Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Trees )

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native Tree ) Redbud, ( Cercis canadensis ) Beautiful tree is covered with flowers in the Spring
before leaves appear. 15 to 30 feet high. A beautiful sight in spring.
For mor info see, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/217/index.html

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native Tree ) Red Buckeye, ( Aesculus pavia ) Gorgeous tree when in bloom.
Prefers semi shade, and lots of water, slow growing but worth it.
To see more info go to, http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/529390/

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Red Buckeye seeds and leaf.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

My Red Buckeye and me.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Jerusalem Thorn, Palo Verde, Retama, Horse Bean, Lluvia de Oro (Parkinsonia aculeata), Caesalpiniaceae Family, Texas native, blooms in late spring through summer, deciduous, may be invasive

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53709/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 10:32 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Jerusalem Thorn, Palo Verde, Retama, Horse Bean, Lluvia de Oro (Parkinsonia aculeata)

It is fast growing and can be considered a large shrub or tree ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Berlandier acacia, guajillo, huajilla, thornless catclaw, mimosa catclaw, round-flowered catclaw (Acacia berlandieri), Fabaceae Family, endemic Texas native (Rio Grande Plains northwest to eastern Brewster County in the Trans-Pecos Region, dry limestone hillsides in SouthCentral Region), large shrub/tree

This is known as the honey plant. It is famous for the delicious sweet honey made from its fragrant flowers. Usually, it is a multi-trunked large shrub. It can be pruned to a small tree. It is a desirable ornamental with its fern-like leaves (have 20 to 50 pairs of 1/4 inch leaflets per pinna) and can serve as a hedge or fragrant speciman plant around pools or patios, in wildscapes and rock gardens. It is adaptable to many soil types, but they mist be well drained. It is hardy to around 20 degrees F. The small, recurved thorns are not rigid and do not pose a hazard like the thorns of other acacias do.

The ball-shaped creamy white flowers occur in spring and occasionally later through fall.

For more information and a photo of its bloom, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64760/live_view/

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Berlandier acacia (Acacia berlandieri)

A closer view ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Catclaw Acacia, Gregg Acacia, Gregg Catclaw, Texas Catclaw, Devils-Claw, Uno de Gato, Long-flowered Catsclaw (Acacia greggii), Texas native, perennial, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through summer, large shrub/small tree

The leaves are 1/8 to 1/2 inch long. It can have numerous backward 1/4 inch curving spines.The blooms are a creamy white to creamy yellow and are conically-shaped bottlebrush spikes. It can attain a height and width of 30 feet. It is a magnet for butterflies and bees.

See this link for a photo of its blooms.
http://ag.arizona.edu/maricopa/garden/html/pubs/1104/images/trees-acacia-greggii-2.jpg
See this link for more photos:
http://www.naturesongs.com/vvplants/catclaw.html
For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77170/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 11:18 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides), Fabaceae Family, Texas and Louisiana native, perennial, small tree/large shrub, evergreen to semi-deciduous; blooms in April and May and sometimes the fall; bloom color: white or less frequently pink; cold hardiness: 20f

This tree (large shrub depending upon growing conditions) is rare and is found naturally occurring in the West Texas hill country south into northeastern Mexico. Usually, it is single-trunked tree, but it sometimes is multi-trunked. It has wlight green, bi-lobe leaflets that look like cloven hooves. All members of this genera have leaves divided into two identical halves. John and Casper Bauhin (after whom the genera were named) were 16th century twin German botanists worked so closely together in their botanical efforts that the twin leaflets were thought to symbolize their labors. The small blooms appear in clusters and the plant produces a small flattened bean pod. This is a great patio tree and it attracts butterflies. In the zones 9+, it benefits from afternoon partial shade.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55962/live_view/

Bloom cluster ...

This message was edited Jul 17, 2005 1:59 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides)

The 1/2 to 1 1/2 inch leaves look they are deeply clefted, but they are 2 leaflets. The leaflets have very nice veination.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides)

Here is a view of the whole plant which I found growing at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. It did not have a name plaque. It took me quite some time before I was able to identify it. I finally noticed that the blooms resembled small orchids and searched for "orchid +tree".

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana), Ebenaceae Family, endemic Texas native tree/large shrub, semi-evergreen to deciduous, blooms February through June, fruits ripen in late summer

It is found naturally occurring in South and Central Texas and west to the Big Bend region. It may be a predominant invading woody species in some pastyre in Central Texas. It grows best in shallow, rocky limestone soils; but, It is adaptable to most soil types including clay. The soil must be well drained. It usually is a shrub or small tree less than 15 feet tall. However, along the upper Texas coast some specimens may reach 50 feet tall. Fine hairs are on the underside of the oval leaves which are rounded at the tips. The thin bark peels off in layers revealing mottled gray, white and pink hues.

The insignificant white, cream or grayish bell-shaped flowers have a sweet fragrance. The female plants produce 1 inch fruit that turn beautiful color shades as they ripen to black. The fruit pulp is sweet and edible; but, contains many seeds. Wildlife love the fruit. It is difficult at times to collect any ripe fruit because it has already been devoured or knocked from the tree with the fruit being smushed as it hits the ground before one can pick them. The persimmons are used in custards and pies. In Mexico, the fruits are used to make a black dye employed to stain animal hides.

The compact wood is almost black, hard and heavy. It takes a high polish and is valued because it can be used for tools, engraving blocks and art work.

For more information and more photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55056/index.html

A view of the attractive bark ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana)

A young persimmon that has not started to turn color ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana)

Two ripe persimmons ready to be picked ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii), Sapindaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, medium or large tree or large shrub, blooms in mid-spring through early summer, fruits are fully ripe in November

For a details see my comments in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62411/index.html

This message was edited Jul 20, 2005 9:27 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii)

The fruit (about 15 mm in diameter) which are not ripe yet ... one is shown in the photo before it wrinkles and becomes more translucent

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii)

A closer view of the fruit shown in about September ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Carolina Buckthorn, Indian Cherry (Frangula caroliniana), Family Rhamnaceae, Texas native, deciduous, small to medium in size tree or large shrub, blooms late spring to early summer, fruits start ripening in late summer and turn black in mid-fall

For other photos and further details see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58428/index.html

A view of immature fruit (drupes) ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Carolina Buckthorn, Indian Cherry (Frangula caroliniana)

A view of maturing fruit (drupes) in September (they will turn black when ripe and are consumed by birds and other wildlife) ...

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Naturalized native) Bird of Paradise ( Caesalpinia gilliesii )
This South American tree has long escaped cultivation and become naturalized.
The showy yellow flowers have red stamens protruding 3 to 5 inches beyond the petals. It grows up to 10 feet tall and blooms May-September, Central and West Texas and Chihuahuan desert. Close up of flowers.
See plant files; http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2120/index.html




This message was edited Jul 22, 2005 5:00 PM

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Partially open bud.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Bud and leaves.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Bird of Paradise ( Caesalpinia gilliesii)

These trees used to be able to be found all over San Antonio; but, the numbers have been declining so much that you do not see them very often anymore.

A view of the blooms backlit with afternoon sun ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen, small tree or shrub, blooms May through August

This evergreen large shrub or small tree is native to Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties and the coastal parts of the Rio Grande Plains; however, is also cultivated in other counties in Southwest Texas. Although it is found naturally by stream edges or near water holes, it adapts to dry locations as well and has a high heat tolerance.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60169/index.html

These hotos do not do justice to the true beauty of the plant.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens)

A view of a fresh bloom, spent blooms and green seedpods in August ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens)

The tenaza seed pods change colors as they mature. They are iridescent, even the reddish-brown ones, and appear is if they could glow in the dark. These beautiful pods are the reason that the plant is sometimes called "Apes-Earring".

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata), Pinaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen

In Texas, shortleaf pine grows in upland woods, fields and well-drained slopes and hills in the east Texas Pineywoods region. Being the most cold hardy of the southern pines, it is also drought tolerant and wind resistant due to its long taproot which also makes it difficult to transplant. It adapts to various soil types, but likes well-drained, adidic, sandy soil the best.

It is an important food source for wildlife. The wood is moderately heavy, firm and well-suited for many uses. It is used as structural timbers, pulp and planing-mill products. It is sometimes used as an ornamental tree in the landscape and is very attractive; however, the needles, cones and dead branches drop off frequently which can be an aggravation.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/67817/live_view/

Shown in San Antonio, Texas (a bit out of its native range and in alkaline soil) in the spring ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)

The bark ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)

Young cones ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)


Aged cone from the year before ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides), Bignoniaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early summer

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1682/index.html

A view of the buds and blooms at different stages of maturity (shown in May) ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides)

Trunk and bark ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides)

Young very, very long seedpods which add interest, but which are a mess to clean up ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis), Bignoniaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms in April through September

I really love these trees and wished that I known about them when I first started landscaping my yard over 22 years ago. I would acquire them when in bloom to be sure that the color of the bloom is what you desire.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/265/index.html

Beautiful orchid-like blooms adorn this hardy tree. Shown in May.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

One with a different color of bloom ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

The white blooming specimens are less abundant than the other types.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

A composite providing a view of the bark and an open seedpod which is at least 6 inches long ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

The desert willow is not a willow. It is referred to as such because of its narrow, delicate foliage.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Close up of a light colored Desert Willow blossom.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/79349/

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