Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Organic Gardening: Where do I get chemical-free soil?

Communities > Forums > Organic Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Organic GardeningReplies: 7, Views: 71
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
BlueAsh
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 15, 2006
10:06 PM

Post #2509707

I posted this in the container gardening forum but have not gotten any response yet. This may be a better place for my question:

I'd like to plant some salad greens (and herbs) with my kids (both as an activity and as a way to encourage them to eat more greens), but I haven't done much because I don't know where/how to get soil that is chemical-free. Potting soils in bags? Water a pot of soil long enough to clean it? Put aside a pot of soil for it to 'naturally' mature?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Zeppy
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2006
10:46 PM

Post #2509821

It shouldn't be hard for you to find organic humus and organic compost in bags. Check with your local nurseries. You don't need a deep container for salad greens.

Another option for salad greens is to grow them in an inch or two of compost on top of a straw bale. You water the bale for a few weeks, then put some compost on top and sow the seeds. See the straw bale gardening threads in Vegetable Gardening.
BlueAsh
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2006
2:05 AM

Post #2510527

Thanks for the info. So organic soil, by definition, is free of chemicals. I'll look into it.
Zeppy
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2006
3:35 AM

Post #2510782

Oh, BlueAsh, organic's hardly got a definition anymore. But basically you want something that's not full of herbicides or insecticides, yes.
BlueAsh
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2006
12:03 PM

Post #2511315

Good.

I am actually mostly interested in "rehab" my own soil. Composting is new to me, but overtime I'll get the hang of it. What about old potting soil? It is soil after all. Is it possible to get rid of the chemicals by repeated watering? (but then the nutrients would be washed out as well, I suppose.)
Zeppy
Shenandoah Valley, VA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2006
1:29 PM

Post #2511461

The "lasagna" method of rehabbing soil is a good one. There are books about this at your local library, and threads on it in this forum. I'd also recommend "The Vegetable Gardener's Bible" for a practical organic approach.

Basically, I add grass clippings and shredded leaves from our yard to my garden soil, as well as chicken poo and litter from our hens. This feeds the soil and also improves its tilth, making it more fluffy, water-retaining, and wormy. My vegetables are happy.
BlueAsh
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2006
3:05 PM

Post #2511680

Great! Our local library has a copy of this book so I don't have to buy one yet. Appreciate the tips!
BlueAsh
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2006
3:20 PM

Post #2511725

By the way, Zeppy, I just found the "soil and composting" forum (Duh!:-) So I'll read up on composting there as well.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Organic Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Miracle Gro darius 70 May 14, 2013 6:35 AM
Not Gardening, but Organic information darius 14 Feb 20, 2008 9:10 PM
pumpkins & borers roseofkaren 25 Feb 24, 2008 8:39 PM
Brewer's grain vs. Alfalfa meal/pellets for amendments? tabasco 9 Nov 3, 2008 6:36 PM
Raised beds & soil-borne disease sfk 9 Apr 6, 2008 4:37 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America