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Plumerias: underplanting plumies

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Forum: PlumeriasReplies: 21, Views: 376
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vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 25, 2006
2:50 AM

Post #1998391

I have two plumies in huge pots. can I plant annuals around the base, or will that be too stressful on plumie. I just hate to waste planting space, which enables me to play with annuals. thanks for your help
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 25, 2006
10:07 AM

Post #1998759

Absolutely you can underplant with annuals; I would just make sure they like the same sun/water/soil conditions.
Malestrom
Plumiedelphia, PA
(Zone 7a)

January 25, 2006
4:53 PM

Post #1999492

I like to put portulacas under mine,
They dont suffer from the plumie hogging all the water LOL!!
Clare_CA

(Zone 10b)

January 25, 2006
8:38 PM

Post #1999934

Hi Nery! How are you, girl?

Well, I'm afraid I have to disagree with my friends here, but the size of the container, I think, makes all the difference. Since you mention "huge pots," then you probably should plant annuals because a plumeria in a huge pot with unused soil by the roots can cause drainage problems and bacteria buildup, but planting annuals in that unused soil will fix that problem because their roots will absorb the water.

Plumeria roots tend to be fragile, especially the feeder roots which are often near the surface as well as below, so as the plumeria grows, the roots of the annuals and the roots of the plumeria may intermingle and could get broken when you pull out the annuals. Will you be pulling out the plumeria at the end of the summer, or will you keep them in their containers? If you keep them in their containers, the decaying roots of the annuals could cause problems for the roots of the plumeria as bacteria sets in.

Perhaps I am over-cautious, but it is not something that I would do unless it was a type of ground cover or succulent that had roots which used very little soil, but that being said, I also wouldn't overplant a plumeria since they are so sensitive to root rot and drainage problems. When I repot, I go from a one-gallon container to a three- or five-gallon container to a seven- or ten-gallon container to a fifteen-gallon container to a 25-gallon container, and I don't transplant until the tree is rootbound in its current container. Each time I replant, the roots have about two to three inches of soil to grow into.

Again, I'm probably just being over-cautious and underplanting them will work out fine. Let us know!
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 26, 2006
12:01 AM

Post #2000333

hmmmm. I would say the plumies are in 25 gal containers. I put the on casters so I will be rolling the whole thing when needed. would you believe we only had a week in the lo 30s and that's it for winter so far? so I haven't brought those plumies in. During our "cold spell" I just covered them with a huge tarp. the smaller plants, which are in 5 gal or small I did bring in to a protected area and the have been in there since late Nov.

Looks like maybe I should just sit potted plants around the plumie to avoid any root disturbance.

thanks for your help everyone.
Clare_CA

(Zone 10b)

January 26, 2006
12:52 AM

Post #2000459

Nery, sitting potted plants on top of the soil will work well! A 25-gallon container is fairly big. How big is the root system and what size pot did the plant come from and how long has it been in that container? If it went from a 15-gallon to a 25-gallon, there probably isn't that much free space for annuals. It has been an especially warm winter here too! I love it!
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 26, 2006
12:56 AM

Post #2000465

dont remember, probably 15 gal to 25. I guess at a minimum I can put nice mulch and it will look pretty.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

February 5, 2006
6:28 PM

Post #2024596

Quoting:Perhaps I am over-cautious, but it is not something that I would do unless it was a type of ground cover or succulent that had roots which used very little soil, but that being said, I also wouldn't overplant a plumeria since they are so sensitive to root rot and drainage problems. When I repot, I go from a one-gallon container to a three- or five-gallon container to a seven- or ten-gallon container to a fifteen-gallon container to a 25-gallon container, and I don't transplant until the tree is rootbound in its current container. Each time I replant, the roots have about two to three inches of soil to grow into.


Clare, I just asked that question in another thread - thanks for answer!

How about some trailing succulents or groundcover in those curved pots they make to go around an umbrella pole or the like? I've seen some pretty terra cotta ones. Depends on your pot of course, but it's another idea.

Kathleen
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 5, 2006
7:03 PM

Post #2024648

I want some curved pots! I haven't seen those; point me in the direction please!!
Clare_CA

(Zone 10b)

February 7, 2006
2:42 AM

Post #2027624

Very interesting, Kathleen! Sure, I don't see why not. That would probably look neat.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 16, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #3089692

well, I'm embarrased to say I didn't heed anybody's advice and went ahead and underplanted my potted plumies with portulaca, aka moss rose. It appears that in keeping my plumie watered, I provided too much water for the moss rose. They died and I pulled them out, (Lord who kills portulaca???). Lucky for me, doesn't look like my plumies suffered.

However, I promise to be wiser this year and just underplant w/ potted annuals. Any suggestions? I have some 4 oclock seeds I could use, should be safe if they're pot grown, right?.

it would be great to find those half circle pots.
Clare_CA

(Zone 10b)

January 16, 2007
5:02 PM

Post #3089874

Hi Nery! The great thing about this place is that you can read other people's advice and then make your own decisions! I give advice just based on my own experience in my own climate and always try to make the disclaimer that I could be wrong. I never want to appear to be an expert because I am not -- not by a long shot.

If you must plant beneath a plumeria, I would recommend nasturtums, alyssum, or anything with very shallow roots so that the plumeria roots don't have to compete for space, nutrients, and water. If I were you, I would not plant 4 o'clock seeds in with the plumeria. Mirabilis jalapa have huge tuberous roots in time and will compete big time with your plumie. They also self-seed like crazy.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 16, 2007
10:12 PM

Post #3090829

Okie dokie. I can do nasturiums. thanks.
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

January 16, 2007
10:46 PM

Post #3090917

Nery, check any patio furniture store, they should have those half circle pots.
GordonHawk
Brooklyn, NY
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2007
12:42 PM

Post #3102810

Hi Nery...
Good idea..I'm an underplanting beliver...I hate the bare look.. I find in mine... picking the similar water acceptance is some what a consideration...what ends up being the most affecting influence ..for me...is the amount of sun the understory plants willl enjoy.. as mine are already so underpotted.. to keep it all a bit faster in cycleing from wet to dry.. [andso Icancarry htem on my sholder up the ladder.. and through the small hatch]... Many of my under planting attempts start off great in the spring...but soon ...as the canopy fills out and in.. it blocks so much of the sun ..making the understory quite small weak and unhappy...and then subject more to water issues than they might be...
Philodendrums and ivy I find are happy..although not much for flowers and I've had some luck with some of the flowering vines.. but you have to keep them pinched down out of the plumerias canopy ...somewhat..but they do provide some branch support and anchoring in high winds..as the vines grow from branch to branch.. then perhaps to another plumeria or other anchoring support of something near by.. Bocca.. a personal favorite here starts out great.. but then gets needing more light.. although moving the big pot about will help with the light issues..
underplanting/light problems... are like the potted plumerias in th rain... although it might have rained heavily... that doesn't mean much if any water actually fell into the pot... keep up the expermentation though..
Gee..love the temperature reports... sounds like a borderline ideal location there for them...most everywhere else if that close to perfect..seems to fall just on the otherside of ideal..this year anyway.. all the best... Gordon
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 20, 2007
11:26 PM

Post #3104516

Thanks Gordon. I have lots of philo cuttings that I'm presently trying to root. I might use that in one of my pots. If it turns out it is robbing plumie of water, I won't feel too guilty about yanking it out.

Good to hear from you.
tucsonplumeriaz
Tucson, AZ

January 31, 2007
7:13 PM

Post #3142675

i would be careful about sitting potted plants around the base of your plumeria.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 31, 2007
7:23 PM

Post #3142712

why is that tucson,, could they damage the trunk?
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 19, 2008
12:20 AM

Post #4970771

I am bumping this thread to show you my underplanted plumies. Last year I used verbenas, and they did well but I'm just not that crazy about them.

This year I used calibrachoa (million bells) and they are great! These potted plumies are in full sun. I am very careful not to overwater. Neither plumies nor millon bells appreciate it.

I have a pot with the red bells, one w/ blue, one with white bacopa and the 4th one with a dwarf yellow zinnia and a var. vine that Seedpicker_TX said I simply had to have. She wasn't wrong.

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Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

May 19, 2008
12:34 AM

Post #4970846

Very attractive!!
I am very happy with the effect my ground orchids are creating under my larger trees.
Always looking for other options, though!
Clare_CA

(Zone 10b)

May 19, 2008
7:23 PM

Post #4974590

Hi Nery! Plumies love water, especially with your heat, so don't be afraid to water them well as long as drainage is good. They are now competing for food and water with the other plants so I would water more frequently if they were mine. Don't forget to fertilize regularly for blooms! They do look pretty!
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 19, 2008
10:33 PM

Post #4975352

ahem! today we hit 94 so you're right, I won't be skimpy w/ water right now, lol.

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Other Plumerias Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
What about a "new forum" for plumerias? Plumeriagod 56 Apr 25, 2007 2:15 AM
Feeding CaCajun 9 May 12, 2007 12:09 AM
have neve hard this happen to one of my plumies before junglebob 56 Sep 19, 2007 3:28 AM
Panama plumies vossner 53 Apr 15, 2007 11:22 AM
South Florida Blooms! \(^o^)/ lopaka 184 Jun 12, 2007 5:30 AM


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