Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Other & Bicolor )

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Antelope- Horns, ( Asclepias asperula ) Milkweed family. Bloom period March--November.
Almost all of the Asclepias are considered very poisonous yet they are some of the major medicinal herbs. A native pernnial plant.
For more info see the Plant Files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54138/index.html

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 5:34 PM

Thumbnail by frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Another view of Antelope Horns showing the leaves.

Thumbnail by frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Mexican Hat, ( Ratibida columnaris ) Sunflower family.
Native Perennial, bloom period March-November, most of the these flowers are bicolor in various combinations, although there is a solid yellow.
For more info see the plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/801/index.html

This message was edited Jul 14, 2005 5:34 PM

Thumbnail by frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Another color combination of Mexican Hat.

Thumbnail by frostweed
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Carolina Modiola (Modiola caroliniana), Malvaceae Family, Texas native, annual/biennial/perennial, blooms early spring to late summer, subshrub/shrub/
forb/herb

The color of the 1/2 inch or less bloom is difficult to describe and the color varies somewhat in hue. The leaves can be several types of shapes.
For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/65514/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 9:55 AM

Thumbnail by htop
Gordonville, TX(Zone 7b)

Thats what that lawn "weed" is! Will it really grow to 24"? I will have to nurture one and see what happens! Has a great color.

John

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Country Sida, Southern Sida, Country Mallow, Heartleaf Sida, Bala, Flannel Weed, Wire Weed (Sida cordifolia), Malvaceae Family, Texas native. perenial/annual, blooms late spring to early fall

Country Sida is considered to be a weed by many and can be invasive because of its self-seeding. Although it is also classified as a subshrub or shrub, I am entering it here because its bloom color and shape closely resembles other plants that I am posting here. I will make another entry in the "Shrubs" thread with a link back to this thread.


I could not find much information about its distribution in Texas; but, found lots of information referring to its use as an herb and in herbal products (can be dangerous - see below). iIt is commonly found in fields, pastures and abandoned home sites, as well as along roadsides.

It has erect stems, is ligneous (a plant having woody parts, especially stems) and grows to a height of between 2 and 3 feet. The stem branches several times. The 2.5-5 cm long leaves are cordate (heart-shaped with the leaf stem attached to the inside point of the heart), ovate and oblong with serrated margins. They are covered with fine hairs whcih gives them a felt-like appearance and a light green color. The small blooms may be goldish orange (as shown below) or goldish yellow and are in dense clusters at the end of the branches. The 6-8 mm in diameter seed capsules are divided into 10 chambers and have two fine bristles at one end. Due to its having a well developed tap root, it is very drought tolerant as well as difficult to transplant without killing it unlees it is a very young plant. Used as an external poultice, the leaves provide a cooling effect and are an astringent.

Warniing: Although this plant is tauted to have all sorts of medicinal uses when ingested internally as a tea or powder, the same stimulating ephedrine alkaloid which has caused the Chinese plant Ma Huang to have much notoriety when used as a cardiac stimulant is found in country sida. The concemtration is weaker, however, than is found in Ma Huang. Small amounts of these alkaloids are marketed and labeled as being useful for body building, weight loss, "pep," and as performance enhancers, as well as a substitute for illicit drugs such as MDMA. These products are described as "natural" or "herbal".

The Food and Drug Administration has reports of harmful side effects resulting from ingesting these products. Among them are heart palpitations, heart attacks, strokes and psychoses. Several states have banned supplements that contain ephedrine, one of these being Ephedra. Its interactions with presceiption drugs and other supplements may cause a fatal reaction. However, if one does a search for "Sida cordifolia" images, most of the images that appear are of bottles of supplements for sale. If one searches for information about this plant, most of what is found describes its medicinal value.

Sooo ... I wouldn't make a tea with it and drink it, smoke it or eat its leaves or roots. Read all the labels on any supplements you may take because I have seen ephedrine and Sida cordifolia listed as ingredients in many of them.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/74728/index.html

A view of its bloom which is small, but lovely ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Capeweed, Creeping Lip Plant, Frog-Fruit, Frog's Bit, Licorice Verbena, Turkey Tangle Fogfruit (Phyla nodiflora), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms from spring to fall

In its native habitats, frog-fruit can be found in moist sandy or rocky areas and is adaptable to most soils. It prefers a moderately fertile soil, but succeeds in poor soils. Preferring poor sun, when grown in shade the plant makes a lot of vegetative growth but does not produce many blooms. The compact round bloom clusters are about 0.5 to 0.8 inch in diameter.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantsFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62730/index.html

This message was edited Jul 23, 2005 11:05 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Capeweed, Creeping Lip Plant, Frog-Fruit, Frog's Bit, Licorice Verbena, Turkey Tangle Fogfruit (Phyla nodiflora)

Thumbnail by htop
Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Plains Coreopsis, ( Coreopsis tinctoria ) Lovely annual that can cover large expanses, 1 to 3 feet high, a very attractive wildflower, often used in cultivated gardens. See plant files; http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31/index.html

Thumbnail by frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Indian Blanket, ( Gaillardia pulchella ) Sunflower family.
Lovely annual wildflower blankets entire fields in the Spring. Also called Firewheel. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/60111/

Thumbnail by frostweed
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Scarlet Pea, Texas Indigo, Butterfly Shoestring-Pea (Indigofera miniata), Papilionaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms from April through September

It is a prostrate (usually between.3 to 1.0 feet tall) legume with trailing, spreading stems that arise from from a woody base and a large tuberous root. The stems run mostly along the ground and are between 4 and 30 inches long. It usually forms a mat of vegetation and sometimes forms colonies. It is commonly found on prairies, woodlands and along creeks. In Texas, it grows in the Pineywoods, Gulf Prairies and Marshes, Blackland Prairie, Post Oak Savannah, South Texas Plains, Edwards Plateau and the Rolling Plains regions.

It is an excellent plant to use for erosion control. It is eaten by wildlife (is a good deer browse) and livestock including cattle, sheep, goats and horses. As a small mammal cover, it is also valuable. It is a larval host for butterflies including the Funereal Duskywing (Erynnis funeralis), False Duskywing (Gesta invisa), Ceraunus Blue, Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus), Cassius Blue (Leptotes cassius) and Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola).

For more information, see its PlantFiles entry:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/66699/index.html

View from above ... Blooms are 3/4 of an inch long. Note the small seedpods.

This message was edited Jul 26, 2005 5:14 PM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Scarlet Pea, Texas Indigo, Butterfly Shoestring-Pea (Indigofera miniata)

A closer view of a bloom, bloom buds and leaves ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Scarlet Pea, Texas Indigo, Butterfly Shoestring-Pea (Indigofera miniata)

This plant has seedpods that are about 1.5 inches long as shown below.

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Green False-Nightshade, Greenleaf Five Eyes (Solanum coronopus), SolanaceaeFamily, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring through early summer

For more information, see its PlantFiles entry:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/66167/index.html

The plant grows in a variety of soils including sandy, loamy and heavy clay. The flowers are hermaphrodite.


This message was edited Jul 27, 2005 8:45 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Kisses Gaura (Gaura suffulta ssp. suffulta), Onagraceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms March through June

This gaura grows in the moist rich soils of the Edwards Plateau and mostly east of the Balcones Escarpment. Occasionally, it inhibits disturbed sandy to clayey soils in grasslands and open areas. Look for it along roadsides, in prairies and regularly mown embankments along freeways. It is a bit gangly; but, it is suitable for rock gardens, wildscapes, xeriscapes and other landscape areas that have well drained soil.

For more information, see its PlantFiles entry:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64326/index.html

This plant is between one and four feet tall and has sweet smelling white flowers that turn pink with age. The flowers are about 1/2 inch wide and have dark red anthers.

This message was edited Jul 30, 2005 11:06 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Kisses Gaura (Gaura suffulta ssp. suffulta)

A closer look at the blooms ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Ball Moss (Tillandsia recurvata), Bromeliaceae Family, perennial, epiphyte, blooms (insignificant) all year

There are few plants that I hate, but this is one of them. Ball moss is an epiphyte that gets its nutrients from the atmosphere and does not rob the host plant of its nutrients. However, the fact that heavy infestations keep the sunlight from reaching the leaves, the leaves die and the branches that are covered die. The smaller branches break off constantly with the wind, rain (the moss becomes wet and heavy) and especially squirrels running and jumping on them. Many quite large branches have completely died by being smothered by the moss or because the limbs above are so heavily covered that the sunlight cannot reach the lower limbs.

For more information, see its PlantFiles entry:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2061/index.html

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Ball Moss (Tillandsia recurvata)

Ball moss on a dormant crepe myrtle showing how dense it can grow and blooms ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Velvet leaf, Butter print, China jute (Abutilon theophrasti), Malvaceae Family, naturalized, annual (sometimes a short lived perennial), forb/herb (sometimes called a subshrub because of its size), blooms from June through October, invasive

It has a large taproot and attains a height between 1 foot to over 7 feet. It is covered with short, soft, velvety hairs. The Chinese used (use) the plant for many ailments such as stomachaches, fever and dysentery and in experiments, it has been shown to be a depressant. It produces a strong fiber in the stems, China jute, that can be used in the making of rugs.

Colorado: Noxious weed
Iowa: Secondary noxious weed
Oregon: "B" designated weed, Quarantine
Washington: Class A noxious weed, Noxious weed seed and plant quarantine

For more information, see its PlantFiles entry:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/792/index.html

The bloom is about ¾ inch wide. The stamens fuse to form a tube which is not seen well in the photo.

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Mexican Poinsettia, Wild Poinsettia, Fire-on-the-Mountain, Painted Euphorbia,
Mexican Fire Plant, Summer Poinsettia (Euphorbia cyathophora), Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, yellowish-green blooms are inconspicuous

The orangey-red color starts appearing in early June and spreads to its fullest extent by the end of November. It reseeds prolifically. Seeds should be planted in January. This plant can handle heat very well.

For more information. see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/641/index.html


This message was edited Oct 13, 2005 10:16 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Mexican Poinsettia, Wild Poinsettia, Fire-on-the-Mountain, Painted Euphorbia,
Mexican Fire Plant, Summer Poinsettia (Euphorbia cyathophora)

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Mexican Poinsettia, Wild Poinsettia, Fire-on-the-Mountain, Painted Euphorbia,
Mexican Fire Plant, Summer Poinsettia (Euphorbia cyathophora)

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Queen’s Delight, Queen's-Delight, Texas Queen's Delight, Texas Queen's-Delight, Texas Toothleaf (Stillingia texana), Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms from April through September, yellowish-green blooms are inconspicuous

Texas toothleaf is native to New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It is very drought tolerant due to its deep woody taproot, prefers dry soil and can be found in open areas in fields and on hillsides. In Texas, it grows mainly in the calcareous soils of the Rio Grande Plains and the Edwards Plateau, but can be found throughout the state.

Texas toothleaf has an erect habit with multiple stems and its alternate, serrated, glossy, thin, linear leaves are quite attractive. Its yellowish-green blooms appear on spikes and are not showy. The leaves are clumped under the blooms. The male and female blooms are found on the same spike with the male bloom being above and female bloom below. It produces a milky sap that may cause skin blisters. It has been used to cure ringworm.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113540/index.html

Growth habit (specimen photographed in Blanco, Texas in September) ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Queen’s Delight, Queen's-Delight, Texas Queen's Delight, Texas Queen's-Delight, Texas Toothleaf (Stillingia texana)

Fruit ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Queen’s Delight, Queen's-Delight, Texas Queen's Delight, Texas Queen's-Delight, Texas Toothleaf (Stillingia texana)

Closeup of fruit in different stages of maturity; the dehisced fruit at the top of the photograph is quite distinctive ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Cocklebur, Rough Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in late summer through early fall, greenish blooms are inconspicuous, considered a weed by many

Common Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum) is a weedy, taprooted, wetland native plant that is widely distributed throughtout Texas as well as other states. It can be found growing around watering holes, arroyas, playas, cropland (especially corn fields), fallow fields, degraded meadows, stabilized areas of beaches and sand dunes, the floodplain zone of rivers and ponds, vacant lots and disturbed areas. It prefers a loamy or sandy and moist to mesic (neither to moist nor too dry) soil.

Young seedlings give off toxic chemicals that can inhibit germination of other species of plants and/or kill off their seedlings. The toxicity level lessens as the plants mature. All classes of livestock may be poisoned by the cocklebur. Seedlings and seeds are the most toxic parts of the plants. Usually, livestock do not eat the seeds. However, if furnished hay or cottonseed feed contaminated with cocklebur serious problems and even death may occur. Pigs eating a sufficent amount of young plants may be poisoned. It does Deer occasionally eat the upper half of mature plants before the bur-like flowers form. Sometimes horses and cattle eat the mature plants with the bur-like flowers. This can lead to obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract. The purple finch and Franklin ground squirrel eat the seeds with no ill affects.

For more information, see its ebtry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113795/

A colony shown in the mid-October in Bexar county near a drainage area ...

This message was edited Oct 18, 2005 6:50 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Cocklebur, Rough Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum)

Growth habit ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Cocklebur, Rough Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum)

The very conspicuous, hard, spiny, football-shaped fruits have many spines and contain 2 compartments that each house 1 seed. One of the seeds in each bur may germinate the following year with the other seed taking at least 2 years to germinate. The burs stick to fur and clothing and can be very difficult to extract. Often they form tangled clots in the fur of animals which have to be cut out.

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Cocklebur, Rough Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum)

A leaf ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Spanish Moss (Tillandsia usneoides), Bromeliaceae Family, Texas native, perrenial, blooms in late spring through early summer, blooms are inconspicuous (chartreuse to blue)

Spanish moss tendrils can grow to 25 feet in length is "Unlike ball moss, Spanish moss does not develop the very dense growth around the limbs and for that reason is not considered to be a problem on trees." (Texas Cooperative Extension Horticultural Service,Texas A&M University). The scaly covering receives and holds moisture, enabling the plant to dispense with roots. Birds and the wind carry fragments of the plant to new locations which is in all probility the commonest means of propagation. The seed pod opens in winter releasing dozens of fluffy seeds that drift in the wind. Many kinds of birds use pieces of Spanish moss for nesting material and/or to conceal their nests. The yellow-throated warbler and northern parula intertwine their nests into the moss itself. Their nests look like tennis balls hanging in the tendrils. Egrets, owls, mockingbirds and squirrels use Spanish moss for nest bedding. Spanish moss serves as a place to roost for several species of bats and one species of spider, the Pelegrina tillandsiae, inhabits only Spanish moss. Chiggers and rat snakes which eat the roosting bats, live in the moss as well. Deer, wild turkey and horses eat it; however, it has little nutritional value.

Spanish moss has been used for many things. Native Americans used it as the first "disposable" diaper, and colonists used the moss mixed with mud to caulk their cabins. In the past, Spanish moss has been used for clothing, bulk livestock feed, bedding and mattresses and kindling for fires. Commercially processed Spanish Moss has been used as packing material, auto seat stuffing (Henry Ford used it in his first Model T seats; but, it hasn't been used since 1975 for this purpose), saddle blankets, bridles, braids, and even filament to repair fishermen’s nets. Because it retains moisture so well and is a great source of nitrogen, it has always made an excellent mulch. It is also used in the arts-and-crafts trade. Herbalists use it in a tea to relieve rheumatism, abcesses and birth pains. In the past, doctors prescribed medicines containing Spanish moss extracts to treat diabetes. In 1998, research was being conducted by Northeast Louisiana University exploring uses of Tillandsia unsneoides to control blood glucose levels.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2060/index.html

Spanish moss growing in Brackenridge Park in San Antonio along with ball moss ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Spanish Moss (Tillandsia usneoides)

It is gray in color, but can have a greenish hue when it is wet or when there is high humidity ...

Thumbnail by htop
NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Burridge's Greenthread is an annual Texas wildflower naturally occurring only in about 7 counties in Texas. Botanical name is Thelesperma burridgeanum. Also available as Cosmidium burridgeanum, the cultivated plant usually grown from seeds. Popular in Britain, but less available here. I suspect it could eventually become endangered in the wild because of limited distribution and increased development. It is 12 to 28 inches tall and has threadlike leaves. It prefers sandy soil and warm temperatures and blooms about April to June.

Thumbnail by LindaTX8
Gordonville, TX(Zone 7b)

Interesting that its popular in Britain.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Umbrella Plant, Umbrella Papyrus, Umbrella Palm (Cyperus involucratus), Cyperaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms all year

( Note; Cross-referenced in Aquatic and Bog Plants)

Altough this plant is perfect for ponds and bogs, it grows in theregular landscape as well and does not require as much water as may be sugested in its description. With less water. it does not grow as tall. I love this plant because it gives a tropical feeling to the landscape area in which it growing. It will die back after a hard freeze, but returns quickly in the spring. It is suitable for growing in containers.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2532/index.html

The blooms ... although described as inconspicuos because the individual bloom is so small, the bloom clusters add interest to the plant.

Thumbnail by htop
west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Schoenocalulon texanum
Texas Green Lily

A native Texas Bulb

This species was first identified by Scheele and are native in limestone soil in slopes, canyons, outwashes, and flats from the northeastern Rio Grande plains to the hill country and Edwards Plateau of Texas. Texas Green Lily blooms in the late spring with tiny greenish flowers and have extruded pinkish stamens and a faint sweet scent. Not showy but very interesting. The grassy leaves remain in active growth for most of the year and the plants are not invasive. They can be planted in a poor, dry spot, where they will persist; but I grow them in clay pots to ensure the well-drained conditions they need to thrive.

Thumbnail by dmj1218
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Dwarf Indian Mallow, Small Leaf Indian Mallow, Littleleaf Abutilon, Small-Leaved Abutilon (Abutilon parvulum), Malvaceae Family, native, perennial

Its native habitats include disturbed areas, rocky slopes, dry plains, gravelly flats, foothills, grasslands and desert scrubs. The bloom color varies and includes red is a brick-red and to a goldish-orange. Because it has a small, trailingly or sprawling habit, it may be grown in containers including hanging baskets. It is sutable for rock gardens, wildscapes and xeriscapes.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/115786/index.html

A goldish-orange flower ...


This message was edited Dec 4, 2006 2:28 AM

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Dwarf Indian Mallow, Small Leaf Indian Mallow, Littleleaf Abutilon, Small-Leaved Abutilon (Abutilon parvulum), Malvaceae Family, native, perennial

The leaves ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Ragweed, Annual Ragweed, Short Ragweed, Annual Bur-Sage (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), Asteraceae Family, native, annual, blooms August through September

County distribution:
http://69.41.173.145/ww/plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=AMAR2

The male flowerheads are pendulous meaning they hang down with the anthers exserted meaning that they are stuck out of the heads. The female heads are located beneath the male heads on the inflorescence stalks and above the highest leaves. The pollen can cause allergic reactions

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32136/index.html

Male and female flowerheads ...

Thumbnail by htop
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Common Ragweed, Annual Ragweed, Short Ragweed, Annual Bur-Sage (Ambrosia artemisiifolia)

A very close view of the Common Ragweed, Annual Ragweed, Annual Bur-Sage (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) male flowerheads showing the fine hairs and some of that infamous pollen falling from the top right flower ...

Thumbnail by htop

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or register to post.

Upload Images to your reply

    You may upload up to 5 images
    BACK TO TOP