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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Vines )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
7:50 PM

Post #1626089

( Native vine ) Cross Vine, ( Bignonia capreolata ) Breautiful Perennial evergreen vine, reaches up to 50 feet in length.
Blooms very heavily in Spring, occassionaly during the year, highly recommended.
Fot more info see plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56818/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
7:54 PM

Post #1626096

My Crossvine and me.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 16, 2005
12:24 AM

Post #1626580

wow! is it draped along a fence?
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2005
6:33 AM

Post #1627235

Mustang Grape, Vitis mustangensis, a deciduous vine, grows to 10m, but gets so large it can smother trees, is diecious, leaves have white or cream colored hairs on the underside, leaf shapes may vary, fruit mature from June to August, grape skin is tough and may irritate the throat if not removed. Indigenous. This is my favorite leaf shape.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58364/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
8:11 PM

Post #1628162

Patterson’s Bindweed, Patterson’s Dawnflower (Stylisma pickeringii var. pattersonii), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late spring(May) to early fall.

A very pretty vine that can be found in all regions of Texas. It is an endangered species in Illinois and Iowa. The very small morning glory like blooms adorn this vine which forms a mat and likes dry soil. The flowers are solitary or in clusters. There may be as many as five flowers atop a stalk. The flowers are about 1.2-1.8 cm wide and have five fused petals forming a funnel-like shape. They produce seed capsules that contain one or two seeds from June through October. The best time to collect seeds is when the plant is in flower because it can rapidly deteriote in hot, droughty weather near the end of summer.

For more information, see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76492/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
9:31 AM

Post #1629306

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima), Cucurbitaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in in May through September

This is is a low growing vine that can reach a length of 20 feet. It ccurs often in sandy areas.The large 3 to 4 inches long, 1 to 2 inches wide yellow flowers open in the mornings. The rough gray-green leaves are a narrow triangular shape. The leaves have a potent, disagreeable odor.especially in spring, The immature fruit is a gourd that is dark green with lighter green stripes. When ripe, it turns yellow. It undergoes dormancy after flowering and fruiting. Although many times it is a groundcover, it does go up fences and other objects that serve as support. It does not have tendrills with which to attach itself in order to climb.

For more information, see the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58001/live_view/

Morning or afternoon sunlight makes the green of the leaves which are backlit contrast with the gray-green of those that are not. This is when I like to view the plant the best.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
9:41 AM

Post #1629310

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

Buffalo gourd growing in a vacant lot in San Antonio ... they are becoming more and more difficult to find.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
9:44 AM

Post #1629311

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

Buffalo gourd bloom just opening with the sunlight making it glow almost all the way to the stem. Note the bug in the right hand corner of the photo that has a splotch of the same color of the bloom on it.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
9:48 AM

Post #1629312

Buffalo Gourd, Wild Gourd, Missouri Gourd, Stinking Gourd, Fetid Gourd, Coyote Melon, Calabazilla, Chilicote (Cucurbita foetidissima)

A view of an unripe buffalo gourd fruit shown in September ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 21, 2005
1:41 AM

Post #1637571

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora), Scrophulariaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms March through September

Roving sailor vines are native plants that can be found on limestone hills, slopes, sandy dunes, dry salt marshes and beach areas of the southern Texas coast through the Texas Rio Grande Plains as well as the Texas Trans-Pecos region. In addition, they are native to Arizona, California, New Mexico and and Mexico. They are adaptable to most soils that are well drained and require moderate water. Supplemental irrigation or rain will extend its blooming season and encourage faster growth. The genus is named after Catalina Pancratia Maurandy who was an 18th-century botanist from Cartagena, Spain.

The roving sailor vine is a vine that is not showy from a distance. It is a vine whose fragile beauty needs to be seen close-up. Plant it near a walkway, garden bench or an entryway. Let it climb up a small trellis or dangling from a hanging basket. Don’t be surprised if the common buckeye (Junonia coenia) butterfly shows up because this plant is one of its larval foods.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles and read my comments:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1203/live_view/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 21, 2005
1:44 AM

Post #1637573

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora)

These blooms are 5/8 to 1 inch long and the vine produces them in profusion.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 21, 2005
1:45 AM

Post #1637578

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora)

A closeup of the bloom showing the bumps which partially close the throat.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
1:02 AM

Post #1642920

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii), Ranunculaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March through September, invasive

This is a climbing, semi-woody perennial vine that has numerous small (.8 inches across) white to creamy colored blooms.It grows prolifically and some consider it an invasive weed. It is a native to Arizona, New Mexico, southwestern Oklahoma and Texas. The butterfly, fatal metalmark, likes its nectar which is not very strong.

For more onfprmation and other photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53218/index.html

New leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
1:05 AM

Post #1642926

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

The blooms shown in June ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
1:13 AM

Post #1642947

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

October ... The leaf is not the vine leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
2:18 AM

Post #1643174

Species clematis, Texas virginsbower, barbas de chivato, Drummond's clematis, virgin bower vine (Clematis drummondii)

Seed entangled in "feathers" in October ...
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
9:36 PM

Post #1649203

Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Virginia Creeper, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native. Blooms May to August

A 20 - 30 foot deciduous perennial vine. The palmately compound leaves are usually divided into 5 coursely serrated leaflets. The vine is vigorous and is grown for its foliage which turns brilliant red in autumn if grown in full sun. Slightly paler if grown in partial shade. Very small (2 - 3 mm long) yellow-green flowers borne in panicles. Small berries (6 - 9 mm) are bluish-black when ripe. Inedible to humans, but loved by birds. The vine climbs by arial disks. The leaves at the base of the vine and on immature vines may have 3 leaflets instead of 5.

For more information, see PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1695/index.html

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 4:52 PM
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
9:43 PM

Post #1649224

Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Virginia Creeper, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native,

Close-up of the leaves and unripe berries.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
10:34 PM

Post #1649355

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

A deciduous perennial bushy vine grows 15 - 30 feet. Leaves divide into 5 toothed leaflets. New Growth has red tinge. Plant prefers deep moist loam. Will grow in full sun or light shade. Foliage turns red in autumn. Flowers greenish, 5 petaled and borne in clusters. Fruits turn white to red then black. Can be invasive. This is a photo of this year's seedling.

For more information, see PlantFiles:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/63405/index.html
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
10:38 PM

Post #1649364

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

A close-up of a leaf.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
10:45 PM

Post #1649378

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native

Green fruit cluster.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 25, 2005
10:49 PM

Post #1649387

Ampelopsis arborea, Peppervine, Vitaceae (Grape) Family, Texas native.

A fruit cluster in different stages of ripeness. The black ones are ripe.

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 5:49 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
8:18 PM

Post #1651694

( Native ) Passion Flower, ( Passiflora incarnata ) Bloom period April- September.
Beautiful complex flowers are said by legend to represent the Passion of Christ.
The three pistils represent the three nails, the five stamens the five wounds, and the rays, the crown of thorns. Passionflowers are food plants for several species of butterflies. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1189

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2005
8:55 PM

Post #1651780

( Native ) Sharp-pod Morning Glory, ( Ipomea trichocarpa ) Vining perennial volunteers all over the place, very pretty, blooms April- November.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55639/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
12:37 AM

Post #1652171

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms, late spring to early summer

This is a perennial herbaceous vine that has a taproot and usually has 3 to 6 foot stems. Sometimes it grows along the ground and over other plants. Other times, it finds vertical support such as a fence. The leaves are are doubly compound; that is, the petioles come off the stems and are divided into leaflets that, in turn, are divided into subleaflets. These subleaflets are less than 1/4 of an inch long and are prominently veined on the lower surface. The blooms are similar to the powder puff mimosa, but the plant is a scrambling vine and has thorns.

For more information, see its entry in thee PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56502/index.html

The blooms ... note that the leaves have folded because I had touched them.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
12:42 AM

Post #1652176

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla)

A closer view of the leaves and thorns that are exposed when the leaves fold ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
12:45 AM

Post #1652180

Sensitive Briar, Sensitive Vine, Littleleaf Mimosa (Mimosa microphylla)


The bloom bud clusters ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
12:49 PM

Post #1652976

Texas Bindweed (Convolvulus equitans), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial blooms in early spring through late fall

For more information, see its entry in thee PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62413/index.html

The leaves are fuzzy on both surfaces. The bloom resembles the wild potato vine's bloom.

This message was edited Jul 27, 2005 7:59 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
5:53 PM

Post #1653583

( Native ) Trumpet Creeper, ( Campsis radicans ) Very vigorous perennial woody vine.
Deciduous, cold hardy, drought tolerant, grows with abandon, will require prunning in small spaces. See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/79996/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
9:26 PM

Post #1656574

( Native ) Trumpet Creeper, ( Campis radicans ) flower cluster.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
9:28 PM

Post #1656576

(Native ) Trumper Creeper, close up of the flower.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
9:36 PM

Post #1656596

( Native ) Carolina Snailseed, or Moonseed, ( Cocculus carolinus )
Deciduous vine, full sun to partial shade, lovely berries in tha Fall.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1574/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
1:57 AM

Post #1657198

Carolina Snailseed, Moonseed (Cocculus carolinus)

A view of the vine covewring a chain link fence ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
1:26 AM

Post #1661174

Coral Honeysuckle, Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Caprifoliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2013/index.html

The buds are a dark purplish color and lighten as they open. Also, the new growth has some purple coloration. Notice how the bloom cluster stems emerge from the center of the veins of the last pair of fused leaves which is very unusual. Shown at the end of March.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:06 PM

Post #1662098

Catchweed Bedstraw, Sticky Willy, Goose Grass, Cleavers (Galium aparine), Rubiaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms in early spring to early summer, considered a noxious weed by some

This plant will stick to almost anything including socks, other clothing, pets, etc. It is classified as a vine (has small white blooms), but without support it rambles over other plants as well as anything in its path. Although this plant is a very fast grower snd is considered an invasive weed, as an herb it is used as a dried extract (capsules and powders), in herbal teas and even eaten raw. When researching this plant, I was amazed at how many ailments it is supposed to relieve. One of the many, many common names for it is "angelic root" because the root of the plant has medicinal uses as well as the rest of the plant parts. It is listed on the labels of herbal remedies as "cleavers".

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53011/index.html

Cleavers is actually a very pretty plant especially when it has something to help prop it up such as the chainlink fence in this photo. Its foliage is such a refreshing green and its leaf arrangement is nice. I find it to be easily pulled and I do so before the seeds are made.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
3:42 PM

Post #1662163

Wild Yellow Passion Flower, Passionflower (Passiflora lutea), Passifloraceae
Family, Texas native, blooms mid-summer through early fall, can be an obnoxious weed

The quarter size(or less) chartreuse to pale green blooms have a slight sweet fragrance. It produces a green grape-like fruit which turns purple when ripe. You don't see these for long because the birds usually find them first. I am constantly pulling these vines up because they reseed themselves all over the place where I don't want them to be. They cover up other plants if they have no support. The plant is actually quite pretty, but I consider it an invasive weed in my cultivated gardens. It is on the endangered species list in Pennsylvania.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58221/index.html

Gulf fritillary caterpillars love the leaves so I leave a few. These are young leaves and were damaged by a freeze. The leaves are usually a darker green.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:09 PM

Post #1662218

Greenbrier, Cowvine (Smilax bona-nox), Smilacaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, vine/subshrub/shrub, evergreen, blooms in April through June, can be a noxious weed

There are few plants that I hate, but this one is one of them. It is described as being a low-growing vine which formsf low thickets and having spines at the nodes and along internodes. These sharp spines make it dangerous to try to remove. The stems become very thick and almost woody. It grows from a tuber that is deep in the soil making it difficult to dig up especially when it is growing next to other wanted plants. It grows over other plants if not having support. There is one specimen growing almost all the way up a large cedar tree in the field behind my house.

Some specimens have leaves that are covered with light green splotches while others have purely dark green leaves. The blooms are small, have green tepals and are a greenish white to yellowish white. The 0.25 inch fruit is a black berry which contains one seed which matures in October to November. I never let it produce berries. It is an important deer, cattle, and rabbit browse with the stems being 5-10% of a dee'sr diet. Wild turkey, wood ducks and song birds eat the berries.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31746/index.html

Smilax bona-nox has many leaf variations. Some are not speckled like this one and younger leaves are not as oblong. A vine or subshrub to avoid due to its spines.



htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:11 PM

Post #1662222

Greenbrier, Cowvine (Smilax bona-nox)

A young leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 2, 2005
3:29 PM

Post #1666512

Silver Dichondra, Silver Pony-foot, Kidneyweed, Silver Nickel Vine and Aluminum Vine (Dichondra argentea), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, to semi-deciduous, deciduous in winter (depending upon the zone in which it is growing), blooms May through August (inconspicuous)

I didn't quite know where to post this plant because it has a vining habit, but in its native habitat, it is a groundcover. It is a native plant that inhabits West Texas to southeastern Arizona and the Mexican states of Durango and Michoacan. In Mexico, its preferred habitat is on igneous substrates. It prefers alkaline to neutral pH soils, but is adaptable. It is the only desert-adapted Dichondra, but does best as a cultivated plant with occasional irrigation especially during periods of drought. Although it will tolerate drought, it will look a bit puny after suffering leaf die back. It requires well-drained soil if planted in the ground as a groundcover and is deer resistant in areas that are not overpopulated with deer.It is perfect for hanging baskets, as a ground cover, in window boxes, as a cascading plant over walls and even as a lawn (does not take frequent foot traffic). If used in a rock garden, xeriscape or wildscape, it may require some additional water.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/76508/index.html

This message was edited Aug 2, 2005 10:33 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 2, 2005
3:32 PM

Post #1666523

Silver Dichondra, Silver Pony-foot, Kidneyweed, Silver Nickel Vine and Aluminum Vine (Dichondra argentea)

Used as a groundcover that is cascading over a wall at the San Antonio Botanical Garden ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 2, 2005
3:39 PM

Post #1666539

Silver Dichondra, Silver Pony-foot, Kidneyweed, Silver Nickel Vine and Aluminum Vine (Dichondra argentea)

Available cultivars which have the same growth habit: 'Silver Falls' (silver white leaves and stems - I have this one and love it); 'Emerald Falls' (deep green leaves)

'Silver Falls' cultivar can be seen at its entry in the PlantFiles (some images posted here are not photos of 'Silver Falls'):
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56847/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 2, 2005
4:14 PM

Post #1666599

Virginia Creeper, Woodbine, American ivy, Fiveleaved ivy (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), Vitaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, deciduous
blooms late spring to early summer, sucker pads at the ends of branched tendrils, listed as invasive weed in many areas, can cause severe skin irritation

It natively inhabits the eastern half of Texas and has five-leaf clusters. It should not be confused with poison ivy which has 3 leaves. The shiny green foliage turns a brilliant red in the fall. It will grow in sun, shade or any other light situation. It is sometimes supported by aerial rootlets, but usually by tendrils having adhesive discs and it will crawl over a tree stump or a rock, climb a fence or trail along the ground in open woodlands and at the forest edge. The birds will eat the bluish-black berries in the winter suspected of being poisonous to young children.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles (note all of the negative ratings):
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1695/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
5:49 AM

Post #1668002

Texas Wisteria, American Wisteria, Kentucky Wisteria, Woody Wisteria, Kidney-bean Tree, (Wisteria frutescens), Papilionaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, vine/large shrub, blooms in spring, summer (fragrant)

Texas wisteria grows in part shade to full sun in moist woods and along the edges of swamps in East and Southeast Texas. Although many sites state that it prefers acidic soil but is adaptable, I have found that it shows signs of chlorosis in non-acidic soil and the foliage appears "anemic" due to its inablilty to absorb enough iron. Unlike the Asian species, it blooms after the leaves have appeared and it is less agressive. It has compund shiny, dark green leaves. Because it can grow quite large and is heavy, it requires substantial support in order to grow upward. Blooms may be purple, lilac or bluish-purple.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1351/index.html

One half of an arbor covered with wisteria. Look closely and you can see a few of the seed pods. Photo taken in October)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
5:57 AM

Post #1668012

Texas Wisteria, American Wisteria, Kentucky Wisteria, Woody Wisteria, Kidney-bean Tree, (Wisteria frutescens)

The leaves are starting to turn color (October) and the long seed pods are very attracive. They turn color from green to golden to brown. The ripe pods twist and burst open with a loud bang and the seeds are dispersed.
mkjones
Aurora, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2005
2:49 PM

Post #1668480

WOW, Frostweed!!! Your cross vine is AMAZING! So full of blooms! I have 'Tangering Beauty' all across my backyard, newly planted this season, and have a few blooms. How can I get mine to look like yours next year???

=) MKJ in Trophy Club

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2005
3:04 PM

Post #1668512

Thank you MKjones, Give it a little time and it will reward you also, mine is 6 years old, and it is amazing, I love the Crossvine too. They seem to get better every year. Josephine.
BugZ11
Covington, GA

August 5, 2005
1:38 PM

Post #1672784

Hi, I'm new to all this and not quite sure where to ask for plant help! I visited SA back in the Spring and discoverd a beautiful blooming vine at the SA Zoo. Obsessed, when I got back to GEORGIA, I went on-line to find and purchase one--a Mexican Flame Vine. It bore one cluster of blooms very early on, the vine is growing and looks healthy, but no blooms. Sorry if I'm in the wrong place, but can anyone help or tell me where to go for help? thanks
mkjones
Aurora, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2005
5:22 PM

Post #1673226

You know, just recently someone had some up for trade on the Plant Trading Forum...you might check as to who the poster was, and Dmail them. I would imagine if they can propagate them, they can make them thrive! ;-)
BugZ11
Covington, GA

August 5, 2005
6:28 PM

Post #1673386

Thanks!----I'll try that.
TXMel
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2005
8:24 PM

Post #1673637

Josephine asked me to see if I could help with the MFVine... but... I also was obsessed when I saw this last summer. I have planted two of them, but they have not gotten very big, and no flowers at all. I had one little flower early, like you say, but nothing ever since...

I also love them, but cannot yet tell you what the best luck is with them. I think that I might know someone that can help, so let me dmail her and see if she can help us!

Melanie

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2005
8:31 PM

Post #1673649

Thanks Mel, for trying, you are so sweet. Josephine.
BugZ11
Covington, GA

August 6, 2005
2:23 PM

Post #1674992

Thank you Melanie. I haven't yet gotten a reply from the trading forum person. I'm thinking I may have the "foot" of mine in too much shade. It's intertwined with mandevilla and corkscrew vine. I also have it in a pot because I'm in Z8 and I'm pretty sure it wouldn't survive the winter-----was going to try and overwinter!!! I save everthing!! But I appreciate your help and will just keep watching!
mkjones
Aurora, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2005
3:49 PM

Post #1675112

Oh, you made me chuckle, Bugz..."intertwined w/mandevilla & corkscrew vine." Isn't that the truth??? I have corkscrew, lablab, trumpet vine, thunbergia, Carolina jessamine and clematis all intertwined into a big, um, glob? My husband was just saying last night, "I don't really know WHAT you've got going there..."

Ah, no vision...;-)
BugZ11
Covington, GA

August 6, 2005
6:27 PM

Post #1675417

Really...I'd like to have my husband and a "man-de-fleurs"!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My trellis sits on a walkway that leads to my back door. He's like a bull in a china shop (altho, a pretty sweet guy) and I truly expect to walk out one morning and see them all murdered!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
10:07 PM

Post #1679832

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba), Convolvulaceae Family, annual

This is a photo of one day old seed leaves which are huge. The seeds sprouted 4 days after I planted them in the ground at the first of June. They were soaked for 24 hours before planting them.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
10:11 PM

Post #1679841

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba)

The first huge bloom bud almost ready to open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
10:15 PM

Post #1679849

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba)

The bloom bud has opened a few hours later. The bloom is over 5.5 iches across and is not fully opened yet. It is very fragrant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
10:17 PM

Post #1679853

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba)

The bloom after it closes is still quite interesting.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 8, 2005
10:18 PM

Post #1679855

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba)

The bloom sepals add interest ... oops ... the photo didn't upload
I'll try again.

This message was edited Aug 13, 2005 9:42 AM
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

August 11, 2005
2:28 PM

Post #1684960

Beach Morning Glory, Mile a Minute Vine, RR Track Vine(Ipomoea imperati)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 13, 2005
2:42 PM

Post #1689351

Moonflower, Moon Vine (Ipomoea alba)

The bloom sepals add interest ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
5:24 PM

Post #1719109

Scarlet-fruit passion flower; Corona de Cristo Running Pop, Love-In-A-Mist, Stinking Passion Flower (Passiflora foetida), Passifloraceae Family, native and introduced, blooms late spring to early fall

This native plant has lovely small blooms. It is considered a "weed" by many people.

For information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1194/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
5:28 PM

Post #1719116

Scarlet-fruit passion flower; Corona de Cristo Running Pop, Love-In-A-Mist, Stinking Passion Flower (Passiflora foetida)

Unripe fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1719122

Scarlet-fruit passion flower; Corona de Cristo Running Pop, Love-In-A-Mist, Stinking Passion Flower (Passiflora foetida)

Ripening fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
9:12 PM

Post #1719495

Alamo Vine (Merremia dissecta), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, vine/subshrub, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall


For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53476/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
9:13 PM

Post #1719499

Alamo Vine (Merremia dissecta)

The leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
9:14 PM

Post #1719501

Alamo Vine (Merremia dissecta)

The large seedpod (seed pod) as seen from the back ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
9:16 PM

Post #1719503

Alamo Vine (Merremia dissecta)

The large seedpod (seed pod) as senn from the side ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 25, 2005
9:17 PM

Post #1719509

Alamo Vine (Merremia dissecta)

A bloom bud ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 28, 2005
6:15 PM

Post #1725519

Texas Globeberry, Balsam Gourd, balsamapple, Snake-Apple, Rio Grande Globeberry, Balsam Apple, Hierba de Vibora (Viper's Herb) (Ibervillea lindheimerii), Cucurbitaceae Family, Texas native, uncommon, perennial, deciduous, blooms April through July

In Texas it is uncommon and usually found in South Central Texas (most frequently in the Edwards Plateau region) and northward to southern Oklahoma and westward into New Mexico. It thrives on rocky hills and draws, fencerows, dry woods or thickets, brushland and occasionally in open, rocky soil. Not too picky about what type of soil inwhich it will grow, it can be found growing in sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay and saline soils.

From April through July, balsam gourd produces 5 to 8 staminate blooms per raceme. The yellow, 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter, short -tubed, 5-lobed blooms are salverform (have corollas with the outer edges spreading out flat) to tubular. The 1 to 2 inches in diameter, smooth, unedible fruit start appearing in August through October; look like small round, striped watermelons when young and turn an orangish-red to bright red when mature. The ripe fruit have soft fleshy skin. It has a slightly sweet smell, the 6 mm long seeds are covered in a fleshy gel. The seeds are eaten by scaled quail, and the leaves are occasionally eaten by white tailed deer.

This vine puts on quite a show when the fruit turn red. They are highly conspicuous and look like red Christmas ornaments. It would make a great vine in a shady area of a rock garden, xeriscape or perennial bed growing on a support of some kind, up a tree or along a fence.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/912/index.html

The immature and mature fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 28, 2005
6:18 PM

Post #1725523

Texas Globeberry, Balsam Gourd, balsamapple, Snake-Apple, Rio Grande Globeberry, Balsam Apple, Hierba de Vibora (Viper's Herb) (Ibervillea lindheimerii)

The fruit appears more red in shady areas ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 28, 2005
6:19 PM

Post #1725527

Texas Globeberry, Balsam Gourd, balsamapple, Snake-Apple, Rio Grande Globeberry, Balsam Apple, Hierba de Vibora (Viper's Herb) (Ibervillea lindheimerii)

The immature fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 28, 2005
6:20 PM

Post #1725530

Texas Globeberry, Balsam Gourd, balsamapple, Snake-Apple, Rio Grande Globeberry, Balsam Apple, Hierba de Vibora (Viper's Herb) (Ibervillea lindheimerii)

Balsam gourd has long tendrils as shown here ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 28, 2005
6:24 PM

Post #1725539

Texas Globeberry, Balsam Gourd, balsamapple, Snake-Apple, Rio Grande Globeberry, Balsam Apple, Hierba de Vibora (Viper's Herb) (Ibervillea lindheimerii)

The leaves may be 3- or 5-lobed or may have no lobes at all. They look like ivy when young, but usually increase in "lobeyness" as the plant matures.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2006
7:41 PM

Post #2107671

Texas Bindweed (Convolvulus equitans), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial blooms in early spring through late fall

This is a variant of the Texas bindweed which does not have the purple/maroon throat. Its bloom is a very pale pink. Unfortunately it was destroyed right after I took the photo as the land was cleared in order to build an apartment complex. No seeds were on the plant or I would have gathered a few.

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2006
7:44 PM

Post #2107677

Texas Bindweed (Convolvulus equitans), Convolvulaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial blooms in early spring through late fall

The leaf ... (Texas bindweed leaves can vary in shape and are eaten by whitetail deer)
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2006
4:14 PM

Post #2466109

Red Crossvine--Binonia capreolata.

Blooming on the 4th of July--how nice.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:49 AM

Post #2809371

Climbing Milkweed vine, Bearded Swallow-wort, Thicket Threadvine (Cynanchum barbigerum), Asclepiadaceae Family, endemicTexas native, perennial, blooms March through early fall

This is a tightly twisting vine with no tendrils which grows to be about 6 feet long. Its fuzzy, sweet scented flowers are about 1/8"-1/4" wide and have bulbous tubes at their base. The smooth leaves are 1/2"-1 1/2" long. It can be found climbing on boulders, fences, over forbs, trees and shrubs in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau regions of Texas as well as a few other areas in juniper shrublands shrubbery, at upper edge of wooded canyons, and on dry rocky limestone slopes. It oozes latex when injured as do other members of the milkweed family. It is the host plant for the Variegated Fritillary butterfly.

Native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=CYBA

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/135446/index.html

The delicate, very small and fuzzy, sweet scented blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:52 AM

Post #2809373

Climbing Milkweed Vine, Bearded Swallow-wort, Thicket Threadvine (Cynanchum barbigerum)

A view showing the bulbous tubes and showing that the flowers emerge from the leaf axils ..
.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:54 AM

Post #2809376

Climbing Milkweed Vine, Bearded Swallow-wort, Thicket Threadvine (Cynanchum barbigerum)

A view of its growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
5:56 AM

Post #2809379

Climbing Milkweed Vine, Bearded Swallow-wort, Thicket Threadvine (Cynanchum barbigerum)

Its stem stem that twists and twines around other plants and objects... (don't know what that bug on the stem is)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
10:29 AM

Post #2966840

Texas Nightshade, False Wild Pepper, Vine Nightshade, Hierba Mora, Tomatillo (Solanum triquetrum), Solanaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, blooms all year

This is a vining, sometimes shrub-like, plant that produces highly variable leaf shapes ranging from lanceolate to ovate. The delicate leaves are very small and can be either 3 or 5 lobed. The bottom leaves are are larges and are deeply cut with the center lobe being the largest. Leaves in the middle are long and narrow and those near the flowers are small and narrow. The 3/8" wide flower has 5 petals and is white; however, it can have a lavender blush. The golden yellow anthers touch which distinguishes it from other Solanum species. It produces 1/4 inch wide, tomato-like, succulent, red berries on its older stems. It can be found growing in canyons and woodlands, on alluvial terraces and mesic limestone slopes and sometimes in fenceline thickets.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/114899/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
10:31 AM

Post #2966842

Texas Nightshade, False Wild Pepper, Vine Nightshade, Hierba Mora, Tomatillo (Solanum triquetrum)

The "banana anthers" open by pores at their tips. Pollen exits these pores when the anthers are vibrated at just the right frequency by large bees.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
10:32 AM

Post #2966843

Texas Nightshade, False Wild Pepper, Vine Nightshade, Hierba Mora, Tomatillo (Solanum triquetrum)

The berry ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
4:38 AM

Post #3338932

Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis), Papilionaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, deciduous, vine/large shrub, blooms in early spring, fragrant

The Chinese wisteria blooms before the leaves have appeared and it is more aggressive than the native American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens). Because it can grow quite large and is heavy, it requires substantial support in order to grow upward. The bloom clusters may be somewhat smaller than the Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) and range from 9 to 12 inches in length; however, there are now many cultivars that have larger bloom clusters. The white and violet-blue varieties are the most popular. This species of wisteria blooms at an earlier stage of maturity than the other types. Wisterias may be grown as vines, large shrubs or trees. The form they have depends upon selective pruning. Be aware that any wisteria needs a lot of room in which to grow.

Naturalized distribution in Texas:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=WISI

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55392/index.html

A young plant that I gave to my friend last year because I had no place to plant it ...


This message was edited Mar 31, 2007 3:41 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
4:43 AM

Post #3338936

Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis)

A closer view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
4:49 AM

Post #3338937

Chinese Wisteria (Wisteria sinensis)

An even closer look ...
QueenB
Shepherd, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 31, 2007
1:54 PM

Post #3340003

Coral Honeysuckle, Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Caprifoliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, blooms mid-spring to mid-fall; growing on a fenceline near Oakhurst, San Jacinto County, Texas.


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 2, 2007
8:56 PM

Post #3348821

Southern Dewberry (Rubus trivialis), Rosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March - April, edible fruit

Southern dewberry is a very spiny vine that scrambles along the ground, or over and up other vegetation. It occurs natively on sandy soil but has adapted to other situations as well. It is commonly found in abondoned fields and in thickets, on open riverbanks and creekbanks and along railroad tracks and roadsides. Usually it is located in deeper soils of valleys rather than in shallow soils. The blooms are crinkled looking.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53002/index.html

A beautful bloom that had just opened ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 1, 2007
10:50 PM

Post #3453309

Louisiana Vetch, Deer Pea Vetch (Vicia ludoviciana), Papilionaceae Family, native, annual, blooms March to May or so, considered a weed by many

Deer pea vetch is an annual plant which has climbing or sprawling stems from 6 to 36 inches long. The South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau regions are its native habitats. The leaves are pinnately compound having 6 to12 separate leaflets. It has lavenderish-blue flowers which are less than 1/4 inch in length which are followed by 3/4 to1 inch long flat seedpods. It will grow up and over other plants if it has a chance to do so. Deer pea vetch is a nutritious browse for wildlife. It also is useful as a soil builder through nitrogen fixation. The seeds and leaves are a food source for white-tailed deer, cattle, bobwhite quail and Rio Grande turkeys. It dies down in summer heat.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=VILU

For more information and more photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/144595/index.html

The lavender-blue flowers are less than .25 inch in length. These, as seen from the side, are turning their mature color and are quite lovely.

(edited for typos)

This message was edited Apr 26, 2008 4:36 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 1, 2007
10:54 PM

Post #3453319

Louisiana Vetch, Deer Pea Vetch (Vicia ludoviciana)

These blooms that have just opened and have not turned color yet. Note the seed pods in the background.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 1, 2007
10:57 PM

Post #3453327

Louisiana Vetch, Deer Pea Vetch (Vicia ludoviciana)

Its tendrils are actually modified leaves. They are used to cling to other plants, objects and/or to the plant itself.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 1, 2007
11:00 PM

Post #3453356

Louisiana Vetch, Deer Pea Vetch (Vicia ludoviciana)

Shown here clinging to drying native grass for support
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2007
3:07 PM

Post #3492871

htop, or anyone?

Which Wisteria do I have?
Wisteria frutescens or Wisteria sinensis

Thanks,
Emma

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2007
3:49 PM

Post #3492958

Hazel probably knows for sure, but I do know that the flower clusters on the Japanese and Chinese wisterias are longer than the Frutence's. It is hard to tell from your picture.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 13, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #3493068

Emma,

The Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) has large 12 to 18-inch clusters of flowers. The bloom cluster is elongated. It usually flowers as the leaves are developing. Its leaves have 13-19 leaflets and the vine twines clockwise around its supporting structures. The plant twines clockwise around its hosts. Its hairy, brown, narrow at the base seedpods are 10 to15 cm in length. They are constricted between the seeds.

The Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) flowers before the vine begins to leaf-out. Flowers are a bit smaller than those of the Japanese wisteria, ranging from 9 to 12 inches in length. This type tends to bloom at an earlier age and most blooms are open at the same time. The ones here in San Antonio have completed their blooming cycle. Its leaves 7-13 leaflets and the vine twines counter-clockwise around its supporting structures.

Wisteria frutescens is a native wisteria. It can be distinguished from W. floribunda in that it produces flowers from late May or early June. Its leaves are 10 to 30 cm long and have 9 to15 oblong leaflets that are each 2 to 6 cm long. Its about 6 inch long bloom racemes are not scented as are the other 2 types. It has brown seedpods that are 5 to 10 cm long and they are hairless.

So if yours started forming bloom buds when it did not have any leaves forming, it is a Chinese wisteria. I see developed leaves on the vine in your photo. So if it is blooming now, probably it is a Japanese wisteria because I think that American wisteria blooms a bit later.

I hope this helps.

This message was edited May 13, 2007 12:38 PM
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2007
6:12 PM

Post #3493319

Thank you Josephine,

And Hazel, FABULOUS INFORMATION.
Thank you for taking the time for this explanation. Now, I can figure out what I have. I have LOTS of other photos and can study those and the leaves on the vines now. They have already bloomed their first flush, and will now bloom sporadically throughout the summer.

From your great information, Wisteria frutescens, it is NOT, as my vines are highly fragrant and the seed pods do have hair. My guess is that it is the Chinese Wisteria, but I will study my vines first to be sure now that I know what I am looking for. Then again, it could be the Japanese Wisteria. I will also be able to tell by the way they twine.

THANKS AGAIN HAZEL,
Very much appreciated . . .

Emma


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 13, 2007
8:44 PM

Post #3493723

You are quite welcome, Emma. I had difficulty identifying the wisterias in the past and had saved the data about distinguishing between them. I am happy it has been helpful to you. :o)
organic1
DFW Metroplex, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 29, 2007
12:09 AM

Post #3671532

Carolina Jessamine
Gelsemium sempervirens

Evergreen – Sun
Spacing 4’ – 8’

Habitat: Climbing vine needs support from the start. Many yellow flowers in early spring, sometimes in the fall and during warm spells in the winter! It needs well prepared soil, good drainage, moderate water. It will grow in the shade, but it will not bloom well there.

This is not a jasmine. All parts of this plant are poisonous, but not to the touch. Native to East Texas, Florida, and Virginia.

It grows quite well in my yard here in North Central Texas.
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2007
5:58 AM

Post #3678232

htop
I thought I'd see if you might know what this Wisteria is before I posted on the Plant Identification Forum.

This is growing at Texas A&M Research & Extension in Overton in their trial gardens. The vine was given to them and they haven't tried to figure out what it is yet.
I don't know what color the blooms are, but I can make a phone call to find out.

I thought it might be Millettia reticulata, but the seeds look nothing like Millettia reticulata seeds. In fact, they also do not look like Wisteria Seeds. They are a BEAN-LIKE SEED, and not at all flat and round like the Wisteria Seeds.
I have some that I can take a photo of tomorrow if you need to see the seeds.

Thanks for any help you might have.
Emma

EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2007
6:00 AM

Post #3678233

Another photo
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2007
6:01 AM

Post #3678234

One More of leaves
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2007
6:09 AM

Post #3678238

Same vine taken last feb
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2007
6:10 AM

Post #3678239

Last one
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
9:33 AM

Post #4866097

EmmaGrace, I am sorry to report that I have not been able to ID this vine. Maybe it is blooming now. A photo of the blooms would help.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:01 AM

Post #4866103

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata), Acanthaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms late spring through early fall with the most blooms in cooler weather, self-seeds prolifically

Texas distribution as a naturalized plant:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=THAL3

I attached black bird netting (black, little squares) all around the bottom part and 6 feet up the trunk of an oak tree by "hooking" it on the bark. The vines have been growing up it each year and the netting is almost unnoticeable. Although some of the leaves were damaged in some areas, the vines are still blooming after many nights of freezing weather. The ones growing along the ground at the base of a privacy fence have no freeze damage at all and are blooming like crazy. Nothing can compare in beauty to the cheerful blooms against deep green foliage and its rapid growth rate. I

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/248/

Vine as observed at the Kula Botanical Garden in Maui, Hawaii ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:03 AM

Post #4866104

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

Vine as observed at the Kula Botanical Garden in Maui, Hawaii ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:07 AM

Post #4866105

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

Bloom of the the yellow type called lemon black-eyed Susan ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:09 AM

Post #4866109

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

Bloom bud of the orange blooming type ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:12 AM

Post #4866118

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

Leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
10:14 AM

Post #4866120

Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata)

The seed leaves (cotyledons) with a blurred image of the first true leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 22, 2008
8:05 PM

Post #4989250

Roving Sailor, Twining Snapdragon, Snapdragon Vine, Violet Twining Snapdragon (Maurandella antirrhiniflora), Scrophulariaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, blooms March through September

(Described in the July 20, 2005 post above)

Two cultivated Roving Sailor (Maurandella antirrhiniflora) vines grown from seed in containers growing on a triangular shelving unit turned on end; on top, a small satellite dish serves as a bird bath; and a jar serves as a squirrel watering station. The rim of a large satellite dish (on a tall stand) can be seen above the bird bath and serves as a bird feeder. It is about These vines are are 2 years old. They did not freeze back this winter and have really taken off. I just hope the 2 whistling ducks that come into the yard to eat in the bird feeder and then drink in the bird bath twice a day don't eat the tops. One was nibbling on them today. I wish I could command the big old dog to stop knocking over the edger and stop relieving himself on the vines. That's not rain on the edging, folks! :o)
ambersas
Mount Vernon, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 21, 2011
4:05 PM

Post #8511861

I was wandering in our woods this afternoon and came across this vine. Can you identify it for me. The leaves are large, widely spaced on the vine, opposite, heart shaped.
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

April 21, 2011
5:53 PM

Post #8512137

This is a poor guess but it could it be star milkweed?
newtonsthirdlaw
Arlington, TX

April 21, 2011
5:57 PM

Post #8512145

This is what I thought it was, but definatly not.
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/species.php?id_plant=FUCR
ambersas
Mount Vernon, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 21, 2011
7:28 PM

Post #8512400

I thought of the milkweed also, but the leaves are all wrong. This is picture of the leaves and the file cluster with my hand to also show size relationship.

It is growing in the woods, so dappled sun at best, under mostly tall post oaks and loblolly pines and no water other than the little rain that we've had this year.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 21, 2011
8:33 PM

Post #8512546

Well, that sure is pretty, but I have never seen it before.
ambersas
Mount Vernon, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 22, 2011
5:30 AM

Post #8512972

Finally got it! Belinda McLaughlin (NPSOT) identified it for me. It is called milkvine and it is in the milkweed family. matelea gonocarpos. Angelpod or angularfruit milkvine. I have about 8 books on Texas plants, mostly about natives, and even knowing the name, I couldn't find it listed.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 22, 2011
5:55 AM

Post #8513018

Wonderful, see if you can collect some seeds, I wonder if the monarchs go for it, if they do, it would be great, here is a link ;
http://wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=25744
Josephine.
EmmaGrace
Jacksonville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2011
5:06 AM

Post #8559727

Pretty sure this is
Matelea decipiens
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/61927/

ambersas - I would LOVE to have seeds too. I have been looking for seeds/plant forever. As I understand, it is also a Perennial and you could very well have luck with rooting cuttings

Just let me know what you would like in exchange.

Wow, I just love this vine.
Emma

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