Spring blooms

Central, UT(Zone 5b)

I figured I'd start a more general thread for some of the other plants that are blooming right now. This picture is of one of the many native Phlox. I don't know which variety it is but it is about 6" in diameter and absoluelty smothered in blossoms. It also smells wonderful.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Here is a picture of one of my favorite plants Astragalus utahensis. It's definitely not an alpine but does seem to do well in troughs if you're unable to grow it in the ground.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Here is a close up of a bloom on my Arabis androsace.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

This is Oxytropis oreophila var. juniperina.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

This is Erigeron compactus which is a rather prodigous reseeder. It's cute though.

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I definitely have an Arabis Andrasace! And the phlox is amazing. Such a pure white.
Thanks for starting this thread.
Tam

Sebastopol, CA(Zone 9a)

Ally, Ally, Ally, what gorgeous plants! The Astragalus and Oxytropis are things I've never seen. I love them all.

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Lots of primulas in bloom ... here's a shot of primula japonica by the spring

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Gentiana Acaulis in bloom

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I believe this is Lewisia Pygmaea

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Iris Cristata with a few primulas blooming

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

And I had to throw in a shot of these native phlox and the maizes (I can't figure out how
to spell this groundcover). The color of their blooms matches perfectly.

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I'm not sure what the species of this primula is... probably veris?

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Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Almost forgot my little round trough with a lewisia almost squeeze out by the
sedum & semps. Gotta replant that one soon!

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Thanks Tammy and Zuzu!

Wow Tammy, it looks like things are really getting going there in PA! What a wonderful assortment of flowers. Your first picture is wonderful. I love the mix of plants that you have there. Are those blue spikes of bloom Camassia quamash?

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Ally - yep! Those are camassia quamash. There's also a few of a variegated type but they aren't
blooming yet.

Tam

North East England, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

Wonderful! Lovely primula and phlox. Some plants here I've never come across before like the Astragalus so thanks for the introduction!

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Iris suaveolens is very nice. Only 4 inches(6 cm) high and completely evergreen, even in Minnesota. The reflexing foliage makes it interesting during the whole season, too.

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Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Iris suaveolens foliage:

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North East England, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

Lovely!

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Great plants Tammy....I'm slowly catching up. You seem to be about 3 weeks ahead of me as my G. acaulis is just starting to move. My Primula veris is just starting (yes, you yellow one is P. veris).

Ally....what choice plants! I'm too wet for the kinds of plants you grow...I can only live vicariously through western alpine growers like yourself! That phlox is stunning.

Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Rick I love that Iris... it's another plant that I'll have to try when I can get my hands on one.

Thank you Todd! I feel the same way about your saxifrage and primulas and oh so many other plants that like your cooler and wetter climate.

Here are a few more things that have been blooming for the past week. I've been busier than normal and not had a chance to post these yet. Some of these many be a bit large for the rock garden but oh well.

This is Moltkia aurea

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

This is Veronica tauricola which I have totally fallen in love with.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Here is a close up of a bloom on the little Abronia nana. This plant hails from the southeastern corner of our state. You can find it growing in the red rocks country outside of Moab.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

This little Physaria condensata has surprised me with it's extened bloom time. It's been blooming for at least three weeks now.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

This is a little bun of Lepidium nanum just starting to bloom. It is about 3 inches in diameter. I bought this from Siskiyou Rare Plants about 4 years ago off of their limited supply list.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

Last but not least... I grew these little potentilla from seed listed as P. rupestris var. pygmaea. The larger plant is about 8" tall and wide. Behind that is the little Japanese poppy, Papaver miyabeanum.

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(Zone 4a)

Ladies, your settings are lovely!

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Ally, the only plant you have shown that I can grow is the Potentilla rupestris...that one is a bit of a weed in the rockery as it self-seeds all over. I am growing some drylanders from seed this year (from wild-collected seeds in Colorado). I will overwinter them in a cold frame to keep off the wet snows and hopefully they will survive.

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Ally - you've brought a selection of plants I am not familiar with and they are all beautiful.
Thank you!
Tam

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Most of this recent bunch I hadn't heard of either. My favorite is the Lepidum, but they're all so veryinteresting.

My Iris gracilipes is blooming now. Only 7 inches high. But I have no digi camera, so it will be a while before I have pics. a photo of last year's foliage is interesting though, albeit a bit bedraggled and drought stricken. Also blooming is Hesperis kotchyi, and Veronica gentianoides.

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Central, UT(Zone 5b)

And here I thought you could grow anything Todd. I'm somewhat glad to hear that the Potentilla reseeds a bit. I think it will make a nice front of the border plant for a more traditional perennial bed I'll be adding this year. I look forward to seeing your dryland plants in next years postings.

Thank you Taramark and Tammy. And yes Leftwood the Lepidium is one of my favorites as well.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

I'll try anything once (and sometimes twice!) but I live in a wet climate so mother nature will only allow so much. At the botanical garden we have an alpine house so I will house many of my drylanders there and see if protection from the rain and snow in winter will allow them to survive in my area. I was fortunate to collect many alpines from areas west of Denver last September so there are quite a number of Erigeron, Townsendia, Chrysopsis and other dwarf 'daisies' among the new seedlings.

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