What woodworking projects are you planning?

Temecula, CA(Zone 8b)

Let's hear about what types of projects you are planning for the next year. I, for one, have several 'honey do's'...lol.

I plan to repair and replace the balustrade around our front porch. The original construction was done with poorly sealed woods that were meant to be used indoors and has begun to dry rot at an ever increasing rate. DW is now close to taking away my tools if I don't get on this one soon...lol. And I've got a project in DW's office to remodel the room with a library and new desk. We've chosen the woods; Padouk, Quilted Maple, with Macassar Ebony trim. This one will take a while as the layout of the library seems to change every time a new Architectural Digest comes out...lol.

What are you planning?

best,
don

Royston, GA(Zone 7b)

Sounds like you have a list!

As for me:

Rip some 2x4's to go around my spa to finish it up. Put some latttice around the bottom of the deck to finish it up. Yank up the old boards on my back porch that I just found out don't match the rest of the porch floor (it was covered with that outside carpet...ick), Repaint the porch floors a hunter green to match the roof. Grade the front yard and sow grass so that the kids have somewhere to play. Dig up all my boxwoods in the front yard and replace them with gold dust plants. Etc etc etc.

The list goes on and on. Plus in the meantime during the hottest times of the summer, I plan on building birdhouses, a swing, about 6 adirondack chairs to adorn our decks, and several wooden planters.

I think I may have put too much upon myself.

Conroe, TX(Zone 9a)

Don, I'm considering doing a rip-off (sort of) of your wiggly fence to use as a back-drop to plants in one of my flowerbeds. I got the idea when you were telling me to practice using my jigsaw, to just cut some scrap wood. I figure I can cut "wiggled boards", maybe paint them, and then arrange them in the ground - seperate boards, but as close as they would be if attached like a fence - in just a bit of a curve. I can't decide if I should drive the boards into the ground (therefore requiring some kind of prep to help prevent rotting), or attach something to the bottom of each one to drive into the ground (like attach a spike of some sort to the bottom?)

Temecula, CA(Zone 8b)

hiya maggiemoo,

You've got Carte Blanche to do anything you'd like. Anyway, once you start doing the wiggled boards they'll take on a life of their own and it will end up completely different and reflect your great style and taste. As far as putting them into the ground, try checking out the steel concrete form stakes. They are pre-drilled for nails and narrow enough to be concealed by the wiggled boards. Check it out, it might be the answer to your challenge.

hugs,
don

Conroe, TX(Zone 9a)

...steel concrete form stakes...

Home Depot? Lowes? Or similar? Thanks for the heads up, I'll look for them.

Temecula, CA(Zone 8b)

Hiya maggiemoo,

huge hug

Yep they are steel stakes used for stabilizing concrete forms. HD and Lowe's should both have them in the areas where concrete tools and steel rebar are sold.

Your project is already different, I think it will be amazingly interesting as it offers a dimension of placement that a mere fence can't offer.

What a great idea!

best always,
don

Marysville, WA(Zone 7a)

Now if Grizzly would kindly ship my new 1/8" rabbiting bit I could rabbit out a slot for the sliding back of this little box. Chipping away at a piece of wood is very relaxing. A no-brainer, no deadline, set it and forget it whenever you want kind of job. Considered doing the sides and ends as well but I hate carving end grain. Don't look too close, its best seen from afar. With that finished (except for the back cover) it is time to get one of those neat 'moon' gates from Lowe's and "puppy-proof" another part of the garden.

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Satsuma, AL(Zone 8b)

Here are my upcoming projects:

- kitchen cabinets (in progress)
- bookcase for den
- dresser & chest for my son's room
- christmas presents (cutting boards, boxes, etc)
- 2 planters (from Woodsmith, for next year's mother's day presents)

For the shop:

- upgraded lumber storage
- upgraded crosscut sled and miter sled
- better DC on my contractor saw & general DC improvements

Regards,
David

Marysville, WA(Zone 7a)

A long time coming, but at last it is here. "But-first" ruled the day, actually most of the year. Finally the carpenter arrived. Out went two 4'X7' skylights on the sunroom roof and in went four 2'X2' insulated units. Then the ledge over the house-side windows could be removed, then the naked triangle could be framed and sheeted, and NOW I can get to shingling the remaining unadorned sunroom walls. The new (almost new pawnshop purchase) Ryobie Scroll Saw I found today makes it all possible. At least now there is a place to start. The joy of playing with hammers and nails and saws and shingles and stuff is beyond description.

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Marysville, WA(Zone 7a)

Most of the wall, up to the former ledge/shelf has been done and only needs a bit of touching-up

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drumheller, Canada

Okay now that I've built my China and Japanese gates for my back yard ,I need to carry that Oriental theme to cover my garbage pails, which is right outside the fence.Sooo I'm thinking of making this (see picture.) I just have to figure out how to frame it inside.I was thinking of using plywood and a jig saw to make the curves.
Any ideas?

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Columbus, OH(Zone 5b)

I would approach this project similar to building a small boat - perhaps steam bending or lamination bending - build a jig to get them all to match. Perhaps make the cover wider to protect the bottom from the elements. I would also consider using bamboo to make this project - when its cut into strips its easy to work with as long as your predrill all your fasteners to prevent splitting. As an alternative to conventional fasteners you could use natural fiber to bind the pieces together. Let us know how you decide to finish it.

drumheller, Canada

Hardwood:Wow you must think I'm know how to do all that.This woman is limited in her experiences with building....but i am learning.
Will check into you rsuggestions.Thanks.

California, USA Minor Outlying Islands

Actually I have many plans to start;

I just watched a video that shows an interesting project, and which i thought to perform many times before
It is called "Chair in Motion".....really amazing project and the chair looks flexible and comfortable
I will share the video with you in further post

thanks for starting such interesting post,


Columbus, OH(Zone 5b)

Uekiya,

I did not mean to throw that much at you all at once. I would be more and happy to break things down into small bite sized pieces. I guess the first thing I would ask you is what tools to you have to work with and go from there..

drumheller, Canada

Hardwood: No problem.I was just letting you know that I am handy at some woodworking but not too knowledgable.I was hoping I could make a frame of 2X2's or??then cut plywood out for the outside shape.I don't think bamboo is hardy out here in our Winters', so that is why the 2X2's...which tend to crack when cut.Would a square frame work ?(in front)...And the roof..I'm not sure about the poles holding it..and ..also the roof design.II found out that there is no plans one can get to make a triangular shaped Oriental roof.I need to know where the "ribs" would go..and how one goes about building it..You see I am modifying this design from an old Chinese stewing pot.I built an oriental Myoshi post with somewhat of a triangular roof with great difficulty.
I really didn't want to start steaming wood.There's gotta be another way to achieve the look I want.
As for tools my hubby has lots of them.Skill saw,circular saw,drills etc...I've used them before.I'm comfortable around machinery so it's not too daunting.I appreciate the 'experienced advice."

drumheller, Canada

Myoshi post with roof that I'm unhappy with.

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Tokyo, Japan(Zone 10a)

I am currently building a 40' pergola using Japanese red cedar. Each section is 5' wide and just 3' deep, I am planning to
grow vines in large containers, the base is to be decked and raised 2' above ground level with a central bench made from a felled cherry tree. Wish me luck!

Missouri City, TX

Sounds like it should be beautiful, pajonica. Be sure to share pictures of the progress.

Riverdale, NJ(Zone 6a)

I am thinking about ripping a few 2x4 Douglas fir studs into 3/4" batons and using them to make a 6' * 6 '* 3' 3D trellis to support 20 cherry tomato plants grown in 12 pots. I am sick of fighting with hoop cages and the price of new cages has gone through the roof.

I will also have to make a new railing for my front steps this year, and am considering a new mailbox. Nothing fancy... purely functional.

Ed

Ames, NE(Zone 5b)

Ed I made wood cages once.I don't like them at all compared to concrete reinforcement wire MHO

Tubby

Riverdale, NJ(Zone 6a)

Thank's for the input Tubby. I know everyone on TV swears by the concrete wire, but that is so hard to build in to my plans since I am, for the moment, confined to pots. Was there anything specific that proved a problem with a wooden cage? Blocked too much light? Broke too easily? Hard to clean? Anything you can remember might allow me to modify my design to avoid it. Perhaps a wood, wire hybrid would be better....

Ames, NE(Zone 5b)

Ed the best advice is secure them good..I think the pressure a tomato branch has when pushing agianst those cross peices is more then a person would think..

I will do a wood hybrid for my HEBs..Which I made out of wood..First year with EBs

Winchester, CA

Im in progress of building a 8'x40" red oak gun cabinet.
Glass inlays for upper doors.
My first big project, and im stuck
need a wider planer for boards

North Ipswich, Qld, Australia

Hi, I am a single woman and want to build a planter where I can put my plants that I have for sale (in there own pots) and be able to keep up the water to them as I am getting alot of plants.

They mainly consist of Cacti and Succulents and an occasional normal plants.

I am a little habdy with a hammer and nail, (being on my own for such a long time), but need to "know" what I need for this purpose.

Can anyone out there explain this to me in easy to understand steps, please.

Debi

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