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Can you tell me what kind this is?

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

I got this Jap maple a few weeks ago, and just planted it. Does anyone know what kind it is. I have a small blood good and the leaves are larger.

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Here's the top of the leaf.......

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Here's the under side..........

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Does anyone think it could be Shojo Homura??

Newport News, VA(Zone 7b)

I am certainly in the dark on this one! I'm still a newbie...but thought you might like to know you aren't being ignored.

Laura

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)


" I have a small blood good and the leaves are larger. "

I assume you mean these leaves on this tree are larger than your bloodgood??? unclear sentence...let us know...is it grafted???can't tell from pic ...if not it is most likely just a seedling tree with no pedigree where did you buy it ..a big box store?? David

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Thanks for the replies............ Here's the comparison....... The unknown's leaves thinner. The bloodgood's are fuller. The unknown is a little larger overall.

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

It was a gift and it's not grafted as far as I know.

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

1st picture unknown, this is the bloodgood.

Thumbnail by nikki_conway
Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

about a foot up the tree is what looks like a graft I think it is a grafted tree...My bloodgoods look more like the questionable tree than your alledged bloodgood which seems to have a more amoenum type leaf rather than a palmatum shape it is not incised enough ...Bloodgoods are palmatum.....If I had to guess I would say the questionable tree uis a bloodgood or a generic atrprupurium

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

here is evalds bloodgood pics..it sort of looks like then first pic ...sort of if you can ignore the bug holes ;>) ( why post a crunmmy pic like this huh???).. but not any of the others ...Leaves can very maybe you just picked a non typical one ...beautiful color though... David

http://www.esveld.nl/htmldiaen/a/acpblo.htm

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

The unknown is a Matsumurae group JM....Bloodgood is a Palmatum group. And yes, that is definitely a graft about a foot off the ground. I'm still searching to see if I can find a match.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

It looks most like Beni kagami which means 'red mirror'. That selection is a Matsumurae group that is more the colour of atropurpureum (not the deep wine of the Bloodgood types). It is suppose to have greenish undersides, just as yours does.

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Thanks guys for your help. If it is Beni kagami, should it be planted further than 7 feet away from my screened in deck? It seems like it might get too big to be that close.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Beni kagami is quite vigorous and can reach 20 feet...giving it some space might be advisable.

Rock Island, IL(Zone 5b)

A great question was raised initially and one to my dsmay, however, it was asked if you could see a graft union (which will be visible at that size of a plant big time)...

Since you answered "no" - most-likely a seedling known as 'Atropurpureum'. I have many seedlings of these and the leaves are all purple and have different shapes and sizes:)

Dax

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

I do think it's a seedling. How big do you think it could get? I haven't moved it yet, but I think I will need to. I do want to get a full spread, and not have to trim it lopsided so it doesn't go into the house.

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Another reason I think it's a seedling.......... It was given to me by someone whose uncle had several on his land. Now I doubt he had several around his land that he would give away that were grafted unless it was a brand new property.

Thanks for responding! :)

This message was edited Jul 18, 2006 11:30 PM

Rock Island, IL(Zone 5b)

Well then, we better call it a seedling of unknown origin. How big it grows will be determined only by your own observation which is very easy to distinquish. All on the same plant, you'll see "hardwood", 'semi-hardwood", and "softwood". Come this fall, you'll be able to see from where last years wood 'hardened off', the new amount of growth and the direction the stems/branches are heading off into.

You hold the answers -

Dax

Ellicott City, MD(Zone 7a)

Very cool, I didn't know you could see the change in levels of growth. I will have to go check it out:)

Medway, OH(Zone 5a)

Hi, I have a Bloodgood tree and it is growing very slowly. I had two of them but some type of Beatle that was bright green and blue ate away at the leaves and that tree died. I sprayed my last and only bloodgood tree left with soapy water and the beatles left it alone. I try to stay away from chemicals if at all possible and only use it when I need to. How tall can I expect this tree to grow? Thank you for your answers and support. I appreciate your answers.

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

This was caused by Japanese beetles ...I am not sure of their scientific name and our Japanese friend gave me a dirty look when I used it ..oh well ...anywho ..it is highly unlikley they caused the death of your tree unless it was brand new and not well anyway ...it should have shot ourt new leaves and been ok ...but disease or a particularly bad winter may have done it in...if it were really young small and not established..

A healthy established tree should be fine ....every two week treatment with seven will do the trick and it is not too toxic except to bees ...you can use spreader sticker to see it stay on through rain ...These beatles are a true menace DO NOT use hormone bait traps(it is ok though to put in neighbors yard ;>) they just attact more... if your yard is small enough you can treat with stuff that kill the grubs before they are beatles in the fall I can't remember the name off hand but it is purly biological ..not chemical ...expect trouble every year some worse than others ...unfortunately my only words of wisdom are "deal with it" ..David

This message was edited Feb 21, 2008 10:35 PM

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

Popillia japonica is the scientific name

you might find this useful there is a ton of stuff if you google

http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef409.asp

Sumter, SC(Zone 8a)

Milky Spore powder found at many big box stores will treat the grubs... you use 1 tsp every four ft and it is supposed to control them within a year...I know it sounds like a long time but to break the cycle it should be done.... I use the product mfg by St Gabriel = their toll free number for their natural lawn n garden products is 800-801-0061:O)

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