look best when planted in mass.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 25, 2006
2:20 AM

Post #2314526

Another Texas Star Hibiscus ( Hibiscus coccineus ). Native plant grows to over 7' in Houston. Very easy to propagate from seeds--a "no fail" first perennial native to grow from seed for the beginner. There is also a rare white variety.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2006
5:12 AM

Post #2315272

Heartleaf Hibiscus, or Hibiscus martianus
A South Texas beauty, it is also root hardy as far north as San Antonio. Must have well-drained soil and is somewhat drought tolerant. Propagated by seed.
princessnonie
New Caney, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2006
12:01 AM

Post #2717078

Turk's Cap, Turk's Turban,
Malvaviscus arboreus
Drummondii

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56887/index.html

A native herbaceous perennial
Hardy Zone 8-10
Full sun or shade

Native in the Pineywoods of Southeast Texas
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 14, 2006
3:04 AM

Post #2721011

Indian Pink, Pinkroot
Spigelia marilandica L.

A perennial herb
1-2 feet tall with 1 -2 inch long red blooms, with yellow inside.
Grows wild in rich soils on the edges of woods and clearings.
Also domesticated.

debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 19, 2006
10:24 PM

Post #2740281

Swamp Hibiscus, Texas Star Hibicus, ( Hibiscus coccineus )

This is a photo I took at the Discovery Garden where it was growing in a small shallow pond. Looks like a great water garden plant to me. Such perfection in form, stunning!
renatelynne
Boerne new zone 30, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 29, 2006
2:57 PM

Post #2769809

http://www.neilsperry.com/article.cfm?show=265

Rhodophiala bifida
Oxblood or Schoolhouse Lily

I love the look of this... have never seen them before but have to get some now.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2006
4:58 PM

Post #2770152

They are native to Argentina but naturalize well here.
http://www.solasgardens.com/page3.html



htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
6:44 PM

Post #2967988

Shrubby Copperleaf, 3-Seeded Mercury (Acalypha phleoides), Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas natitve, perennial, blooms April through November

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=ACALY

Shrubby copperleaf is a trailing plant that can found growing natively in shaded limestone outcrops in wooded canyons and deep, dry creek and river gravel bars. It is frequently located in oak, juniper and pinyon woodlands. When I first saw this plant, I thought it was a rouge plant; however, on closer inspection, I determined that the flower spikes were quite different. Distinguishing it from other Acalypha are the staminate flowers at the tip of the inflorescences. The rose to reddish colored male flowers have conspicuous yellow anthers and the female flowers which are beneath the male flowers have leafy bracts under each flower. The total length of the flower spike is about 2" or 3". Seed capsules are formed above the bracts and contain 3 seeds which are especially liked by house sparrows. The plant is used as a medicinal herb in Mexico. The aerial parts of Acalypha phleoides are prescribed for a variety of gastrointestinal problems. It contains an antispasmodic agent.

This is another plant about which I only am able to locate a tad of information.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77600/index.html

The male flowers are just beginning to form at the top of the spike. The female flowers are at the bottom of the spike, have threadlike styles and have bracts below them ...


This message was edited Dec 5, 2006 3:32 AM
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 4, 2006
8:55 PM

Post #2968339

I don't know that Acalypha, so of course I looked it up. I'm only familiar with Acalypha Lindheimeri and Acalypha radians, which I've seen many plants of those two locally in the wild. Maybe I'll find this one someday. This site has really good pics of A. phleoides:
http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/eup/acalypha_phleoides.htm
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 5, 2006
8:42 AM

Post #2970029

Thanks, LindaTX8. I believe that Acalypha lindheimeri is a synonym for Acalypha phleoides.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 5, 2006
12:30 PM

Post #2970301

Ladies, don't you wish they would stop confusing people with the name changes and the synonyms?
You would think a scientific name would stick, or that if they changed it they would have a better way of letting people know about it.
It can be very confusing.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 5, 2006
10:34 PM

Post #2971919

Josephine, I sure do and it sure can be sonfusing.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2006
3:34 AM

Post #2972884

I have books and sometimes I just go by the genus/species in the book, but that may have changed long ago! When I find out another one changed, I think, gee, they forgot to notify me again!
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

February 10, 2007
5:46 PM

Post #3175314

I wanted to put more on Turk's Cap, Malvaviscus arboreus var. Drummondii, a Texas native. I'm putting a photo below of my "mother plant", as I call it. I bought it from a nursery (my first Turk's Cap). Now it has many offspring, but the mother plant is the biggest. I can't even get the whole thing into one picture. I've been in awe of this wonderful plant from the first season it bloomed. From Trees, Shrubs and Vines of the Texas Hill Country:
"A big, large-leaved perennial, woody only near its base, with bright red blossoms much of the summer and fall; prefers moist, shady sites near streams and springs. Along with many beautiful wildflowers, such as winecup and rose mallow, Turk's cap is in the mallow family. Though somewhat invasive, it is a good shade-tolerant ornamental that can be pruned every other year to control its spread. Turks cap is readily propagated from seed or green cuttings. The leaves can be made into a poultice for use as a soothing emolient, and its flowers are used medicinally in Mexico to promote menstrual flow. The blossoms are an important nectar source for butterflies and the ruby-throated hummingbird on its fall migration from the northeastern United States through Texas and into Mexico. The small, mealy red fruit is edible either coooked or raw and is food for many birds and mammals."
Obviously, I don't prune my mother plant back much. I just can't bear to lose many blooms. I've watched as butterflies nectar from it. They seem to insert their proboscis through the petals that are curled around each other, so I assume the nectar is inside there somewhere. BTW, the bloom is edible also.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

February 10, 2007
5:52 PM

Post #3175327

Here's another photo showing the bloom a bit closer up.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 10, 2007
9:49 PM

Post #3175891

Linda, that is a very nice description, thank you for posting it.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:30 PM

Post #3403009

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

(See entry above)
I didn't know whether to put these photos here on the thread with its entry or under "Other" because the blooms are actually a brownish color. I found a group of fragrant gaillardia plants that all actually have blooms that have entire ray flowers which is very rare. I took me a while to decide what they were because I have never seen any that had entire ray flowers. I identified them by their leaves, growth habit, long spathe, etc. The color of the ray flowers are an interesting coppery, reddish-brown or orangey brown which I have never observed any other plant's blooms being. It is very difficult to describe and I found it very difficult to capture their true colors with my digital camera. The blooms are very beautiful. I found them in the same field that I observed pink bluebonnets and white bluebonnets.

Bloom bud on a plant whose blooms have ray flowers ...


This message was edited Apr 17, 2007 8:53 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:31 PM

Post #3403016

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

Developing bloom on a plant that has blooms that do have ray flowers; ray flowers are starting to emerge at the base ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:34 PM

Post #3403031

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

Ray flowers emerging from bloom bud on this plant whose blooms have ray flowers ..
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:37 PM

Post #3403048

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

Bloom with entire ray flowers ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:39 PM

Post #3403056

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

Involcural bracts are ovate-lanceolate and the receptacle is covered with stiff bristles; the long scape is hairy ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:48 PM

Post #3403093

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

A group of plants that all of the blooms have ray flowers; the blooms (coppery reddiish-brown) are large and easily seen from a good distance. I went bacj to take more photos in different light to see if I could capture the true color of the blooms and to collect any ripe seeds. A truck had plowed through them to get to a vacant house on the other side of a fence on the right in the photo). Not one scape was left standing. My luck ... :o) I think that most of the plants are okay.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 17, 2007
9:50 PM

Post #3403103

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Sweet Firewheel, Rayless Gaillardia, Pincushion Daisy (Gaillardia suavis)

Leaves which are all basal and very soft; some are lobed and others non-lobed; 2-6 inches long with toothed or entire margins and loosely covered with pubescence.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2007
4:02 AM

Post #3551303

Fragrant Gaillardia, Perfumeballs, Gaillardia suavis, found at Pappy Elkins park.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2007
2:43 AM

Post #3555524

I love that round red flower. Is Pappy Elkins park open to the public?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2007
3:40 AM

Post #3555828

Yes, absolutely, it is in Dalworthington Gardens right next to Arlington.
You have to follow the trails and look closely, but if you look you will find interesting things there.
If you are thinking of going there, maybe I could go with you? I live not too far from there.
Josephine.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
2:22 AM

Post #3564157

I would love to go with you! I am thinking about going around the middle of the month. Will the Perfumeballs still be in bloom? If not, I will go sooner.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
3:35 AM

Post #3564396

I think they will be fine, dmail me when you know the date you can come and we can arrange it. It will be fun.
Josephine.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
4:17 AM

Post #3564532

I am looking forward to meeting you and the Texas natives.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2007
2:02 PM

Post #3565385

Great, let me know when. I am very excited to meet you and show you around.
Josephine.
Texyplantluva
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 3, 2007
12:07 AM

Post #3567247

Indian Paint being pretty just because that is what it does for a living.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2007
2:04 AM

Post #3567717

Very neat, thank you Texyplantluva!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
3:50 PM

Post #4650549

Other Turk's Cap information can be found on the Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) page. These include:

Turk's Cap, Wax Mallow,( Malvaviscus drummondii ) - more information and photos

Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus)

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap, Mazapan, Sleeping Waxmallow, Sleeping Hibiscus, Aloalo Pahūpahū (Malvaviscus penduliflorus)

Mexican Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. mexicanus) - one photo shown below

Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) page:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/529385/

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