Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Brugmansias: when to start watering cuttings

Communities > Forums > Brugmansias
bookmark
Forum: BrugmansiasReplies: 21, Views: 197
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2001
4:50 PM

Post #8336

I got some cuttings and put them in water for 3 days and then in good soil, and left them on the dry side. I have some that are putting out leaves now. Does that mean the roots are growing and I move them to the sun and water like the others? These are only about a week or so old, but some grew roots in that three days, and all the leaves are new.
I need someone to move in with me and answer my 24/7 questions. I cook really good ;)
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2001
5:24 PM

Post #93617

Country cooking!!!!! What will hubby have to say. Jim
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2001
5:30 PM

Post #93621

as long as there's some for him, it will be fine. And in our extra time, he'll put us to work weeding!!! (oops, shouldn't have said that, it might scare away volunteers:) LOL!!
Georgiaredclay
lagrange, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2001
5:44 PM

Post #93623

Weeds, weeds and more weeds. Seems I get them out one day and the next they are right back. I guess I had better weed here. Jim
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

July 12, 2001
6:46 PM

Post #93671

tig, i would break them in, move them to more sun, then more sun a few days later. congrats on your babies, i am a semi-rooting failure. once they get in full sun, mine use water in a hurry. rain here for two days, so nice!
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2001
7:05 PM

Post #93676

thanks arlene!!!
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2001
8:44 PM

Post #93705

yes!! come on down:) I followed Brugmansia's advice on this, as the cuttings were from him. But quite a few have roots. So the new leaves mean that they are on their way???
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

July 13, 2001
1:02 AM

Post #93784

TIG, yes they do, and unfortunately i ruined some...don't know how i did this..., feel like i should be punished. but i am sure brug man knows his varieties, it seems some root as soon as you plant them. i think we hit a rainy season and i didn't protect some from too much water, so sad.
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

July 13, 2001
1:18 AM

Post #93790

Karma, thank you, thank you! The good news is i have buds on one of YOUR babies, juter orange, can't wait!
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2001
2:14 AM

Post #93804

I got so very lucky with my first cuttings. I bought two and got some from kHT, and I just stuck them in dirt outside in the sun and all the rain we've had. They're doing great!!!!!!!! Go figure:)
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

July 15, 2001
5:34 AM

Post #94597

Arlene, don't worry be happy, I have killed more Brugmansia than I can shake a stick at, each plant, hybrid,etc is different. Some root in water, some just rot in water, still others will root in almost frozen water, if you don't know keep it as dry as you can and only water enough to keep it from wilting and provide a well draining well aerated soil. Some root super fast, still others take months is seems. Tons depends on the soil as well. If you get scared don't worry, kill a few and learn what works best for that particular hybrid. As a side note Arlene, I plan on killing a few very nice white versicolor hybrids in my yard as I can't stand white unless its a 2/3 aurea hybrid or extremely fragrant. These white versicolors are very well shaped-long cylindrical full body, tendrils that curl out 2 or more inches, etc. In short, they would look better if crossed with an aurea. Sorry, I only like the versicolors if they are in color. The old Peach Versicolor is one of my favorite and its not the best in shape. The white versicolors I have are much better as far as shape goes. And so I do continue to ramble. Personally, I prefer any hybrid more after its crossed to an aurea, but some of those other traits are so appeasing to me as well, of course I just want them on a more aurea looking flower...
I am going to stop rambling, I swear, off I go...
Brugmansia
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2001
12:15 PM

Post #94652

KILL THEM????? oh, dearest Brug, let me send a bit of postage for a cutting from them first, and let their legacy live on in someone elses yard:)
btw, we've missed your rambling
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

July 15, 2001
12:54 PM

Post #94665

Brugmansia, i have a couple of good trading friends here, we can mount a rescue mission if you like, save you some roundup, let me know...
Brugmansia, love to read your posts, your "rambling" is a good thing. I haven't seen that many flowers yet, don't really know what i like best, but i have sure learned things to look for from you. i like those ruffly green leaves, are they from versicolor?
tig, isn't it painful to think of brugs with roundup on them? CAn't imagine having that many brugs.
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2001
1:05 PM

Post #94670

I can't either!! It's just too sad. And there are people begging for the babies. oh, the inhumanity!!!!!! :)
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

July 15, 2001
1:06 PM

Post #94671

Tig,
Well, I am sure you must know that my favorite Brugmansia species of all is the aurea. My favorite aurea of course is the Culebra. Well, my children have knocked another limb off of my Culebra so it looks like I am going to be rooting 15 or so of them. Just got done pulling the long thin snake like leaves off of them to start this next batch rooting. Ahh, and the Culebra I thought I killed from the last batch, it is sprouting new leaves from beneath the soil. Must of just barely took. For those of you who have never seen a Culebra you should check out a picture of one. It is far more impressive than the shredded white, double orange, etc, but then that is just my oppinion. The Culebra was so strange that it was actually classified into its very own Genus for a time--Methysticodenron amnesium. It has also been thought to have been a highly atrophied clone, sport, or perhaps a variable produced by generations on breeding by a medicine man in the Sibundoy valley where it was found. Leaves are 8-11 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. The white flowers can get up to 11 inches long, highly fragrant, has a split up its corolla going most of its length and is deeply incised as well. The Calyx of this flower covers a good 3/5 of its length as well. Culebra Borrachero is Cultivated by the Ingana and Kamsa Indians in the Sibundoy valley and is used medicinally and for religious ceremonies, this specimen is trully remarkable and like no other. Held to be one of the most sacred if not most sacred Brugmansia. B. aurea species are implored primarily for the relief of rheumatism.
As for rooting them. I have only watered the last batch once since I planted them a week or so ago. Watering is contingent on soil type and how long you leave those leaves. I try to remove as many of the leaves as I can possibly bring myself to tear off. The more leaves you tear off the better the chances of a hard to root Brugmansia or a green cutting will root. The less leaves on has the slower the Brugmansia is to take off rooting. Its a balance. If you have plenty of well draining soil and the soil dries out in a few hours watering twice a day is not uncommon for cuttings.

This message was edited Sunday, Jul 15th 9:13 AM
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2001
1:09 PM

Post #94672

where can I find a picture, you have me hooked!!!
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

July 15, 2001
1:47 PM

Post #94694

Is the culebra really slow growing and sparse flowering?
Liz
North Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2001
1:58 PM

Post #94702

Good Grief Brugmansia~~~you have time for children??
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

July 15, 2001
2:17 PM

Post #94707

Arlene, it is slow growing at first, the slowest I had, but thats because it likes to bush out at every node and is very difficult to root. This is the hardest Brugmansia I have contended with as a cutting. Hard=different which means it doesn't respond as easily as I would like for it to respond. Once it starts to root though it takes about 2 months for it to start shooting up fast and then it sends out shoots from the ground and each branch as fast as can be. This Brugmansia grows faster than the Ecuador pink, slower than the Double orange. At least at first. This is my first time taking green cuttings and rooting them of the Culebra, but green cuttings generally grow almosts as fast as seedlings if you can root them so heres to a bunch of fast growing Culebra. The Culebra has been killed from cuttings and rooted plants by a number of skilled Brugmansia growers I know in the states. Don't try this one close to winter time unless you have a heated greenhouse. Best to start in spring outside and get it fully rooted before fall comes so it has a firm base to come back from. The Culebra is a very dense bushy Brugmansia that can grow over 25ft tall if you let it. Of course you can keep it trimmed back as to a small 1 or 2 gallon pot.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Brugmansias Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
it you take cuttings from a blooming plant.. arlene 52 Dec 21, 2010 12:39 PM
Great Brugmansia hybrids fast Brugmansia 24 Jul 8, 2013 12:49 AM
How Many Other Canadian Brug Lovers Are Here? Ladybug 30 Aug 7, 2010 8:24 PM
Labeled Parts - 2nd try poppysue 15 Jan 8, 2010 2:19 PM
parentage monika 80 Nov 14, 2011 6:36 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America