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Clematis: What are some of your best Clematis?

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bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2006
5:29 AM

Post #2074467

My favorites are Henryi and Ramona. The only way that I know to propogate them with is layering in the ground. What have you had success with?

Does anyone swap on this forum? I also have a large Gardener's Delight clematis. I would love some cuttings of Mandevilla too.
Teresa
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2006
11:52 PM

Post #2076036

Hi Teresa:

Gosh, that's a hard question because there are so many wonderful Clematis! Henryi is definitely one of my favorite. I also have Ramona, but I haven't planted this one outdoors yet because it was to small. I was waiting for it to grow some more. I also love Etoile Violet, Violet Charm, and Maidwell Hall. I've never tried propagating my Clematis. Do you propagate them through serpentine layering? How long does it take before you have rooted babies? I would be interested in trading Clematis with you. I don't have any Mandevilla at this moment. Please send me D-mail.

Thanks,

Shirley
Roselaine
North Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2006
4:26 PM

Post #2077241

I would say: Madame Le Coultre, Hagley Hybrid, Huldine, Miss Bateman*my fave, and Arabella...this one is non-stop and oh so healthy! Elaine
wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2006
5:56 PM

Post #2079678

For sheer flower power I would say C. flammula, it is also strongly scented, and flowers forever. I grow C. kasmu with it, they are both in PF if you want to look, that also flowers well for a long time.

Kugotia, or Golden Tiara (same plant) is another robust grower and flowers forever. They are easy to grow, some easier than others. This one has Plant Breeders rights but I bought one for my daughter and grew 2 plants from it for myself! It is also a very quick one to establish from cuttings.

To grow from cuttings, take a new growth that has turned a little ripe, you don't want the very soft end growth. Choose a bit further down that is strong, cut about 1.5" below a pair of leaves. Cut the stem above the leaves to about 1/4" from the leaves. Remove one of the leaves to retain moisture, remember it has no roots and will perspire through leaves. Place in a small deepish pot, like the little ones you buy small cactii in will do well.

Bury the stem to the leaf joint, I find this is where it will root best. I place them in a heated propogator which is automatically heated 68-72F, preferably shaded from hot sun. Keep just moist, too wet is likely to rot the stem, it helps to wet the mat at the bottom to provide humidity. It should root, but not all will. You can place 3 in a slightly bigger pot, putting them around the edges, and transplant when growing well. Harden off slowly, keep inside for a start, and in a greenhouse when warmer. They can be put ouside when summer comes, but if a slow maturing plant I would keep in a cold greenhouse over winter. Kugotia matured in a season and flowered 1st year.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2006
12:47 AM

Post #2080426

Excellent propagating information, Wallaby! Thanks so much for posting it!
beaker_ch
Columbia Heights, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 2, 2006
2:19 AM

Post #2080588

Hi Wallaby - Gee I find you all over the place. Question - Do you ever use a root hormone in your plant rootings. Don't know too much about it myself, but I'm under the impression it's suppose to promote root growth.
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2006
6:27 AM

Post #2080894

I am going to try the rooting hormone because my Mom and sisters have been asking about a start of mine. I love sharing plants. I did have one little volunteer of Henryi that I gave away last year.
Now I need to add this to my list with Pro Mix.

Thanks
livilou
Halifax, NS
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2006
2:08 PM

Post #2081244

My Sho-un clematis! It's absouloutley beautiful every year. Last year had some wilt..so hopefully won't be back this spring.

Thumbnail by livilou
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wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2006
2:31 PM

Post #2081279

Sho-un is very pretty, shame about the wilt. Do you plant them deep? if you plant them about 4" deeper than they were in their pots they should regrow if they get wilted.

I'm like a butterfly beaker, flitting everywhere!
Hey I think I'm finding you all over the place too!

No I don't use rooting hormone, some plants are supposed to be difficult and it is supposed to help, having never tried it I couldn't compare! I have heard from some that it doesn't make any difference. Oh no I don't want to go off on one of those experimental routes, too much else to do...

With ripe stems if you scrape off some of the outer layer an inch or so from the bottom, that exposes the part with the hormones that will promote rooting.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2006
5:01 PM

Post #2081538

Beautiful livilou! I love the Japanese Clematis cultivars!! I planted Sho-un last year, so I hope I'll see a few flowers this season.
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2006
10:09 PM

Post #2082240

Who sells Japanese clematis? Like I need a new source for flowers.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2006
10:26 PM

Post #2082292

Lots of Nurseries sell the Japanese cultivars. Which were you interested in?
beaker_ch
Columbia Heights, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 3, 2006
6:31 AM

Post #2083130

Here's a Japanese I really like, but I'm holding out for this year. Too much to do in the garden as it is.

This is Fujimusume from Silver Star Vinery.

Thumbnail by beaker_ch
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beaker_ch
Columbia Heights, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 3, 2006
6:44 AM

Post #2083134

Back to rooting. How long does it take the cutting to set roots? There's a woman who lives across the street from me who admires my Clematis and I don't think she has a lot of money to spend on plants. Maybe I could start her a few.

We had a terrible storm last August and she lost her two big elms in her front yard. It was just an awful mess. The top of one tree was in my yard with the trunk laying across the street, not to mention we were without power for a few days. Anyway, I figure I can now grow roses out front. I probably owe her something for that!
wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2006
2:02 PM

Post #2083591

It's a few years since I did it, I tried a few varieties and got success with most. Something from 2 weeks to a little longer I think. remember to push the leaf joint just so it's nicely hitting the compost, roots can come from them and head to the compost. I used a free draining leafy compost mix, keep moist but not soaked as that can rot them, the humidity around them can make them grow roots, so keep warm and a little shaded with a clear cover and moist mat underneath. Try it, you will be surprised! If you leaf is large you can also cut half off.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 4, 2006
8:47 PM

Post #2086576

Fujimusume is a beauty! I ordered that one from Silver Star Vinery too!!
conifers
Rock Island, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2006
2:04 AM

Post #2087254

Take a look at this info I've had stored on my computer for several years now. I'm going to give it a try full force this coming year.

Leaf-bud Cuttings
Leaf-bud cuttings are used for many trailing vines and when space or cutting material is limited. Each node on a stem can be treated as a cutting. This type of cutting consists of a leaf blade, petiole, and a short piece of stem with an attached axillary bud. Place cuttings in the medium with the bud covered (1/2 to 1 inch) and the leaf exposed (Figure 4). Examples of plants that can be propagated in this manner include clematis, rhododendron, camellia, jade plant, rubber plant, devil’s ivy, grape ivy, dracaena, blackberry, mahonia, and heart-leaf philodendron.

MISSING PHOTO - WRONG FORMAT - PHOTO BELOW

· Bryant, G. 1995. Propagation Handbook. Stackpole Books: Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.
· Dirr, M. A. and C. W. Heuser, Jr. 1987. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation: From Seed to Tissue Culture. Varsity Press: Athens, Georgia.
· Hartmann, H. T., D. E. Kester, F. T. Davies and R. L. Geneve. 1996. Plant Propagation, Principles and Practices. 6th ed. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.
· McMillan Browse, P. D. A. 1978. Plant Propagation. Simon and Schuster: New York.
· Toogood, A. 1993. Plant Propagation Made Easy. Timber Press: Portland, Oregon

*Accidentally added unrelated info I had saved with this info as well*

Heres a photo of what is being explained with these "leaf bud cuttings".

I already plan to use my greenhouse with this shade cloth on always and have a contiunous mister that pushes water condensated air (I bought the thing at Walgreens Drug Store - It's made by 'Sunbeam') with bottom heat...everything Wallaby says, basically.

This information I got off the internet - sorry I don't have links nor do I know where it came from! It was meant for me to refer to only for myelf so please excuse the plagurize! It's worth sharing however.

Dax

This message was edited Mar 4, 2006 10:08 PM

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Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 5, 2006
2:24 AM

Post #2087311

Very interesting leaf-bud propagating techniques. Are you going to try propagating Clematis using this method? What do you do to the mother plant to seal up the wound?
conifers
Rock Island, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2006
5:55 AM

Post #2087678

Well to answer your question I'm not worried the slightest about leaving something exposed. I do however think for bulk propagation (like "budding" grafting - Doing a "Bud-Graft") you really can't beat this method. As Wallaby says though and I agree, you'll get some to root and others will simply rot. Once you have the environmental conditions correct, you can do pretty much anything within those conditions to achieve good results!

Then, since I plagurized, I wrote the staff to at least remove the photo. While I may not have a link as reference, the information is still cited properly, or at least I think it is, just not the photo.

Dax



This message was edited Mar 5, 2006 1:56 AM
wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2006
1:38 PM

Post #2088036

If you have a long new shoot you can just cut it into sections and use any that look suitable. That depends on the plant you are taking it from though, you may only ber able to get a short piece.

No need to protect the wound from the cut on the mother plant, when it's in growth it will just make more growth from the leaf axils further down, and can even encourage more shoots from the bottom.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 5, 2006
4:21 PM

Post #2088428

Thanks so much for the very valuable info conifers & wallaby1! I'm going to try "bud grafting" some of my Clematis, Azaleas, Rhododendrons & other soft wood plants.

I'm sure that the mother plant's system must cause a scab to heal over the grafted area in time. However, I still worry that it will leave the host plant more susceptible to disease & insects. Do you know if large commercial nurseries treat the host plant with anything?
wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2006
8:45 PM

Post #2088957

I think you are mixing grafting up with taking a green, semi-ripe or other cutting. Bud grafting requires a root stock, and is used maily for things like fruit trees, apples etc., that is a bit more expertise.

This is simply taking a cutting and rooting it. Rhododendrons are often better done by layering, that is pegging a branch down to the soil and letting it root before removing from the parent.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 5, 2006
11:32 PM

Post #2089285

Yes, you're probably right, wallaby1! I'm mixing up simple & complex bud grafting. Sheesh! So many different propagation methods!

Pegging a Rhododendron branch down into the soil is definitely the easiest way to propagate! I do this when propagating Hydrangeas too.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 5, 2006
11:43 PM

Post #2089312

What are some of the varieties that would be in bloom all summer long? I have an area that gets morning sun and would probably work out well for the Clematis.

Deb
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2006
12:23 AM

Post #2089400

Hi deb,

According to the American Clematis Society, "Most clematis enjoy being exposed to at least 5 to 6 hours of sunlight daily...planting pastel pink varieties in bright shade helps to minimize fading."

A lot of the large early flowering varieties will bloom in May & June & then have a repeat flush in September. Plus, Herbaceous & non-clinging varieties (Integrifolias & Heracleifolias) will flower all Summer long, such as:

Alionushka
Arabella
Blue Boy
Caerulea
Eriostemon
Juuli
Pamiat Serdtsa
and others


wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2006
12:57 AM

Post #2089485

Juuli

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wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2006
1:05 AM

Post #2089502

C. flammula with Kasmu

Thumbnail by wallaby1
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wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2006
1:15 AM

Post #2089529

Kugotia

Thumbnail by wallaby1
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bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 6, 2006
1:25 AM

Post #2089552

How do you know which clematis to trim back and which to leave to bloom on old wood?
Will Ramona and Gardener's Delight bloom on old wood? They are new to me. I left the vines last fall.

I was cutting my old Henryi back to about a foot until 2 years ago someone told me to leave it alone! It is over 6 ft tall and 2 ft wide. It is so beautiful when it is in full bloom.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2006
1:43 AM

Post #2089578

Gorgeous pictures, wallaby! I wish that Kugotia was available in the States!

Here is what Debbie says on her website about Clematis care & pruning. http://www.clematisdebbie.com/care.asp "Ramona" and "Henryi" are type 2's. They both benefit from light pruning. I'm not familiar with "Gardener's Delight". I cut my "Henryi" back lightly in early Spring and then after it's first flush of flowers. Here's a picture of my "Henryi" last year.

Thumbnail by Shirley1md
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wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2006
1:46 AM

Post #2089585

There are 3 groups, those that flower only on the new season's growth, and should be cut to within a foot or so of the ground in spring just above buds, mostly late flowereing species and cultivars, Jackmanii, Ville de Lyon, Ernest Markham, Gipsy Queen, Hagley Hybrid are examples.

Those that flower on side shoots from the previous seasons growth, in which case the old flower heads and dead end growth should be removed. Early large-flowered cultivars, examples Marie Boisselot, Nelly Moser, Niobe, Daniel Deronda.

The other is mostly your small flowered types, early flowering species such as alpina, montana, macropetala, armandii, cirrhosa, which should only be pruned after flowering if the plant is overgrown.

There is a link on this site giving names under groups

http://www.taunton.com/finegardening/pages/g00156.asp
wallaby1
Lincoln
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2006
1:54 AM

Post #2089616

Shirley I think Kugotia is available at Forest Farm, it is also called Golden Tiara. Henryii looks to do very well!
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2006
5:16 PM

Post #2090963

Thanks wallaby! I knew that Clematis by the name "Golden Tiara", not by Kugotia!
Alyssum
Cortlandt Manor, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 8, 2006
3:16 PM

Post #2095758

My favorite is "Multi blue".

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Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 8, 2006
5:03 PM

Post #2095978

Hi Alyssum! Haven't seen you here for a while! Glad your "Multi-Blue" has done so beautifully for you!!
Alyssum
Cortlandt Manor, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2006
2:50 PM

Post #2196725

Thanks -- I don't get on Dave's that much -- but I do love that multi-blue. All the ones I got from the co-op did well -- but Multi blue is definitely my fav.

Chamelle
Springfield, OR
(Zone 8b)

April 17, 2006
11:42 PM

Post #2197907

I have no idea what my best clematis actually is. It's purple and it blooms in spring. That's the only information I have. What I DO know, and what makes it the best is that my grandma had it growing up her porch trellis for years and when she finally had to leave her place and move to town I went up and rescued a ton of plants, including the clematis. I'm SOO pleased to report that I didn't kill it, and it's currently looking very happy climbing up my lightpost and has quite a few blooms! Yay! My grandma is thrilled that some of her plants were saved, and the clematis was a favorite of hers. When it blooms perhaps I'll post a pic of the blooms to ID.

In the photo you can see some little violets coming up, which were also 'scavenged'. I hope that they'll fill in the whole rocky area.

Thumbnail by Chamelle
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Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2006
3:14 AM

Post #2198827

Hi Chamelle!

Welcome to the Vines & Climbers Forum!! Congratulations on rescuing your Grandmother's Clematis vines from her garden. You were very successfull transplanting them because they have a lot of growth and nice fat buds ready to burst into bloom! I'm looking forward to seeing pictures of them soon.
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2006
10:24 AM

Post #2199241

My oldest vine, which is a Henryi is almost ready to open! It is always so beautiful, I will try and post a pic of it later.
Chamelle
Springfield, OR
(Zone 8b)

April 25, 2006
4:28 PM

Post #2219663

Thank you for the welcome, Shirley! I'm excited about the clematis too... every day I think this might be the day, those buds are just getting HUGE! I can't wait to share pics and get an ID. My other clematis (autumn blooming and something or other 'elizabeth') are just now starting to put on some growth.

I have introduced myself over on the welcome mat if you'd like to take a peek.

Cham
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2006
3:05 PM

Post #2223099

How long do you keep clematis seedlings inside? I have a couple that are looking puny. They are so small I think I will pot them up and watch them a few weeks. It may go down to 40 tonight.
Ivy1
Mystic, CT
(Zone 6b)

May 11, 2006
7:37 PM

Post #2269696

Don't want to interrupt, but I like General Sikorski.

Sorry about the quality of the pic, my 5 year old got the only picture of it last year.

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Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2006
1:19 AM

Post #2270548

What a beautiful picture of General Sikorski!
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2006
11:30 AM

Post #2271633

Here is a shot of Henyri. It has even more blooms now.

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Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2006
12:27 AM

Post #2273726

Henryi is putting on a show! That's what we all hope for!!
Ivy1
Mystic, CT
(Zone 6b)

May 14, 2006
2:42 PM

Post #2278010

I gotta get one of those!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #7131489

It's so nice to see lush clematis vines in October even though these photos were taken in spring.
venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

October 4, 2009
1:41 PM

Post #7133171

I might sound like a broken record, but here is one of my favorites this morning. He is taller than I, so I had to hold the camera over my head and hope I got the shot. John Huxtable doesn't seem to realize it's fall !

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 4, 2009
1:54 PM

Post #7133218

Gorgeous at any time but in October it's twice as lovely, Louise.
dathen
W of Cleveland, OH
(Zone 5a)

October 4, 2009
2:33 PM

Post #7133321

He is beautiful. How old is he - was he a slow starter?

Dathen
venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

October 4, 2009
3:02 PM

Post #7133387

He was planted in spring of '07. He went to about 3 feet in '07, 4 feet in '08 and about 9 feet this year. On a scale of 1 to 10, I'd give him an 8 for speed of growth. Bloomed nicely every year.

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


October 6, 2009
7:24 AM

Post #7140154

Oh thanks pirl for bumping this one up, too tired to read it all now but I will have to come back to it.

Just came across this picture taken this past April in a local public garden.

Thumbnail by Calif_Sue
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shihtzumom
Pearisburg, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 7, 2009
6:43 PM

Post #7144953

Barbara Harrington, Semu, John Huxtable, Lady Betty B, the list goes on. Barbara Harrington is a stunning clematis for my zone. She is full of blooms now. I have lots to post if time ever allows.
Kathy
dathen
W of Cleveland, OH
(Zone 5a)

October 7, 2009
7:33 PM

Post #7145125

Venu - I missed your last post on John. That sounds like very good growth speed. If mine comes up next year and just sits there, I may have to find another spot to plant him - I do love his looks.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 7, 2009
7:49 PM

Post #7145173

Everyone seems to have John but me. At least I have one as a husband!

(why does that sound all wrong?)
venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

October 7, 2009
8:21 PM

Post #7145315

Hopefully you'll have another John next spring...a clem, not a man :)

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


October 7, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #7145402

That John's a real looker Venu!
venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

October 8, 2009
1:45 AM

Post #7146406

He's such a flirt too!

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


October 8, 2009
3:22 AM

Post #7146680

I bet!
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

October 9, 2009
4:54 PM

Post #7151651

I love the Evergreen Clematis armandii, for it is hardy in our winters, it can stand heat/ dry spots, and its scent is incredible in the spring.
My mother says it smells like a cross between Gardenia and Jasmine.
The only problem with it is, it is very vigorous, so do not not plant it unless you have the space, as it will take over.
My one has now grown down my washing line and smothered a south/west facing wall, and is growing down the other sides now.
Regards from England.
Neil.

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KimmyCoCoPop
Taylorsville, KY

October 9, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #7151734

Neil! Love your posts in the recipe forum. My ex-MIL was from Cheltenham and I visited for 3 weeks in 1978 and loved your country...your vine is gorgeous. What zone are you considered? I WILL be making your Yorkshire Pudding ! Kim
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

October 9, 2009
5:54 PM

Post #7151851

My dearest, KimmyCoCoPop thank you for your comments. I am most glad you like my Clematis I will enclose another picture.
However I do not trust your zone maps or anything about them. For my Clematis is said to be hardy in zone 9 but the temperature dropped to Minus 16.2 ℉, and my Clematis was covered in snow as were my tree ferns, yet it did not touch them at all.
So I asked this as it seems there are a few problems with the system.
Your Zones that members use confuse me, I understand the nicely coloured maps, but they are irrelevant and totally meaningless!
I live in the U.K. (London), so that only adds to more confusion, this is from wilkipedia, regarding Zones!
Possibly the largest drawback is that they do not incorporate summer heat levels into the zone determination. Sites which may have the same mean winter minima, but markedly different summer temperatures, will still be accorded the same hardiness zone. An extreme example is the Shetland Islands and southern Alabama, which are both on the boundary of zones 8 and 9 and share the same winter minima, but very little else in their climates; in summer, the humid subtropical climate of Alabama is about 20 degrees Celsius hotter than the oceanic climate of Shetland, and there are very few similar plants that can be grown at both locations. Due to its maritime climate, the UK is in AHS Heat Zone 2 (having 1 to 8 days hotter than 30 degrees Celsius) according to the AHS (American Horticultural Society), whereas Alabama is in Zones 7 to 9 (61 to 150 days hotter than 30 degrees Celsius). It is by consequence most relevant to combine the hardiness zone with the heat zone to have a much better picture of what can be grown in such or such places.
Another problem is that the hardiness zones do not take into account the reliability of the snow cover. Snow acts as an insulator against extreme cold temperatures, protecting the root system of hibernating plants. If the snow cover is reliable (then present during the coldest days), the actual temperature to which the roots are exposed is not as low as the hardiness zone number would indicate. As an example, Quebec City in Canada is located in zone 4 but can rely on an important snow cover every year, making it possible to cultivate plants normally rated for zones 5 or 6, whereas in Montreal, located in zone 5, it is sometimes difficult to cultivate plants adapted to the zone because of the unreliable snow cover. But snow cover is a most unreliable event, and although a colder zone might have more snow in theory, just a single dry winter will remember the gardener or farmer how deep the soil can freeze in his/her region.
Other factors that affect plant survival but are not considered in hardiness zones are soil moisture, humidity, the number of days of frost, and the risk of a rare catastrophic cold snap. Some risk evaluation – the probability of getting a particularly severe low temperature – often would be more useful than just the average conditions.
astly, many plants will survive in a locality but will not flower if the day length is inappropriate or if they require vernalization (a particular duration of low temperature). With annuals, the time of planting can often be adjusted to allow growth beyond their normal geographical range.
Then last year we were classified as Zone 9, now due to the bad winter weather, we are now classified as London, England 8-9?
Then most users have a Zone with a/b in them, according to the net I quote:
The 2006 map appears to validate the data used in the 2003 draft completed by the AHS. Like the AHS map, it also did away with the more detailed a/b half-zone delineations, this refers to the new U.S.D.A. map!
So we are rather confused here in poor old England for many reasons.
Firstly most people (apart from the youngsters), refuse to use Celsius as they use Fahrenheit , T.V. and Radio stations usually do it in both!
We have Pounds and Pennies, they have Euros. The EEC insist we have Beer in Liters, but we still have Pints, yet Petrol (gas) is in liters not Gallons! They have Kilometers we have miles, they insist our food is weighed in Kilos, but most grocery shops still do it pounds and ounces as well, then are Cricket pitches are measured at 22 Yards, yet we are supposed to use centimeters, not feet and inches.
Yours a very confused Englishman!
Regards from London.
Neil.

Thumbnail by NEILMUIR1
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glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2009
12:14 AM

Post #7156031

OH MY Neal now I'm so confused but that was very interesting how do you ever keep any thing straight ? ;0)
Gloria from cold zone 5 Michigan
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

October 11, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #7156136

Dear Gloria, the Romans made straight things in the first Century when they invaded some of our Island, but not all of it.
So the Roman roads are straight, but our roads are curvy all over the place, which is much more fun than straight roads, especially on a very fast motorcycle!
We were quite happy till the European union, then; our potato's were too big and we were told to stop growing them, our bananas are not straight enough, are farmers were not allowed to grow food as we produce too much as we are efficient, so they will pay us not to grow it or rear it.
Don't laugh we have been told we will be paid not to rear pigs, or indeed milking cows, cereals or grow anything!
Here is a letter to the Secretary of State I sent, for this is what we have to put up with, as well as other things.

Rt Hon David Miliband MP
Secretary of State..
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA),
Nobel House
17 Smith Square
London
SW1P 3JR




16 September 2009
Dear Secretary of State,

My friend, who is in farming at the moment, recently received a cheque for £3,000 from the Rural Payments Agency for not rearing pigs.. I would now like to join the “not rearing pigs” business.

In your opinion, what is the best kind of farm not to rear pigs on, and which is the best breed of pigs not to rear? I want to be sure I approach this endeavour in keeping with all government policies, as dictated by the EU under the Common Agricultural Policy.

I would prefer not to rear bacon pigs, but if this is not the type you want not rearing, I will just as gladly not rear porkers. Are there any advantages in not rearing rare breeds such as Saddlebacks or Gloucester Old Spots, or are there too many people already not rearing these?

As I see it, the hardest part of this program will be keeping an accurate record of how many pigs I haven’t reared. Are there any Government or Local Authority courses on this?

My friend is very satisfied with this business. He has been rearing pigs for forty years or so, and the best he ever made on them was £1,422 in 1968. That is until this year, when he received a cheque for not rearing any.

If I get £3,000 for not rearing 50 pigs, will I get £6,000 for not rearing 100? I plan to operate on a small scale at first, holding myself down to about 4,000 pigs not raised, which will mean about £240,000 for the first year. As I become more expert in not rearing pigs, I plan to be more ambitious, perhaps increasing to, say, 40,000 pigs not reared in my second year, for which I should expect about £2.4 million from your department. Incidentally, I wonder if I would be eligible to receive tradable carbon credits for all these pigs not producing harmful and polluting methane gases?

Another point: These pigs that I plan not to rear will not eat 2,000 tonnes of cereals. I understand that you also pay farmers for not growing crops. Will I qualify for payments for not growing cereals to not feed the pigs I don’t rear?

I am also considering the “not milking cows” business, so please send any information you have on that too. Please could you also include the current DEFRA advice on set aside fields? Can this be done on an e-commerce basis with virtual fields (of which I seem to have several thousand hectares, on my computer at the moment)?

In view of the above you will realise that I will be totally unemployed, and will therefore qualify for unemployment benefits. I shall of course be voting for your party at the next general election.


Yours faithfully.

Regards from England, Gloria.
Neil.


venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

October 11, 2009
1:32 AM

Post #7156349

Neil, thank you so much for sharing your letter. I needed a good laugh and you restored my faith in that "WHAT?!?" is worldwide.
NEILMUIR1
London
United Kingdom

October 11, 2009
3:06 AM

Post #7156703

Dear venu209, I did in fact get a letter back from them, which said:
Dear Sir,
your points have been noted, and your letter will be passed on the the relevant department.
Then it was just signed by someone for the Secretary of State.
I have no idea what the relevant department is, oh well at least it has caused a laugh on DG, so that is nice.
Regards.
Neil.
glevely
Sanford, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2009
10:00 AM

Post #7157057

Well I got a laugh but may be you will be rich soon for not doing any thing wouldent that be nice !!! good luck on your non work search lol;0)
Gloria
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 18, 2009
3:43 PM

Post #7182308

Neil, you added such fun to this already interesting thread. Thanks for posting your letter... such a good laugh! Evey =)
neheskett
Albert Lea, MN
(Zone 4b)

November 30, 2009
6:23 PM

Post #7322286

Hi everyone, to answer the OP I would have to say that the best clematis for me have been my Ville de Lyon, Polish Spirit and what I had *thought* was a Ken Donson but now I'm not so sure. (I just hate when the tags get lost, now I keep them all written in a notebook just in case!) I have a few that just seem to barely make it, like my jackmanii and Nelly Moser, I suppose they are just not planted in the right spot.
Nancy
GardenQuilts
Pocono Mountains, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2009
11:26 PM

Post #7404994

With regards to propagating...My trellis fell down and broke my new rubro clematis. (I am new to clematis, this is my first one). I put the broken part in water. It started to root so I put it in a self watering pot. (Actually a soda bottle cut in half, the top half inverted, with soil in the top and water in the bottom. It made more roots and grew leaves. I brought it inside during the hot weather. The cat played with it, fraying the stem. I put it in the garden, planting it almost horizontally with the leaves above ground. The leaves have stayed alive (and are still green). This is obviously the wrong way to propagate clems. Rubro must be very hardy to survive this ordeal.

The original plant which was broken at ground level sprouted new growth and climbed the trellis. It is also still green.

With regards to the cat, she seems to like vines. My jasmine was moved to a hanging pot. I discovered that she HATES neems. I spray any accessible plants with very dilute neems. She has her own cat grass (oats) and catmint plants. I just rescued a dwarf palm while walking my dog on garbage day. It is the new favorite and gets sprayed with neems frequently. I need to find a high place for it. I check my pet health books to be certain that I avoid or hang potentially dangerous plants. Luckily she doesn't eat the plants (except for tarragon and garlic chives), just bats them around. She makes up for this nuisance by catching flying insects inside. (She doesn't go outside.)

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