Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Vines )

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native vine ) Cross Vine, ( Bignonia capreolata ) Breautiful Perennial evergreen vine, reaches up to 50 feet in length.
Blooms very heavily in Spring, occassionaly during the year, highly recommended.
Fot more info see plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56818/index.html

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

My Crossvine and me.

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Richmond, TX(Zone 9a)

wow! is it draped along a fence?

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Mustang Grape, Vitis mustangensis, a deciduous vine, grows to 10m, but gets so large it can smother trees, is diecious, leaves have white or cream colored hairs on the underside, leaf shapes may vary, fruit mature from June to August, grape skin is tough and may irritate the throat if not removed. Indigenous. This is my favorite leaf shape.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58364/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Pattersonís Bindweed, Pattersonís Dawnflower (Stylisma pickeringii var. pattersonii), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late spring(May) to early fall.

A very pretty vine that can be found in all regions of Texas. It is an endangered species in Illinois and Iowa. The very small morning glory like blooms adorn this vine which forms a mat and likes dry soil. The flowers are solitary or in clusters. There may be as many as five flowers atop a stalk. The flowers are about 1.2-1.8 cm wide and have five fused petals forming a funnel-like shape. They produce seed capsules that contain one or two seeds from June through October. The best time to collect seeds is when the plant is in flower because it can rapidly deteriote in hot, droughty weather near the end of summer.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76492/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima), Cucurbitaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in in May through September

This is is a low growing vine that can reach a length of 20 feet. It ccurs often in sandy areas.The large 3 to 4 inches long, 1 to 2 inches wide yellow flowers open in the mornings. The rough gray-green leaves are a narrow triangular shape. The leaves have a potent, disagreeable odor.especially in spring, The immature fruit is a gourd that is dark green with lighter green stripes. When ripe, it turns yellow. It undergoes dormancy after flowering and fruiting. Although many times it is a groundcover, it does go up fences and other objects that serve as support. It does not have tendrills with which to attach itself in order to climb.

For more information, see the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58001/live_view/

Morning or afternoon sunlight makes the green of the leaves which are backlit contrast with the gray-green of those that are not. This is when I like to view the plant the best.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

Buffalo gourd growing in a vacant lot in San Antonio ... they are becoming more and more difficult to find.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

Buffalo gourd bloom just opening with the sunlight making it glow almost all the way to the stem. Note the bug in the right hand corner of the photo that has a splotch of the same color of the bloom on it.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

A view of an unripe buffalo gourd fruit shown in September ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora), Scrophulariaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms March through September

Roving sailor vines are native plants that can be found on limestone hills, slopes, sandy dunes, dry salt marshes and beach areas of the southern Texas coast through the Texas Rio Grande Plains as well as the Texas Trans-Pecos region. In addition, they are native to Arizona, California, New Mexico and and Mexico. They are adaptable to most soils that are well drained and require moderate water. Supplemental irrigation or rain will extend its blooming season and encourage faster growth. The genus is named after Catalina Pancratia Maurandy who was an 18th-century botanist from Cartagena, Spain.

The roving sailor vine is a vine that is not showy from a distance. It is a vine whose fragile beauty needs to be seen close-up. Plant it near a walkway, garden bench or an entryway. Let it climb up a small trellis or dangling from a hanging basket. Donít be surprised if the common buckeye (Junonia coenia) butterfly shows up because this plant is one of its larval foods.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles and read my comments:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1203/live_view/

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora)

These blooms are 5/8 to 1 inch long and the vine produces them in profusion.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora)

A closeup of the bloom showing the bumps which partially close the throat.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii), Ranunculaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March through September, invasive

This is a climbing, semi-woody perennial vine that has numerous small (.8 inches across) white to creamy colored blooms.It grows prolifically and some consider it an invasive weed. It is a native to Arizona, New Mexico, southwestern Oklahoma and Texas. The butterfly, fatal metalmark, likes its nectar which is not very strong.

For more onfprmation and other photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53218/index.html

New leaves ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

The blooms shown in June ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

October ... The leaf is not the vine leaf ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

Seed entangled in "feathers" in October ...

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Virginia Creeper, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native. Blooms May to August

A 20 - 30 foot deciduous perennial vine. The palmately compound leaves are usually divided into 5 coursely serrated leaflets. The vine is vigorous and is grown for its foliage which turns brilliant red in autumn if grown in full sun. Slightly paler if grown in partial shade. Very small (2 - 3 mm long) yellow-green flowers borne in panicles. Small berries (6 - 9 mm) are bluish-black when ripe. Inedible to humans, but loved by birds. The vine climbs by arial disks. The leaves at the base of the vine and on immature vines may have 3 leaflets instead of 5.

For more information, see PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1695/index.html

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 4:52 PM

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Virginia Creeper, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native,

Close-up of the leaves and unripe berries.

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

A deciduous perennial bushy vine grows 15 - 30 feet. Leaves divide into 5 toothed leaflets. New Growth has red tinge. Plant prefers deep moist loam. Will grow in full sun or light shade. Foliage turns red in autumn. Flowers greenish, 5 petaled and borne in clusters. Fruits turn white to red then black. Can be invasive. This is a photo of this year's seedling.

For more information, see PlantFiles:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/63405/index.html

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

A close-up of a leaf.

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

Green fruit cluster.

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La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native.

A fruit cluster in different stages of ripeness. The black ones are ripe.

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 5:49 PM

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Passion Flower, ( Passiflora incarnata ) Bloom period April- September.
Beautiful complex flowers are said by legend to represent the Passion of Christ.
The three pistils represent the three nails, the five stamens the five wounds, and the rays, the crown of thorns. Passionflowers are food plants for several species of butterflies. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1189

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Sharp-pod Morning Glory, ( Ipomea trichocarpa ) Vining perennial volunteers all over the place, very pretty, blooms April- November.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55639/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms, late spring to early summer

This is a perennial herbaceous vine that has a taproot and usually has 3 to 6 foot stems. Sometimes it grows along the ground and over other plants. Other times, it finds vertical support such as a fence. The leaves are are doubly compound; that is, the petioles come off the stems and are divided into leaflets that, in turn, are divided into subleaflets. These subleaflets are less than 1/4 of an inch long and are prominently veined on the lower surface. The blooms are similar to the powder puff mimosa, but the plant is a scrambling vine and has thorns.

For more information, see its entry in thee PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56502/index.html

The blooms ... note that the leaves have folded because I had touched them.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla)

A closer view of the leaves and thorns that are exposed when the leaves fold ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla)


The bloom bud clusters ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Texas Bindweed (Convolvulus equitans), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial blooms in early spring through late fall

For more information, see its entry in thee PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62413/index.html

The leaves are fuzzy on both surfaces. The bloom resembles the wild potato vine's bloom.

This message was edited Jul 27, 2005 7:59 AM

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Trumpet Creeper, ( Campsis radicans ) Very vigorous perennial woody vine.
Deciduous, cold hardy, drought tolerant, grows with abandon, will require prunning in small spaces. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/79996/

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Trumpet Creeper, ( Campis radicans ) flower cluster.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

(Native ) Trumper Creeper, close up of the flower.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Carolina Snailseed, or Moonseed, ( Cocculus carolinus )
Deciduous vine, full sun to partial shade, lovely berries in tha Fall.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1574/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Carolina Snailseed, Moonseed (Cocculus carolinus)

A view of the vine covewring a chain link fence ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Coral Honeysuckle, Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Caprifoliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2013/index.html

The buds are a dark purplish color and lighten as they open. Also, the new growth has some purple coloration. Notice how the bloom cluster stems emerge from the center of the veins of the last pair of fused leaves which is very unusual. Shown at the end of March.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Catchweed Bedstraw, Sticky Willy, Goose Grass, Cleavers (Galium aparine), Rubiaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in early spring to early summer, considered a noxious weed by some

This plant will stick to almost anything including socks, other clothing, pets, etc. It is classified as a vine (has small white blooms), but without support it rambles over other plants as well as anything in its path. Although this plant is a very fast grower snd is considered an invasive weed, as an herb it is used as a dried extract (capsules and powders), in herbal teas and even eaten raw. When researching this plant, I was amazed at how many ailments it is supposed to relieve. One of the many, many common names for it is "angelic root" because the root of the plant has medicinal uses as well as the rest of the plant parts. It is listed on the labels of herbal remedies as "cleavers".

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53011/index.html

Cleavers is actually a very pretty plant especially when it has something to help prop it up such as the chainlink fence in this photo. Its foliage is such a refreshing green and its leaf arrangement is nice. I find it to be easily pulled and I do so before the seeds are made.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Wild Yellow Passion Flower, Passionflower (Passiflora lutea), Passifloraceae
Family, Texas native, blooms mid-summer through early fall, can be an obnoxious weed

The quarter size(or less) chartreuse to pale green blooms have a slight sweet fragrance. It produces a green grape-like fruit which turns purple when ripe. You don't see these for long because the birds usually find them first. I am constantly pulling these vines up because they reseed themselves all over the place where I don't want them to be. They cover up other plants if they have no support. The plant is actually quite pretty, but I consider it an invasive weed in my cultivated gardens. It is on the endangered species list in Pennsylvania.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58221/index.html

Gulf fritillary caterpillars love the leaves so I leave a few. These are young leaves and were damaged by a freeze. The leaves are usually a darker green.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Greenbrier, Cowvine (Smilax bona-nox), Smilacaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, vine/subshrub/shrub, evergreen, blooms in April through June, can be a noxious weed

There are few plants that I hate, but this one is one of them. It is described as being a low-growing vine which formsf low thickets and having spines at the nodes and along internodes. These sharp spines make it dangerous to try to remove. The stems become very thick and almost woody. It grows from a tuber that is deep in the soil making it difficult to dig up especially when it is growing next to other wanted plants. It grows over other plants if not having support. There is one specimen growing almost all the way up a large cedar tree in the field behind my house.

Some specimens have leaves that are covered with light green splotches while others have purely dark green leaves. The blooms are small, have green tepals and are a greenish white to yellowish white. The 0.25 inch fruit is a black berry which contains one seed which matures in October to November. I never let it produce berries. It is an important deer, cattle, and rabbit browse with the stems being 5-10% of a dee'sr diet. Wild turkey, wood ducks and song birds eat the berries.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31746/index.html

Smilax bona-nox has many leaf variations. Some are not speckled like this one and younger leaves are not as oblong. A vine or subshrub to avoid due to its spines.



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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Greenbrier, Cowvine (Smilax bona-nox)

A young leaf ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Silver Dichondra, Silver Pony-foot, Kidneyweed, Silver Nickel Vine and Aluminum Vine (Dichondra argentea), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, to semi-deciduous, deciduous in winter (depending upon the zone in which it is growing), blooms May through August (inconspicuous)

I didn't quite know where to post this plant because it has a vining habit, but in its native habitat, it is a groundcover. It is a native plant that inhabits West Texas to southeastern Arizona and the Mexican states of Durango and Michoacan. In Mexico, its preferred habitat is on igneous substrates. It prefers alkaline to neutral pH soils, but is adaptable. It is the only desert-adapted Dichondra, but does best as a cultivated plant with occasional irrigation especially during periods of drought. Although it will tolerate drought, it will look a bit puny after suffering leaf die back. It requires well-drained soil if planted in the ground as a groundcover and is deer resistant in areas that are not overpopulated with deer.It is perfect for hanging baskets, as a ground cover, in window boxes, as a cascading plant over walls and even as a lawn (does not take frequent foot traffic). If used in a rock garden, xeriscape or wildscape, it may require some additional water.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76508/index.html

This message was edited Aug 2, 2005 10:33 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Silver Dichondra, Silver Pony-foot, Kidneyweed, Silver Nickel Vine and Aluminum Vine (Dichondra argentea)

Used as a groundcover that is cascading over a wall at the San Antonio Botanical Garden ...

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