Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Grasses,Ornamental & Others)

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Texas Native Grass, Picture and description courtesy of Htop.
Sweetgrass, ( Hierochloe odorata ) Height; 18 inches zones 5-9 light sun to part shade.
Used by Native Americans in religious ceremonies.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/50020/index.html


This message was edited Aug 2, 2005 2:44 PM

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Sea Oats, ( Chasmanthium latifolium ) Lovely Perennial grass for the ornamental garden.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/798/index.html

This message was edited Aug 2, 2005 2:41 PM

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Close up od Sea Oats seed heads.

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Native ) Lindheimer Muhly ( Muhlenbergia lindheimeri ) Lovely perennial ornamental grass, well suited for the natural garden.
See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57056/index.html

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Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

( Naturalized ) Jonhsongrass ( Sorghum halepense ) Introduced plant from Europe, some times used for ornamental purposes, but mainly disliked by farmers. See plant files, http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/978/index.html

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Richmond, TX(Zone 9a)

frostweed, is the lindheimer muhly the same as pink muhly grass that you see growing in galveston area? turns pink in late summer and moves so beautifully in the wind, ahh....

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I beleive it is, althoug I have not seen it blooming in Galveston.
Josephine.

Richmond, TX(Zone 9a)

i got a tiny division in trade this year. right now all green, wonder it I'll see it turn red/pink. this is such a pretty grass! Also the mexican feather grass. I love to see that one dancing in the wind.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Johnsongrass ( Sorghum halepense), naturalized, listed as a noxious weed in many states

Johnson grass is very difficult to eliminate. The roots really grow deeply and are very tough. Be careful when pulling it so your hands aren't cut by the sharp blades.

A view of the young inflorescence ...

This message was edited Aug 4, 2005 5:45 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Paspalum, Dallis Grass (Paspalum dilatatum), Poaceae Family, naturalized, perennial, blooms most of the year, starts declining in late summer and is dormant through the winter

A perennial cluster grass, it is grown as pasture grass (usually mixed with legumes) for grazing by usually cattle and horses in the southern United States. It is a fast growing perennial that grows on a wide variety of soils. Dallis grass does best on moist, alluvial, fertile clays and loamy bottom lands. Withstanding extreme drought due to its extensive root system, it requires adequate rainfall at some time of the year. It is often seeded into rice fields in Texas and Louisiana. After being introduced, it now has naturalized in the USA and is primarily a weed of turfgrass and lawns, but occurs in pastures and along roadsides. Dallis grass is a major weed of wetland edges and wet native grasslands.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/77527/index.html

Dallis grass growing in my St. Agustine grass right before I pulled it up ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Paspalum, Dallis Grass (Paspalum dilatatum)

A close view of the base ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Paspalum, Dallis Grass (Paspalum dilatatum)

A view of the very identifiable seeds being produced ...

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Yellow Nutsedge, Weedy Yellow Nutsedge, Earth Nut, Weedy Nutsedge, Weedy Nutgrass (Cyperus esculentus var. esculentus), naturalized and Texas native, perennial, blooms late spring to early fall, listed as a noxious weed in several states, but not Texas

I am listing this plant here even though it is a sedge instead of a grass because it is a grass-like plant and a lot of people would assune it is a grass.

The chufa eaten by people are not the kind of nutsedge (weedy) I am describing here. That type is Cyperus esculentus var. sativus (cultivated nutsedge) and is also known as tiger nuts and earth-almonds. Herein, is where some of the confusion lies about this plant.

This cultivated aanual yellow nutsedge does not have the over-wintering capability of the perennial yellow nutsedge and is grown as an annual plant. It does not produce the huge number of seeds that is typical of the perennial nutsedge. In Massachusetts, it was reported that weedy nutsedge produced 605 MILLION seeds per hectare which is equal to 10,000 square meters or a little more than 2.47 acres (1). A single nutsedge tuber is able to propagate close to 1900 plants and 7000 tubers annually (2). The weedy nutsedge tubers are a grayish brown color; whereas, the cultivated Chufa tubers are grayish orange color. The cultivated variety's tuber is much larger than the weedy variety's tuber.

If I could add a 1000 more negatives to this plant in the PlantFiles, I would. Once you do not fight it constantly, it will gradually kill almost all of the low growing plants by not permitting them to receive any light. I am not sure if they also effect the growth of the other plants by robbing the soilof nutrients and/or production of allelochemicals.which has been suggested by some research studies. I do know that I have had difficulty growing certain plants as transplants and with seed germination in the areas where the nutsedge has been prolifically growing for years. It does not seem to effect larkspur, moss rose, purselane, Texas bluebonnets nor lantana. But, all of the roses as well as many types of bulbs and other plants are unable to grow in these areas (but to be fair, I can't blame on the nutsedge - it might just be a coincidence.)

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/105965/index.html

Young weedy nutsedge, weedy nutgrass (Cyperus esculentus var. esculentus) growing in the crack between my sidewalk and street curb and an adjacent small flowerbed to the right where I have attempted to remove them for years and years ...

This message was edited Aug 4, 2005 6:28 AM

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Yellow Nutsedge, Weedy Yellow Nutsedge, Earth Nut, Weedy Nutsedge, Weedy Nutgrass (Cyperus esculentus var. esculentus)

Young weedy nutsedge, weedy nutgrass (Cyperus esculentus var. esculentus) growing through the street asphalt next to my street curb ... you can see in the middle of the photo where I have damaged the curb in previous attempts to remove the plants.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Silver Beardgrass, Silver Beard Grass, Silver Bluestem (Andropogon saccharoides var. torreyanus), Texas native, some consider a weed; in the fall, it turns red, purple or burnt orange with the color persisting into the winter


This common bunch (clumping) grass that likes dry soil can be used in a prairie, meadow or wildscape and even as an accent plant. It attracts songbirds who eat its seeds. The Kiowa are thought to have used the stems as toothpicks.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/108484/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Silver Beardgrass, Silver Beard Grass, Silver Bluestem (Andropogon saccharoides var. torreyanus)

I forgot to mention that this is a perennial grass.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Windmill Grass, Finger Grass (Chloris sp.), Perrenial, Texas native

I am unable to absolutely determine the species of this grass, but it is a Texas native.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Windmill Grass, Finger Grass (Chloris sp.)

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Windmill Grass, Finger Grass (Chloris sp.)

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Windmill Grass, Finger Grass (Chloris sp.)


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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Giant Reed, Spanish Cane, Reed Grass (Arundo donax), Poaceae Family, naturalized, perennial

It is a perennial grass that can grow to over 20 feet tall. Giant reed propers in well drained soils where abundant moisture is available such as streams, ditches and riverbanks and grows in many soil types from heavy clays to loose sands. It has fleshy, creeping rootstocks which form compact masses. Its tough, fibrous roots penetrate deeply into the soil. Giant reed root and stem fragments can float for miles and may take root and initiate new infestations. It has a rapid growth rate which makes it possible for it to quickly invade new areas forming pure stands. The 1-2 inches wide and 12 inches long leaves are elongated. The flowers appear on 2-foot long, dense, plume-like panicles during August and September. I would not recommend planting giant reed grass as an ornamental plant. It took over a large portion of our yard when I was a child and took years and years to eradicate.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/75416/index.html

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west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Vossner--this is pink gulf coast muhly:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/88971/index.html


Muhlenbergia capillaris* Gulf Coast Muhly
2' tall purple(really more pink--I guess that parts subjective)
blooms:Aug-Oct

I will get a pic of it as soon as I can.
Debbie

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Grass, Rescue Grass (Bromus catharticus), Poaceae Family, naturalized, annual,/short lived perennial, some consider it a weed, cool season grass, seeds produced in spring

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/96564/index.html

Rescue grass (rescuegrass), prairie grass is a tufted annual or perennial to 1m tall. It has loosely folded, glabrous leaves. A native of South America, it was introduced as a pasture grass. It is a common lawn weed and can infest wheat and other crop fields. It may grow to 2.5 feet high on a variety of soils, and is usually found natively in disturbed areas or overgrazed pastures. Rescue grass got its name for coming to ranchers' "rescue" providing forage and soil cover during times of drought. White-tailed deer may graze it during the winter. The leaf blades are up to 12 inches long and about 1/2 to 3/4 inch wide. They may be hairy on the upperside only and the sheath may be hairy on the lower leaves. The inflorescence is a large, open, drooping panicle to 40cm long composed of compact, glabrous, awnless spikelets. The spikelets appear on pedicels and are up to 1 3/4 inch long, 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide and have 4 to 9 flowers. Its seeds are flattened, terminating in a short awn 1 to 3 mm long, and its leaves are broader than those of other brome species.

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Grass (Sorghastrum nutans), Poaceae Family, native, blooms September through February,

Indiangrassis an herbaceous perennial bunchgrass and prefers the open prairie to the woodland habitats. Its usual height is 3 to 5 feet and width is 1 to 2 feet. Indian grass is frequently planted alongside highways both as an ornamental and to control erosion. It provides high quality forage for wildlife and livestock and can, if cut before the flower stalks develop, produce excellent hay.

The leaf blades have open sheaths, with the lower sheaths usually hairy and the upper ones smooth. The panicles (flowering heads) are much branched and usually slightly nodding. However, they appear dense due to the many yellowish, golden-brown to reddish spikelets and the silvery hairs on the branches and spikelet stalks. The fertile spikelets end with a usually bent awn If you hold the base of a flowering head, then run your hand upwards, it feels smooth and almost greasy. The flowering heads of most other grasses are rougher to the touch

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/72831/index.html

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Grass (Sorghastrum nutans)

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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tall Grama Grass, Tall Hairy Grama Grass, Tall Hairy Eyebrow Grass (Bouteloua hirsuta var. pectinata), Poaceae Family, native, blooms June through September in Texas, height 18-36 inches

Tall Hairy Grama (Bouteloua hirsuta var. pectinata) is a native bunch grass which can be found in Texas and Oklahoma. It is differientiated from hairy grama ((Bouteloua hirsuta) by its taller, more robust size. Like Hairy Grama Graas, the inflorescence has a distinctive extension that projects beyond the inflorescence axis on which the spikelets are borne.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/133942/index.html

Shown as it dries ...

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