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Hypertufa and Concrete: Building a concrete wall for the garden.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2006
10:17 PM

Post #2417602

For the people on the 'sedum' thread, here is how to build this concrete wall. Building these walls was a way for me to recycle part of the mountain of broken concrete in my backyard. All the broken concrete was from a remodel we did and it costs a fortune to have hauled away, plus it's good for building stuff so I figured I should just look at it as a resource.

Basically, the walls start out like this: sorry it's so bright, but the sun came out just as I was photographing. Just take the chunks of concrete and lay them where you want the wall to be. Be sure that the widest chunk is not wider than you want the wall.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2006
10:20 PM

Post #2417614

Next, put your forms up on both sides of the concrete. What you use for forms depends on whether you want a wall with wavy sides like mine or straight sides, and how tall you want it to be. I wanted an 'undulating' wall where the sides bulge out a bit here and there, and I wanted the wall to curve around to 'hug' the garden. so I used cheap hardboard. I bought it in 4 x 8 sheets and then cut strips as wide as I wanted the wall to be tall. In other words, for a 2 foot wall, cut the hardboard into 2 ft wide strips.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2006
10:24 PM

Post #2417626

To make the forms, use lots of rebar. Drive the rebar down into the soil on both sides of the cement chunks to hold the form against the chunks. don't skimp on the rebar if you are using flexible forms. The cement is heavy and will push out of the bottom and will easily bend the hardboard out of shape. Use the rebar to define the outside shape of the wall and hold the form in place. Again, I can't say it enough. Do not skimp on the rebar. Where I wanted big curves, I just put the rebar a little bit further out.
Put a form on both sides of the concrete. You'll notice that on my wall the outside bulges more than the inside. That's because I wanted the inside to be fairly straight, so I used extra rebar. Make sure the rebar is driven deeply into the earth and is sturdy or you will be very, very sorry.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2006
10:27 PM

Post #2417645

Once your form is up, start filling the form with concrete rubble. These are small pieces that are just hard to get rid of. They make good filler. I also used lots of rocks from my soil, since I have an unlimited supply. They also make good filler. don't fill the form up to the top. Basically you will be doing 'layers' of mixed concrete, then rubble.

So put in a layer of rubble, leaving a little room for the concrete to 'mush' down between everything and hold it together. Then start mixing your concrete and shovel into the form. I did not make mine too 'liquidy' because I didn't want it to run. When you mix, don't use too much water. You want to be able to put the concrete where you want it and have it stay there. continue adding concrete on top of your first layer of rubble, then add another layer of rubble on top - like making lasagna.
At this point, if you want to take a break and come back to it the next day, you can. Just see that the second layer of rubble is embedded in the fresh crete.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2006
10:33 PM

Post #2417668

continue adding fresh concrete and rubble until the forms are filled , ending with fresh concrete so the top will be smooth.
let the forms sit for a day or two to cure.
when the crete has hardened enough, wiggle the rebar out of the ground and pull off the forms. I did not use a release agent on my forms and they came off fine. The outside of your wall will show the layers of concrete and rubble and will not be solid. If you like this look, you can leave it and stain it, etc. I started filling the hole in with freshly mixed crete, using my hands. I just packed it in anywhere there was a gap in the wall.

If you are wanting to do the sedum wall, this is the time to attach the rocks to the top and use fresh concrete to build up between them a bit. Since sedum doesn't like to sit in water, you'll have to put drainage holes in like I did in the photo. Just put a stick or something into the fresh concrete to make a hole. You can leave it there until the concrete hardens.
I also built up the wall a bit on either side of each drainage hole so that the water would run toward the hole. Our winters are very wet here.
If you want to do mosaic on top of the wall, this is a good time to do it.



I'll have to finish this thread later, I have to go to work now.

This message was edited Jun 21, 2006 2:34 PM

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:34 AM

Post #2418988

I wanted a smooth finish on the wall, so I used topping mix that comes in the big bags in the concrete aisle. You just add water, same as the concrete. Add enough water to make it thick enough to trowel on easily. Now here is the important part: To get the topping mix to stick to a vertical surface, use the product in the photo , or the equivalent. Brush it onto the wall in an area just big enough to do right away without the product drying. Then use a bricklayers trowel or any other tool that feels right to you and smooth the topping mix onto the wall. You can play with the texture, etc. You can also use concrete colorant to color the mix and make a wall other than grey. There's a lot of wrist action in this part of the work, so go slowly if you have a tendency to joint pain. I dipped my trowel in water when I wanted the surface really smooth. You just have to play with it until you get the look you want.

Then let the wall cure before you plant the top. Remember that concrete leaches lime into the soil, so acid loving plants are not going to be happy there for awhile unless you seal it. It needs to be fully cured before sealing.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:46 AM

Post #2419019

Here's a photo of a larger segment of the wall.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:47 AM

Post #2419024

You can see the face of the wall better in this shot.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:48 AM

Post #2419029

Here's a little mosaic on another wall.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:49 AM

Post #2419032

Here's one of the mosaics for 'sitting' on the big wall.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:50 AM

Post #2419035

Here's the other one.

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
4:53 AM

Post #2419044

I found this photo of the wall before planting. You can see how the rocks are put on and how the concrete is built up a little between them to contain the soil. sedums have a shallow root system, so the planting areas are not very deep.

Good luck with yours!

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PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

June 22, 2006
5:11 AM

Post #2419083

Hi pixydish! So you go right from the topping pic to the next couple of shots? Is that what the wall looks like at first, weird. Wait, is that because the shallow trench that you plant the sedums in isn't formed yet? Until the rocks are put on and the concrete is built up a little between them, right? I'm really glad you showed us all how you do this, even step by step, I'm not sure I get it. I know I'd be really lost without any pictures! Or being able to ask questions, LOL. thanks again, I really love the look. Some of the sedum and other succulents are so small, the raised bed is really genius, and the built in benches are divine.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
5:20 AM

Post #2419098

Thanks, Pairiegirl. I built this wall before I was a member of DG and nobody cared how I built it but me, so I didn't have many photos of the entire process. I'm going to be doing another wall this year, or maybe two, so I'll have a chance to photograph the process a bit better. when I do it, I'll post photos here of all of the steps. But i'm always available to answer questions.

This message was edited Jun 21, 2006 9:20 PM
shellabella
West Central, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 22, 2006
4:42 PM

Post #2420494

Pixidish , Thank you so much for sharing this with us! What a clever way to dispose of the concrete junk on your property.

I was wondering if you poured a footing first and used any rebar on the inside?

How long was the wall and what would you say roughly was your cost?

The mosaics are very nice and I especially love the fish one.

Michelle
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2006
5:09 PM

Post #2420606

Hi Michelle,
No, I did not pour any kind of footing or use any rebar on the inside. The walls are solid as rock. I just made sure that the ground was fairly level.
The wall is about 25 feet long and about 2 1/2 feet tall. All told, the cost was about 50$ -75$. One reason for using the concrete rubble is that is saves a lot on the cost since it takes up a great deal of room inside and the fresh crete holds everything together.
glad you like it!
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

June 22, 2006
7:23 PM

Post #2421035

Pixydish, Thank you for the instructions. I wonder if I can find anyone that is taking a sidewalk out and wants to get rid of the concrete chunks. How cold does it get where you are? I think I would need to put a footing in with the cold weather we have. It gives me a great start. I already have some ideas rolling around.

The wall looks great, I like the way the mosaics are placed between the sedum areas.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2006
12:12 AM

Post #2422029

Yeah, your weather gets a lot colder than we do. We don't get the long, hard freezes that you do so a footing would likely be the best thing for you.
Glad you like it! I'm thinking of using a colored topping mix next time.
crockny
Kerhonkson, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2006
6:47 PM

Post #2497816

What's a footing?
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2006
7:03 PM

Post #2497865

Pixydish, I love your Washington stones. We don't have anything like that in Mississippi...

In another life I might try to make a wall like yours... this is inspiring. Thanks.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2006
7:51 PM

Post #2498039

A footing is like a foundation for the wall, generally below soil level.

thanks, flowrlady! It always makes me happy when people enjoy my garden, even just the photos!
tango88
Tomball, TX

July 12, 2006
11:14 PM

Post #2498822

Hey Pixy --- Don't know how I missed this thread until now, but I'm glad I found it. What a wonderful wall! I love the mix of seating & growing areas. I love your idea so much I may have to "steal" it! Just outstanding...more pix, more pix!

Tango
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2006
3:44 AM

Post #2499950

LOL! Steal away! I love the walls, too. I'll be doing some more in the next few weeks and I'll post the process photos on this thread.
Say, didn't you email me about a question about the rocks I've got pictured on another thread?
shellabella
West Central, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2006
3:54 AM

Post #2499979

Thanks Pixy for posting this . Look forward to part 2!
I decided I 'll use this method for the low wall I wanna do. Looks like I can handle this. (Not alot of extra he man types around here to help!)

Michelle :)
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2006
4:37 AM

Post #2500112

Yep, Michelle, you can do this without attending resident he-men. The worst part is lifting the bags of concrete mix into the cement mixer. When my he-man is absent, I just use the trusty shovel to shovel it in. Works just fine! Good luck!
GuardanGirl
Palm Bay, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 16, 2006
5:06 AM

Post #2918177

Love this idea,, got my wheels turning !!
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 16, 2006
12:25 PM

Post #2918633

Burning some rubber myslef. and like SB..if i cant do it alone...it aint going to get done.
GuardanGirl
Palm Bay, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 16, 2006
12:53 PM

Post #2918679

I'm with you on that GG
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2006
4:24 AM

Post #2921225

And down in Florida, you definitely would be able to do this without a footing. That makes it even easier!
shellabella
West Central, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2006
1:13 PM

Post #2924416

Now, It's just a matter of getting Dh to agree that it will look good where I want to build it! LOL!
Doxiesmom
Gig Harbor, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2006
3:41 PM

Post #2924725

Pixy you have such great ideas and talent. Your garden bed is to die for. So, when are you going to do a garden tour of your yard? LOL
I would love to see and yes, steal ideas. LOL
Right now my yard looks awful, but it's because I leave my old plants as is till spring. The birds love to either eat from them or find refuge.
Take care,
Kathy
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 18, 2006
4:20 PM

Post #2924830

Kathy, tell me about your doxie. I have a black and tan energy ball/protector named PeeWee.

This message was edited Jan 17, 2007 1:31 PM
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2006
5:01 PM

Post #2924925

Hi kathy,
You can 'steal' as many ideas as you like - I consider it high praise! I don't think I could stand the stress of a garden tour. Here's a link to some photos of the open garden and pond party we had last year.
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/537929/

And I always welcome Dgers to come by and visit. My gardens look pretty ragged right now. I generally leave my plants over the winter, too, but this year I'm still trying to amend the soil in all of the beds so many of them are dug up. I hope I am rewarded next spring with happier plants.
Doxiesmom
Gig Harbor, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2006
8:02 PM

Post #2934466

Hi Flowrlady!!
I have 2 doxies. Moxie is a longhaired red with black ears. Longhaired's are very laid back and she is. She has a thyroid problem and loves to eat, and even tho we've cut her food way back still isn't losing. Guess she needs a doggie treadmill.:) She's 5yrs old.
My other Doxie is Breck(It's Irish for freckles) She's a chocolate/tan piebald with ticking, thus the freckle name. She's 1 yr. old and still in puppy feisty stage. She weighs 8lbs.
Both love to ride in car and Breck knows where all the driveup windows are where they gets treats and she howls when we get near them. First time she did that I thought she had fallen out of her car seat. lol
Let me know what your doxie is like.
My first doxie was a blk and tan named Mitzy and she lived for 22 yrs.
Take care,
Kathy

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Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 22, 2006
6:22 AM

Post #2935912

Such a pretty baby!!
PerennialGirl
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 4a)

January 15, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #3084813

You're amazing Pixy!!! Totally awesome!! This what I want to do on the farm land that we have when we start building our new home. I luv it, luv it!!!
:) Donna
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2007
4:32 AM

Post #3085366

Technically they are pretty easy in my zone, Donna. Just grunt work, really,. and the 'stucco' exterior finish. I can really get into a hypnotic 'zone' when doing that. Time just flies, and my joints just hurt worse and worse. LOL!
In your zone, I think I would likely want to pour a footing because of your long freezes. Might creat a problem if the wall isn't totally stabilized.
PerennialGirl
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 4a)

January 16, 2007
12:05 AM

Post #3087787

What do you mean by a footing?
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2007
5:26 AM

Post #3088740

What I am referring to is digging down probably 18 inches below the soil surface along where you want to build the wall. You would pour cement into the trench and then build your wall on top of that, securing it probably with rebar. You would want to consult someone who lives in your area and works with cement walls. They could give you a good idea of whether you would need one and how deep it should be. Seems like someone else had mentioned this as well, but I'm not sure if it's on this thread.
PerennialGirl
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 4a)

January 16, 2007
1:36 PM

Post #3089202

Thanks, Pixy for the explanation. DH will know what to do.
:) Donna
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2007
9:14 PM

Post #3205928

well you are my kind of girl because I have been scavenging for concrete for a while now for walkways and in that garden it would look so cute. In the desert you always find it, people illegally dumping so i have endless supplies, but my dh doesn`t help so.. He hates to see me bring junk that sits for a project but this is something that you can`t do over night. I`ve seen ones similar with only the rocks as filler and instead of smooth , the river rock shows on the outside or they add more to the outside, i am not sure. I have to make them high enough to keep bunnies out or use it as an accent or seperation for garden rooms. Did you put bender board at the ends of the wall with rebar?
imapigeon
Gilroy (Sunset Z14), CA
(Zone 9a)

February 19, 2007
9:22 PM

Post #3205953

Pixy you must have been reading my mind---I've had a stack of concrete chunks in the back yard for years that I always intended to do something with, and recently decided to build raised beds. A variation of this technique may be just the ticket. Thanks for posting the instructions & pics!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2007
9:28 PM

Post #3205972

Acid wahing would look cool too in a raised planter, so the acid does not mess up the ground where roots are going to be. It would be nice in an area where there is a gravel walkway next to it or if you protected the base and trunk of a tree then built the planter around the tree before you fill it with dirt. I`ll end up going to work and not finish it.

Happy_1

Happy_1
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2007
9:33 PM

Post #3205989

Be careful about adding soil around the base of a tree. Some can not take it and will die.

Hap
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2007
10:38 PM

Post #3206162

I know that, that is why I said to protect the base and trunk. My friend did it with some trees, but he put cement blocks around the tree so no dirt was near the tree itself, it was a planter in a planter. it is good that you clarified that so other trees don`t die.
imapigeon
Gilroy (Sunset Z14), CA
(Zone 9a)

February 20, 2007
12:36 AM

Post #3206550

I have a sloped bed at the front of my filter pond that has a small crape myrtle in it---all the soil washes out of that bed because there's nothing to hold it in place, so I think that's where I can start. I can put a rock well around the base of the tree so it doesn't get too much soil buildup around the roots too fast (I did this in front, and the tree has done great for the past 3 years---thanks for reminding me to think of that). Plus everything in the bed will be drought-tolerant and not get watered much anyway. I'll have to wait till all my grape hyacinths have stopped blooming, tho, as I need to put the wall right on top of where they're planted, and I'll have to dig them all up and move them back farther into the bed.

I do like the idea of acid-washing the concrete----I also love the "faux rock wall" that azreno posted in this forum http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/641023/. AND I love your idea of incorporating succulent planting areas and mosaics on / in the wall! SIGH... SOO many options----I feel another night of brain-churning coming on!!
Pesky DGers----too much talent and good ideas for my feeble old mind to process while I'm awake!!! ;-}

This message was edited Feb 20, 2007 1:58 AM
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 20, 2007
1:02 AM

Post #3206632

People must be gearing up for cement season if this thread is seeing any action!

In terms of the end of the wall, I used a piece of hardboard to hold the concrete in place. I put a piece of rebar to hold the hardboard against the poured cement. I have two more walls to build this year and I'm really really hoping to get them done. If I do, I"ll post other photos.
I considered acid washing the walls, and also considered painting them some outlandish color. But frankly, I was afraid of them looking garish in the winter time if the color was too outlandish. I'm starting to reconsider, though. I really like bright colors in the garden.
imapigeon
Gilroy (Sunset Z14), CA
(Zone 9a)

February 20, 2007
2:20 AM

Post #3206822

'Tis the season!~

I really liked the idea of using the hardboard to "form" the wall--even if I just stack and mortar the concrete chunks. That will give me a lot of flexibilty in the shape, which I need because all of my beds are very curved.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2007
4:41 AM

Post #3207199

imapigeon, you sound like me after I get a big idea for the yard or inside or I see a great decorating or landscaping magazine or some dg things like the wall idea, I can`t sleep, all night it is my only downtime, to just plan and get the wheels turning, then a few days later i am exhausted from my heart pounding with excitement. It is nuts. I love DG and these new thread numbers are helpful too copy and paste for reference in your diary. Did you see the cool yard on the frugal living with the livestock panels? man!
imapigeon
Gilroy (Sunset Z14), CA
(Zone 9a)

February 20, 2007
5:03 AM

Post #3207238

Oh, NO---not ANOTHER forum I just HAVE to look at!!!!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2007
5:08 AM

Post #3207248

Ok, remember your Lamaz breathing techniques? HHee hhehu
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 20, 2007
5:42 AM

Post #3207275

Can you post a link or a thread number?
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2007
2:01 PM

Post #3207843

I never tried to post it on onother thread but I think that was the idea. I have posted it in my diary, just copy and paste so I think yes.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 20, 2007
2:20 PM

Post #3207905

What I meant was would you post the number of the thread or a link to the thread on this thread so everyone can find it? Just copy and paste into a message on this thread.

This message was edited Feb 20, 2007 7:20 AM
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2007
2:26 PM

Post #3207919

Post #3130346

Depending on how cheap is cheap. We are going to use cattle panel to fence our yard in. If you are not familiar with cattle panel, you can buy it at farm supply stores (Tractor Supply in our area). It comes in 16ft long panels that are 52 inches high. Each panel is about $16. We have about 200 ft that we are going to fence in and this is the most sturdy, economical thing we have come up with (thanks to DG and some Google searches!). I'm posting a link of what we are planning. This gentleman spraypainted the wire panels with black Rustoleum paint and painted the wooden 4x4s green. I think it's very pretty and cost effective!
[HYPERLINK@homepage.mac.com] , OH here it is.
imapigeon
Gilroy (Sunset Z14), CA
(Zone 9a)

February 20, 2007
11:53 PM

Post #3209597

Oh, wow, I DO like that livestock panel fence. Yet another idea to keep in mind. Much more durable and maintenance-free than wood lattice!! And how gorgeous is that guy's place, anyway??? If only mine looked anywhere NEAR that good. One of these days...
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2007
2:47 AM

Post #3210187

I was convulsing and lost conciousness when I saw it.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2007
2:52 AM

Post #3210205

That link won't work for me. Would you post it again, please? I"m wanting to see it, too!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2007
3:02 AM

Post #3210234

HMMM that is wierd. If it doesn`t go to the Frugal living forum and you will see it, but I will try again tomorrow because American Idol is on. lol
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 21, 2007
3:39 AM

Post #3210358

http://homepage.mac.com/lemec/Garden/PhotoAlbum133.html

Is this it? To post a link to a thread, just go up to the address bar at the top of the browser, right click on it and 'copy' it, then go into the new message box on the DG thread, right click again, and 'paste' the address into the message box.

What a place that guy has!!


summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #3210490

Dawn, the convulsions & loss of consciousness were self induced by shoveling "American Idol" into the cranial space vacated by the roar of NASCAR engines.

Word.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 21, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #3211085

word
sugarfoot
Granbury, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 15, 2007
2:10 PM

Post #3283934

Pixy, are all of your walls free standing or are some of them retaining walls? I want to use your wonderful ideas, but my walls will be holding back parts of a hillside.

Thanks,
Linda
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

March 15, 2007
3:41 PM

Post #3284215

If they are going to be retaining wall, you might cut some rebar pieces and shove them in a little footing, if there is a lot of hillside.
Pixydish
Lakewood, WA
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2007
5:10 AM

Post #3286837

Sugarfoot, my walls are free standing, but I could see using the same kind of thing to do a retaining wall, depending on how much 'hill' has to be 'retained'.
MollyD1953
Columbia, TN
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2007
12:10 PM

Post #3354451

Okay you guys. I just stumbled across this thread and was floored by the use of cattlepanels as beautiful fencing! I already used cattlepanels to make my hoopshaped greenhouse and was considering how I could use one to make an arbor (the idea of painting it had not registered!) and now this!!!! I am so excited because not only is this very affordable but I can do it in small stages as fits the budget!

Thanks for the great ideas!

MollyD

Happy_1

Happy_1
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2007
12:13 PM

Post #3354460

Hey there Molly,

I'm from that area, Rochester, and my boys are still there. On in Victor and one in Fairport.

Look out for the snow this weekend.

Hap
MollyD1953
Columbia, TN
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2007
1:27 PM

Post #3354715

Hi Hap !

Yep snow on the way. We've had really mild weather the last two weeks and everything thought spring was here. Even the bluebirds are back! Now snow (ugh!). Oh well as someone on another forum pointed out at least the snow will give the plants some protection from the cold.

I have to go over to Victor this week and get some stuff at Brussel's Garden Center.

Cheers!
MollyD

Happy_1

Happy_1
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2007
3:14 PM

Post #3355089

My son from Victor is coming in this Friday with the DIL and 3GKs. Boy, did he pick a good week!!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 4, 2007
3:31 PM

Post #3355138

Hi Nancy Lee. We are blessed to not be in Winter anymore. How are you feeling, more up? I`ve been sort of down lately. Me and DH got in a huge fight about when I was going to go back to work and what was I planning? I`ve been stressed since.

I saw those cow fence panels too and it was a really huge roll for 175dollars but it would do a butt load of things and easy to work with and bend and mold. I still need to collect more concrete but I need a tarp to protect the truck bed or dh will flip. I`ll make that wall yet.
MollyD1953
Columbia, TN
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2007
3:51 PM

Post #3355220

He sure did Hap! You may have trouble getting them to leave ;-)

MollyD

Happy_1

Happy_1
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2007
4:14 PM

Post #3355336

Helln...Tell your DH you ARE working!

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