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Woodworking: Let's see your shop!

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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 10, 2006
2:44 PM

Post #1966152

hiya folks,

My shop is still in a state of flux. As is my life...lol. I have yet to build my workbench and am considering doing it this year sometime from Quilted Maple and Cocobolo. My tools reflect my newness in this hobby. I still have several lower quality machines but have been able to add a few good tools to the shop (thanks Pam). The shop takes up a one car garage and a third. I'm still doing the logistics of machine permanent machine placement.

I'll post pics of the shop as time and dust permit...lol. Let's see yours!

best,
don
dave

January 10, 2006
3:11 PM

Post #1966204

Hiya everyone (whoever might be here!)

We just moved to a new house a couple months ago, and we're still kind of getting settled in. My shop is in our shed, which is 3600 sqft. It's ridiculously huge, as the previous owner apparantly needed that kind of space for the automotive repair he used to do.

Anyway, I've taken a corner of the shed for my shop and I can expand as I wish. I have marked out spots for all the goodies I'll be bringing.

Right now I have a 16' long table that I am using for my work bench. The table is 2 folding tables butted up against each other.

I'm planning on building a solid bench to replace the flimsy folding tables. The owner left me a huge pile of 16' long 2x6s that will be fine material for goofing off.

dave

drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 10, 2006
3:35 PM

Post #1966253

hiya dave,

all those 2x6s will be great practice wood and sood for doing some projects as well. I've never met a woodworker that said he/she's got too much wood laying around...lol.

I need to build a bench soon, as my table saw seems to be the current 'catch-all' horizontal surface in the shop for stuff when there's not enough time to put things away...lol.

Thumbnail by drdon
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dave

January 10, 2006
3:40 PM

Post #1966273

Heh - that looks like I imagine my shop is likely to look in the near future!!

dave
balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2006
5:01 PM

Post #1966469

My woodshop area is only 12 X 18 feet and certainly not what I would like. Even had to part with my old band saw and super scroll saw to make room enough to 'turn around'. DW has wisely (?) said I can't expand into her garage, so we'll just make small projects.

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balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2006
5:02 PM

Post #1966470

It doesn't even seem larger from the other end. Pity.

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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 10, 2006
5:09 PM

Post #1966477

I inherited the fabluous scroll saw from balvenie. Talk about generosity! It is so much better than the one I had before...a Dremel.

I don't see how size matters, but it sure would be nice to have more space around the table saw for panel cutting. I for one find the stuff coming out of your shop balvenie to be huge on creativity, it would fit that they came out of a small shop...balance in the universe...lol.

best to you always,
don

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balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2006
5:41 PM

Post #1966537

This is the biggest "furniture" piece to date. A great addition that gets used everyday. Guess I could count the kitchen cabinetry, such as it is, too.

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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 10, 2006
5:53 PM

Post #1966565

Whoa,
dave

January 10, 2006
6:06 PM

Post #1966597

Wow, very nice, balvenie! I'm glad that you found this forum!

I don't have a picture inside of my shop yet (I'll take my camera next time I go out there). Here's an aerial view, though. The two arrows indicate the house and the shop. The shop is the structure closest to the pond. The borders are shown by the red lines.

(37 acres, in case anyone was curious)

Dave

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balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2006
6:17 PM

Post #1966626

That's a great piece of land Dave. You have a really wonderful shop area away from the house so noise and dust isn't a problem. Keep the pictures coming.
ecobioangie
Mableton, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2006
7:05 PM

Post #1967135

Shop's a weeeeeee bit bigger than the house eh? lol
dave

January 10, 2006
7:07 PM

Post #1967141

Actually, no. :) The house is surprisingly huge. It wasn't that we intended to buy a huge house, but it was the only one with the property that matched what we wanted.
ecobioangie
Mableton, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2006
7:13 PM

Post #1967152

ok, well it must have a lot of trees around or something because the shop really sticks out. Either way you've got yourself quite a compound there! You can be in the shop and Trish will have to call you (literally) for dinner. lol
dave

January 10, 2006
7:45 PM

Post #1967207

Cell phones are a must around here, for sure!!

You can't see the house because of the tall trees around it. I have another picture from a different angle where the barn looks very small compared to the house. :)

dave
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 10, 2006
8:03 PM

Post #1967248

It's an incredible property dave. Congratulations man, really nice indeed. Maybe we can take a tour of it some time through your diary and discuss it on the Garden Tour forum...lol.

3000sqft...holy smokes. The capacity to store lumber/wood alone makes my palms sweat...lol.

balvenie, can you imagine the machinery you could pack into a space like that? woohooo, Pam would divorce me for sure...lol.

Or she'd be very happy to have no noise from the shop...lol.

wow,
don
dave

January 10, 2006
8:37 PM

Post #1967334

A garden tour would be great! I just need a better internet connection (it's still on the way) so I can upload a ton of pics into my diary. :)
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
1:42 AM

Post #1968094

cool, we'd love to see it dave.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 11, 2006
4:29 AM

Post #1968504

Wow, what a nice wooded property you have, Dave! Looks like the water is a little low in your pond, as it is everywhere in TX right now, lol.

If I can ever get my 24-yr-old to get all his stuff out of my garage (and get the stuff we threw in there when Rita was headed this way) I'll take a picture of my samll workspace. I have a pegboard on the wall (I was so proud when I installed it last year), a nice long shelf underneath, and sawhorses. Be it ever so humble, it's a start!
:-)
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:34 PM

Post #1969841

Some pics of my shop...it's a mess, but it's always a mess. come on in!

first steps in bring you to the planer, which I hope to replace with a more durable brand this year and the 6" jointer.

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:36 PM

Post #1969848

Around the table saw/router table. It's a bit of a squeeze through here.

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:40 PM

Post #1969893

The window in the shop looks into the greenhouse on the south side of the shop. There is a long counter on this side that runs the length of the shop and has lots of cabinets for storing hand tools and failed projects I can't seem to part with...lol. The buffing wheel is out because I've been buffing and polishing abalone shells for use in my next tiling project.

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:43 PM

Post #1969910

the back wall that has a window that faces east and looks out into the Hacienda garden (see my garden diary), and I can hear the fountain when machinery isn't blaring. Under the cabinets is where I store hand power tools like routers, jigsaws, sanders and drills.

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:46 PM

Post #1969917

Along this wall I've got my little lathe, an oscillating spindle sander, belt/disc sander, scroll saw and lumber storage...then it's back to the table saw.

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:55 PM

Post #1969934

As I previously stated, I'm a beginner. I first purchased inexpensive tools to see if there would be any lasting interest in woodworking. Now I get embarrassed when guys with amazing shops come to visit and see all these 99cent store machines...lol. Not really, as with the size of a shop, a tool is only as good as the user. But then the time does come when the tool can't do more and it's time for a better machine. I've had some of these tools for almost three years and they've started reaching their limitations. In my next three year plan I do hope to begin to upgrade machines as I can afford them or I get permission from the boss (DW) to get some...lol.

My beginning bandsaw, still works for small detail projects

Thumbnail by drdon
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drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
8:57 PM

Post #1969940

My birthday present to myself...from Pam last year. I've been making some cool veneers now and have so much more flexibility with thicker and harder woods, like my favorite Cocobolo.

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dave

January 11, 2006
8:57 PM

Post #1969942

Great shop, Don!! Thanks for posting these pictures.
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
9:00 PM

Post #1969945

thanks dave,

boy would some of these machines love living in a giant space like your shop. You should see what I have to do to cut up a sheet of plywood in here...lol.

best to you,

don
dave

January 11, 2006
9:05 PM

Post #1969957

Well, when you start upgrading your stuff, I'll buy these old guys from you!! Shipping might be a problem, though, eh?
balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2006
9:39 PM

Post #1970032

Holy moly! That's a bunch of great tools. Jet makes some fine stuff. I've been curious about the Rigid tools. They appear to be well designed and made, what do you think of them ? Your variety of tools and the space available makes me very envious. That sure is a nice shop.
drdon
Temecula, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2006
10:15 PM

Post #1970119

hiya balvenie,

The Rigid jointer isn't a bad machine at all, but the lathe, my first, is a bit of a joke for anything but spindle turning. I've learned about as much as I can on that machine and I'm grateful that I have it, but now it's finally time for a good one. Rigid tools are reliable as far as I'm able to judge. Their circular saw (mag saw) is as good a saw as my old Makita wormdrive mag saw. And a good skilsaw isn't easy to make. I've certainly owned a few dogs...lol.

When I was a kid Rigid was THE brand for pipe wrenches, power threaders, and all things plumbing and that was about it. Then the Home Depot phenomenon happened and now they make everything, or have everything made for them by six year olds in China then label and box the tools here in the US...lol.

As far as space goes, we both work in small shops amigo. I have to plan ahead if I want to mill any piece of wood longer that 6ft...lol.

Jet does indeed make quality machinery, and I'm lucky to have the pieces I have. Some day, when I grow up I'll be good enough at this stuff to warrant some really great machines.
Magwar
Royston, GA
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2006
9:38 PM

Post #2068735

Nice work areas yall! My shop is the garage =D I have a building we call the "Big Building" that I want to convert into a workshop. The previous owners used it for a RV garage. My husband is getting quite tired of the garage holding everything but the cars. *grins sheepishly* I would take pictures, but its a mess right now.

Hardwood
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2006
4:58 PM

Post #2070642

Here is my shop. The saw is a powermatic 72a and the bench is my own creation made of reclaimed Oak 4x4 posts milled to about 3.5. (very heavy) The apron is Ash and the end vice (a Veritas Twin screw) has a front jaw made of Purpleheart. It has 3/4 inch square dog holes for the end vise and few rows of round dog holes on the front vise side. The base is made of reclaimed Oak as well but I ebonized it with a mix of vinegar and rusty nails. The tablesaw, jointer and band saw are connected to a Grizzly dusy collection system. I love the Vidmar cabinets for keeping all my stuff in order.

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Hardwood
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2006
4:59 PM

Post #2070647

Here is a closeup of the bench.

Thumbnail by Hardwood
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balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2006
6:30 PM

Post #2070832

That's the neatest bench I've seen anywhere. "The Workbench Book" from Taunton Press has a bunch of beauties from ancient to modern, but yours is in the best of them. Great shop, and the Powermatic must be a joy to use. How large is your work area ? That's my biggest problem, tools take up so much room you can hardly turn around. I'm envious. Thanks for sharing. How about some pictures of projects.
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

February 25, 2006
6:35 PM

Post #2070844

Wowie, zowie! That is a beautiful bench!
Hardwood
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2006
11:48 PM

Post #2071533

I am using most of a 3 car garage for my shop. I have to shuffle a few things around to get the vette in and have to move it to the driveway to use the tablesaw. Your right about the saw its awesome. I got it from a friend for nothing. It had triple phase motor on it so I had to buy a 5hp single phase - about $700 and some change. The 14 inch blades cut through anything with ease. It's a far cry from the Powermatic 66 contractors saw I was using which used to bog down and trip the breaker when ripping the big stuff. As far as projects go my wife posted this one to Daves a while back. http://davesgarden.com/place/t/565790/ I have to take some pictures of some of the other pieces I've made.. If anyone wants advise on making a bench the best I can give them is design it around your vises. Everything else you can play around with but with the hardware there is no give or take it must be planned for exactly...
dovey
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2006
12:01 AM

Post #2071560

Maggiemoo,
When I saw the finished bench Hardwood (my hubby) built I was so impress (translate jealous *LOL*) I asked him to make me a harvest table along the same lines. I think it's beautiful.

Dovey
dovey
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2006
12:04 AM

Post #2071564

Balvenie,
I love your rolltop cabinet, it's fablous.
Dovey
balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2006
12:32 AM

Post #2071619

Thought French Valley was familiar from Dovey's post, but didn't make the connection. A three car garage makes for a pretty good sized work area, and who would want to get sawdust all over a vette anyway. Five horses and a 14 inch blade, you could almost become a sawmill (small one of course). The bed is a work of art.
Hardwood
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2006
2:20 AM

Post #2071842

Thanks for the compliment. I could hardly stand making my wife sleep on the water bed I had for almost 14 years and we finally broke down and bought a Sterns and Foster. The metal bed frame it came with did not do the comfortable nights sleep justice so I had to make something befitting. I love working with exotics. Frequently my Dovey will find me in the shop talking to my wood asking it what it wants to become...
maggiemoo
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

February 26, 2006
6:20 PM

Post #2073052

I can just see that, too. You're in the garage whisoering to the wood, she's in the garden whispering to the plants. Makes for a winning combination! So Dovey, did he make you that harvest table?

(BTW, I'm looking forward to meeting your daughter at the TX RU in April, and then you guys at the RU at Don's in July. Balvenie, any chance you can get to Don's for the RU?)
dovey
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2006
7:17 PM

Post #2073174

Maggie
You got that right...
Often times when I get a new rose I go to the garden and ask the other roses who wants to sit next to the new kid.
Kind of like when I was in grammar school...
OK - so it's a bit eccentric but I swear they answer *S*

The harvest table is on it's way, first was a little remodel job to make the perfect spot for it.

I hope Laura makes it to the TX UP. I give her a little nudge.
I'm thrilled to hear you're going to come to ours! Woo-Hoo!

Dovey

fishking54
Livonia, MI
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2008
2:43 PM

Post #4502096

My shop

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dovey
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 6, 2008
4:40 PM

Post #4502503

Holy Cow Fish, that is the cleanest shop I have ever seen!
Not one speck of saw dust on that shiny floor, wow.
picabo
Nashville, TN
(Zone 6b)

February 6, 2008
11:40 PM

Post #4504375

OK, That is a trick photo, Where is the sawdust????? LOL

Just kidding, That is a Beautiful shop!!
kimmage
Maple City, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 3, 2008
5:51 PM

Post #4751437

My boyfriend and I just bought a house that has a seperate workshop in the back. The previous owner was very much into woodworking. It's split in half so we didn't have to argue about who's it was...lol. We just picked sides. Here is a picture of my side. BTW, does anyone have any recommendations on what tools a beginning woodworker would need...bare minimum?

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balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

April 3, 2008
11:28 PM

Post #4752920

The first stationary power tools would probably be table saw, drill press, band saw and jointer.
fishking54
Livonia, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 4, 2008
5:55 AM

Post #4754976

Re first tools
I would do away with the table saw. Get a good Skil Saw (Porter Cable)
and this guide system http://www.eurekazone.com/
re sizing large plywood is much safer place your lumber on a table
like this http://www.eurekazone.com/products/detail/smarttable.html
You will get straight cuts for a lot less than the cost of a low priced
table saw. I have both and use the guide 50% of the time . The table
saw is nice and a little faster once you are working with smaller sizes.
but I can do more with the guide than I can do with my table saw and
feel safer about it. For a beginner this is the safe way to go just be
sure your work is supported.
From the EZ Guide site
The Dead Wood concept and the EZ smart
Everyone has had a few close calls working with wood. We become complacent. We relax. We try to work with the tool in an unsafe manner, and we know it. Many things happen when we work with wood. Some of these things can scar us for life.

We have these thoughts as we look for ways to make this occupation and hobby safer. The idea we have embraced is the 'Dead Wood Concept'. We have sought to design a system of tools and accessories which will keep the wood dead still in place as we cut, bore, plane, rout, etc. First we eliminate the opportunity for the wood to become a projectile. Next, we position the power tools in such a way that hands and fingers stay clear of the tool path. Then the path of the power tool is always going away from the body guided in the track of the rail.

This concept of securing the work piece is widely used. By labeling it the 'Dead Wood Concept', we are just calling attention to our desire to make woodworking safer and more enjoyable. We like designing 'Smart Tools for Smart People'.




This message was edited Apr 4, 2008 1:57 AM
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

April 11, 2008
8:39 PM

Post #4793694

Most of my woodwork is repair and remodeling, so it is at a client site.

As a result, stationary tools have been low on my list of needs. But I do have a variety of tools that are on board for EVERY job: Drills, saws, hammers, gloves, electric cords, screwdrivers, wrenches, pliers, lighting, cleaning products, fasteners (all types) - and a thermos of coffee, tea, or ice water.

Here is a list of things i would have in a beginning shop.

1) Drills - corded or cordless -2 or more makes drilling and driving screws much quicker and easier. Keyless chucks preferred, except for drill-presses. Bits are where you may spend as much as the drill - buy the best you can afford for the task at hand - you will collect a full set of what you need over time.

2) Saws - a Stanley Quick-Cut 15" - can cut almost as fast as a circular saw,
Circular saw - get a good one 10 amp or better, and buy top quality blades, a hacksaw for those occasions when you have to cut some metal, a jigsaw - again get a good one - I've worn out cheap ones, and yet again, buy good blades. Nice to have, but not essential to begin with: a recipricating saw, a rotary tool (Dremel, Roto-zip, etc)

2) Hammers - 12, 16 & 20+ oz claw hammers make a good start. Depending on the projects you tackle, several more types can be added.

3) Disassembly tools - wrecking bars - WonderBars are great, FuBars, too. And you will need several different sizes, but a starter set would include a WonderBar and a 2' claw wrecking bar. Combine that with a construction hammer and you can take almost anything apart.

4) Screwdrivers - besides the drivers for the drills, there are times screws must be manipulated by hand. Buy good quality drivers, cheap ones will destroy screws, fingers, wood, sheetrock, etc.

5) Pliers - standard, slip-joint, electricians, and needlenose will als be needed at some point. Buy what you need as you need them.

6) Measuring devices - Tapes, rulers, squares, protracters - all will wind up in your shop. Nice additions include calipers, dividers, digital measuring tools.

7) Gloves - there are many types, so get what you need, but one type that most of us don't think about is the disposables - very handy when working with finishes, strippers, solvents, etc.

8) tool boxes - decide what you want to organize and store, then buy accordingly. You are bound to wind up with several.

9) Extension cords - I'm partial to the ones with lghted connectors. And for the most part keep them on cord reels, or carefully coiled and secured.

10) Lighting - task lighting is very important. Ironically, a friend gave me a headlight that gets more use that I would ever have thought - it is always pointing where my head is aimed. But stationary lighting is also needed.

11) Vacuum - get the biggest baddest shop vac you can afford - dust is very distructive to your body and every finish. This is usually the last thing added to a shop, and should be one of the first. Add a good big distpan and a large soft bristle brush for site cleanup.

12) sanding, filing, scraping tools. Hand files, rasps, planes, and scrapers will be needed for some projects. Power tools are available for must, but ultimately, you will be hand finishing.

13) fasterers - nails, screws. glues - all depend on the job what will work best. But you will need some way to organize the leftovers, so preplanning for this will save time and $$.

14) odds 7 ends - scrapers, can openers, paint stirrers, paint brushes, rollers, shop cloths, a vice or several, clamps, straps, measuring cups & spoons, mixing containers, storage containers, etc.

Have fun collecting and using your tools.

If you are close enough to where The Woodworking Shows have one of their annual events, it is worth the price of admission. I have added something to my collection every year - and saved 20-50% over retail.
Hardwood
Columbus, OH
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2008
7:54 PM

Post #4802964

Much depends on what type of projects you going to take on but one thing most of us never have enough of is clamps.
I would buy a couple a clamps every time you make a tool purchase or when every you can afford them.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2008
3:45 AM

Post #4820351

Just noticed this thread.
We built a shop to fit our needs. 24 x 40 with a vaulted ceiling. Starts at 8 ft & is 10 ft at the middle. Don't knock out light bulbs with long boards.
A 16 x 24 storage area is on one end for finished projects. 10 x 56 along one side is the finishing room. It is completely separate from the shop to keep dust out. It has a fan in there to rid the place of fumes. We spray most things.

This picture is before we were completely set up.
Bernie

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #4820358

Storage room.
Door in picture goes to finish room.

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2008
3:48 AM

Post #4820364

Finish room.

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 17, 2008
4:05 AM

Post #4820441

Tools, 10" table saw, 8" table saw, 12" miter saw, 12" extra fine miter saw, 4 routers on tables, 3 routers, portable, dovetail jig, 12½" planer, 6" jointer, 18"-36" drum sander, 4 orbital sanders, pocket hole jig & drill, 4 screw guns, 12" band saw, 2 small drill presses, 2 dust collectors, 2 shop vacs, 2 hand held jig saws, portable planer, somewhere around 30 pipe clamps, various other clamps.
We have many multiples because of saving set up time. One table saw is for hardwood ripping, the other for plywood. Routers are mostly set for certain job. One drill press is strictly for drilling hinge holes.

This is really a full-filled dream. I started in an old hen house with a 6½ ft ceiling. When you are going to build new, it's nice to get it right.

We put in big doors for moving things around. Doors to storage area & finish room are 4 ft wide.
We have an 8 ft door to the outside. We can back the van in there to unload plywood or anything if weather is bad.

I built this material storage, copied from local Menards store.
Bernie

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Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

April 17, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4822524

Thanks for sharing, Bernie.

I saw your shop of one of these threads when you initially started construction. Nice to see the result. And really admire your cabnets!!

Bill

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2008
12:13 PM

Post #4845469

Bernie… Drool.

rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2008
2:30 PM

Post #5229048

I moved to KY 1 1/2 years ago. In FL I had my tools outside under a portable carport. POOO!
One of these days I wiil streighten this out. ^_^
Bought some typing stands (and file cabinets, rear of shop) at an auction and have the chop saw, planner, ect on them so I can move them out to use them.
The ShopSmith (on the left) is used for most work.

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frank316
Waverly, IA
(Zone 4b)

February 16, 2009
1:31 PM

Post #6145797

kimmage the best tool you can buy is a Gripper push block! You can have all the fancy tools in the world but without fingers you cannot work wood very well. I bought my first gripper for 65$ and the second for 70$. That is the best investment I have made in woodworking tools.
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2009
1:42 PM

Post #6145841

I found a link here http://www.woodpeck.com/gripper.html
Frank, looks like it goes on top of the wood but does it push from behind the wood like a Miter Gauges ?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

February 16, 2009
1:54 PM

Post #6145883

If "TheWoodworkingShows" appears within traveling distance from where you live - I highly recommend spending a day or at least a few hours touring the exhibits and demonstrations.

They will be in Houston in April, but have a nationwide circuit.

Products are heavily discounted, and the demonstrations and classes are great - always learn something new.
tubbytee
Ames, NE
(Zone 5b)

February 16, 2009
2:00 PM

Post #6145907

Bubba_MoCity Do you know where to find out their circuit


Tubby

Thanks I found it.. Darn nothing close to me ..I'll bet it would be interesting

This message was edited Feb 16, 2009 8:07 AM

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

February 16, 2009
2:03 PM

Post #6145933

It would certainly cut down on amount of work one could get done. One would be adjusting the thing constantly. My son just looked at this & shook his head.
Our push block cost us about 5 minutes of time. Cut it out of a piece of plywood. Same one for couple years now.
Another goodie is Saw Stop. That's as bad as standing in front of a gun, not knowing weather it's loaded or not. Stick your finger in a running saw & hoping it will stop! Yikes!!
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

February 16, 2009
2:07 PM

Post #6145960

Go to their website - www.thewoodworkingshows.com

There are a couple of coupons you can print, too.

First tool I bought at the "show" was Kreg's pocket hole kit. Now, I don't go to any project without it - I have found sooo many uses for their screws and drill bit in addition to normal pocket hole jointery. And the screws are about 1/3 less at the shows.

Also got the Fein Multimaster there - should have bought a lot more blades, sandpaper, etc. They were NOT at last year's show, so hope they are there this year.

Also on this year's "wish list" is Ridgid's fiber optic camera.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

February 16, 2009
2:15 PM

Post #6145989

Bernie, I have seen the "Gripper", but thought it was overkill, too.
A couple of feather boards and a good "homemade" push stick, and I'm in fine shape.

But I do admire what mfgr's are doing about installing a true riving knife behind the blade on table saws. Kickback is dangerous.

Most of my work is on site, so portable saws over 99% of the time. Maybe someday, I'll buy another truck so I can haul a table saw.

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