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flowering vines list for the SW

Phoenix, AZ

I cannot locate the vine list in the faq at the other forum. I found this website ---> http://gardeningwithskip.tamu.edu/tips/tip0204F.htm
that I'd added to my faves last year; the list below is from the site. Though it's Texas, it seems applicable to low-elevation AZ as well. Perhaps we can add others not on the list... as well as additional comments/modifications. I don't quite know into what category Mexican Flame Vine goes! (tropical?)


ANNUAL AND TROPICAL VINES:

Cypress Vine (Ipomoea quamoclit) - Small (1") red flowers and a canopy of feathery foliage somewhat like that of the cypress tree. Reseeds profusely. Full sun. Flowers attract hummingbirds.

Hyacinth Bean (Dolichos lablab) - Fast growing bean vine with beautiful stalks of purple flowers over 12" long. Blooms begin to set seed in late summer and fall. Leaves are green with burgundy undersides, adding to the vine's appeal. Full sun.

Morning Glory (Ipomoea sp.) - Fast growing vine with large blooms in shades of blue, white and red. Mites can be a problem at times, but the gorgeous blooms are worth it. The moon vine (Ipomoea alba) is a close relative that blooms at night. Great for an outdoor deck area. Full sun.

Rangoon Creeper (Quisqualis indica) - This plant starts off as a 3' shrub then starts sending long vining shoots out and the plant becomes a vine. This is how it gets the name "quisqualis" which means "which - what?" Produces large clusters of flared trumpet blooms which start out white and turn to red. Full sun.

Blue Butterfly Pea (Clitoria ternatea) - Tame vine that won't take over and thus is great for restricted areas. Showy dark blue flowers with white centers. Full sun. Best viewed up-close.

Dutchman's Pipe (Aristolochia) - Several species of imported and one native vine with unique pipe-shaped blooms, best viewed up-close. Fast growing. Full sun to part shade.

PERENNIAL VINES:

Coral Vine or Queen's Wreath (Antigonon leptopus) - Vivid pink clusters of delicate lace-like blooms that hang down like pink chains. Blooms through the last of summer. Attracts pollinator insects like bumble bees. A white blooming form is also available. Full sun.

Sky Flower (Thunbergia grandiflora) - Fast growing vine that covers an area quickly to provide a fast screen. Large blue flowers are a very attractive accent and appear late in the season. Attracts hummingbirds. Full sun.

Passion Flower (Passiflora sp.) - several species offering blooms in various colors including red, blue or purple. Larval food source for Gulf Fritillary butterfly. Flowers are fascinating and complex. Best viewed up-close. Full sun.

Snail Vine (Vigna caracalla) - Pale purple blooms that curl around on themselves reminiscent of a snail's shell. Best viewed up-close. Full sun.

Sweet Autumn Clematis ( Clematis discorifolia) - Clouds of whitish flowers in late summer or early fall offer a scent reminiscent of vanilla. Prefers to grow onto something such as a garden arch or pillar, forming a cascading mound of foliage. Full sun to part shade. A native clematis worth mentioning is Scarlet Clematis (C. texensis), a dainty vine with single, red, urn-shaped blooms in mid to late summer. Shade to part shade. Best viewed up-close.

WOODY VINES:

Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) - A dainty grower that is well suited to a confined area. Coral blooms form clusters of tubular flowers. A yellow form is also available. Full sun to part shade. Other well-mannered honeysuckle species worth growing include the varieties 'Pam's Pink' and 'Gold Flame.' Full sun to part shade.

Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) - The native form sports rusty brown-red to yellow blooms. A dazzling new variety 'Tangerine Beauty' is a show stopper with its tangerine to coral blooms. It blooms profusely in spring and sparsely later in the season. Full sun to part shade.

Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans) - The "wild" version is often cursed as a rampant weedy vine. Newer cultivars like "Madame Galen" & "Georgia" offer larger blooms and have a place as a strong vine for a large arbor or to cover the expanse of a western wall. Full sun to part shade.

Wisteria (Wisteria sp.) - Several species and varieties are available. Long cascades of blue to purple flowers in spring. Looks great trained along the top of a fence and cut back heavily each winter. Full sun to part shade.

Carolina Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) - Evergreen vine that puts on spring show of trumpet shaped yellow blooms. Full sun to part shade. All parts of the plant are poisonous.

Lady Banks Rose (Rosa banksiae) - Long arching thornless canes bear yellow blooms in spring. Needs lots of room to do its thing. Full sun. A lightly fragrant, white blooming form is also available.

Butterfly Vine (Stigmaphyllum periplocaefolium) - Semi-deciduous vine named after the butterfly-shaped seed pods which form after the yellow clusters of flowers drop. Full sun. May freeze to ground some years.

Thumbnail by magpied
Tucson, AZ(Zone 9a)

The uber-list! Thanks, Magpied!

Goodyear, AZ

I didn't know Dutchman's Pipe (Aristolochia) could grow here! Does it take long to get established? In the Northeast it take about three years in accordance with the vine growers rhyme.

First year sleeper
second year creeper
third year Leaper!

How about grape vines? And Ivy's?

Phoenix, AZ

My Concord Grape

Thumbnail by Fish_knees
Goodyear, AZ

Those grape vines are Japanese beetle food in the Northeast! Any bug problems here? Spiders?

Phoenix, AZ

WarriorAnt - this is the grape I just got. I am so excited about it. Vitis californica Roger's Red.

http://www.wildscaping.com/plants/plantprofiles/Vitis_calif_RogerRed.htm

Phoenix, AZ

Japanese beetle...hmmmmm...never saw one.

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Thanks for the great info, Magpied!

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

So what is the pretty purple flower in the picture, please? It's very unusual and striking - new to me!

Phoenix, AZ

deserteden, it's the blue butterfly pea. I googled it and borrowed the image. I agree that it's pretty... I'm gonna have to get me one o' those. I wonder if anyone has any experience with them-?

warriorant, I don't know anything about "Dutchman's Pipe". I'm just the messenger...lol Sounds nice though! Ivy grows here; perhaps someone more knowledgeable about the varieties will chime in with ivy info.

This message was edited Apr 9, 2006 10:00 PM

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9a)

Just a thought here, some people don't like having their images borrowed. You might want to get their permission first.

Phoenix, AZ

I agree, judy... but there was no copyright or name associated with it (or I'd give credit)--and only jibberish (unless it's another language!) on the site; I'm not using it for profit, nor am I claiming ownership :)

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Thans, Magpied, it's so pretty - my Wants & Needs list just keeps getting longer.

Phoenix, AZ

I got lost on the internet looking for relevant info for Dutchman's Pipe--hundreds of species in this family--but found Aristolochia watsonii, native to the Sonoran Desert/AZ...

Aristolochiaceae (pipevine family)
Mark A. Dimmitt

This is a tropical family of 400 species in the world, 300 of which are in the genus Aristolochia. They are mostly vines with strangely-shaped flowers and foliage that exudes a distinctive, unpleasant odor. Only a single species occurs in the Sonoran Desert.

Aristolochia watsonii (English names: Southwestern pipevine, snakeroot, birthwort)

Description
A trailing or climbing vine with stems up to 3 feet (0.9 m) long. The 1 inch (2.5 cm) long, arrow-shaped leaves are usually dark brownish-green when growing in full sun. The tubular-funnel form flowers are about 1¼ inches (3.8 cm) long, green with brown spotting.

Flowering
Throughout the warm months.

Range
Aristolochia watsonii grows from Southern Arizona and adjacent Mexico to the tip of Baja California.

Notes
Though this species is inconspicuous and rarely encountered unless actively sought, it is included here because of three fascinating ecological stories.

One story is its pollination. Most pipevines are pollinated by deceiving insects into visiting the flowers; no reward is available. Usually the flowers smell like carrion or dung to attract insects that are seeking a place to lay eggs. The story of our species is even more remarkable. It is pollinated by Ceratopogonid flies; these are the small, blood-sucking flies that pester humans and other mammals in the humid summer. The flowers of Aristolochia watsonii resemble a mouse’s ear—translucent funnels with fur and veins—and give off a musty odor. The fly apparently expects to find a blood meal, and instead is trapped inside the flower tube overnight. During the night the flower releases pollen. The following morning the flower releases the pollen-covered fly. If the fly visits another flower it effects pollination.

All pipevines contain a variety of powerful toxins that humans have used for medicines. The name birthwort comes from its use during difficult births; it stimulates expulsion of the fetus and placenta.

The plant has also been used to treat snakebite, paralysis, malaria, impotence, intestinal worms, and infections. Though pipevine seems to be effective for numerous ailments, the side effects are horrific.

Despite the virulent toxins, pipevines are the larval food plant of the pipevine swallowtail, a large, showy butterfly. The caterpillars are black or red with red tubercles and grow to about 3 inches (7.6 cm) long. This conspicuous coloration warns potential predators that the larvae are protected by the pipevine’s toxins, which they store in their bodies without harm to themselves. Several caterpillars can often be found feeding on one small plant of A. watsonii. They will completely defoliate the plant (it later resprouts from its perennial root). Without this species of pipevine, the pipevine swallowtail would not occur in the Sonoran Desert.

Mesa, AZ(Zone 9b)

How about Spanish Flag vine? Does it do good here? I had some seeds for it so planted some,
they are just coming up so I hope so. I also have a lavender trumpet vine that I bought at
Target last year. It just bloomed for the first time. The passiflora I bought at Lowes is covered up
with buds, more opening everyday.......

Gemfire

Tolleson, AZ(Zone 9a)

Cool vines my want list or should I say NEED list is getting larger all the time.

Chandler, AZ

I grew the butterfly pea vine, it died back in winter and i am growing it from seed again this spring. Its color and bloom shape is quite spectacular.

Thumbnail by paperwhite1
Phoenix, AZ

Oooooh, that's pretty, paperwhite!

Chandler, AZ

Thanks. I hope to have more this year. I got the seeds from India when i went back there for a visit last year. They grow like weeds and come in two colors, the blue and the white.

Tolleson, AZ(Zone 9a)

Ok not going to India any time soon. :o)

Phoenix, AZ

WarriorAnt,
I saw Dutchman's Pipe vines at Baker's today... they have quite a few of them. Not sure if they were all priced the same but the ones I remember were about $32.

Phoenix, AZ

Since there's been some "vine talk", thought maybe this could be helpful :)

Phoenix, AZ

Does anyone have the Blue Butterfly Pea (Clitoria ternatea)~? I'd sure like to know if they can live through our heat :)

China Spring, TX(Zone 8a)

I have several growing right now. I even have the "white" butterfly pea vine. Same as the other but white. It hasn't flowered yet, but the blue ones have been for awhile. They are quite dainty, sweet flowers. It doesn't even curl in the heat. Seems to thrive w/the heat. My ipomeas wilt mid-day, but not these. I was fortunate enough to get some seeds from a friend. If these go to seed, I'll be glad to share. Just remind me later on in the season.
hilary

Mesa, AZ(Zone 9b)

Magpied, I not only have it living through our heat but...............living through our heat in a plain ole plastic pot. It's easterly facing under an overhang directly above it of shade cloth. It's been growing all summer but only a couple of flowers before the furnace kicked in. I got it at the rare fruit growers sale in the spring and this is my first time growing it.

Queen Creek, AZ(Zone 8b)

Great list! That give me lots of choices to think about. I'm still sold on the crossvine though!

Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I think some of the Aristilochia have cool looking foliage too. I guess I just never liked the idea of a stinky, non-colrful flower but maybe I'll try one next year .



Carl

Phoenix, AZ

"thornless canes"

Huh? Are they talking about the same Lady Banks I planted? These are great plants and I'd recommend them to anyone, especially if you want to create a privacy hedge, but "thornless" - not really. I've got the scratches to prove it. I think Lady Banks makes a good security 'fence', too.

This is a great list, magpied, thanks for putting the info up. Like everyone else, it just creates a new list of wants for me. I think it's good to start a discussion so people can share their experiences with plants others of us don't have. Unfortunately for me, I have a lavendar trumpet vine that refuses to bloom and passies that are, apparently, sympathetic. Most of my bloomers right now are bower vines and snail vines.

Phoenix, AZ

Carl, I'm not partial to stinky flowers either. I think you will have to content yourself with your Aristilochia providing color by way of the butterlies it will attract. Seems like a fair exchange to me!

I am starting to appreciate nice foliage more and more. When the flowers aren't blooming it is nice to have a plant that still looks unusual or beautiful without them. sam

Mesa, AZ(Zone 9b)

TF, not all lady banks are created equal, there are thornless varieties.

Phoenix, AZ

The ones I got at Bakers are white. Does that make a difference? I have two yellows sitting in pots waiting to be planted. I haven't checked them for thorns.

Mesa, AZ(Zone 9b)

Nope, I've had white ones with thorns and without.

Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

wow! this Aristalochia looks pretty cool! Wonder how big the flower is?

http://www.kartuz.com/pc/67120/FLV1/Aristolochia+grandiflora.html


Carl

Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

dang! this one's pretty huge - I might be able to put up with a slight stink if I though I could grow one of these puppies!;

http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/14329/


Carl

Mesa, AZ(Zone 9b)

Carl, I wonder how big the stink is on those big ones.....anyone know how big the stink is? I know the stink on fimbriata is minimal and it's such a great foliage plant, too. The flowers on watsonii are tiny! No stink there and yet another great foliage plant.....I'm loving that little plant!

Tucson, AZ(Zone 9a)

az, that is the Aristolochia that I have growing on my front porch (grandiflora), but it has never flowered (yet)

Check this one out http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/616411/

and this one

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/633122/

Phoenix, AZ

I am looking forward to a pipevine. I have *no* sense of smell :)

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

That second one is one that I have - a. elegans. It's just a baby cutting right now. Hopefully I don't kill it.

Also have:

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/56130/index.html

They are stinky huh?

Tucson, AZ(Zone 9a)

I thought so, but I just googled it, and a page from DG came up and says it isn't. Mine is suppose to be, IF it ever "stinkin" flowers

This message was edited Jul 30, 2006 5:02 PM

Phoenix, AZ

Sifted out the finer points from the lengthy post up there ;)

Aristolochiaceae (pipevine family)
- - -They are mostly vines with strangely-shaped flowers and foliage that exudes a distinctive, unpleasant odor. Usually the flowers smell like carrion or dung to attract insects that are seeking a place to lay eggs.

Aristolochia watsonii
- - -Grows from Southern Arizona and adjacent Mexico to the tip of Baja California, native to the Sonoran Desert in AZ.

- - -A. watsonii is pollinated by Ceratopogonid flies; these are the small, blood-sucking flies that pester humans and other mammals in the humid summer. The fly is trapped inside the flower tube overnight. During the night the flower releases pollen. The following morning the flower releases the pollen-covered fly. If the fly visits another flower it effects pollination.

Several caterpillars can often be found feeding on one small plant of A. watsonii. They will completely defoliate the plant (it later resprouts from its perennial root). Without this species of pipevine, the pipevine swallowtail would not occur in the Sonoran Desert.

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