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Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Trees )

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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:27 PM

Post #1626160

( Native Tree ) Redbud, ( Cercis canadensis ) Beautiful tree is covered with flowers in the Spring
before leaves appear. 15 to 30 feet high. A beautiful sight in spring.
For mor info see, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/217/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:36 PM

Post #1626179

( Native Tree ) Red Buckeye, ( Aesculus pavia ) Gorgeous tree when in bloom.
Prefers semi shade, and lots of water, slow growing but worth it.
To see more info go to, http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/529390/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:39 PM

Post #1626187

Red Buckeye seeds and leaf.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2005
8:43 PM

Post #1626197

My Red Buckeye and me.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
9:32 PM

Post #1626286

Jerusalem Thorn, Palo Verde, Retama, Horse Bean, Lluvia de Oro (Parkinsonia aculeata), Caesalpiniaceae Family, Texas native, blooms in late spring through summer, deciduous, may be invasive

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53709/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 10:32 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 15, 2005
9:38 PM

Post #1626299

Jerusalem Thorn, Palo Verde, Retama, Horse Bean, Lluvia de Oro (Parkinsonia aculeata)

It is fast growing and can be considered a large shrub or tree ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
3:28 PM

Post #1627661

Berlandier acacia, guajillo, huajilla, thornless catclaw, mimosa catclaw, round-flowered catclaw (Acacia berlandieri), Fabaceae Family, endemic Texas native (Rio Grande Plains northwest to eastern Brewster County in the Trans-Pecos Region, dry limestone hillsides in SouthCentral Region), large shrub/tree

This is known as the honey plant. It is famous for the delicious sweet honey made from its fragrant flowers. Usually, it is a multi-trunked large shrub. It can be pruned to a small tree. It is a desirable ornamental with its fern-like leaves (have 20 to 50 pairs of 1/4 inch leaflets per pinna) and can serve as a hedge or fragrant speciman plant around pools or patios, in wildscapes and rock gardens. It is adaptable to many soil types, but they mist be well drained. It is hardy to around 20 degrees F. The small, recurved thorns are not rigid and do not pose a hazard like the thorns of other acacias do.

The ball-shaped creamy white flowers occur in spring and occasionally later through fall.

For more information and a photo of its bloom, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/64760/live_view/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
3:32 PM

Post #1627668

Berlandier acacia (Acacia berlandieri)

A closer view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 16, 2005
4:10 PM

Post #1627749

Catclaw Acacia, Gregg Acacia, Gregg Catclaw, Texas Catclaw, Devils-Claw, Uno de Gato, Long-flowered Catsclaw (Acacia greggii), Texas native, perennial, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through summer, large shrub/small tree

The leaves are 1/8 to 1/2 inch long. It can have numerous backward 1/4 inch curving spines.The blooms are a creamy white to creamy yellow and are conically-shaped bottlebrush spikes. It can attain a height and width of 30 feet. It is a magnet for butterflies and bees.

See this link for a photo of its blooms.
http://ag.arizona.edu/maricopa/garden/html/pubs/1104/images/trees-acacia-greggii-2.jpg
See this link for more photos:
http://www.naturesongs.com/vvplants/catclaw.html
For more information see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77170/index.html

This message was edited Jul 16, 2005 11:18 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
6:58 AM

Post #1629248

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides), Fabaceae Family, Texas and Louisiana native, perennial, small tree/large shrub, evergreen to semi-deciduous; blooms in April and May and sometimes the fall; bloom color: white or less frequently pink; cold hardiness: 20°f

This tree (large shrub depending upon growing conditions) is rare and is found naturally occurring in the West Texas hill country south into northeastern Mexico. Usually, it is single-trunked tree, but it sometimes is multi-trunked. It has wlight green, bi-lobe leaflets that look like cloven hooves. All members of this genera have leaves divided into two identical halves. John and Casper Bauhin (after whom the genera were named) were 16th century twin German botanists worked so closely together in their botanical efforts that the twin leaflets were thought to symbolize their labors. The small blooms appear in clusters and the plant produces a small flattened bean pod. This is a great patio tree and it attracts butterflies. In the zones 9+, it benefits from afternoon partial shade.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55962/live_view/

Bloom cluster ...

This message was edited Jul 17, 2005 1:59 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
7:01 AM

Post #1629253

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides)

The 1/2 to 1 1/2 inch leaves look they are deeply clefted, but they are 2 leaflets. The leaflets have very nice veination.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
7:09 AM

Post #1629263

Anacacho Orchid Tree, Texas Plume, Dwarf Orchid Tree, Chihuahuan Orchid Tree, Pata de Vaca (Bauhinia lunarioides)

Here is a view of the whole plant which I found growing at the San Antonio Botanical Garden. It did not have a name plaque. It took me quite some time before I was able to identify it. I finally noticed that the blooms resembled small orchids and searched for "orchid +tree".
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
8:46 AM

Post #1629297

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana), Ebenaceae Family, endemic Texas native tree/large shrub, semi-evergreen to deciduous, blooms February through June, fruits ripen in late summer

It is found naturally occurring in South and Central Texas and west to the Big Bend region. It may be a predominant invading woody species in some pastyre in Central Texas. It grows best in shallow, rocky limestone soils; but, It is adaptable to most soil types including clay. The soil must be well drained. It usually is a shrub or small tree less than 15 feet tall. However, along the upper Texas coast some specimens may reach 50 feet tall. Fine hairs are on the underside of the oval leaves which are rounded at the tips. The thin bark peels off in layers revealing mottled gray, white and pink hues.

The insignificant white, cream or grayish bell-shaped flowers have a sweet fragrance. The female plants produce 1 inch fruit that turn beautiful color shades as they ripen to black. The fruit pulp is sweet and edible; but, contains many seeds. Wildlife love the fruit. It is difficult at times to collect any ripe fruit because it has already been devoured or knocked from the tree with the fruit being smushed as it hits the ground before one can pick them. The persimmons are used in custards and pies. In Mexico, the fruits are used to make a black dye employed to stain animal hides.

The compact wood is almost black, hard and heavy. It takes a high polish and is valued because it can be used for tools, engraving blocks and art work.

For more information and more photos, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/55056/index.html

A view of the attractive bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
8:48 AM

Post #1629298

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana)

A young persimmon that has not started to turn color ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 17, 2005
8:52 AM

Post #1629300

Texas Persimmon, Mexican Persimmon, Black Persimmon, Chapote, Chapote Manzano, Chapote Prieto (Diospyros texana)

Two ripe persimmons ready to be picked ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
2:27 PM

Post #1636299

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii), Sapindaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, medium or large tree or large shrub, blooms in mid-spring through early summer, fruits are fully ripe in November

For a details see my comments in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62411/index.html

This message was edited Jul 20, 2005 9:27 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
2:34 PM

Post #1636317

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii)

The fruit (about 15 mm in diameter) which are not ripe yet ... one is shown in the photo before it wrinkles and becomes more translucent
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
2:36 PM

Post #1636326

Western Soapberry (Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii)

A closer view of the fruit shown in about September ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
3:54 PM

Post #1636476

Carolina Buckthorn, Indian Cherry (Frangula caroliniana), Family Rhamnaceae, Texas native, deciduous, small to medium in size tree or large shrub, blooms late spring to early summer, fruits start ripening in late summer and turn black in mid-fall

For other photos and further details see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58428/index.html

A view of immature fruit (drupes) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 20, 2005
3:57 PM

Post #1636484

Carolina Buckthorn, Indian Cherry (Frangula caroliniana)

A view of maturing fruit (drupes) in September (they will turn black when ripe and are consumed by birds and other wildlife) ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2005
8:22 PM

Post #1642406

( Naturalized native) Bird of Paradise ( Caesalpinia gilliesii )
This South American tree has long escaped cultivation and become naturalized.
The showy yellow flowers have red stamens protruding 3 to 5 inches beyond the petals. It grows up to 10 feet tall and blooms May-September, Central and West Texas and Chihuahuan desert. Close up of flowers.
See plant files; http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2120/index.html




This message was edited Jul 22, 2005 5:00 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2005
8:24 PM

Post #1642411

Partially open bud.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2005
8:25 PM

Post #1642413

Bud and leaves.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 22, 2005
11:53 PM

Post #1642790

Bird of Paradise ( Caesalpinia gilliesii)

These trees used to be able to be found all over San Antonio; but, the numbers have been declining so much that you do not see them very often anymore.

A view of the blooms backlit with afternoon sun ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
12:17 AM

Post #1642834

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen, small tree or shrub, blooms May through August

This evergreen large shrub or small tree is native to Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties and the coastal parts of the Rio Grande Plains; however, is also cultivated in other counties in Southwest Texas. Although it is found naturally by stream edges or near water holes, it adapts to dry locations as well and has a high heat tolerance.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60169/index.html

These hotos do not do justice to the true beauty of the plant.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
12:20 AM

Post #1642840

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens)

A view of a fresh bloom, spent blooms and green seedpods in August ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 23, 2005
12:22 AM

Post #1642845

Tenaza, Apes-Earring, Huajillo, Guajilla, Mimosa bush (Havardia pallens)

The tenaza seed pods change colors as they mature. They are iridescent, even the reddish-brown ones, and appear is if they could glow in the dark. These beautiful pods are the reason that the plant is sometimes called "Apes-Earring".
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:50 PM

Post #1646252

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata), Pinaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen

In Texas, shortleaf pine grows in upland woods, fields and well-drained slopes and hills in the east Texas Pineywoods region. Being the most cold hardy of the southern pines, it is also drought tolerant and wind resistant due to its long taproot which also makes it difficult to transplant. It adapts to various soil types, but likes well-drained, adidic, sandy soil the best.

It is an important food source for wildlife. The wood is moderately heavy, firm and well-suited for many uses. It is used as structural timbers, pulp and planing-mill products. It is sometimes used as an ornamental tree in the landscape and is very attractive; however, the needles, cones and dead branches drop off frequently which can be an aggravation.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/67817/live_view/

Shown in San Antonio, Texas (a bit out of its native range and in alkaline soil) in the spring ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:52 PM

Post #1646256

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)

The bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:53 PM

Post #1646258

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)

Young cones ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 24, 2005
3:55 PM

Post #1646260

Short-Leaf Pine, Shortleaf Yellow Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Yellow Pine, Arkansas Pine (Pinus echinata)


Aged cone from the year before ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:14 AM

Post #1652854

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides), Bignoniaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early summer

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1682/index.html

A view of the buds and blooms at different stages of maturity (shown in May) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:16 AM

Post #1652858

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides)

Trunk and bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:18 AM

Post #1652863

Southern Catalpa, Catawba, Indian Bean Tree, Fish-Bait Tree (Catalpa bignonioides)

Young very, very long seedpods which add interest, but which are a mess to clean up ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:26 AM

Post #1652875

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis), Bignoniaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms in April through September

I really love these trees and wished that I known about them when I first started landscaping my yard over 22 years ago. I would acquire them when in bloom to be sure that the color of the bloom is what you desire.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/265/index.html

Beautiful orchid-like blooms adorn this hardy tree. Shown in May.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:28 AM

Post #1652880

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

One with a different color of bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:31 AM

Post #1652884

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

The white blooming specimens are less abundant than the other types.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:32 AM

Post #1652886

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

A composite providing a view of the bark and an open seedpod which is at least 6 inches long ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 27, 2005
11:35 AM

Post #1652889

Desert Willow, Desert Catalpa, Flowering Willow, Orchid of the Desert (Chilopsis linearis)

The desert willow is not a willow. It is referred to as such because of its narrow, delicate foliage.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
6:08 PM

Post #1653630

( Native ) Close up of a light colored Desert Willow blossom.
See plant files http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/79349/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:30 PM

Post #1654140

( Native ) Flowering Dogwood, ( Cornus florida ) Native distribution East Texas to Florida and north to Canada. Deciduous tree 15 to 25 feet tall. Bloom period March-June. Likes filtered sun to shade.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1045/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:31 PM

Post #1654142

Close up of white blossom.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:33 PM

Post #1654144

Close up od Red blossom.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:34 PM

Post #1654148

Fall foliage on my little Red Dogwood.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:50 PM

Post #1654177

( Native ) Mexican Plum, ( Prunus mexicana ) Central to East Texas ; Mexico.
15 to 25 feet high, deciduous, bloom period March-April, full sun to partial shade.
Beautiful white flowers in Spring before leaves appear.
See plant files; http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/67638/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:58 PM

Post #1654200

( Native ) Laurel Cherry, ( Prunus caroliniana) Lovely evergreen tree 15 to 40 feet high, bloom March-April, full sun to partial shade. drought tolerant.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/58905/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
9:59 PM

Post #1654205

Close up of the flowers.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
10:08 PM

Post #1654228

( Native ) Honey Locust, ( Gleditsia triacanthus ) Deciduous 30 to 70 feet, full sun, cold hardy. Has large thorns on trunk and branches, lovely fall color.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/60633/

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2005
10:09 PM

Post #1654231

View of bare branches with thorns.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
9:55 PM

Post #1656633

( Native ) Possum Haw, ( Ilex decidua ) Small tree to 20 feet, deciduous,
full sun, partial shade, shade, cold hardy. Red berries on female trees remain on the branches after the leaves fall and look stunning. Be sure to buy the tree in the Fall to make sure it is female and has berries.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58203/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
10:05 PM

Post #1656651

( Native ) Prairie Flameleaf Sumac, ( Rhus lanceolata ) Deciduous tree with beautiful fall color, up to 30 feet tall, drought tolerant, full sun. partial shade.
Fast growing tree.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/73366/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2005
10:13 PM

Post #1656672

( Native ) Goldenball Leadtree, ( Luceana retusa ) Fast growing tree 15 to 25 feet, deciduous, drought tolerant, cold hardy to 0 degrees, full sun, partial shade.
Lovely yellow puff balls spring to summer, lightly scented.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62589/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
6:31 AM

Post #1657612

Prairie Crabapple, Wild Crabapple (Malus ioensis), Rosaceae Family,Texas native, deciduous, blooms in April through June, fruits are mature in September or October

This tree (or large shrub) can be found Texas in the Edwards Plateau region in central Texas growing in moist soils along streams, canyons, thickets, pastures, and woodland borders. It prefers prefers acid and neutral soils, but is adaptable to other types and grows at a slow rate. Due to its showy and fragrant flowers, prairie crab apple has been cultivated since 1885. The fruits are hard and sour, but have been used to make jellies, cider and vinegar. The fruits are eaten by several species of birds and mammals.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/65652/

Soft 1.5 inch pink blooms which fade to white appear in the spring. Not only are they beautiful, they are fragrant too. Shown in at the end of April when most of the blooms have already expired.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
6:35 AM

Post #1657613

Prairie Crabapple, Wild Crabapple (Malus ioensis)

At the end of April, a lot of the fruit has already set. The fruit is eaten by songbirds, bobwhite quail, ring-neck pheasant, opossums, fox and other critters. The leaves serve as larval food for at least 4 kinds of butterflies. Note the fine hairs on the undersides of the leaves.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
9:50 AM

Post #1657691

Texas Wild Olive, White Geiger, Anacahuita (Cordia boissieri), Boraginaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen, blooms late spring through early fall


This small tree (can be grown as a large shrub) is native to the southern most tip of the Rio Grande region of Texas. It can be grown as far north as San Antonio, but may freeze to the ground during an exceptionally cold winter in this area. Tip dieback occurs in the mid twenties and it is hardy to 18 degrees.
For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2246/index.html

The Mexican olive bloom is a clear white with a center varying from gold to an orangish color. The buds are a deep green with lighter green striations. This tree blooms almost nonstop.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 29, 2005
9:53 AM

Post #1657693

Texas Wild Olive, White Geiger, Anacahuita (Cordia boissieri)

This Texas wild olive is still blooming in December, although the flowers are smaller than during the warmer months. There have been several nights with freezing or below temperatures
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
1:40 PM

Post #1661967

Texas Huisache, Sweet Acacia (Acacia smallii), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, semi-deciduous to deciduous, blooms in February through April

In Texas, it grows in the South Texas Plains and Edwards Plateau regions. It tolerates both desert and lawn plantings, is fast growing to 15-30 feet, prefers full sun, is hardy to about 15 to 20 degrees F. and can be trained as a multiple- or single-trunked tree. Not picky about soil types, sweet acacia is easy to grow in any acid or alkaline soil. Due to their desirable qualities which include fragrant blooms, shade, and dark green canopy, these trees are used in a wide array of landscape settings. They are great trees in wildscapes, xeriscapes and in the background of rock gardens. It is among the most widely used desert trees

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/63234/index.html

The Texas Huisache used as a lanscape specimen provides an unusual bloom color to herald spring. This photo does not do it justice because it was taken as it was lightly raining at twilight.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
1:42 PM

Post #1661970

Texas Huisache, Sweet Acacia (Acacia smallii)

The Acacia smallii is one of the first trees to bloom in San Antonio and signifies the onset of spring. The fragrant, deep yellow or gold (some call it mustard), 1/2 inch in diameter, puffball-shaped flowers are primarily composed of stamens.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
1:44 PM

Post #1661975

Texas Huisache, Sweet Acacia (Acacia smallii)

The Acacia smallii's deep yellow or gold blooms turn a beautiful rust color as they age. The blooms attract bees which use the pollen, not the nectar.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:21 PM

Post #1662242

Ashe Juniper, Post Cedar, Mountain Cedar, Blueberry Juniper (Juniperus ashei), Cupressaceae Family, evergreen perennial, tree/large shrub, blooms in early winter to late winter

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54344/index.html

A branch ...


htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:22 PM

Post #1662244

Ashe Juniper, Post Cedar, Mountain Cedar, Blueberry Juniper (Juniperus ashei)

The bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:36 PM

Post #1662271

Sycamore, Buttonwood,American Sycamore, American Planetree (Platanus occidentalis), Platanaceae Family, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through early summer

The American sycamore is sometimes confused with the several other trees in the same genus which are similar in appearance. If the tree has single seedpods, it is an American sycamore. If there are two seedpods together, it is a London planetree (Platanus X acerfolia). If there are 3-5 seedpods, it is an Oriental planetree (P. orientalis) which has the seedpods hanging like beads. All three have lobed maple-like leaves, but each is slightly different. American sycamore's leaf lobes are wider than long. London planetree's leaf lobes are about as wide as they are long. Oriental planetree's leaf lobes that are much longer than wide and deeply incised. London planetree is a hybrid between the American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) and the oriental planetree. It prefers moist, deep, rich soils in full sunl however, it is adaptable to a wide range of soils, including wet soils, dry soils, compacted soils and poor soils. If not receiving enough water and during very, very hot summers, the leaves will drop. It is a bit messy due to large leaves falling even in the summer, the seed balls, shedding bark and small twigs and branches that fall under it which have to be cleaned up.

Be careful where these trees are planted. The growing roots can clog sewers and damage sidewalks and driveways. The fallen leaves can clog drains. Also, be careful not to plant these fast growing trees too close to buildings and utility lines.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1607/index.html

The Platanus occidentalis sycamore showing its structure, bark and round, ball-like seedpods. The object 1/3 of the way up the tree to the right is not a wild animal. It is an old pinata.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:40 PM

Post #1662281

Sycamore, Buttonwood,American Sycamore, American Planetree (Platanus occidentalis)

The seedpods are individually attached which helps distinguish it from the London planetree (Platanus X acerfolia)and the Oriental planetree (P. orientalis).
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:42 PM

Post #1662286

Sycamore, Buttonwood, American Sycamore, American Planetree (Platanus occidentalis)

The trunk can appear like this at the base if the tree is an older tree.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


July 31, 2005
4:44 PM

Post #1662291

Sycamore, Buttonwood, American Sycamore, American Planetree (Platanus occidentalis)

Platanus occidentalis sycamore has thin bark that flakes which gives the trunk a mottled appearance with irregular brown, gray, white and green patches. This is the bark of the same tree, but higher up than the first photo. In the fall and winter, the tree's bark provides interest in the landscape.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
7:30 AM

Post #1663538

Texas Red Oak, Spanish Oak, Spotted Oak, Red Oak, Rock Oak (Quercus buckleyi), Fagaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms in the spring

This medium-sized oak is related to the Shumard oak, Q. shumardii, and is in the black oak group. It is more drought tolerant than the Shumard oak, but less hardy. The Texas red oak is naturally found in an area located in central Texas. It was originally named Q. texana, which remains a synonym.
It usually reaches a height of 30 feet or more and a width of 30 feet or more.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60892/index.html

Texas red oak in December. The leaves retain their deep green color as they change to the deep maroon and red shades. An outstanding tree for fall color ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 1, 2005
7:32 AM

Post #1663539

Texas Red Oak, Spanish Oak, Spotted Oak, Red Oak, Rock Oak (Quercus buckleyi)

A leaf turning colors ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 2, 2005
4:29 PM

Post #1666634

Honey Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), Mimosaceae Family, Texas native, deciduous, blooms mid-summer, may be a noxious weed or invasive

The most common shrub or small tree of the Desert Southwest, mesquite restores nitrogen to the soil. The bean pods can lie dormant for forty years and can be viable. The bean pods have been used by wildlife (especially deer), livestock and humans as a source of food. Believe it or not in late summer, it is estimated that over 75% of a coyote's diet is comprised of mesquite beans.

Native Americans counted upon the mesquite pod as a main source of food making ground meal called pinole, tea and syrup. The bark was employed in the production of medicines, fabrics and basketry. The yellowish-gold mesquite flowers produce a fragrant honey which is a favorite of bees and other insects.

A hated tree by many (large taproot and large root system uses up the moisture in the soil, thorny, invasive, seed pods make a mess, etc.) and loved by me. When the leaves fall from the mesquite, I know the first frost is not far behind. When the beautiful yellowih-green leaves sprout in spring, I know that the last frost has usually occurred and I start planting my frost sensitive plants. For some reason, it is frequently hit by lightening.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31989/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2005
6:50 PM

Post #1666942

( Native ) Honey Mesquite, a beautiful specimen at Veterans Park,
Arlington, Texas.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2005
6:51 PM

Post #1666945

A close up of Honey Mesquite leaves and seed pods.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2005
6:53 PM

Post #1666948

A close up of Honey Mesquite tree trunk.
imway2dumb
Gordonville, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 3, 2005
3:14 AM

Post #1667826

The original location of the Preston Trail (a precursor to the famed Chisholm Trail) can be followed by noting the numerous Mesquite growing in a line from South Texas to Preston Bend near Denison. It is especially easy to see from the air. Apparently the seed was in the hide and dung. An example of a native invasive species.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2005
7:21 PM

Post #1673514

( Native ) Flameleaf Sumac, ( Rhus lceolata ) Small tree in bloom.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/73366/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 7, 2005
10:54 AM

Post #1676539

Silk Tree, Mimosa Tree, Pink Siris (Albizia julibrissin), Mimosaceae Family, (naturalized), deciduous, blooms in mid-summer, listed as an invasive plant in some states

I love the mimomsa tree. It is airy looking and the blooms are gorgeous, But, it has its pitfalls. It spreads out not up and may take a lot of training to fit into one's landscape, the dropping blooms can cause problems (debri on cars, sidewalks, other plants, etc.) as well as the seed pods. The branches break easily in high winds. Although it is listed as invasive in some states, my Mother's tree has never caused a problem.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1764/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 7, 2005
10:56 AM

Post #1676542

Silk Tree, Mimosa Tree, Pink Siris (Albizia julibrissin)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2005
6:41 PM

Post #1683419

( Native ) Chinkapin Oak, ( Quercus muehlenbergii ) Beautiful Oak tree with lush foliage,very pretty. The tree.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/62918/index.html

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2005
6:42 PM

Post #1683422

Close up of leaves and acorn.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 13, 2005
7:00 PM

Post #1689800

Orchid tree, Napoleon's plume, butterfly flower, pink orchid tree, poor man's orchid (Bauhinia monandra), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, hardy in Zones 10-11, blooms April through July, shrub or small tree

Pink orchid tree can attain a height of 20 feet and has a spreading habit. The 4 to 6 inches across leaves are cleft almost to the middle which gives them the shape of a hoof print. In April through July, the blooms appear in terminal racemes. The blooms, which look like orchids, start out a pale yellow, but turn to pink the next day and the center petal is streaked with magenta. The seed are enclosed in pea-like pods which are between 6 inches and 1 foot long. Although not usually necessary, they can be pruned after flowering. Pink orchid trees sometimes suffer from chlorosis and may be treated with iron chelate.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53511/index.html

Blooms look like orchids hence the tree's name. Photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 13, 2005
7:02 PM

Post #1689807

Orchid tree, Napoleon's plume, butterfly flower, pink orchid tree, poor man's orchid (Bauhinia monandra)

A closeup of the bloom ... photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


August 13, 2005
7:04 PM

Post #1689813

Orchid tree, Napoleon's plume, butterfly flower, pink orchid tree, poor man's orchid (Bauhinia monandra)

A view of the blooms and leaves ... photo courtesy of TopTropicals.com
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 8, 2005
2:27 PM

Post #1747013

Empress Tree (Paulownia tomentosa), Scrophulariaceae Family, naturalized, deciduous, blooms mid-spring through mid-summer

For more information and photos of the blooms and growth habit, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/391/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1749202

Weeping Willow, Wisconsin weeping willow (Salix x pendulina, Salix pendulina var. elegantissima), Salicaceae Family, naturalized

This willow needs full sun and tolerates a wide range of conditions and soil types. It needs ample water to fully develop. It is the most grown willow tree in Texas (except the deep southern regions).

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53461/index.html


This message was edited Sep 9, 2005 12:12 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
5:10 PM

Post #1749206

Weeping Willow, Wisconsin weeping willow (Salix x pendulina, Salix pendulina var. elegantissima)

A view from the side showing its trunk, branches, shade provided and neat trimming.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
6:01 PM

Post #1749287

Golden Rain Tree, Golden Raintree, Panicled Goldenraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata), Sapindaceae Family, naturalized

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1778/index.html

The blooms are yellow and appear in clusters and are followed by lovely seed pods. The sun illuminating the seed pods which make them look like like Japanese lanterns.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:01 PM

Post #1749362

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus), Verbenaceae Family, naturalized, tree/large shrub, blooms late spring through late summer

Chaste tree can have pink, laveder, blue-violet or white blooms. It is drought resistant once established and can grow to be quite large.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1188/index.html

I placed my car in the photo to provide a perspective to gauge the size of the specimen.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:03 PM

Post #1749364

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus)

A close view of the blooms ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:05 PM

Post #1749368

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus)

A specimen of the white bloomer that is not as plentiful in my area as the bluish lavender species.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:06 PM

Post #1749371

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus)

A view of the blooms of the white blooming variety.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:06 PM

Post #1749372

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus)

Don't know what I did to make this appear twice ... sorry.

This message was edited Sep 9, 2005 2:10 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 9, 2005
7:09 PM

Post #1749376

Vitex, Chaste Tree, Lilac Chaste Tree, Monk's Pepper (Vitex agnus-castus)

A view of the seeds ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:25 PM

Post #1751142

Chinese Tallow Tree, Candleberry Tree, Chicken Tree, Popcorn Tree, Florida Aspen (Triadica sebifera), Euphorbiaceae Family, naturalized, deciduous, good fall color


It is considered invasive in other states such as Florida and California, but doesn't seem to be a problem in the San Antonio area. The leaves tend to be pale in limestone soils.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32151/index.html

The Chinese tallow provides wonderful fall color. I wished that I could have taken this photo 2 weeeks before a lot of the leaves dropped. I had to purchase a new camera. There are a few white blooms still on the tree in December.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 10, 2005
6:26 PM

Post #1751145

Chinese Tallow Tree, Candleberry Tree, Chicken Tree, Popcorn Tree, Florida Aspen (Triadica sebifera)

The Chinese Tallow leaves turn various colors of gold, maroon, purple and red in the fall. The small greenish white seed capsules stand out against the deep color tones.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
3:59 PM

Post #1752556

Texas Flowery Senna, Flowering Senna, Flowery Senna, Tree Senna, Argentina Senna, Buttercup Bush (Senna corymbosa), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, can be evergreen in southern most zones, small tree/large shrub

Senna corymbosa, a native of Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay, has attractive, pinnate, deep green leaves with huge clusters of rich buttercup yellow (yellow-gold) 1 inch or so blooms. It produces 3 to 4 inch seedpods in the fall. It is easy to grow, requires a sunny location in well drained soil and is very drought tolerant. In addition, it is a host to butterfly caterpillars. This plant would make a lovely addition to any landscape, especially wildscapes and xeriscapes.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/60780/index.html

It is literally covered with blooms. This photo does not do the plant justice, but at least it provides an image of its growth habit.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
4:03 PM

Post #1752563

Texas Flowery Senna, Flowering Senna, Flowery Senna, Tree Senna, Argentina Senna, Buttercup Bush (Senna corymbosa)

The seedpods are shown here. The small leaves are a lovely deep green which makes the buttercup yellow (yellow-gold) blooms really standout.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
4:05 PM

Post #1752567

Texas Flowery Senna, Flowering Senna, Flowery Senna, Tree Senna, Argentina Senna, Buttercup Bush (Senna corymbosa)

The blooms...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 11, 2005
6:32 PM

Post #1752794

Bead Tree, Persian Lilac, Pride of India, Pride of China, Chinaberry, Umbrella Tree, White Cedar, Paraiso, Indian Lilac, Lelah (Melia azedarach), Meliaceae Family, naturalized, deciduous, blooms from mid-spring through early summer, can be invasive

This tree prefers well drained, alkaline soils and is a very fast grower. I have many fond memories of the ones growing in my yard as a child. The blooms are beautiful and smell great. It has its drawbacks: the blooms and berries can make a mess when the fall, the limbs are brittle and break easily, suckers appear around its base, seeds itself prolifically, can be killed by root rot and is considered invasive in many locales.

For more information and great photos of the blooms and berries, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/51724/index.html

The shiny, deep green, delicate leafed chinaberry tree brings back found memories of my youth when my six brothers and I would have chinaberry fights when the berries turned green. The blooms are beautiful. A not so good photo of one growing on a creek bank ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
2:59 AM

Post #1753674

Japanese Privet, Waxleaf Privet (Ligustrum japonicum), Oleaceae Family,
naturalized, evergreen, small tree/shrub, blooms from early spring through early summer

Nice leathery deep green foliage, fragrant white blooms and purple berries make this a desirable landscape plant.

For more information, see its entry inthe PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/51523/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
3:01 AM

Post #1753677

Japanese Privet, Waxleaf Privet (Ligustrum japonicum)

Berries shown iin October which turn purple as they mature ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
3:48 AM

Post #1753727

Chinese Pistache, Chinese Pistachio (Pistacia chinensis), Anacardiaceae Family, naturalized, deciduous, blooms in spring

Chinese pistache has beautiful lightish green leaves and great fall color. It may need to be topped when first planted to encourage lateral branching. It grows very fast into a nice shade tree. Mine has been a bit messy when the fruit drop. I wish I had not planted it near my patio.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57160/index.html
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
4:14 AM

Post #1753758

Castor Bean, Caster Oil Plant, Mole Bean, Higuera Infernal (Ricinus communis), Euphorbiaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, large shrub/small tree, blooms June through August, on invasive plant lists in California and Florida

Castor bean is a fast growing large shrub or small tree (can attain a height of 16 feet or more) which has beautiful foliage. It is one of the most toxic plants around and should be planted with caution in mind.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/70/index.html



htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


September 12, 2005
4:17 AM

Post #1753761

Castor Bean, Caster Oil Plant, Mole Bean, Higuera Infernal (Ricinus communis)

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
3:58 AM

Post #1794410

Ashe Juniper, Post Cedar, Mountain Cedar, Blueberry Juniper (Juniperus ashei)

(Other photos shown above)
Female cones ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
5:37 PM

Post #1795228

Prairie Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata)

(Other photos shown above)

Photographed in Blanco, Texas.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
5:39 PM

Post #1795230

Prairie Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata)

It may be considered a large shrub or small tree.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
5:40 PM

Post #1795234

Prairie Sumac, Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata)

Closeup of the fruit ...


This message was edited Oct 3, 2005 5:16 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
10:28 PM

Post #1795716

Prairie Sumac, Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata)

Beautiful foliage and fruit shown at the first of October before the leaves have changed color ...

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 3, 2005
10:29 PM

Post #1795717

Prairie Sumac, Flameleaf Sumac (Rhus lanceolata)

A close look at the fruit ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 5, 2005
6:11 PM

Post #1858639

(Texas Native ) Bald Cypress, Taxodium distichum. A beautiful specimen in my neighborhood.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
12:21 AM

Post #1994165

Texas madrone (Arbutus xalapensis), Ericaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, evergreen, blooms late winter through spring

This tree is has beautiful mahogany colored bark that peels in the winter. Its small bell-shaped blooms are white to pink and appear in clusters. They are followed by small orangish-red to red fruit that add winter interest.

For more information and great photos of the blooms and berries, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58429/index.html

A view of a specimen at the San Antonio Botanical Garden ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
12:24 AM

Post #1994174

Texas madrone (Arbutus xalapensis)

A view of the fruit on the tree which appears in clusters (only one left from this cluster) ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


January 23, 2006
12:27 AM

Post #1994188

Texas madrone (Arbutus xalapensis)

A closeup view of one of the bumpy fruit that has fallen from the tree and is ripening ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
4:46 PM

Post #2077272

Mexican Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens), Ericaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen, blooms January through March

Mexican manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens) is also known as point-leaf manzanita, bear-berry, kinnikinnick, pinguica, palo de pinguica and Manzana. It natively inhabits woodlands, sunny woodland edges, rocky slopes, ridges and chaparrals. It often forms dense thickets. In Texas, it can be found in only two populations in the Trans-Pecos, although it grows west to California and north to Utah. Mexican manzanita is a low-maintenance plant and a lovely ornamental with its crooked branches for the landscape, but is difficult to find commercially.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/99670/index.html

Its growth habit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
4:48 PM

Post #2077278

Mexican Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens)

The bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
4:52 PM

Post #2077282

Mexican Manzanita (Arctostaphylos pungens

The 10 to 15 white to light pink, waxy, bell-shaped flowers appear in clusters at the ends of branches from January to March.
caraboof
Spring, TX
(Zone 9b)

February 28, 2006
7:16 PM

Post #2077533

htop, frostweed, what a lovely thread. There is a large shrub/small tree at my work that has large (fist sized) blossom clusters in a dark periwinkle/lilac. leaves are smallish. is it a laurel, perhaps?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2006
11:08 PM

Post #2077984

It really sounds like it, does it smell like grape coolaid? If it has that type of scent, it has to be Texas Mountain Laurel.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
11:23 PM

Post #2078013

Thanks caraboof. I agree with Josephine ... probably is Texas Mountain Laurel. They are just starting to put out bloom buds in my zone.
Here's the PlantFIle link:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/37018/
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
11:31 PM

Post #2078024

Texas Mountain Laurel, Mescal Bean (Sophora secundiflora), Papilionaceae Family, shrub or small tree, evergreen, blooms in late winter through early spring

Cross-refernced in Texas Gardening: Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs )

Growth habit ...

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2006
11:34 PM

Post #2078028

Hazel, that is the most beautiful one I have ever seen.
Where was this picture taken? Amazing!
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
11:35 PM

Post #2078032

Texas Mountain Laurel, Mescal Bean (Sophora secundiflora)

Bloom buds ...


This message was edited Feb 28, 2006 6:37 PM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


February 28, 2006
11:39 PM

Post #2078037

Josephine, we have many, many latge beautiful specimens like this one in San Antonio, It is growing in an older neighborhood here so it must be fairly old.
aprilwillis
Missouri City, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 1, 2006
10:30 AM

Post #2078859

You guys are great resources! These are all gorgeous trees. My oven experience, for those who may not have tried some of these, any of the Bird of Paradise trees are easy to grow, very forgiving and put on a great show! The Dessert Willow is also very forgiving- I got one last year as a birthday gift. I had always wanted one because I think they are beautiful- turns out they are not only pretty, but the flowers smell nice as well. That was news to me. My Anacacho Orchid, purchased last year, is young and had only a few flowers last year. Now it is covered with flowers. I love it and also it is easy to grow.
On my wish list for this year is Jeruselum Thorn- they are pretty. There is an apartment complex in Sugar Land that uses 3 or 4 of them along the parking lot- separates the parking lot from the street, so last year I watched them and while many other trees seemed to wither with the heat and drought, they were going strong and just beautiful.
Thanks for all the great pictures!

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2006
1:28 PM

Post #2079104

You are welcome, aren't Texas plants beautiful? More people need to get aquainted with them.
Josephine.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 1, 2006
11:31 PM

Post #2080265

The Texas Mountain Laurel is one of my favorite small trees. My mother had one that was about 10' tall. It is such a slow grower that I've been looking for a large potted one otherwise I'll never live to see it reach a respectable size. I have a 4 year old that's about 6" tall because my DH has shredded it 3 times.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2006
3:25 AM

Post #2080746

Hello Veronica, maybe you need to build some kind of enclosure around it, so he won't cut it down again by accident.
Josephine.
bettydee
La Grange, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 3, 2006
8:36 PM

Post #2084397

I need a large tomato cage. This year the little fig trees I planted in October will be in danger also. I mustn't forget the hose. It used to be one two hundred foot hose. There are 2 splices on it now. I hope my tickweed comes back this year. He got those several times last year , too. :-)
Veronica

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 28, 2006
12:30 PM

Post #2144750

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, blooms late winter through early summer (intermittenly there after), considered a Category I invasive in Florida

This tree growing near downtown San Antonio has one of the most beautiful blooms I have ever seen. Most of the blooms are 4 to 5 inches across and the tree is covered with them right now. It has been blooming for some time. The blooms are followed by long seed pods. It is winter hardy to 22°F. The Purple Orchid tree does best in acidic soil and are off green under limey conditions and it is not tolerant of salty conditions.

Note: It is often mistaken for Bauhinia purpurea. Bauhinia variegata blooms have petals that overlap; whereas, B. purpurea bloom petals do not overlap. B. variegata blooms, which are self-pollinating, have 5 to 6 stamina (pl. for stamen); whereas, B. purpurea blooms have 3 to 4 stamina. There are other differences as well.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2403/index.html

The growth habit ... This photo doesn't do it justice.


This message was edited Dec 4, 2006 4:01 AM
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 28, 2006
12:33 PM

Post #2144755

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata)

A photo giving a bloom size perspective ... notice the colors of the faded blooms.

htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 28, 2006
12:35 PM

Post #2144758

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata)

A beautiful bloom showing how the petals overlap ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 28, 2006
12:36 PM

Post #2144761

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata),

A closer view ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2006
5:15 PM

Post #2223550

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, blooms late winter through early summer (intermittenly there after)

This plant is covered which white blooms in the spring. It will bloom less heavily intermittenly throughout the summer and sometimes into early fall.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/130370/index.html

The bloom ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2006
5:17 PM

Post #2223553

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

The leaf ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2006
5:18 PM

Post #2223560

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

New leaves ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2006
5:20 PM

Post #2223564

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

Limb bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


April 26, 2006
5:22 PM

Post #2223569

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

The unripe seedpods ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
9:25 PM

Post #2811251

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia), Ulmaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen to deciduous, typically blooms August through September, fruit ripens from September to October (flowering dates have been reported as early as July and fruiting as late as November. When flowers appear in August, fruit ripens in September, and then a second flowering and fruiting may occur in October and November, respectively), known to cause severe allergy reactions similar to ragweed reactions

The cedar elm is used frequently as a street tree and small shade tree in the desert southwest due to its ability to survive in difficult soil types with very little care. It is relatively fast growing ang long living. If you need a vertical tree that is more tall than broad, cedar elm fits the bill. It is commonly named "cedar elm" because it is often found with ashe juniper which is locally called "cedar." Leaf fall is late in the year, often in early winter and It provides vivid yellow color to the landscape (except in the southern part of the tree's range where it is evergreen). Because the leaves are small and they decompose quickly, they do not need to be raked. It is one of two native Texas elms that flower and set seed in the fall.

Cedar Elm is the most widespread native elm in Texas. Growing in all areas of the eastern half of Texas, it can not be found natively in the extreme southeastern part. It usually is found on moist, limestone soils along water courses such as in flat river bottom areas (cedar elm flats') and wooded areas near riverbanks. But it also grows on dry limestone hills; however, the tree is small and scrubby in this environment. It grows in dense, poorly drained clay soils (vertisols) in central Texas. It is adaptable to various soils; but prefers moist to dry alkaline soils. It can be seen growing in sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay, caliche type soils. Cedar elm can thrive in heavy, poorly drained clay soils and soils that are moderately compacted. .

Native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=ULCR

Its twigs are pubescent and reddish brown. The brown to reddish, but more often gray, bark has ridges flattened and broken into thin, loose scales and only forms on mature trunks, limbs and branches after a minimum of 5 yrs. The oblique based leaves are small, 2.5 - 5 cm long and 1.3 - 2 cm wide.

The reddish-purple flowers are so small that they are inconspicuous. They are produced in fascicles of three to five on slender, pubescent pedicels located in the axils of the leaves. The red-to-green, hairy calyx is divided into four to eight equal and acute lobes. The stamen is composed of five or six slender filaments and reddish purple anthers. The green, 6 to 13 mm (0.25 to 0.5 in) long, pubescent fruit (samara) is oblong and flattened, with a deep notch at the apex. They mature quickly in the fall. The seed within samura are acute, unsymmetrical and covered with a dark chestnut brown coat. The seeds are disseminated by wind with germination occuring the following spring. Air-dried seeds may be stored at 4° C (39° F) for at least I year. Stratification at 5° C (41° F) for 60 to 90 days before sowing may increase germination rates. Because they are fall-ripening, plant after winter storage and stratification.

The seeds are part of the diet of several bird species. In south Texas, including chachalaca, pheasants, quail, songbirds and wild turkey. Dead cedar elms provide nesting sites for cavity-dwelling birds. It provides cover for wildlife and squirrels and deer eat the buds as well as the seeds. In addition, other small mammals eat the seeds. It is a larval host for the Mourning Cloak butterfly, Question Mark butterfly.

The wood is very strong and has good shock resistance so the lumber is mixed with other southern elm species and sold as r"ock elm". Rock elm is Ulmus thomasii; but, cedar elm goes by this name as well. Their specific gravity and shrinkage are quite similar. Furniture and fence posts are made from it. Because it is well suited to steam bending, it is used to make containers such as barrels, baskets, boxes and crates to name a few. Caskets and dairy, poultry, and apiary supplies are other products made from the wood.

For more informatio, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/82851/index.html

The small leaves which are somwhat rough ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
9:28 PM

Post #2811257

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia)

The fruit ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


October 12, 2006
9:30 PM

Post #2811262

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia)

The bark ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
9:31 AM

Post #2966798

Orchid Tree, Red Bauhinia, Nasturtium Bauhinia, African Plume, Pride of De Kaap (Bauhinia galpinii), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, large vine-likreshrub, small tree, blooms mid-summer through mid-fall

This tree with a vine-like growth habit is real traffic stopper in late summer and fall when it produces beautiful blooms which are a reddish-orange color that is defficult to describe. It can easily be trained into an attractive small tree or large shrub. In its native habitat (South Africa), the long fbranches are frequently used by the local people for weaving baskets and for the construction of roof trusses for their huts. Although, I have read it will not live in Zone 8b, I found one growing near downtoen San Antonio. I have stopped many times this fall to see the beautiful blooms. Until it is about 3 years old, it must be protected from freezes. It is not suitable for a small garden. Prune in early spring.

The flowers ...
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


December 4, 2006
9:37 AM

Post #2966803

Orchid Tree, Red Bauhinia, Nasturtium Bauhinia, African Plume, Pride of De Kaap (Bauhinia galpinii)

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58957/index.html

Shown as the setting sun lights up the area beneath its spreading canopy (Posts are supporting a palm tree) ...
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 26, 2007
9:42 AM

Post #3432515

Sand-Paper Tree, Anacua, Knock-Away Tree
Ehretia anacua Boraginaceae (Borage family)

Anacua is an ornamental native tree found in south Texas, north to Travis County, and in Mexico. It is hardy to 10 degrees F. It is well adapted to Houston, and can be grown as far north as Dallas but will suffer from die back in hard winters. Anacua most often grows in calcareous soil but will thrive in arid, sandy soil. Very drought tolerant and generally not subject to disease.

Anacua can be up to 50 feet or more, but more often a moderate sized tree of 15-40 feet, often multi-trunked or with suckers clustering around the main stocky trunk. Mature trees have an interesting, gnarled, and stocky appearance with a dense, rounded crown. Anacua forms dense thickets in its natural habitat of alluvial woods, which is where I found it. Their extensive root system provides erosion control on stream beds and hillsides. Anacua’s moderate size works well for small front and side yards, and commercial plantings with limited space. Its only disadvantage is that the abundant berries can cause messy litter on walks, drives, and patios.

Thick furrowed bark separates into thin gray or reddish scales. Dark green oval-shaped pinnate, somewhat toothed leaves have a sandpapery feel. Provides heavy shade year around, with old leaf drop occurring in the Spring. Grass does not typically grow underneath them, but found many species of wildflowers growing underneath them in the woods

Anacua has two main flowering periods: April/May and again August/ September. Fragrant star flowers are held in large showy white clusters at the ends of branches. Ripened fruit of orange-red drupes, ¼-1/4 inches wide, appear about six weeks later, and are quite showy against the contrasting dark foliage. Birds are very fond of the fruit, which is edible to humans as well.

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68610/index.html
http://wildflower.utexas.edu/gallery/species.php?id_plant=EHAN

The flowers do not last long on the trees and as you can see I actually missed the flowers this year. I am hoping for another short burst with that last rain. You can also see some of the branches have been burned back by that three day run of real cold weather we had here in the hill country.
KayeTX
San Antonio, TX

April 26, 2007
9:52 AM

Post #3432541

Sand-Paper Tree, Anacua, Knock-Away Tree
Ehretia anacua Boraginaceae (Borage family)

The many trunks of a young Anacua tree.

This message was edited Apr 26, 2007 1:18 PM

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2007
10:57 AM

Post #3432792

I love the Anacua tree, but I am afraid it would be too risky here.
Thank you for posting Kaye, it is nice to see more native plant lovers on the Texas forum.
Josephine.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2007
1:26 AM

Post #3449737

Escarpment Black Cherry, Prunus serotina var. eximia is found in the Edwards Plateau and can grow up to 45 to 50 feet. It's often found along creeks or other occasionally moist areas. The leaves turn yellow in the fall.It flowers in mid-spring, with long clusters of white flowers hanging from branches and small berries are later found to attract wildlife. It's a host plant for certain butterfly species. In the hilly dry-creek area I live in, it's fairly common. I suspect the wildlife in the area help spread the seeds.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2007
7:53 AM

Post #3450046

Oh Linda, I would love to have one of those, maybe you can gather me up a seedling for the next R.U. Please?
Josephine.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
1:29 AM

Post #3453759

Of course, I could pot one up. Goodness, there's enough of those little ones around here! Here's another shot of one.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2007
6:09 AM

Post #3453899

Kaye, thanks for the photo of the knock-away tree. I had never seen one before. It is great that it has 2 blooming seasons.

Linda, I had seen an escarpment black cherry blooming last year and didn't know what it was. Thanks for the photo.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
7:56 AM

Post #3454085

Oh Linda, you are such a sweetheart, how could I ever repay you.
Josephine.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2007
2:56 AM

Post #3787877

Carolina Buckthorn, Rhamnus caroliniana is a large shrub or small tree to 30 feet tall. Its habitat is often moist woods, bottomlands and along streams. It can also grow in drier areas, such as in the Hill Country. It has small, light green flowers in the late springtime or early summer. The berries vary, earlier on green, then may turn pink or reddish, or just turn dark and black. The berries aren't edible to humans, although some birds eat them.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2007
7:22 PM

Post #3789842

Here it is blooming. I've been having trouble with my provider, I think, so very hard to get pics posted.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #4648558

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca), Solanaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen, blooms mid-March through November (warm climates, all year), all parts are poisonous

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=NIGL

Tree tobacco is small, evergreen tree or shrub with a loose-branching habit. It grows between 6 and 25 feet tall; however, it is usually between 6 and 15 feet tall. The opposite, smooth, large lance-shaped leaves appear on short stalks and clasp the stems. The thickish, oblong, silvery blue-green, rubbery leaves are opposite each other low on the branches. Lacking stalks, the upper leaves lie in an upward angle against the branches. They become smaller as they near the end of the branches near the flowering portion. The bark has a waxy coating.

Tree tobacco usually blooms from mid-March through November; however, in warm climates it will bloom all year. The up to 2-inch (5 cm) long, tubular flowers are loosely clustered at the branch tips. The flowers attract hummingbirds and are pollinated by butterflies and moths.

Nicotiana glauca is propagated by cuttings or by seed. Seed should be surface-sown because they need light to germinate. They can be sown in the spring; however, for an earlier and, thus, longer bloom time, start the seeds about 8 to10 weeks before the usual last frost date.

Tree tobacco contains the toxic alkaloid anabasine and all parts of the evergreen plant are toxic year-round. In Texas, cattle and horses are most frequently poisoned. Tree tobacco has been publicized as a safe, hallucinogenic plant on some internet websites; however, smoking and/or ingesting the plant has lead to death. The use of Nicotiana glauca derivatives is being studied as a possible treatment for nicotine addiction because it does not contain nicotine.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51448/

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) blooms ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:20 AM

Post #4648601

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Bloom cluster ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:26 AM

Post #4648639

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Bloom buds and immature fruit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #4648661

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Blooms and leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:31 AM

Post #4648689

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #4648703

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:35 AM

Post #4648712

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:55 AM

Post #4648794

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Seedlings ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.
htop
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)


March 11, 2008
1:56 AM

Post #4648803

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

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