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Winter Sowing: wintersowing variation?

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Forum: Winter SowingReplies: 14, Views: 15
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missgarney
Cullowhee, NC
(Zone 6b)

February 9, 2006
5:50 PM

Post #2033046

I was describing wintersowing as I have learned to do it on this forum to a friend who gardens but doesn't have lots of time to spend on it. She said, "So then the roots just grown down through the openings in the containers?" I said, "No, at the right time for the plant you transplant it into the garden where you want it." She said, peremptorily, "Too many steps."

So then I got to thinking, suppose one makes the containers but cuts off the bottoms, and digs little holes in the garden and fills the holes with seedling-friendly potting mix, and sows the seeds where the plants are actually wanted in the garden, and then puts the little plastic container with the slits on top of each place? It would be like the classic garden cloche but much cheaper. Of course she might not like having all the little plastic things in the garden, but it would save a step, and at least some of the less fastidious seeds would probably do well, wouldn't they?
KatyMac
So. Puget Sound, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 9, 2006
6:19 PM

Post #2033091

Hmmm, being a newbie to this I can't offer an opinion. BUT, I'm making newspaper pots so I can put the little plants directly in the ground to save a step (and money). I've gotten carried away and I think it would be too much work to put little plastic thingies all over my yard.
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

February 9, 2006
6:54 PM

Post #2033135

Sounds like an experiment to me!!! Do some that way and let me know the results!! I want to use the paper pots too, but I haven't had time to get a container that will hold them. Walmart - here I come!!!!
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 10, 2006
12:12 AM

Post #2033737

They probably would do well. You are simply protecting the seed with a plastic cloche. Some people might not like a plastic looking garden for a few months, but the end result would be fabulous! However, if those plastic cloches blew away in a storm, you may need to go looking for them all over your neighborhood. Don't think the neighbors would exactly appreciate that! Also, if that area did not get enough precipitation, then you would need to be watering your plastic cloches during the winter. Like Anita said...experiment & let us know!
heathrjoy
Weedville, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 10, 2006
8:33 PM

Post #2035686

Sounds great to me too. The only problems I see with it (in my zone) are actually digging the holes in Dec, or anytime in the winter. If it's cold enough to winter sow I don't know how frozen or hard the ground might be. Also, I just wouldn't want to go out in those temps and be digging holes!! Do you think the holes could be dug ahead of time, maybe during fall clean up time? That would make it easier...in this zone anyway.
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

February 10, 2006
10:12 PM

Post #2035921

good point heathrjoy...that never occured to me!
missgarney
Cullowhee, NC
(Zone 6b)

February 11, 2006
2:40 AM

Post #2036586

I have no neighbors, and many warmish winter days here so no problem with digging holes. However, I think my husband might not like the plastic things here and there, because let's face it...they look just like garbage if you don't know why they're there.
heathrjoy
Weedville, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 11, 2006
6:51 AM

Post #2036970

How high would the plastic thingies have to be? How much snow do you get in your area? If the snow is deeper than the plastic covers are high no one will see them till spring melt. If they are white/clear most folks driving by prolly won't notice if the snow does melt...they'll just think it's a patch of snow if they do see it.

Or what if you just did a bed for ws items this way and covered the whole thing in whatever way you could? Then just transplanted in the spring. I know you're still transplanting, but somehow seems easier to just move the plant. I've been thinking of doing this myself, but don't know if I will or not (depends on room and DH's opinion). I was even thinking of doing a coldframe with a garden bed bottom for wsing, no pots or containers needed. Gets rid of the garbage look for good. Just an idea, and I have a year to research it...IF it's going to happen. Supplies are readily available to us all in the form of old windows and doors...if anyone wants to run with this please share the info and pics if you construct anything. I think it might be the cheapest, fastest and least messy (sloppy looking) way to go...that I've thought of anyway.

DH used plexiglass in my gh that he made. If you're worried about the safety of glass (kids, pets, etc.) you could always go that route. It's held up extremely well for us.

Sorry this is so long, you just got me thinking now. :)
missgarney
Cullowhee, NC
(Zone 6b)

February 11, 2006
12:40 PM

Post #2037169

Last night I would have complained about how little snow we get here; but this a.m. we have 4 inches! I'm disappointed that I had too many obligations yesterday to get any more seeds sown, seeds which would today be dosed with this wonderful white "time-release-water".

Anyway, I really can do whatever I want in my garden because we have no neighbors and our house is 1/2 mile up a private gravel road; even if people come up the private road, they can only see the top of our house from it. So I think I might try this cheap cloche technique here and there. It may be that I get such fantastic results that it justifies the eyesore.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

February 11, 2006
7:08 PM

Post #2037958

I am using these cut down nursery pots so that I don't have to worry about transplanting if I don't want to... they can grow bigger in place if I need to let them. They all have soil in them today and I have more pots in place. I will put my seeds out today, if i can get off of here! or tomorrow :)

Susan

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kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 11, 2006
10:15 PM

Post #2038307

I might do a few flowers that way, too. I haven't tried this techinque, but it looks good. Would make the cloche a little more sturdy to dig into soil. I've saved this link for a long time so I hope it works

http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/extras/49cloche.php

Karen
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

February 11, 2006
11:54 PM

Post #2038517

Excellent link Karen, Thanks!
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

February 12, 2006
6:56 PM

Post #2040508

Karen, that is excellent.. My cousin takes the thrown out bottles from a local water distributor... the large 5 gallon ones, and he does the same things with them. :)

oh my... I just had a lightbulb... maybe I could put those big things on top of my pots when i am WS'ing.. Hmmmm..

Susan
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

February 12, 2006
7:28 PM

Post #2040562

ding-ding-ding!!! Excellent idea
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

February 12, 2006
7:44 PM

Post #2040586

yes, sometimes its "ding a ling" for me, but that might actually be a good idea for the pots that are just about the same size... I'm going to look into it. :)

Susan

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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