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Hibiscus: This was too die for, a must must must have.

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Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
7:49 PM

Post #1777449

Sue (Calif_Sue) and I went to the Berkeley Botanical Gardens to visit with Marilyn (faeden) yesterday. They had a tree of this. And I am talking about a TREE not a bush.

We both went nuts simultaneously.

So where do we buy it?? Anyone know??? We are desperate for it.

Know the name??

This message was edited Sep 25, 2009 10:23 AM

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Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
8:07 PM

Post #1777490

Could this possibly be Confederate Rose, Cotton Rose????

Oh my. Does a Confederate Rose grow into a tree with a thick trunk and branches??

Thumbnail by Kell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
8:08 PM

Post #1777493

I see Confederate rose comes in all colors and even doubles.

Is this one??

Thumbnail by Kell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
8:14 PM

Post #1777500

Kell I don't have any of the single but here is a picture of mine. Did they have different colot blooms. The confederate rose will open light pink and then turn dark pink or I have another that opens white and then turns pink the next day. It will have two different color blooms on it at the same time when it is in full bloom. Here's the pink. Maybe you can tell by the leaves.

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
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Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
8:16 PM

Post #1777503

Here's the white one. I have never seen a single but Soulgardenlove, Susan, told me last week that she had the single She might know if that it is or not.

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
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Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
8:16 PM

Post #1777505

Here's the bloom when it first opens. White

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
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Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
8:23 PM

Post #1777511

The Confederate Rose can grow into as high as 30 ft. The tallest one of mine is about 12 feet high and one is about 8 and another one about 3. The white is about 8 ft tall. The oldest is 3 years old. I was wondering if there were any of them in California. You want a cutting or two when I cut them back? The pink ones I bought and the white one I rooted from a limb that a gril I worked with gave me. They say they are easy to root. It took me forever to get the white to root. Seems I always have trouble with white flowers rooting. ?????? The reason I haven't tried to root the pink is because I paid only $5 for a gallon pot and thought that was cheap enough with out spending time trying to root.
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
8:25 PM

Post #1777512

Meant to add the bloom of the pink. Here she is.

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
8:30 PM

Post #1777524

Oh my gosh, Jim. Be still my double pink heart. That last picture has my name all over it. I NEED it. LOL What zone is it hardy too?

All of yours are so beautiful. I do not understand why they are not all over here. I have never seen one before. And I get around.

Sue will go nuts when she sees all your colors. You are a lucky man!

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 23, 2005
8:36 PM

Post #1777529

Oh man I AM going nuts! Are they easy to root from stem cuttings? Water or starter mix and baggie over it? The leaves look the same as the one we saw but I only saw all pink, nothing lighter on any blooms as shown in the large plant pic kell posted. Maybe this is just some un-named hybrid. It was just stunning, such a bright pink and rich green foliage!

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
8:42 PM

Post #1777541

OHHH so they are all from the same tree? WOW. Oh Sue, be still our pink hearts.

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 23, 2005
8:45 PM

Post #1777549

Yes, can you imagine, ALL those shades on ONE plants! Just think of the room you can save if we could have that in all the plants we like! Grafted or natural, an ever changing collage of colors all on one plant! Sigh...
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2005
10:00 PM

Post #1777668

The light pink turns to a dark pink the next day and the white turns to a medium pink the next day.
I am in zone 7 and did a search and it says zone 8-10. But I see them around here all the time. I have seen one that was about 30 feet tall. That was where I bought mine they rooted them off of the cuttings from it when they cut it back, Everyone says they are easy to root. I plan on trying some of the pink ones this year when I cut them back to see if they root.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 23, 2005
10:34 PM

Post #1777742

We are begging, Jim. Aren't we Sue?
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 23, 2005
11:17 PM

Post #1777789

You don't have to beg folks, cuttings are plentiful and they really are easy to root. I have never even tried to start them from seed but I suspect that would be easy too. It is still warm here and mine have not even started to bloom but it is quite a show when they do.
I would hate to sacrifice a flower but as soon as they are finished blooming I would be happy to share cuttings.
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2005
12:20 AM

Post #1777903

Mine needs a home in California. Send me your address and I will send cuttings as soon as I cut them back. It will be a while before they quit blooming. Ardesia do you have white and pink, single or double?
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 24, 2005
1:30 AM

Post #1778005

I have the double 'mutabilis', it is the one that changes color. I have a friend with the all pink one and that one blooms for a much longer period. That is next on my wish list.
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2005
2:00 AM

Post #1778047

Both of mine changes colors as the picture above shows.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 24, 2005
4:10 AM

Post #1778352

Jim, oh my gosh... that's a beauty.. yes, the ones I have bloomed so far are singles.. Here it is. I have a few that have not bloomed yet and they were planted late and new plants, so I'm really hoping that's what I have. I'd be elated!!

Here's my single:

Susan

Thumbnail by soulgardenlove
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soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 24, 2005
4:15 AM

Post #1778364

Kell... the leaves of your plants are ceratinly confederate rose. The gardener where my originals came from has one in his garden that is at least 20 feet high right now... and these are cut back down to the ground every year!! The roots put up new growth and they increase in size each year. He told me that it was only three years old. However, your in a much warmer climate... yours may not need to be cut back??

Susan

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 24, 2005
4:32 AM

Post #1778395

Oh Kell, why are we always drawn to these monsters? 20 ft? Where will we put it? and the huge passi too! Need more land!
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 24, 2005
1:13 PM

Post #1778703

They are monsters. One year I tried to keep one of mine smaller by repeatedly pruning it back by half. I cut it back once a month throughout the growing season until it set buds. Wouldn't you know that plant then grew like it was on steroids and by the time the buds opened it was as large as if I had not cut it back. I was rewarded with many more branches and flowers, but it was still too large for the spot it was in so I started new plants for different locations and had to destroy the big one. They are deciduous and leave a huge bare spot during the cooler months.
This is a photo of a 2 yr. old planted in partial shade. It has not received any supplimental water or food; nor have I pruned it back so it is kind of leggy. It is over 9' tall, not including that rogue branch that is growing up through the Live Oak.

Thumbnail by ardesia
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Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 24, 2005
3:04 PM

Post #1778919

Oh Oh, maybe we should just keep visiting Momma plant every month!

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 24, 2005
3:27 PM

Post #1778978

LOL.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 24, 2005
3:45 PM

Post #1779011

Oh come on! Put it in the front yard somewhere!! :)

Susan

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 24, 2005
4:44 PM

Post #1779145

Yea Sue, what has happened to your fit one more in attitude? LOL
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2005
5:13 PM

Post #1779197

Well if you decide you want a cutting let me know.
Susan I will have yours at the roundup. I am ready to see you girl.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 24, 2005
11:39 PM

Post #1779786

Thanks!!

Geez Jim, I'm getting fatter and had wanted to lose some weight the last time!! Oh well, know that your my true friend and wont mind :)

Kell, what about your yard? Ya got room for one fo those babies? How about you plant it in someone elses yard? That might be fun. I have this love oak in a pot that I've been going back and forth about planting. There was this very nice grassy area by the river where folks would bring their blankets and dogs and enjoy the day and now the good folks that run the govt funded place have seen fit to let it return to it's "natural state" and people can't enjoy it like they use to. I've been seriously considering planting the live oak there. I think it would be a great living testament to my rebellious personality.

Susan

Canna Jim gave me :)

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Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 25, 2005
1:14 AM

Post #1779949

Thanks for the picture Susan. I think that is King Humpert. I hope I spelled it correctly.
Kell I took this picture today of the pink CR. Wanted you to see how many buds are in the top of that thing. Now the tree in the background is a Mimosa. How many of those do you want? LOL

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 25, 2005
1:43 AM

Post #1780005

You're teasing us Georgeiaredclay! Where is that picture?
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 25, 2005
4:22 AM

Post #1780289

Well I thought I added it but here it is.

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 25, 2005
4:30 AM

Post #1780300

Just love the leaves on that plant too, and that is going to really pop when all those buds open!
Mimosa, no way, I am pulling them constantly from seeds coming from the neighbors tree over the fence.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 26, 2005
12:56 AM

Post #1781660

NICE! :)

Susan

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 25, 2009
5:39 PM

Post #7103433

I can't believe 4 years has gone by almost to the very day. We are all 4 years older! ICK!

I still do not have this plant!!! I dropped the PINK ball. LOL

I am reevaluating if the one Sue and I saw is really the one you all have. Are the leaves the same? The one we saw is a tree while the one Alice has looks more bush like. What do you all think?

The thing that brings this up is I saw a small one the other day planted. It was small and woody not big and lush with stems like the one Alice has. And of course I wanted it. LOL


This message was edited Sep 25, 2009 11:50 AM

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Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 25, 2009
5:40 PM

Post #7103437

Somethings never change. I am always in want or need. LOL

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Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


September 25, 2009
6:48 PM

Post #7103615

Oh my, a blast from the past, what fun to see this again!
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 25, 2009
10:30 PM

Post #7104278

Well the leaves look the same but mine grow more into a tree form than the one that ardesia posted above. Mine doesn't spread like that. I guess I forgot about promising cuttings. I'll see what I can do this year.
A friend that used to come and sit with Bobbie came and got a cutting while I was at work last year and she was successful in rooting it. Now the white one I rooted from a limb about 5 feet long that a friend gave me. I placed it in a 5 gallon jar that I had and it took forever but when I noticed the first root in the ground she went.
I think I can buy them next spring in gallon size pots for $5. That was the last price I remember seeing. The man that grows them usually comes in where I work on Saturday morning and I will ask him if he is planning on rooting some. If he is I will get all of you some next spring.
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2009
2:45 PM

Post #7109158

I've got 2 growing in pots that are ready to be put in the ground. ;-) I rooted those 2 without trouble but I tried just sticking some in some soil & nothing. The cuttings when put in water, develop the "white nodes" (?) just like the brugs do when you root them in water & from there it's a piece of cake. I bought cuttings on line.

good to see ya'll over here!

debbie

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 27, 2009
3:01 PM

Post #7109226

Not your fault Georgiaredclay. I dropped the ball. Thanks!

Debbie, what is the name on your cuttings? What colors did you get.

I am off today to see if I can find that tree again. It should be in total bloom and hard to miss. After looking at this thread the other day, I got all excited again to see it so I went back. I looked but could not find it. I wandered all over looking for it. It was so hot I thought I was going to die.
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2009
3:16 PM

Post #7109275

mine is exactly like Georgiaredclay's! nicknamed the "confederate rose", double blooms starting white changing to pink & a darker pink, all 3 colors on the same bush! Have fun on your outing!
trickiwoo
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 27, 2009
4:53 PM

Post #7109546

Deb, I would love a cutting from your CR. Want that with a passion. Or, have I already asked for that?

Judy
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2009
10:00 PM

Post #7110438

The man came in today and I asked if he was going to root some this year and he said yes. He told me he only rooted them every other year. For what reason I don't know. I will try to send cutting when I get ready to cut back. They haven't started to bloom yet but should in the next week or so. Then if you don't have any luck with rooting I will get some from the man next spring. He has two trees and they are probably 30 feet. I mean big.
Judy I will take care of a cutting for you.
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2009
10:59 PM

Post #7110620

Yay! Way to go Georgia, looks like they'll be a lot of happy DGers in the Hib forum.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


September 29, 2009
2:30 PM

Post #7116195

Gosh, 30 foot trees of bloom. That must be a grand sight.
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2009
3:52 PM

Post #7116413

Kell, wish I had seen this post before I went out of town. I just came back from Plant Delights and he had all sorts of hardy hibs, many I had never seen before.

You can train them to be what ever shape you like. A neighbor trained hers into a tree so she would have more real estate to plant underneath hers.
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

September 30, 2009
9:17 AM

Post #7118986

I just purchased two Hibiscus mutabilis double-blooms on eBay which arrived well rooted and in excellent condition from this eBay auction:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItemVersion&item=370248261160
Here is the seller’s page:
http://shop.ebay.com/dogwooderitternet/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_from=&_ipg=

I would not have believed that you could ship a healthy well rooted plant in a pot as small as was used. I moved the two H. mutabilis to larger pots and they will be house plants for the winter. The seller doesn’t currently have any listed for sale but I know he has them.

But forget about a H. mutabilis double-blooms too-die-for, how about a new H. mutabilis cultivar too-kill-for? There is a Hibiscus mutabilis spontaneous mutation by the name of Alma’s Star which has been patented and is available for sale.

Warning: If you click on the following link you may start ripping other Hibiscus out of your garden to make room for Alma’s Star!

Alma's Star
http://www.southerngrowers.com/alma's_star.htm

I have one plant on order directly from Southern Growers which should be arriving within the week. There are several websites, with VERY BAD Garden Watchdog ratings, offering Alam’s Star for sale, so I would recommend you purchase directly from the grower who is still shipping. Again, this plant will be a house guest for the winter.

Here are more pictures too-kill-for. If you have a pre-existing medical condition, do not open the second link below; you have been warned!

ALMA's STAR: A Confederate Rose By Any Other Name Takes Its Place In The Sun
http://www.alfafarmers.org/neighbors/neighborsStory.phtml?id=4504

Master Gardener Alma Bodiford Registers New Variety of Confederate Rose
http://www.alafarmnews.com/1206archive/1206bodiford.htm

Mike


This message was edited Sep 30, 2009 7:23 AM
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

September 30, 2009
1:19 PM

Post #7119448

I don't know what to say about that! How much did you pay for it & what size plant will you be getting. Sorry to be so nosey but I've never heard of it but it's a beauty for sure!
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 1, 2009
7:45 PM

Post #7124101

Davis1676,

If you go to the following page, click on the “BUY NOW OR INQUIRE” line to send an Email to Southern Growers requesting a price list. By return Email you will receive the prices including quantity discounts and shipping costs.

Alma's Star
http://www.southerngrowers.com/alma's_star.htm

As I don’t know DG’s policy on posting prices I will not do so but I would say that the price (quantity one) is about what I would pay for a quality cold-hardy Hibiscus at my local garden center. Shipping costs are also competitive.

Mike

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


October 1, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #7124119

As long as you are not the nursery owner/vendor or are not affiliated with it in any way, you can post anything to recommend (or not, as long as it's not slanderous) a plant or vendor. Please let us all know how your plants looks upon arrival.
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 1, 2009
8:25 PM

Post #7124199

Sue,

Thank you for the clarification on posting prices! Currently one Alma’s Star costs $19.99 and shipping is $7.95. In quantity eight the unit price is $16.99 and the total price is $135.92, with shipping $20.38 (15%). I am expecting delivery in about a week and will post a picture here and a report to the Garden Watchdog.

I will photograph the Hibiscus mutabilis double-blooms which I already have and post a picture here.

Mike
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 1, 2009
11:49 PM

Post #7124764

Thanks Mike, I've sent my request in!

deb
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

October 5, 2009
8:20 PM

Post #7138148

My Confederate Rose started to bloom Saturday. Here's a picture of it.

I call it yesterday, today and tomorrow.
A spent bloom from yesterday, a bloom for today and a white bud for tomorrow.

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

October 5, 2009
8:21 PM

Post #7138150

And here's the size of the bloom. I am 6'6" tall so the hand isn't a little hand. LOL

Thumbnail by Georgiaredclay
Click the image for an enlarged view.

trickiwoo
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2009
3:22 AM

Post #7139790

Jim, that is absolutely stunning. A really big WOW flower. Just love it. Got your cuttings
rooting. Thanks for sharing this beauty with us.

Judy
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 6, 2009
8:19 AM

Post #7140175

Here are the two Hibiscus mutabilis double-blooms which I purchased on eBay for $7.00 ($3.50 each) plus a shipping total of $5.75. The Hibiscus arrived in 3.25” high pots, one of which can be seen in the photograph. The plants are 10” high and were immediately transplanted into the pots you now see them in upon delivery. The cuttings were very well rooted and arrived in a triangular USPS shipping box and were in excellent condition. They will spend the New Jersey winter is a south facing window.

On the second shelf you can see some of the cold-hardy Hibiscus cuttings I am starting. I am also growing several cold-hardy Hibiscus species from seeds.

Mike

Thumbnail by Michael_Ronayne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


October 6, 2009
5:41 PM

Post #7141410

Beautiful blooms, Georgiaredclay!
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 25, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #7205078

My Alma’s Star Hibiscus mutabilis arrived on Thursday October 15, 2009 accompanied by extra product tags, photographs of which are attached this post. According to the product description, Alma’s Star should survive in Nutley New Jersey which is Zone 6B as a perennial. I have the advantage or disadvantage, depending on how you want to look at it, of living 9 miles from New York City’s Time Square and am well inside to New York heat island so my climate is more like Zone 7A than 6B. As long as New York keeps pumping out heat during the winter, Alma’s Star should be OK but I may not take a chance for the winter of 20010-2011. As the song says, “If you can make it here you can make it anywhere”.

Here is the Plant Patent application for Alma’s Star:

Hibiscus plant named Alma's Star
http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=Zz3IAAAAEBAJ

Mike

Thumbnail by Michael_Ronayne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 25, 2009
1:13 AM

Post #7205089

Alma’s Star arrived on Thursday October 15, 2009 just in time for the earliest snowfall in the recorded weather history of New Jersey. The Hibiscus mutabilis was well packed and the 3.5 inch square pot was secured within the shipping container and covered in plastic. The Hibiscus was 11 inches in height above the dirt but the leaves were a little wilted because of the cold weather. Southern Growers had suggested that I wait until spring to ship but I though I had a few extra weeks and insisted that they deliver in October which is usually safe in my section of New Jersey but not this year. Over the next week the two bottom leaves turned brown and fell off but the other leaves picked up and Alma’s Start is now doing well after 10 days in New Jersey. I have Alma’s Star in a southern facing window with my other two Hibiscus mutabilis double-flowers and am looking forward to the spring.

Unless I can find someone else in my locality who also has Hibiscus mutabilis I am going to have to conduct some controlled tests over the next few years to see just well how well Hibiscus mutabilis can survive a New Jersey winter, which if the lack of sunspots continues is going to become “interesting” in the coming years. From the descriptions I have read it is incredibly easy to root Hibiscus mutabilis so I may grow a few clones to see what I can get away with during the winter. With any luck, look for pictures next summer which is why I wanted to overwinter the Hibiscus in my home.

According to some papers I have read, Hibiscus mutabilis will hybridize with Hibiscus moscheutos but the hybrids are sterile because of chromosome mismatches. Fertility can be restored through chromosome doubling but it is not easy for a private citizen to gain access to the chemicals which work for Hibiscus. There are easily available agricultural chemicals which do work for some plant species but they are not effective for Hibiscus. If anyone has done chromosome doubling in Hibiscus, please send me a PM.

Mike
p.s. The attached photographs are pictures of the arrival and transplanting of my Alma’s Star in a larger pot for the winter.

This message was edited Oct 25, 2009 1:56 PM

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Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

November 23, 2009
3:54 PM

Post #7302277

I want to correct a mistake I made in my last post on this thread. I had indicated that the Alma’s Star appeared to be “a little wilted because of the cold weather”. After observing the three Hibiscus mutabilis in my collection, I realized the leaves of this Hibiscus hang vertically; a fact which was confirmed by photographs posted on the Internet.

All three of my Hibiscus mutabilis are doing very well and one of the two double-flower plants has grown over a foot in five weeks with limited access to sunlight. The second double-flower is sending up multiple new stems and appears to be ready the start growing seriously as well. The Alma’s Star has recovered from its journey and is starting to set new leaves.

In the attached group photograph of the three (3) Hibiscus mutabilis, Alma’s Star is in the center. If this growth continues, I may have to move the plants to a new location as they are now approaching the ceiling.

Mike

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smurf428
cullman, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 23, 2009
4:02 PM

Post #7302321

wow mike they look great..
AuntAnne
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 23, 2009
11:59 PM

Post #7304013

Kell, this is a pic of an opening bloom on mine. It looks a lot like the pink one in your first posting. Mine is only a couple of years old and is well over 6'.

Thumbnail by AuntAnne
Click the image for an enlarged view.

smurf428
cullman, AL
(Zone 7b)

November 24, 2009
12:13 AM

Post #7304057

AuntAnne thats a pretty flower
jen
AuntAnne
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 24, 2009
3:22 AM

Post #7304633

It brings so much color to the yard this time of year. The nice thing is that there can be 2 or 3 colors going at once. Anything from white to dark pink and several shades in between. I have another in a pot that I'm going to plant in the spring.

Thumbnail by AuntAnne
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Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


December 8, 2009
2:16 AM

Post #7347077

I finally went back to the original picture place in the UC Berkeley Botanical Gardens. It has a sign now.

I have to read thru this thread to see if this is the name we had decided on.

Thumbnail by Kell
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Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


December 8, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #7347084

A weird woman kept trying to get close behind me as I was trying to get a picture. She so creeped me out, I took one shot as I was on the move to get away from her, it is a bit blurred.

I noticed it is in a different form, less tree like, than it was before so I think it has been cut down and regrew. I wonder if it is frost tender.

Thumbnail by Kell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


December 8, 2009
2:22 AM

Post #7347092

PS Michael_Ronayne
I so love your tile and counter. What is the counter made of? Is that your kitchen?

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=7205089
AuntAnne
College Station, TX
(Zone 8b)

December 8, 2009
4:45 AM

Post #7347552

Kell
The buds on it look awfully much like a Confederate Rose. As do the leaves. Mine was blooming so beautifully, and then the freeze. That's all folks, till next year.

Anne
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

December 8, 2009
1:35 PM

Post #7348110

Hey Kelley girl, I can't believe how old this thread is.

It seems there are so many forms of H. mutabilis these days. Singles and doubles, some that are changeable and some that aren't. They do go dormant in the winter and you can cut them back to whatever size and shape you wish. They would be hardy where you are Kell and they really are big and PINK.

That creepy woman was probably just trying to eavsdrop; you know you have to be a hoot to listen to in person. :-)

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


December 10, 2009
6:16 PM

Post #7355733

Oh, she is!! ;-)

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


December 17, 2009
8:07 PM

Post #7377613

The only trouble with that was I was all alone. Though perhaps my conversations among myself may be the best ones. LOL

Hey Alice! HELLO! Big and PINK, sounds like me! LOL Hope you are going to have the best holidays. Knowing you, your house is no doubt all gussied up in holiday cheer!
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

December 17, 2009
11:38 PM

Post #7378173

LOL, no gussying this year Kell, I am calling it tasteful restraint. :-) We have just had the whole house painted inside; the painter finished up about 4 hours ago. I am not sure when, if ever, I'll get it back in shape. The holiday decorating will be minimal at best but, the grands will be arriving Christmas day so I might get my fanny in gear before they get here.

Best wishes to everyone for a wonderful holiday season...
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 18, 2009
5:09 PM

Post #7380002

Wow it is nice to see a thread on hardy hibiscus and thanks for the introduction to Alma's Star. That will be on my "need" list for this spring for sure!!
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

December 24, 2009
1:55 PM

Post #7395525

I just discovered that Hibiscus mutabilis (Confederate Rose) is extremely vulnerable to whitefly (http://www.google.com/search?q=whitefly) infestation. My three Hibiscus mutabilis had been doing very well until about two weeks ago when I started noticing that the stems were no longer standing as upright has they had been. I had noticed small whiteflies and a small black fly flying around the racks where I keep my plants for the winter. In the last week the deterioration of the Hibiscus mutabilis was noticeable and I had started loosing Hibiscus seedling of several species which had been doing very well until then.

When I inspected the Hibiscus mutabilis I discovered a massive whitefly infestation on the leaves and stems of the plants. The Hibiscus seedlings which were in trouble had small black flies congregating about the roots which were withered. I did try rescuing some of the distressed seedlings by planting them deeper in the ground to increase the area of the stems in contact with the soil.

I had Spectracide Malathion on hand for my last insect problem and had already recalibrated the formulation which came on the bottle label from gallon quantities to small batches of 0.5L and 1.0L which can be loaded into a spray-bottle. The attached graphic contains the recalibrated formulations which I did in Excel. I used 2.9ml of the concentrate in 500ml of water.

The spray was applied to all my plants and the soil for two consecutive days. I am seeing reappearance of whiteflies and the black flies in small numbers which are quickly killed by the Malathion spray. I suspect that I will have to be vigilant for the next few weeks but I appear to have the problem under control for now. Obviously I don’t what to overdo Malathion indoors.

One DG member had commented that they don’t keep Hibiscus mutabilis in Florida because of the whitefly problem. I suspect that my whiteflies were hitchhikers on one of the shipments from Florida. I have no idea where the small black flies came from but they or their larvae appear to go after the roots of Hibiscus seedlings, with the smaller plants being most vulnerable. One Internet BLOG (http://blog.nola.com/dangill/2008/07/carefree_color.html) suggested that whiteflies can be eradicated for the year by applying the systemic insecticide Imidacloprid at the beginning of the growing season. I will have to look into that before spring, assuming that I can keep the whiteflies under control until then.

My Excel spreadsheet of recalibrated Malathion formulations is available to anyone who wants it.

Mike

Thumbnail by Michael_Ronayne
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ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
4:58 PM

Post #7395985

Mike, Once you get them clean, run out to your garden center and pick up some worm castings. Top dress those pots with a heavy layer and your white flies will leave for more hospitable plants at your neighbor's house. I use them on my outdoor H mutabilis and haven't had a problem in years. I also use them as a top dressing on my tropical hibs and on my gardenias which are also white fly magnets.

Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 24, 2009
5:06 PM

Post #7395998

Wow you two that is some great information. I have a severe white fly problem in my yard!!
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 3, 2010
4:57 PM

Post #7423167

The Spectracide Malathion was very effective in reducing the whitefly and small black fly problems on my Hibiscus mutabilis but did not completely eliminate it. Two days after treatment small populations of whitefly began to re-colonize the leaves from sources unknown. Each successive wave of infection was less than the last and the health of the Hibiscus mutabilis was improving thanks to the treatments and the application of Miracle-Gro. I did reduce the concentration of Malathion to the manufactures lowest recommended dosage of 0.977ml per 500ml of water which did appear to be just as effective at controlling the recurrent outbreaks. As I did not want to continue this cat-and-mouse game with the bugs until spring and worm casting are not available in New Jersey at this time of year unless you purchase them over the Internet with ridiculous shipping charges, I decided to take a serious look at using Imidacloprid.

Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid, which is a class of neuro-active insecticides modeled after nicotine. A patented chemical, Imidacloprid is manufactured by Bayer Cropscience (part of Bayer AG) and sold under trade names Kohinor, Admire, Advantage, Gaucho, Merit, Confidor, Hachikusan, Premise, Prothor, and Winner. It is marketed as pest control, seed treatment, an insecticide spray, termite control, flea control, and a systemic insecticide.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid

Under the Bayer trademark Imidacloprid (Advantage®), Imidacloprid is used as a once-a-month topical insecticide on cats and dogs to kill fleas. It is mixed with an oil carrier and the drug collects in the hair follicles from which it is slowly released.

Bayer markets a product “Tree & Shrub Insect Control” where the only active ingredient is Imidacloprid. This is a slow acting insecticide which is intended for one application yearly in the spring before insects become a problem. Imidacloprid is absorbed by the plant and provides systemic protection throughout the growing season as it will spread to new growth. It is not approved for indoor use but I suspect that is only because Bayer never considered that anyone would contemplate such an action. As “Tree & Shrub Insect Control” is only sold in large packaging sizes its use is not cost effective for small indoor problems. This product in various package sizes is sold at Lowes year-round.

Tree & Shrub Insect Control
http://www.bayeradvanced.com/product/Tree-Shrub-Insect-Control/

Fortunately Bayer has indoor approved formulation of Imidacloprid which are suitable for small applications in both indoors and outdoor environments. The product is marketed under the Bayer trade name ”Dual Action Rose & Flower Insect Killer” and is sold at Lowes in a 24 OZ (709 ml) spray bottle for $4.97.

Dual Action Rose & Flower Insect Killer
http://www.bayeradvanced.com/product/Dual-Action-Rose-Flower-Insect-Killer/

This is a ready-to-use formulation which contains Beta-cyfluthrin (0.0015%) and Imidacloprid (0.0120%) and reports to provide protection for up to 30 days. I followed the treatment recommendations for my entire indoor Hibiscus collection but also applied the chemical to the roots of my three Hibiscus mutabilis as recommended by the tree and shrub formulation of the Bayer product.

Beta-cyfluthrin an especially effective isomer of cyfluthrin which is an active ingredient in Baygon. Cyfluthrin is a pyrethroid derivative which is used as an insecticide. For addition information see the following links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyfluthrin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrethroid

It appears that Beta-cyfluthrin is a fast acting insecticide while Imidacloprid is a slow acting insecticide which prevents re-infections. Given the properties of Imidacloprid one has to wonder why Nicotine Sulfate, a natural insecticide approved for organic gardening, was take off the marker.

I redid the Spectracide Malathion small batch reformulation matrix to include a 750 ml volume because that is the upper limit of the larger calibrated spray bottles sold in the United Sates. A redundant column with reparative data was also eliminated. A generic reformulation matrix was included for teaspoon and tablespoon quantities of insecticides over a likely range of dosage regiments to be diluted in one gallon of water which are the typical measurements most chemical manufactures use in the United States.

I will post an update in a few weeks on how Hibiscus mutabilis are doing under the new treatment. If this works I will purchase the Bayer Tree & Shrub Insect Control this spring. I am also looking into local sources for worm castings. There are some good reports of that treatment but I have no idea as to why it works.

Mike


This message was edited Jan 4, 2010 2:45 PM

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marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 3, 2010
8:08 PM

Post #7423731

A new lesson for me!! Next question is do you mind if I copy you postings and keep a file of them for future use?

I have to put Advantage on my list of things to have for control in the garden. I'm not sure of what bugs will try to take over my garden, but we do fight fleas and ticks here.
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2010
1:21 AM

Post #7424813

Marti001,

Anything I post is either content which I developed or is in the public domain. Please be free to use it in anyway you wish. Content to which I link may or mayn't be in the public domain and you should check with the website containing that content.

Mike
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2010
1:50 AM

Post #7424931

Thanks Mike.

I've started a file to keep all the information I collect from everyone on DG. That way I can look things up easier than trying to remember which post I need.

Mary

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


January 5, 2010
6:28 PM

Post #7430978

You can always tag it with the little folder at the top left, either an entire thread or open a single post like Micheal's informative one above by clicking on the post# and then clicking the folder. You can then label it and decide to keep your tag private or add it to the public tagged page list. It's like bookmarking something but all within Daves.
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2010
12:38 AM

Post #7432419

Thanks for the infor.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


January 6, 2010
10:02 PM

Post #7435901

Michael_Ronayne, the one time I had whitefly I used Bayer Tree and Shrub. And they were gone! I love it because it is not a spray but a systemic drench at roots that can be target used much easier than spray. So easy! I also use it for severe scale on my oleanders. I have had them literally covered in scale where you cannot see the bark and Bayer Tree and Shrub came to the rescue!

Also it lasts up to 1 year after just 1 application to the soil, PERFECT!

Oh and another way I have used it to kill cucumber beetles is to treat 2 or 3 flowering roses or bushes they particularly love. I know most will do a stop over on them for a good dinner at some point and then die. I love I only have to treat minimally in my yard instead of spraying everything hoping to get them.
Malestrom
Plumiedelphia, PA
(Zone 7a)

January 19, 2010
4:33 AM

Post #7475260

Kell dahlin'
what do you have that isnt to die for?
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 19, 2010
2:55 PM

Post #7475899

The Bayer “Dual Action Rose & Flower Insect Killer” appears to have eliminated my whitefly problem. I did find a few whiteflies on the Hibiscus mutabilis but found they were all dead. With the Hibiscus mutabilis no longer tasty, the whiteflies went after my Hibiscus aculeatus seedlings but a few quick sprays eliminated that problem. I am planning to use the Bayer “Tree & Shrub Insect Control” this spring on my entire outdoor Hibiscus collection. I am also planning to test Bayer “Tree & Shrub Insect Control” on the roots of my indoor potted Hibiscus once I use all the spray but given the current state of the whitefly population the remaining spray may last a long time.

With the whiteflies eliminated my two Hibiscus mutabilis Doubles resumed their rapid growth and are now over two feet tall plus the pot. To encourage branching I removed the tops of the leaders of both plans and will attempt to root the cuttings. The Hibiscus mutabilis Alma’s Star is also going to need a haircut in a few weeks and that cutting will receive a lot of TLC. I am running out of space on my plant shelves and spring can’t come too soon. It is starting to look like I will have to add another pair of 2 foot florescent shop-lights soon! Next year remind me not to start my seedlings so early.

Mike


This message was edited Jan 19, 2010 9:57 AM
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9200703

ardesia wrote:Mike, Once you get them clean, run out to your garden center and pick up some worm castings. Top dress those pots with a heavy layer and your white flies will leave for more hospitable plants at your neighbor's house. I use them on my outdoor H mutabilis and haven't had a problem in years. I also use them as a top dressing on my tropical hibs and on my gardenias which are also white fly magnets.

I wanted to let you know that I have not forgotten your advice about worm castings as a deterrent to whiteflies. In Zone 6, worm castings are a summer only item at garden centers, so if you believe you will need worm castings during the winter, you need to stock-up during the summer.

During 2010 and 2011 I continued the apply Bayer’s Imidacloprid to control whiteflies which was successful to a point but there was a catch. Bayer recommends using Imidacloprid in the spring when new leaves are forming but with Hibiscus mutabilis, and other hardy Hibiscus, new leaves are forming all the time so I had to keep reapplying Imidacloprid monthly to the roots to maintain the level of insecticide in the new leaves. This spring I was at a local garden center and saw they had worm casting for sale and purchase a bag, which I applied generously to my Hibiscus mutabilis Alma’s Star and a Double, which have survived my Zone 6 winters for over three years now. It has been three weeks now and no sign of whiteflies but the summer is still young.

At HVH they identify the active ingredient in worm castings as “chitin degraders” which produce chitinase that will dissolve chitin in living insects. I will have to investigate these claims. There is quite a bit of research going on involving “chitin degraders” and their ability to dissolve the exoskeletons of insects.

HVH Worm Castings
http://www.hiddenvalleynaturearts.com/acatalog/wormcast.htm

I also found another report that worm castings don’t work but the worm castings were only applied once from the report.

Worm Castings vs. Argentine Ants
http://www.bonniewren.com/log.html

For now my Hibiscus mutabilis are thriving with the worm poop if for no other reason than it is an excellent fertilizer. There are a few small holes in older leaves but the new leaves are all hole free.

Mike


This message was edited Jul 11, 2012 10:00 AM

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