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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:03 PM

Post #1626114

( Native Shrub ) Texas Mountain Laurel, ( Sophora secundiflora ) Beautiful evergreen
slow growing shrub.
The gorgeous purple flowers hav the scent of gape cool-aid and give a heady aroma to your yard.
Very highly recommended. See the plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55062/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:09 PM

Post #1626130

Texas Mountain Laurel, four years old. First time to Bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
9:15 PM

Post #1626258

Acerola, Barbados Cherry, Wild Crapemyrtle (Malpighia glabra), Malpighiaceae Family, native to Texas and the Virgin Islands, blooms mid-spring to early summer, may be considered a large shrub or small tree

It has beautiful small flowers in clusters that are followed by red berries which are edible and jave a high nutrient value. Birds love the berries.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57614/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
9:18 PM

Post #1626265

Acerola, Barbados Cherry, Wild Crapemyrtle (Malpighia glabra)

A closer view of the blooms which are small and very delicate looking, but make an impact because they are in groups and quite numerous.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:01 PM

Post #1626349

Fragrant Mist Flower, White Mistflower, Shrubby Boneset, White Boneset, Thoroughwort, Barba de Viejo (Eupatorium havanense), Asteraceae Family, endemic Texas native, blooms late summer until first frost

I have found that it will not take full preferring AM sun/PM shade or light filtered shade. It has small white bloom clusters that resemble the West Texas Mistflower.

For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64856/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:02 PM

Post #1626350

Fragrant Mist Flower, White Mistflower, Shrubby Boneset, White Boneset, Thoroughwort, Barba de Viejo (Eupatorium havanense)

A closer view of the blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:47 PM

Post #1626416

Giant Ragweed, Great Ragweed, Palmate Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida - may be Texas Giant Ragweed, Ambrosia trifida var. texana; but, I am not sure), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, subshrub, blooms in mid-summer through early fall, bloom is green, invasive, considered a weed by many

For more photos and more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32069/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:49 PM

Post #1626421

Giant Ragweed, Great Ragweed, Palmate Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida - may be Texas Giant Ragweed, Ambrosia trifida var. texana; but, I am not sure)

The leaves are very large.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:51 PM

Post #1626424

Giant Ragweed, Great Ragweed, Palmate Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida - may be Texas Giant Ragweed, Ambrosia trifida var. texana; but, I am not sure)


Growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
10:54 PM

Post #1626430

Giant Ragweed, Great Ragweed, Palmate Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida - may be Texas Giant Ragweed, Ambrosia trifida var. texana; but, I am not sure)

A closer view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:37 PM

Post #1627573

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring through mid-summer, berries

A truly outstanding large shrub; needs a lot of space.
For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2657/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 9:38 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
2:41 PM

Post #1627583

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

Some berry groups are shown against my hand to indicate the size of the clusters.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
4:28 PM

Post #1627786

Smooth Sumac (Rhus glabra), Anacardiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, deciduous, good fall color, blooms in mid-summer


It is a large shrub or can be a small tree to about 15 feet.

For more information and photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62278/index.html



This message was edited Jul 18, 2005 3:42 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
5:06 PM

Post #1636654

Evergreen Sumac, Tobacco Sumac, Lentisco (Rhus virens), Anacardiaceae Family, Texas native, semi-evergreen (leaves turn and drop and are replaced within a week in winter), blooms late summer and early fall, drupes, fast growing

Common throughout the Hill Country and usually found on rocky slopes, this attractive tree or large shrub is evergreen except in the coldest winters (below 5 degrees). It can attain a height of up to 12 feet tall (3.6 m) and a width of 15 feet. Sometimes it can be found in a tree form (up to 15') as seen at Wild Basin Wilderness Preserve near Austin. It has a moderate growth rate. The leathery, shiny dark green leaves are paler colored on their undersides.

The ripe red fruit are a favorite of songbirds and this is important to other wildlife as well. It is not deer resistant; deer love the young plants.Native Americans collected the fruits to use in making a refreshing drink.

It can be killed by overwatering so the soil in which it is planted needs to be well drained. With its dark grren leaves, blooms and red fruit, the Carolina buckthorn makes an attractive specimen, hedge, or background plant. It is generally insect and disease-free, and drought-tolerant and should be planted more often in the landscape.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1636657

Evergreen Sumac, Tobacco Sumac, Lentisco (Rhus virens)

A closeup of the blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
5:09 PM

Post #1636663

Evergreen Sumac, Tobacco Sumac, Lentisco (Rhus virens)

The bark ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
8:03 PM

Post #1639386

Native Texas plant, Truk's Cap, Wax Mallow,( Malvaviscus drummondii ) Lovely shrub 4 to 6 feet tall, evergreen untill freeze, dies to the ground in zone 8 comes back in the spring. Full sun, part shade to shade. The lovely red flowers never quite open, and hummingbirds love to eat from them. Close up of the flower.
See the plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56887/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
8:04 PM

Post #1639388

A large plant in bloom,

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2005
8:05 PM

Post #1639393

A Turk's Cap seedling 4 weeks old.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 22, 2005
12:29 PM

Post #1641533

Pyramid Bush, Wooly Pyramid Bush, Tea Bush, Malva Rosa, Raichie, (Melochia tomentosa), Sterculiaceae Family, Texas native, subshrub, perennial, blooms in late spring through mid-fall

This small erect shrub is a member of the Chocolate Family, It grows natively in southern Florida and southern Texas through the West Indies and Central America into Brazil and Colombia. In Texas, the species can be found on sandy or rocky soil in dry streambeds, mesquite thickets and palm groves. It inhabits pinelands in southern Florida. It adapts to a wide variety of well-drained soils that are derived from igneous and sedimentary rocks. It is an excellent xeriscape plant that grows quickly and provides lots of color in the heat of the summer.

The ovate to lanciolate, 1.5 to 10.5 cm long by 0.9 to 8.5 cm wide leaves are covered with a short wooly hair giving the plant a gray flannel look and are attached by short petioles. They have serrated margins. The 8 to 13.5 mm long, 5-petaled blooms are a beautiful bright, violet to violet-pink. It produces pyramidal capsules that are 6 to 9 mm across and which contain reddish brown, 2 mm long seeds.

In a natural habitat, it contributes to wildlife cover, soil stability and bio-diversity. Sheep and goats tend to munch it when it is growing with other native plants they like, but cattle tend to leave it alone. Bees and butterflies love the blooms’ nectar. A tea can be made from the foliage to treat colds and as an eye wash.

The pyramid bush makes an excellent border plant in areas that do not receive very much water. It is a great choice for rock gardens and wildscapes. With its lovely blooms that are ever present until the first frost, unusual and full foliage and compact size, pyramid bush as a great plant to use in the landscape. It is difficult to find specimens in nurseries. I love mine so much, I am going to buy another one if and when I am able to locate one

For more comments and information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/73674/live_view/


This message was edited Jul 23, 2005 1:58 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:00 AM

Post #1645276

Devil's Shoestring, Ribbon Grass, Lindheimer's Nolina, Lindheimer’s beargrass (Nolina lindheimeria), Liliaceae Family, Endemic Texas native, perennial, blooms mid-spring to early summer

Devil's shoestring is an evergreen endemic Texas native and is endemic to the Edward's Plateau region. Devil's shoestring adapts to a wide variety of soil types, but is at home in the limestone based alkaline Hill Country soils as long as the site has excellent drainage. The plant whose photo is posted here was destroyed a few days after I photograhed it as the road was being widened. I wish I had known this was going to happen because I would have dug it up and tried to plant it in my yard. It is difficult to transplant because it is difficult to not injure the taproot as it is being dug up.

Considered a small shrub, devil's shoestring would be an excellent choice as an accent plant or groundcover for areas with dry well drained soil and could be used as a groundcover in partial shade instead of invasive vinca. Mix it in with blackfoot daisy or xemenia for summer color. Watering should be unnecessary after the plant is established.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68395/live_view/
For more photograhs, see this site:
http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/mbierner/bio406d/images/pics/nol/nolina_lindheimeriana.htm
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:02 AM

Post #1645281

Devil's Shoestring, Ribbon Grass, Lindheimer's Nolina, Lindheimer’s beargrass (Nolina lindheimeria)

A leaf blade which is very finely toothed ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:03 AM

Post #1645288

Devil's Shoestring, Ribbon Grass, Lindheimer's Nolina, Lindheimer’s beargrass (Nolina lindheimeria)

A view of the thin unripe fruit borne on a stout stem that rises 3 or more feet above the mound ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
2:05 AM

Post #1645293

Devil's Shoestring, Ribbon Grass, Lindheimer's Nolina, Lindheimer’s beargrass (Nolina lindheimeria)

The small fruit turn a lovely shade of maroon. They keep the color when dried.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:19 AM

Post #1645420

Golden Daleais (Dalea aurea), Texas native, perennial, blooms rom late May to July

An upright, woody, taprooted plant, it is a legume which is found on the sandy or limestone soils of open prairies and pastures. In Texas, it is foind in the Edwards Plateau and South Texas Plains regions. It is about 12-30 inches in height. It is single-stemmed or sometimes branched above. The blooms may be golden-yellow or pale yellow. The individual flowers are about 3/8 to 1/2 inch long. They form a circle around the flower spike.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68331/live_view/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:21 AM

Post #1645424

Golden Daleais (Dalea aurea), Texas native, perennial, blooms rom late May to July

It has sparse foliage ... the leaves are about 3/4 to two inches long with about five leaflets.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
12:54 PM

Post #1645889

Beaked Yucca, Big Bend yucca, Soyate, Palmita (Yucca rostrata), Texas native which is listed as endemic by some references, but it grows in Mexico too, perennial, blooms in may through August

Beaked yucca is a native plant that naturally inhabits only western Texas and northern Mexico in the states of Chihuahua and Coahuila. Beaked yucca, is usually found growing on rocky bajadas, ridges or slopes that are comprised of limestone gravel. It grows much faster in alkaline soils.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/45486/

The beaked yuccas are the two large specimens in the center of the photo. They are groring at the Sunken Gardens in San Antonio.


This message was edited Jul 24, 2005 7:59 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
1:10 PM

Post #1645919

Banana Yucca, Fleshy-Fruited Yucca, Datil Yucca, Banana Spanish Dagger (Yucca baccata var. baccata), Agavaceae Family, perennial, blooms mid-spring to early summer

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68225/index.html

The cream colored flowes are sometimes striped in purple. (Shown in April)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
7:46 PM

Post #1646737

Whitebrush, White-Brush, Beebrush, Jazminillo, Chaparro Blanco, Privet Lippia, Tronsco, Cedron (Aloysia gratissima), Verbenaceae Family, perennial, blooms sporadically March through November (especially after rains)

It can be found occurring on limestone bluffs, sandy soil and gravelly hillsides. It tolerates poorly drained soils and is drought tolerant. The blooms have a vanilla scent which attracts butterflies and bees.

For further information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/67283/index.html

Just starting to bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
7:48 PM

Post #1646739

Whitebrush, White-Brush, Beebrush, Jazminillo, Chaparro Blanco, Privet Lippia, Tronsco, Cedron (Aloysia gratissima)

Tiny white flowers appear on loose, 1 to 3 inches spikes from spring until fall.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
7:50 PM

Post #1646742

Whitebrush, White-Brush, Beebrush, Jazminillo, Chaparro Blanco, Privet Lippia, Tronsco, Cedron (Aloysia gratissima)

A closer view of the blooms for identification purposes ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
3:04 PM

Post #1648313

Prickly-Mallow, Prickly Fanpetals (Sida spinosa), Malvaceae Family, Texas native, annual/perennial, subshrub, shrub, forb/herb, blooms May to October

It inhabits croplands, abandoned fields, cultivated fields, pastures, gardens, empty lots, grassy areas along railroads and roadsides and waste areas with recently disturbed soil. It has a shallow taproot that divides into secondary roots and spreads by reseeding itself occasionally forming colonies. Although this plant is considered to be a weed by many, it is valuable to wildlife. The blooms attract various bees, including bumblebees, little carpenter bees and halictid bees, as well as small to medium-sized butterflies and skippers. Among them are the clouded sulfur, little yellow, cabbage white, checkered white and common checkered skipper. The foliage may be eaten occasionally by mammalian herbivores. Prickly Sida is a rather unique plant. At first glance, it does not closely resemble other Mallows which are either tall wetland species, small weedy vines, with large blooms or plants that have purple or pink blooms.

For further information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62753/live_view/

This message was edited Jul 25, 2005 10:05 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
3:08 PM

Post #1648322

Prickly-Mallow, Prickly Fanpetals (Sida spinosa)

This Texas wildflower has small delicate blooms with an apricot to orangish color as shown here; but, it may be a pale yellow or pale goldish-yellow also.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 25, 2005
3:10 PM

Post #1648328

Prickly-Mallow, Prickly Fanpetals (Sida spinosa)

A bloom bud ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2005
7:50 PM

Post #1648914

( Native ) Rock Rose, ( Pavonia lasiopetala ) Small perennial shrub with gray green leaves and lovely little hibiscus type flowers in a bright shade of pink.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57756/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 25, 2005
8:36 PM

Post #1649022

( Native ) Flame Anisacanthus, ( Anisacanthus quadrifidus var. wrightii )
Lovely perennial shrub with beautiful bright red-orange tube flowers.
Terrific hummingbird attractor, blooms till frost.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60921/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 26, 2005
12:55 PM

Post #1650497

Flame Anisacanthus, (Anisacanthus quadrifidus var. wrightii)

A diffferent view of the blooms, leaves and seeds just beginning to form ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:03 AM

Post #1652842

American Elder, Common Elderberry (Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis), Caprifoliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in late spring through early summer

Elderberry is a large shrub or small tree often with multiple stems that are spreading or arching. Every part of this plant can be used to sustain human life either as food or as natural medicines. It is considered a sacred plant by many Native American tribes. It is great for naturalizing an area and helps sustain the wildlife population. Watch out though, it spreads by runners which can travel quite a distance.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/36371/

A young elderberry plant emergng from an underground runner attached to the mother plant that is 6 feet away
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:06 AM

Post #1652844

American Elder, Common Elderberry (Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis)

The blooms in very large clusters ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
12:35 PM

Post #1652958

Sunshine Mimosa, Powderpuff, Sensitive Plant, Verguenza, Herbaceous Mimosa (Mimosa strigillosa); Mimosaceae Family; Texas native; perennial; listed as a subshrub, shrub, forb/herb, but is not tall and is more of a groundcover; blooms in early spring through fall

Distribution in Texas: http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=1,2,3,4,6&name=%3Ci%3EMimosa+strigillosa%3C/i%3E+T.+&+G.

Usually growing 3 to 4 inches tall, this native plant is a legume that fixes nitrogen in addition to functioning as a fast growing, mat-forming, evergreen groundcover and can even be substituted for lawn grass. It is found in many counties along the Texas Gulf Coast. Although most specimens do not have prickles there are variations between the members in the upper Gulf Coast region and members in the Rio Grande valley. Specimens collected in the valley frequently have woody stem bases and have a few prickles.

It serves as a larval food source for the Little Sulphur, White-striped Longtail Skipper, Mimosa Yellow and Reakirt's Blue butterfly caterpillars. The foliage is browsed by white-tailed deer and cattle.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1873/index.html

The bristles along the stems are not prickly to the touch. A view of the flower buds ...

This message was edited Jul 27, 2005 7:36 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:23 PM

Post #1653653

( Native ) American Elderberry, ( Sambucus canadensis ) Perspective of the full shrub. See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/76493/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:43 PM

Post #1653710

( Native ) Illinois Bundleflower, ( Desmanthus illinoensis ) Bloom period
Jume-September, bushy perennial up to 3 feet high, lovely little puff balls followed by the very interesting seed pod, lovely fine foliage.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/78537/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:45 PM

Post #1653716

A close up of the foliage.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:53 PM

Post #1653743

The very interesting seed pod from which it gets the name Bundleflower and
Twistpod.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
10:26 PM

Post #1654263

( Native ) Rattle Bush, ( Sesbania drummondii ) Lovely perennial shrub, with very pretty flowers, the seed pods rattle when dry, hence the name.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77138/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
12:29 PM

Post #1655422

Another photo of Illinois Bundleflower, (Desmanthus illinoensis)

The seeds are well liked by gamebirds, including the ring-necked pheasant, bobwhite, and greater prairie chicken. Mammalian herbivores munch on the leaves and eat the seedpods which have a high protein content. Often it is planted in pastures to feed cattle and other livestock. It is classed as is an important native legume and it produces abundant, nutritious hay.

Although some consider the blooms not showy enough to include in a cultivated garden and only recommend that they be included in native and naturalistic plantings, I find them quite attracive. Robert and Subin, the owners of the plant I photograhed, eat the green seedpods raw in salads or just by themselves because of their nutritional value. I have not tried them myself, so I do not know how they taste. Their plant is a little over 6 feet tall as have been other specimens I have observed in their natural habitat.

Robert's and Subin's plant next to a 6 foot tall privacy fence ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
12:35 PM

Post #1655427

Another photo of Illinois Bundleflower, (Desmanthus illinoensis)

The white, creamy or greenish flowers are very small with protruding stamens. The numerous flowers are tightly packed in a 1/2 - 1 inch wide lumpy ball-like cluster. What makes the plant so interesting looking is that there are green flower buds, white flower heads, brownish spent flower heads and seedpods occuring on the plant all at the same time.
txgrdngeek
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2005
1:18 PM

Post #1655482

This is the first time that I have checked out this thread. What caught my eye was the picture of the Texas Mountain Laurel...That’s my favorite...so much so that my youngest daughter is named Laurel.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
2:48 PM

Post #1655723

txgrdgeek, so glad you stopped by ... Here are some more photos of the Texas Mountain Laurel ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
2:51 PM

Post #1655729

Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora)

The Texas mountain laurel is a wonderful addition to the landscape. The blue and yellow pansies are the perfect combination planting. I wish it bloomed all year. Shown in March.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
2:59 PM

Post #1655752

Texas Mountain Laurel (Sophora secundiflora)

Fresh seedpods that are a light green color add interest to the tree. They turn a grayish color and persist on the tree for quite sometime adding ornamental value. The seeds (mescal beans) are poisonous. Fresh seedpods shown in June.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 28, 2005
3:09 PM

Post #1655778

Small-Leaved Sumac, Littleleaf Sumac (Rhus microphylla), Anacardiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, deciduous, blooms in early spring

it inhabits the western three quarters of the state including the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau being found in dry uplands, river-banks, gravelly mesas, canyons and rocky hillsides. The plant is adaptable to various soil types that has good drainage. It is valuable to wildlife. The leaves are browsed by white-tailed deer and small mammals. Cattle also browse the leaves. Quail, turkey and other birds eat the fruit. Several bird species eat the seeds. Its canopy is used for cover by small wildlife. It is used as a landscape plant as well.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62280/index.html

From May to July, the round, 1/4 inch, pea-sized, green ripening to orange-red to reddish brown, tangy lemon flavored fruits are produced. They are covered with red, short, sticky hairs and mature in late summer, but persist through the winter. The fruit can be made into a drink which is called "sumacade" which is tart and sour like lemonade.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
9:45 PM

Post #1656619

( Native ) Yaupon Holly, ( Ilex vomitoria ) Shrub or small tree to 15 feet.
Evergreen, full sun, partial shade, shade. Drought tolerant, red berries in Fall.
See planr files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54622/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
1:50 AM

Post #1657180

Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)

Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria) forming a dense, almost inpenetratable thicket in Gonzales County, Texas ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
1:52 AM

Post #1657186

Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)

This photo provides a view of the Ilex vomitoria as a small tree and a view of the bark. You can see numerous tree trunks in the background because it flourishes in Gonzales County, Texas with new offspring sprouting up almost everywhere mixed in amongst taller oak trees.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
4:15 AM

Post #1657452

Twistleaf Yucca, Twist-leaf Yucca, Twisted-leaf Yucca, Rock Yucca, Texas Yucca (Yucca rupicola), Agavaceae Family, endemic Texas native, evergreen perennial, blooms sometime between May and July

Twist-leaf yucca inhabits the Edwards Plateau region growing primarily in its southeastern area. It can be found growing in rocky limestone hillsides (Rupicola means "lover of rock") as well as grassy flats. Although it prefers alkaline, sandy loam soils, it is adaptable to other soil types as long as they are well drained. It performs best with full exposure to the south. It is the only yucca species with flaccid, twisted leaves which makes it easily identified. It can hybridize with Yucca pallida producing a plant that has gray twisted leaves. In the plant's native environment, its flowers can only be pollinated by the yucca moth. If fruit (a capsule) and seed are needed, hand pollination is necessary which can be accomplished by using a small paint brush. Individual crowns are monocarpic (die after flowering); but, the crown will usually produce sideshoots before it dies

Twist-leaf yucca ia very attractive and is ideal for small spaces where the larger yuccas can not be planted. It is great in rock gardens, wildscapes and raised accent beds. I love this plant and have found many specimens in northwest Bexar County.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/66002/index.html

This specimen is a bit battered after being trampled upon along a hiking trail.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
7:44 AM

Post #1657655

Hoptree, Stinking Ash, Wafer Ash (Ptelea trifoliata), Rutaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms March to July

Classified as a shrub, it sometimes becomes a small tree growing to 18 feet. Except in the extreme southern part, wafer ash is found throughout Texas. It is a larval food for the swallowtail butterfly. The bark and the root have a number of medicinal uses. The fruit was employed as a substitute for hops in beer production. It has been cultivated since 1784. Now there are many varieties; but, it is seldom used as a landscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1710/index.html

This new spring growth eventually turns dark green and becomes glossy by summer. Shown in April.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
7:47 AM

Post #1657656

Hoptree, Stinking Ash, Wafer Ash (Ptelea trifoliata)

The seeds of the Wafer Ash are more ornamental than the blooms. They are wafer thin, round like hops and papery. They hang down in clusters which sway in the wind.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
7:50 AM

Post #1657657

Hoptree, Stinking Ash, Wafer Ash (Ptelea trifoliata)

This photo provides a view of several seedpods from the side to show how thin they are.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
8:35 AM

Post #1657675

Hogplum, Texas Snakewood (Colubrina texensis), Rhamnaceae Family, endemic Texas native, deciduous, blooms in early spring

Texas snakewood is a dense shrub. Its small greenish-yellow blooms are rather strange looking and give the plant a greenish-yellow tone in April and May when seen from a distance.
For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/63576/index.html

The small grasshopper blends in well with the foliage and the blooms.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
8:38 AM

Post #1657677

Hogplum, Texas Snakewood (Colubrina texensis)

This is a view of the small seedpods. The rough looking outside of the dark brown pod cracks to reveal inner tannish colored capsules which hold the smooth, shiny, dark brown (almost black) seeds. One side of the seed is flat. Birds and small animals eat the seeds which are toxic to sheep. The toxin causes swelling in the ears as well as the head, jaudice, and death. Shown in April.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:14 AM

Post #1657708

Woolly Butterfly Bush, Arafrán del Campo, Azafrancillo, Topocan (Buddleja marrubiifolia), Buddlejaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen, blooms late spring through early fall through

Found in the Chihuahuan desert of Texas (southern Big Bend) and northern Mexico ...
This much branching can suffer freeze damage (hardy to 15 degrees F.), but will come back from the roots.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54351/index.html

The wooly butterfly bush's velvety, ash-gray foliage sets sets off the mostly orange marble-sized flowerheads from spring until fall. It attracts butterflies especially in the spring. You can see why the Texas native has "woolly" as part of its name. Shown in April in San Antonio.

This message was edited Jul 29, 2005 5:27 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:29 AM

Post #1657713

Woolly Butterfly Bush, Arafrán del Campo, Azafrancillo, Topocan (Buddleja marrubiifolia)

The flowerheads after the flowers have faded are interesting looking and add a uniqueness to the plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
10:31 AM

Post #1657715

Woolly Butterfly Bush, Arafrán del Campo, Azafrancillo, Topocan (Buddleja marrubiifolia)

A view of the whole plant ... Note the furry gray bloom bud in the lower right corner.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2005
6:23 PM

Post #1660514

( Native ) Mexican Buckeye, ( Ungnadia speciosa ) Large shrub or small tree 8 to 15 feet high, bloom period March to April, blooms very similar to Redbud, appearing before the leaves, three chambered pods with black seeds. Drought tolerant, cold hardy, full sun to partial shade.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53033
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
2:33 PM

Post #1662055

Agarita, Agrito, Algerita (Mahonia trifoliolata), Berberidaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, blooms in mid-spring

This evergreen shrub slowly grows between 3 to 6 feet tall, which can reach 8 feet when growing in favorable conditions. The rigid, spreading branches often form thickets. It has gray-green to blue-gray, trifoliate, holly-like foliage which has needle-sharp tips. Clusters of fragrant, yellow flowers are followed by red berries from May to July. The fruits are eaten by songbirds and quail and small mammals use the plant for cover. It is considered to be a good honey source. It makes a great accent, screen, rock garden, xeriscape or wildscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31559/index.html

The small flowers are along the stems with the buds being wonderful shades of coppery peach. The blooms are unusual. There is a center cup of petals with 6 separated petals that are slightly cupped on the tips surrounding it ... looks like a space station.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
2:35 PM

Post #1662059

Agarita, Agrito, Algerita (Mahonia trifoliolata)

A closer view of the buds and blooms ... the top bloom has 6 petals, but the wind has blown it back.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
6:51 AM

Post #1663515

Chiltepin, Chilipiquin, Chiltecpin (Capsicum annuum var. aviculare), Solanaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms in the spring until the first hard freeze

This pepper plant is a nice addition to any flowerbed with its deep green foliage, small white flowers, deep green immature fruit and bright red mature fruit. It requires little care. I have had one growing in my yard for 20 years. The birds, especially mockingbirds, DO LOVE the fruit (birds have no "hot" taste sensors). If transplanting, but careful to dig up all of the tap root. The plant will wilt until it reestablishes itself. Just keep it well watered until it does.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31752/index.html

Still blooming and producing peppers in December ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:07 AM

Post #1663550

Golden Dew Drop, Sky Flower, Pigeon Berry (Duranta erecta), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, shrub to small tree, perennial, blooms in July through fall

Golden Dewdrop is a fast grower and extremely beautiful. It has a is spreading and sometimes weeping growth habit. In addition to its beautiful blooms, cascades of golden fruit appear in clusters. Grown in full sun, the leaves may droop in very hot weather. It can tolerate morning sun with afternoon shade and very light shade. But, it blooms best in full sun. This plant is attractive to bees, hummingbirds, butterflies and birds.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1320/index.html

Shown in December, there had been several light freezes already. It was still blooming and ddid not exhibit any frost damage.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:07 AM

Post #1663551

Golden Dew Drop, Sky Flower, Pigeon Berry (Duranta erecta), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, shrub to small tree, perennial, blooms in July through fall

Golden Dewdrop is a fast grower and extremely beautiful. It has a is spreading and sometimes weeping growth habit. In addition to its beautiful blooms, cascades of golden fruit appear in clusters. Grown in full sun, the leaves may droop in very hot weather. It can tolerate morning sun with afternoon shade and very light shade. But, it blooms best in full sun. This plant is attractive to bees, hummingbirds, butterflies and birds.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1320/index.html

Shown in December, there had been several light freezes in Zone 8b already. It was still blooming and did not exhibit any frost damage.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:10 AM

Post #1663553

Golden Dew Drop, Sky Flower, Pigeon Berry (Duranta erecta)

Light blue sky flower blooms after a brief shower (December). The blooms are much lighter in color, the fruit are smaller and a lighter golden color than the cultivar "Sweet Memories'.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:31 AM

Post #1663557

Velvet Pod Mimosa, Gatuno, Velvetpod Catclaw (Mimosa dysocarpa var. wrightii), Mimosaceae Family. Texas native, perennial, deciduous, blooms mid-summer through late fall

The velvet pod mimosa is found abundantly in the Chisos and Davis Mountains of the Trans-Pecos area of Texas. The foliage resemble a typical mimosa, but the leaves are much smaller. It has many short branches that produce fragrant, pinkish-purple, cylindrical flower spikes that resemble elongated small bottle brush blooms. Each petal is tipped with white and reflects the light which causes the bloom to look like fiber optics. As the blooms age, they fade to white; thus, the plant has various colors of blooms on it at one time. It will tolerate extreme drought, extreme heat and reflected heat. This is a great plant for a rock garden, xericape or wildscape.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60112/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:34 AM

Post #1663561

Velvet Pod Mimosa, Gatuno, Velvetpod Catclaw (Mimosa dysocarpa var. wrightii)

A photo of the bloom spike close up which does not do the bloom justice. Note the beautiful reddish-brown bark on the branches and the tiny white beads at the tips of the blooms. It was still bloomimg in November.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:54 AM

Post #1663563

Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii), Lamiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms March until the first hard freeze

For hot, dry, sunny areas, it is one of the toughest, most beautiful performers. It is one of the most frequently planted native Texas plants. Hummingbirds love it. This plsnt is an excellent choice for use in a rock garden, xeriscape or wildscape.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1074/index.html

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
8:58 AM

Post #1663564

Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii)

Other autunm sages are available that have different colrs of bloom than this one ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
10:30 AM

Post #1668129

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla), Lamiaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early fall

For more informatio, see its entry in the PlantFiles: http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60119/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
10:32 AM

Post #1668130

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla)

The sepals around the blooms of the Mountain sage (Salvia regla) are a sort of bronze which adds more color when it is in bloom.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 3, 2005
10:34 AM

Post #1668131

Mountain Sage, Red-Sage Salvia (Salvia regla)

A view of the heart-shaped leaves ...

Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

August 9, 2005
2:25 PM

Post #1681128

(Native) Heartleaf Hibiscus, Heartleaf Mallow (Hibiscus cardiophyllus) There is no entry in the database, there is one for Hibiscus martianus, but this is not that one.
Edited because I knew I'd mess up!

This message was edited Aug 9, 2005 9:32 AM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2005
9:38 PM

Post #1681872

( Native ) Illinois Bundleflower, the dried seed pod.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/61021/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 10, 2005
6:50 PM

Post #1683427

Day Jessamine, Willow Jasmine, Wild Jasmine, Hierba Santa, White Day-Blooming Cestrum and White Chocolate Jasmine (Cestrum diurnum), Solanaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen, blooms in summer, fragrant, considered invasive in Florida, poisonous to cattle and horses, fruit are poisonous

In Texas, its natural habitat is in the Edwards Plateau region. It is considered a “serious threat” to natural areas in south Florida and can form dense thickets. It is most commonly found in dry soils, but benefits from even moisture. Although it will take full sun, it grows best in part shade. It is supposed to be hardy to Zone 8. One inch, tubular, white, fragrant blooms appear in clusters in the summer. The bloom petals are bent backwards. The blooms are mildly fragrant and the fragrance intensifies in the late evening and after dark.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2742/index.html

The plant ...Photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com:

This message was edited Aug 10, 2005 1:52 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 10, 2005
6:54 PM

Post #1683433

Day Jessamine, Willow Jasmine, Wild Jasmine, Hierba Santa, White Day-Blooming Cestrum and White Chocolate Jasmine (Cestrum diurnum)

The blooms ... Photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 10, 2005
6:55 PM

Post #1683435

Day Jessamine, Willow Jasmine, Wild Jasmine, Hierba Santa, White Day-Blooming Cestrum and White Chocolate Jasmine (Cestrum diurnum)

The fruit ... Photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com:

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2005
9:06 PM

Post #1685829

( Native ) Dog Fennel, ( Eupatorium capillifolium ) A lovely feathery perennial for the native and xeriscape garden.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54505/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2005
9:07 PM

Post #1685834

A close up of the beautiful foliage.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2005
9:42 PM

Post #1685932

( Native ) Smooth Sumac, ( Rhus glabra ) A lovely hardy shrub that turns gorgeous colors in the Fall.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/76677/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 12, 2005
2:43 PM

Post #1687346

Texas Kidneywood (Eysenhardtia texana), Papilionaceae Family, Texas native (found in northeastern Mexico also), pereenial shrub or small tree, deciduous to semideciduous, blooms April through November (more so after rains)

The aromatic, finely divided (even-pinnate, 8 to 14 elliptical leaflets), grayish green, resinous leaves have a distinctive odor when crushed. From April to November, the small white vanilla-scented flowers appear on 3 to 4 inches long, dense, terminal spikes. The Texas kidneywood's seeds are produced inside seed pods which are somewhat persistent.

It is a relative of kidneywood E. polystacha which was used in remedies for kidney and bladder ailments; thus, its name. Texas kidneywood is a host plant for the Arizona Skipper butterfly (Codatractus arizonensis). Because it requires very little water once established, it is a good choice for xeriscapes, wildscapes and as a backdrop in rock gardens.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58705/index.html

It has delicate foliage and blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
5:26 PM

Post #1749227

Four O'Clock, Marvel of Peru (Mirabilis jalapa), Nyctaginaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, can be invasive

I love these plants and remove the ones that are in areas I don't want them to grow when they are small.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/92/index.html

Cheery yellow blooms appear abundantly despite the August heat ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
5:28 PM

Post #1749231

Four O'Clock, Marvel of Peru (Mirabilis jalapa)

A magenta colored bloom backlit by the setting sun ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
5:31 PM

Post #1749235

Four O'Clock, Marvel of Peru (Mirabilis jalapa)

These red, yellow, magenta and broken colored blooms on different plants which form a huge clump.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
2:13 PM

Post #1750779

White Flowered Bush Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, evergreen, blloms late spring to early fall

The white flowered bush zinnia is also known as desert zinnia, spinyleaf zinnia, dwarf zinnia, wild zinnia and white zinnia. It is deer resistant. In Texas, it can be found in the Trans-Pecos, Southwest Rio Grand Plains and into the Valley regions. Soil pH should be acidic with a pH above 6.8. It has slender woolly stems and needle-like, 1/2" long, narrow, stiff, grayish-green leaves that have sharp tips. The number of bloom petals varies.

It grows 10 to 12 inches tall and to 2 feet in diameter which makes it a great groundcover. Requiring minimum care, the desert zinnia is useful in harsh arid environments. It is very drought tolerant and will survive with no supplemental water, but wll look a bit ragged and has fewer blooms. It will need a little water to grow to its optimum beauty and produce blooms prolifically. An occasional watering with a hose will suffice if it hasn't rained in a while. Soils must be well-drained soils. Itt makes a great xeriscape, rock garden or wildscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53451/index.html

This message was edited Sep 10, 2005 9:15 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:39 PM

Post #1751084

Bush Morning Glory, Morning Glory Tree, Badoh Negro, Borrachero, Matacabra (Ipomoea carnea), Convolvulaceae Family, naturalized, perennial

This plant has an open, some would say sprawling, growth habit, and needs planty of space. Its blooms are in clusters and are very showy. The seedpods which are "hairy" add interest to the plant. It used to be grown widely in San Antonio many years ago, but I have seen only a few plants here in recent years. I have found sites that state that an extract of the leaves causes intoxication and the smoked leaves are a hallucinogen. The seeds are the most potently poisonous of all the Ipomoea species. It is considered invasive in some locales, but I am going to plant a few by my fence in my native plant area. Rest assured that I am not going to brew a tea to become drunk nor smoke the leaves.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/52996/index.html

The bloom on this bush morning glory has a defined darker hued star shape radiating from the center. It was still blooming in December.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
5:41 PM

Post #1751085

Bush Morning Glory, Morning Glory Tree, Badoh Negro, Borrachero, Matacabra (Ipomoea carnea)

The Ipomoea carnaea seedpod resembles a wooden rose when open and contains 3 to 4 furry covered seeds. These clusters of seedpods add to the attractiveness of the plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
5:44 PM

Post #1752723

Lantana (Lantana camara), Verbenaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, shrub/ subshrub

There are many varieties of this plant with all kinds of bloom colors. This is the native lantana that does produce seeds and can be invasive; but, I have never had a problem with them. I love the plant and like its odor; although, some people find it objectionable. Lantanas are one of my best butterfly plants. PLEASE NOTE: ALL PARTS of this plant are POISONOUS if eaten and can be FATAL. This plant causes dermatitis in some individuals (for example: Me!). Be sure to wash your hands (arms and/or other body parts if applicable) after handling.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles (Note: I think that some of the lantanas shown in the photos are hybrids):
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/578/index.html

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
6:05 PM

Post #1752760

Weeping Lantana, Trailing Lantana, Trailing Shrub Verbena (Lantana montevidensis), Verbenaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, shrub/subshrub

This trailing purple blooming lantana is a lower growing type of lantana. It blooms prolifically and takes no care except trimming to the ground if it freezes back. It would maake an excellent addtion to any landscape area that receives full sun, xeriscapes, wildscapes and rock gardens. It especially looks great trailing down rock walls. I have seen it planted right next to chainlink fences which support its branches. Its branches "climb" up the links and it almost looks like a vine. Butterflies love it. It can easily be propagated by stem cuttings and/or simple layering.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2042/index.html

My trailing purple lantana is more delicate looking than the other lantana in my landscape. It has smaller leaves and thinner branches.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
6:55 PM

Post #1752841

Rose Glory Bower, Cashmere Bouquet, Mexicali Rose, Mexican Hydrangea (Clerodendrum bungei), Verbenaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, highly invasive, needs part shade and lots of water in the summer heat, deer resistant, blooms in summer

This plant's blooms are beautiful; but, it can take over your yard very quickly. It sends out underground runners. Mine is growing in a large container and sits upon a stand so that no roots are able to touch the ground. In the hottest part of the summer, I have to water it every other day. My neighbor and I bought specimens at about the same time. I informed him not to plant it in the ground because I had observed it growing in a yard in another neighborhood where it had spread so much, it looked like a cashmere bouquet forest. He did not listen. By the end of the first summer, the whole side of his yard had plants springing up everywhere.

Form ore information and photos of the blooms, etc., see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1253/index.html

Buds just starting to open ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
7:15 PM

Post #1752872

Eastern Baccharis, Groundsel, Sea Myrtle, Consumption Weed, Groundsel-bush, Seepwillow (Baccharis halimifolia), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, large shrub/small tree, called a weed by many

This plant blooms in late summer. The female has white snowy blooms and the male has yellowish blooms. It looks as though it is covered with snow in September and October as the seeds are formed and it becomes a quite attractive "weed".

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/59928/index.html

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
7:19 PM

Post #1752881

Eastern Baccharis, Groundsel, Sea Myrtle, Consumption Weed, Groundsel-bush, Seepwillow (Baccharis halimifolia)

A view of the seeds ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
7:43 PM

Post #1752911

Candle Bush, Empress Candle Plant, Candletree, Candelabra Bush, Ringworm Tree (Senna alata), Caesalpiniaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, large shrub or small tree, blooms mid-summer through early fall

Candle bush has beautiful foliage and blooms. It requires a large space in which to grow, is drought tolerant and is a butterfly catepillar host plant. Bumble bees love the blooms.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/371/index.html

Although the blooms are huge, they look small in the photo because the foliage is so large.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
7:46 PM

Post #1752917

Candle Bush, Empress Candle Plant, Candletree, Candelabra Bush, Ringworm Tree (Senna alata)

You need to give this plant plenty of room to grow.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
3:30 AM

Post #1753714

Scarlet Firethorn (Pyracantha coccinea), Rosaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen, blooms in mid-spring through late spring, thorns

Scarlet firethorn is a great evergreen shrub that can become quite large. I had to remove mine because they became too large for the spots where I had planted them. They are very difficult to remove. The berries provide food for many types of birds in the fall and early winter (most of the berries are eaten by this time).

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1707/index.html

Habit, colors of the berries did not upload well ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
3:32 AM

Post #1753717

Scarlet Firethorn (Pyracantha coccinea)

Berries ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
4:40 AM

Post #1753784

Oleander (Nerium oleander), Apocynaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, evergreen, highly drought tolerant, deer resistant, poisonous and sap can cause skin irritation in some people

The oleander is a very tough plant that takes no care once established. It can become very large. I have to trim my back in the middle of the summer every other year. This causes it to not bloom the rest of the summer because it blooms on the old wood (trimming earlier or later in the year will cause it to not produce any blooms). The leaves can be burned by heavy frost and in severe winters, it can die to the ground in Zone 8b.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1327/index.html


frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 17, 2005
3:48 PM

Post #1765018

Native, Lindheimer Senna, Senna Lindheimerii. A lovely shrub with yellow flowers found at Fort Worth Botanic Gardens.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
10:24 PM

Post #1795708

Prairie Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata), Anacardiaceae Family, deciduous, blooms in mid-summer, fruit in late summer through fall

Cross-referenced in the Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Trees ) thread because it is considered a large shrub or small tree.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/73366/index.html

Photographed in Blanco, Texas.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 6, 2005
7:11 AM

Post #1800231

Chaparral Beargrass, Chaparral Bear Grass, Chaparral Nolina, Beargrass, Bear Grass (Nolina micrantha), Liliaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, evergreen, subshrub/shrub, blooms in summer

Nolina micrantha may be used as a groundcover to decrease erosion on slopes and in cactus and rock gardens as well as xeriscapes and wildscapes. It sends up several beautiful branched infloresences in the summer.

Native range:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=7,10&name=%3Ci%3ENolina+micrantha%3C/i%3E+I.M.+Johnst.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/112980/index.html

A Nolina micrantha surviving a drought ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 16, 2005
6:54 AM

Post #1818884

Chaparral Beargrass, Chaparral Bear Grass, Chaparral Nolina, Beargrass, Bear Grass (Nolina micrantha

OOOPS!! My mistake, this photo is not (Nolina micrantha). It is Nolina texana which is decribed further down in the list.
See Post #3273723


This message was edited Mar 12, 2007 1:18 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 16, 2005
7:26 AM

Post #1818890

Buttonbush, Honey Bells, Honeyball, Button Willow (Cephalanthus occidentalis), Rubiaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, deciduous, large shrub or small tree, blooms in mid-summer, needs regular water to abundant water

This is an upright multiple branching shrub which produces long-stalked, up to 1.5 inches wide, fragrant, sperical-shaped flowerheads that are composed of tiny blooms that have long projecting styles. Butterflies and bees love the flowerheads.

It can be found in wet open areas, river bottomland, stream margins, pond margins, wetland woods, thickets, swamps, shallow standing water and sink-hole ponds. It can be used in woodland areas, wildscapes (needs plenty of water), pond margins, at the edge of ponds, at the edge of water gardens, in low spots or shrub borders.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1515/

The blooms are followed by hard, dark brown, spherical, ball-like fruits composed of multiple tiny nutlets each of which contain 2 seeds. The fruit mature in late summer through fall and persist through the winter.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 16, 2005
7:28 AM

Post #1818892

Buttonbush, Honey Bells, Honeyball, Button Willow (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Fruit at different stages of maturity ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 16, 2005
7:33 AM

Post #1818895

Buttonbush, Honey Bells, Honeyball, Button Willow (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

The bark is thin and smooth on young stems; but, it becomes fissured and scaly with age. Branches ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 29, 2005
2:34 AM

Post #1898272

Bush Morning Glory, Morning Glory Tree, Badoh Negro, Borrachero, Matacabra (Ipomoea carnea), Convolvulaceae Family, naturalized, perennial

I had never seen the white blooming bush morning glory plan until quite a few were planted at the entry way to the San Antonio Botanical Garden this past summer ...
(See information above listed for the pink or pale lavender blooming bush morning glory)

The blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


November 29, 2005
2:36 AM

Post #1898274

Bush Morning Glory, Morning Glory Tree, Badoh Negro, Borrachero, Matacabra (Ipomoea carnea), Convolvulaceae Family, naturalized, perennial

The seed pods (seedpods) ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2006
7:40 PM

Post #2197353

This is a salvia that is also a woody shrub plant. It grows in warmer areas of Texas, including southern areas of the Hill Country. Also known as Mejorana.The light blue flowers are small and you might miss noticing them unless you're close. The foliage and flowers have a pleasant fragrance.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2006
11:20 PM

Post #2310548

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) blooms of pale pink.
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2006
11:23 PM

Post #2310553

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) growth habit in spring before branches fall under the weight of berries. Clearly a very large shrub (up to roof-line, one story house) and very drought tolerant once established.
princessnonie
New Caney, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2006
4:39 PM

Post #2559214

Hercules Club
Zanthoxylum clava-herculis
Huge conical thorns on the trunk
Larval plant food of the Swallowtail butterfly
Often found as an understory tree in creek woodlands
Deciduous
Bloom is yellow green clusters in early spring
This one is in the Pineywoods of South East Texas

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2006
4:45 PM

Post #2559237

Great picture, did you put in the plant files also?
princessnonie
New Caney, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2006
4:49 PM

Post #2559259


Thanks,

Not yet, but I will..
princessnonie
New Caney, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2006
6:21 PM

Post #2559602

Drupe on Arrowwood Viburnam
Viburnnum dentatum
SweetOnion
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 31, 2006
7:00 PM

Post #2571297

This year, I have noticed 2 yaupon holly trees with huge berries - larger than a cherry. The berries are not clustered, but hang on the plants like Christmas ornaments. One neighbor has been feeding them to the deer. I have never seen berries this large in my 20+ years of observing yaupons. Am I seeing something new, or do I need new glasses?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 31, 2006
7:55 PM

Post #2571499

Tha is indeed unusual, I have never seen that either, could be a new variety?
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
3:22 PM

Post #2810217

Lindheimer Senna, Velvetleaf cassia (Senna Lindheimerii), Caesalpiniaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late May through October, poisonous to animals

The one with bright yellow blooms ...

Velvetleaf senna is found mostly in the Edwards Plateau, South Plains west through the Trans-Pecos and to Arizona and south into Mexico. It is common in shallow limestone, sandy, sandy loam soils on hillsides and rocky ravines. Dry, rocky soils. It does best in exceptionally well-drained alkaline soils.

Velvetleaf senna is an erect, perennial that has one to several velvety stems arising from a deep, woody root. The up to 6 in. (15 cm) long, pinnately compound soft leaves have four to eight pairs of leaflets, Each leaflet is 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.0 cm) long and are rounded or oblong. They are covered with fine, velvety hairs (especially the undersides) that are soft and silvery. The leaf color varies by native region with western populations being greener and eastern ones more silver. About 1-1.25 inches across, bright yellow to yellow-orange flowers (5 to more than 20) are held in short racemes near the tips of the stems. The seeds are formed in elongated pods. Pinch back the tips to make the plant fuller and blooming more profuse if desired.

Seeds provide an important source of food for birds. It is a butterfly nectar source and a larval host for the Sleepy Orange and other Sulphur butterflies. Although drought tolerant, In the desert regions, it needs to be watered two or three times a month in the summer to do its best flowering and to keep the plants in good condition. In its native regions or in milder areas this species needs only intermittent watering during a drought. Plants freeze to the ground at 20°F (−7°C) but recover quickly Plant velvetleaf senna makes a great specimen plant and looks great as an accent in rock gardens. xeriscapes and wildscapes.

It is known to be a strong laxative when the leaves are brewed into a tea. It can also be toxic if eaten by livestock. Velvetleaf senna is very unpalatable and is consumed only during severe drought and other unusual circumstances. The chemicals responsible for the toxicity are not known. The symptoms are diarrhea, dark urine and weakness. Most animals that are poisoned by Lindheimer Senna do not recover.

A flower which may have a more orange-yelow color then this type ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
3:31 PM

Post #2810244

Lindheimer Senna, Velvetleaf cassia (Senna Lindheimerii)

The one to two inches long and 3/8 to 3/4 inches wide velvety leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
3:33 PM

Post #2810248

Lindheimer Senna, Velvetleaf cassia (Senna Lindheimerii)

The seed pods (seedpods) form here after the flower has been pollinated.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
8:20 AM

Post #2966776

Roosevelt Weed, New Deal Weed, Jara Dulce, Poverty Weed (Baccharis neglecta), Asteraceae Family, native, deciduous, blooms late summer through November, invasive

Poverty weed is a tall shrub with many willow-like branches which can be found growing in the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau regions in Texas.on prairies, plains, meadows, pastures, savannahs and disturbed areas. It grows in various soil types including sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, granitic and calcareous; howeverr, it prefers calcareous soils The elliptic, narrow leaves are approximately 1- 2 1/2 inches long. They can have a smooth or jagged margins. In the late summer, it starts to bloom and looks beautiful blowing in the winfd with the sunlight illuminating the flowers and later the seeds. Male and female flowers are on different plants. The white cotton-like pappus of theseeds is very conspicuous in the fall and is distributed by wind

Its common names purportedly are derived from the fact that after the great Dust Bowl, it was planted as a cheap, fast and easy way to revjuvinate the severly damaged soil. However, the qualities that mafe it desirable then, have made it a real problem now. Both B. neglecta and B. halimifolia (listed above) have become a pian in the neck in rangelands and disturbed areas. It spread fast and overtakes forage plants with its deep roots using up a large amount of water. It is very difficult to eradicate because livestock do not feed upon it as well as it prolifically produces seeds. However, it is a good nectar plant for many pollinators including some butterflies.

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=BANE2

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1747/index.html

Female flowers ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
8:22 AM

Post #2966777

Roosevelt Weed, New Deal Weed, Jara Dulce, Poverty Weed (Baccharis neglecta), Asteraceae Family, native, deciduous, blooms late summer through November, invasive

Male flowers which do not produce fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
8:28 AM

Post #2966779

Roosevelt Weed, New Deal Weed, Jara Dulce, Poverty Weed (Baccharis neglecta)

Female branch ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
8:31 AM

Post #2966780

Roosevelt Weed, New Deal Weed, Jara Dulce, Poverty Weed (Baccharis neglecta)

Male branch ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
12:53 PM

Post #2967082

Wright's False Mallow, Big Flower False Mallow, Golden False Mallow (Malvastrum aurantiacum), Malvaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, shrub, subshrub, blooms March through August

Wright's false mallow can be found growing natively in Central and South Texas in pastures, along creeks and river floodplains. I can find very little information about this plant. It is a host plant for the tropical checkered skipper (Pyrgus oileus) butterfly.

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=MAAU

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/116622/live_view/

A bloom just about ready to fully open ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2007
10:10 AM

Post #3183959

Fairy Duster, False-Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra (Calliandra conferta), Mimosaceae Family, endemic Texas native, perennial, shrub, subshrub, groundcover, blooms March through early summer and sporadically in the fall, can be invasive

Fairy Duster, False-Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra (Calliandra conferta) is an endemic Texas native plant that is hardy to 15 degrees F. It frequently grows natively in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau regions in.caliche and limestone as well as less frequently in other areas. It resembles mimosa sp., but it does not have thorns. Usually, it is three to twelve inches in height with a width of between 1 and 3 feet; but, it sometimes grows as tall as 3 feet. An airy looking groundcover, it provides erosion control. The blooms are white to cream or sometimes pink-toned with white stamens. It produces blooms from March to May. This plant is often browsed by cattle and white-tailed deer and hummingbirds are attracted to the blooms. It is a great plant for xeriscapes and wildscapes.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113126/index.html

Not fully opened blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2007
10:14 AM

Post #3183961

Fairy Duster, False-Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra (Calliandra conferta)

A view of the foliage and seed pods:
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 13, 2007
10:15 AM

Post #3183963

Fairy Duster, False-Mesquite, False Mesquite Calliandra (Calliandra conferta)

Another view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2007
6:00 PM

Post #3273723

Texas Bear Grass, Bunch Grass, Devil's Shoestring, Sacahuista (Nolina texana), Liliaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, subshrub/shrub, blooms March through July

Texas sacahuista natively occurs in the rocky soils of various habitats including hills, brushy areas and grasslands from Central Texas (very abuindant in the Edwards Plateau Region) to the upper Rio Grande Plains to most of the Trans-Pecos Region and into northern Mexico. It is adaptable to a variety of soils including rocky, limestone-based, sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay, and caliche. It has numerous 2 to 5 foot long thin leaves which when young are arching, but with age, form a weeping mound The foliage is smooth or only slightly rough and has widely spaced teeth on the margins. The leaves are 0.08 - 0.16 in. (2-4mm) wide which gives it a grassy appearance. With adequate moisture, one or more flowering rather short, 12 to 24 inches long, stems appear. They have large panicles of creamy white to greenish flowers which are sometimes tinged with lavender. They are nestled among the leaves unlike some other species of Nolina blooms. Nolinas are polygamo-dioecious: which means that they usually have male and female flowers on separate plants; however, each plant also has a few perfect flowers (male and female flower parts on one flower). To propagate, remove individual offshoots from mature plants in winter. Collect seeds when the capsule begins to dry and spread the seeds in thin layer. Dry at room temperature. Seeds should be planted in a cold frame or greenhouse in late January (cool weather). The seedlings do best if transplanted into 4 to 6 inch pots and given light shade the first season. The seeds may be stored in sealed, refrigerated containers up to one year.

Texas sacahuista is suitable for use on dry slopes, to accent limestone boulders, in rock gardens and wildscapes or in lightly shaded spots in wooded areas. Being evergreen, it adds winter interest. Native Americans used the leaves or the fibers from the leaves for weaving baskets and mats. It attracts hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. It is a larval host for the Atea hairstreak Sandia hairstreak, Atea hairstreak and Sandia hairstreak butterflies. While the leaves are safe, the bloom buds, blooms and fruit (which are roundish) are toxic to sheep, goats and cattle. The toxin, capsicum annuum, can be an irritant to some people. It is deer resistant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/112114/index.html

A view of the growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2007
6:01 PM

Post #3273733

Texas Bear Grass, Bunch Grass, Devil's Shoestring, Sacahuista (Nolina texana)

A closer view of the leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
10:13 PM

Post #3341522

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

(See its information on a post above)

Just wanted to add photos of the bloom clusters ... My relative who lives near Seguin, killed all of his American beautyberry plants because he had just moved to his acreage and did not know what they were. They bloom now and the blooms are very small.

The bloom clusters appear at the base of the leaf axils. This photo shows bloom buds forming and no open blooms.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
10:15 PM

Post #3341525

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

Bloom bud clusters ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 31, 2007
10:17 PM

Post #3341531

American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

The very small blooms ...
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2007
4:03 PM

Post #3621962

Bush Croton, Croton fruticulosus, is a small native deciduous shrub growing up to 3 feet tall. Found growing in the Hill Country areas to West Texas and a few other western states. Leaves are light to medium green, aromatic if crushed, slightly fuzzy. The blooms occur from spring to fall, not very showy, whitish to cream-colored or very pale yellow. The seed capsule is 3-lobed, as many of the Euphorbiaceae family tend to be. I have sometimes seen fall color of very appealing oranges and yellows. The native crotons are not well known and seldom grown in home landscapes. But I have often admired this plant and think it is worthy of growing in yards. It is a host plant for butterflies. I acquired mine last month from a sale by the S. A. chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas. Lucky me! And already I have discovered caterpillars which appear to be some kind of leafwing, probably either the Goatweed or Tropical Leafwing. Hopefully I'll know which when they get bigger, as they are now pretty small.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #3622010

Excellent Linda, Please keep us informed.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
2:34 AM

Post #4648931

Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus), Malvaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, evergreen in areas with no freezes (dies to ground and returns in spring in colder zones), blooms mid-summer through fall

County distribution;
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=MAAR14

Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus) is a spreading shrub that grows to about 2 to 3 m high and 2 to 3 m wide (average size 8 feet by 8 feet). It often spreads by layering. The stems and leaves are densely covered with stellate hairs. The ovate to suborbicular leaves are shallowly 3-lobed or not lobed and have crenate-serrate margins. The 20 to 35 mm long flower petals are scarlet. The red fleshy fruit are about 1 to 3 cm in diameter. It can be propagated by layering, cuttings, root division and seed. Malvaviscus arboreus is a great plant for a hummingbird garden. It is not suitable for a small garden because it tends to ramble. There are dwarf cultivars of this plant. The young leaves, flowers and fruit are edible.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/114737/

Blooms ... Photo (cropped by htop) courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
2:38 AM

Post #4648943

Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus)

Bloom with bee - closer view ... Photo (cropped by htop) courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
2:39 AM

Post #4648948

Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus)

Bloom buds and leaves showing hairs and venation ... Photo (cropped by htop) courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
2:56 AM

Post #4649003

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap, Mazapan, Sleeping Waxmallow, Sleeping Hibiscus, Aloalo Pahūpahū (Malvaviscus penduliflorus), Malvaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, evergreen in areas with no freezes (dies to ground and returns in spring in colder zones), blooms summer through fall

County distribution according to the USDA;
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=MAPE3

Regional Distribution according to Texas A&M:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=6&name=%3Ci%3EMalvaviscus+arboreus%3C/i%3E+Cav.+var.+%3Ci%3Ependuliflorus%3C/i%3E+(DC.)+Schery.

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap will grow in Zone 8a and 8b; however, it will freeze to the ground after hard freezes to return in the spring. The stems have fairly dense split hairs. The undersides of the leaves of M. penduliflorus are glabrate (smooth); whereas, the underside of the leaves on M. arboreus are pubescent. The serrated leaves are oval or sword shaped, mostly unlobed and 4-10 cm long with a pointed tip. The flowers are 2 to 2.5 inches (5 to 6 cm) long with protruding stamensflowers and are humming-bird pollinated. In Hawaii, they are occasionally made into lei with each Micronesian style (tied or woven into a flat collar), 40-inch (100-cm) lei needing about 90 blooms.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/170054/

Blooms ... Photo (cropped by htop) courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.


This message was edited Mar 10, 2008 10:15 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
3:00 AM

Post #4649021

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap, Mazapan, Aloalo Pahūpahū (Malvaviscus penduliflorus)

Blooms and leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
3:02 AM

Post #4649027

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap, Mazapan, Aloalo Pahūpahū (Malvaviscus penduliflorus)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
3:09 AM

Post #4649060

Giant Mexican Turk's Cap, Mazapan, Aloalo Pahūpahū (Malvaviscus penduliflorus)

Habitat in Hawaii - There are many plants that grow in Hawaii that also grow in Texas. I saw a lot of these plants especially in the area shown in this photo ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr. Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 11, 2008
3:45 AM

Post #4649211

Wow Hazel, all those pictures from Hawaii sure are pretty.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
5:30 AM

Post #4649498

Josephine, we are so lucky to be able to use Forest and Kim Starr's photos. They are dedicated to documenting, researching, preserving and re-planting the native plants of Hawaii which are being destroyed. They also document any plants that grow there. Sound familiar? :o)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:00 AM

Post #4649525

Mexican Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. mexicanus), Malvaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, evergreen in areas with no hard freezes (dies to ground and returns in spring in colder zones), blooms heaviest from late summer through fall

Regional Distribution:
http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/cgi/vpt_map_name?reg=6&name=%3Ci%3EMalvaviscus+arboreus%3C/i%3E+Cav.+var.+%3Ci%3Emexicanus%3C/i%3E+Schlecht.

Mexican Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. mexicanus) has almost glabrous leaves with truncate bases; whereas, Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii) has densely tomentose abaxial leaf surfaces and cordate bases. M. arboreus var. mexicanus has larger flowers (up to 50 mm long) and leaves than M. arboreus var. drummondii (flowers 35 mm long) and is more more "Hibiscus-like" or upright in habit. M. arboreus var. mexicanus blooms usually hang downward; whereas, M. arboreus var. drummondii blooms are more erect. M. arboreus var. drummondii is smaller in stature and has more of a "sprawling" habit. M. arboreus var. mexicanus is less free-flowering than M. arboreus var. drummondii with the heaviest bloom production in late summer through fall. Also, M. arboreus var. mexicanus is a bit less hardy than M. arboreus var. drummondii.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1819/

Blooms of plant growing in the rainforest region of Maui, Hawaii ... Photo by htop
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:03 AM

Post #4649527

Mexican Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. mexicanus)

Bloom drenched with tropical rain ... Photo by htop
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
6:05 AM

Post #4649529

Mexican Turk's Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus var. mexicanus)

Bloom capturing a large bead of water at the bottom. The water bead provides an image of the plant's leaves ... Photo by htop
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
3:02 PM

Post #4650362

Turk's Cap, Turk's Turban (Malvaviscus arboreus Drummondii) -see Frostweed's description and photos above on the July 21, 2005 posts.
There are photos and information shown on the Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( Red ) page

by princessnonie:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=2717078

by LindaTX8
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=3175314
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=3175327

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/56887/index.html

This message was edited Mar 11, 2008 10:09 AM
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2008
2:56 AM

Post #4773885

Indigo Bush, False Indigo, Bastard Indigo, River Locust
Amorpha fruiticosa

I am really enjoying this shrub, (thanks Josephine)!! It is quickly becoming one of my all time favorites for it's many functions and stunning beauty.

Functions: Nectar source for many species of early season butterflies. As a larval host plant for Southern Dogface and Silver-spotted Skipper.

As a beautiful shrub of a special color of green foliage with great relief texture for the landscape of a native Texas Garden. The blooms are a slow savoring experience all unto themselves.

debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2008
2:59 AM

Post #4773896

Indigo Bush, False Indigo, Bastard Indigo, River Locust
Amorpha fruiticosa

Just the beginning!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2008
3:28 AM

Post #4774103

Wow Deb!! Yours are a lot farther along than mine, that looks beautiful.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2008
11:22 AM

Post #4774913

I was pleasantly surprised myself Josephine. They do love the sunshine and their fair share of water. I have a taller one back in a tad more shade and it is moving a little slower than these 2. Still had a feeling about this plant when you gave it to me. I knew it would be something very special, and it really is!

TYVM!

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2008
2:35 PM

Post #4775710

I have been with my daughter in Allen, Texas near Plano since 3/29. I had hoped that I would be able to meet with some of you that are in the area and to observe some native plants. However, I am disappointed that my plans have changed a lot due to unforeseen circumstances and I am unable to do so. There are many plants here that do not grow in the San Antonio area. Deb, thanks for sharing your lovely photos.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2008
6:03 PM

Post #4776691

Hazel, are you sure we can't at least meet? We can come to see you, I so want to meet you in person, Please don't let this opportunity pass us by. Let me know if it is possible, I think it would be great.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 8, 2008
11:16 PM

Post #4777935

Josephine, I too think it would be great. Unfortunately, I am going home tomorrow to finish my income tax return and take care of some other business. My daughter is not up to having company right now and I am not able to leave her home for any length of time. I will probably will be back to Allen quite soon.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2008
1:46 AM

Post #4778824

Well, i am sorry we can't do it right now, but next time be sure to let us know with plenty of time so we can plan something special.
Josephine.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 9, 2008
3:59 AM

Post #4779681

Okay.
debnes_dfw_tx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2008
11:11 AM

Post #4780330

Hope your daughter gets better... We understand Hazel.

One of these days we will be able to do the rounds with you.

:-)
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 9, 2008
2:06 PM

Post #4781013

Thanks, Deb.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
7:53 AM

Post #4866039

Night Blooming Jasmine, Night Scented Jessamine, Queen of the Night (Cestrum nocturnum), Solanaceae Family, naturalized, tender perennial, evergreen in areas with no hard freezes (dies to ground and returns in spring in colder zones), fragrant blooms from mid-summer through early fall

Texas distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=CENO

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2128/

Blooms ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr. Kula, Maui, Hawaii. June 21, 2007
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
7:57 AM

Post #4866042

Night Blooming Jasmine, Night Scented Jessamine, Queen of the Night (Cestrum nocturnum)

Fruit ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. September 16, 2006.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:03 AM

Post #4866047

Night Blooming Jasmine, Night Scented Jessamine, Queen of the Night (Cestrum nocturnum)

Fruit ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. September 16, 2006.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:06 AM

Post #4866050

Night Blooming Jasmine, Night Scented Jessamine, Queen of the Night (Cestrum nocturnum)

Fruit ... Photo (cropped by htop) courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. September 16, 2006.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2008
8:16 AM

Post #4866056

Night Blooming Jasmine, Night Scented Jessamine, Queen of the Night (Cestrum nocturnum)

Leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr. Kula Ace Hardware and Nursery, Maui, Hawaii. September 06, 2007

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