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Clean and Clutter-free: Cleaning Stove Top Grates

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ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 28, 2006
1:56 PM

Post #2667544

I've tried scrubbing them with cleanser and steel wool and they just never seem to get clean.

Last night I decided to put one in a gallon size ziplock bag with pure amonia, ( I keep amonia in a spray bottle ), so I just sprayed into the bag so the grate was covered, zipped it up and let set overnight.

This morning I just used one of those heavy duty green scrubber pads, and with very little elbow grease, all the burned on stuff came right off. I now have another one soaking in the bag to clean this evening.

I've heard you can set a dish of amonia in your oven overnight to make cleaning easier, but it never worked that well for me. I guess the bag keeps the moisture in helping to dissolve the burned on grease.

Before picture:

Thumbnail by ginlyn
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 28, 2006
1:57 PM

Post #2667548

After picture:

Thumbnail by ginlyn
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 28, 2006
2:05 PM

Post #2667566

Wow - thanks! I'll definitely try that. I have the gray grates, too

If/when I buy my next stove, I will go back to a no-nonsense stainless steel model with cast iron grates. I'm not looking for a status symbol, I just need a hard-working, easy-to-maintain gas stove that cleans up easily and lets me make huge pots of chili, soup, and/or plunk my 7-quart canning kettle on it without chipping the grates. Grrrrr.

I can't do anything about the chips in the enamel, but the stains drive me nuts and they are next-to-impossible to clean even with a box of SOS pads. I had all but given up on making them look decent again, so I'll try your advice this week.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 1, 2006
11:41 AM

Post #2681095

ginlyn, I've got my third grate soaking in a bag - the same one I've soaked the first two, and will soak the last one in later today. (Yes, I'm too cheap to use four bags and two bottles of ammonia to do them all at once, lolol.)

Other than the powerful ammonia aroma when I open the bag, I am astonished at how well it takes off the stuff I'd spend HOURS trying to scrub off otherwise. My stove thanks you, and I thank you for a great tip!

ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2006
2:09 PM

Post #2681388

Terry, I used the same bag for all four grates too. Unless one was in a hurry to get all of them done at once, there's no need to waste bags.
I couldn't get over the fact that most of the grime came off just rubbing your finger over it. The worst of course, needed a little scrubbing, but not much.

I think, that if it doesn't work for anyone, it might be because they didn't let it set long enough, don't you?

Anyway, I'm glad you could use the tip... Ginny

elsie
Lafayette, NJ
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2006
4:32 PM

Post #2684854

Ginlyn, thanks for the tip. I don't like using ammonia but I will try this on my oven grates. I have read to use that for your outdoor grill grates, but I never thought about the stove ones.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 2, 2006
4:55 PM

Post #2684907

If you don't like ammonia, I think soaking them in a bag of some other strong cleaner will probably work too--the ammonia is extra strong so it may work a little better, but I bet you'd have good results with at least some other cleaners too.
magoobu
Phoenix, MD
(Zone 7a)

September 15, 2006
12:24 AM

Post #2724006

Can I do this with the heavy duty grates on this stove???

Thumbnail by magoobu
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 15, 2006
12:29 AM

Post #2724020

wahhhh - that's like my old stove, that I didn't think I'd miss as much as I do ;o)

Seriously, I don't know - those are plain, uncoated cast iron grates, yes? If so, you might try a product made by Dawn called "Power Dissolver" (works great on outdoor grill grates, too.) It works good, but it just didn't have enough "ooomph" to get those blasted enamel grates clean like the ammonia did. But soaking cast iron in straight ammonia? I'd be a little afraid of creating a rust problem.
somermoone
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 8a)

October 21, 2006
10:57 PM

Post #2838635

Wow! I did this yesterday and it worked WONDERFUL! Now I need tips on how to clean a black stove with out getting streaks?? thanks! K~

oops spell error

This message was edited Oct 22, 2006 12:28 AM
somermoone
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 8a)

October 22, 2006
7:33 AM

Post #2839541

Well' I pulled the book out for the gas range and what do ya know, there under cleaning was how to clean those silly grates. If I would have read the book 2 years ago I may have found that out sooner::)) Our front burner won't ignite, it's not clogged, not the igniter must be a wire. The stove top will sparkling clean tomorrow. Took the trays out, put them in with amonia too. Took the top off washed it with soap and water and took a diaper rag and shined it right up, looks great so far. Thanks for getting me started on this much needed cleaning job. Now all I have to do is turn on the self-cleaning oven and whew la, fin'eshd.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

October 22, 2006
10:53 PM

Post #2840925

The amonia trick I read about in a book written by The Queen of Clean.

And when I bought my gas range for the downstairs kitchen at the Lake I chose the racks that are porcelain coated because the sales person told me it is ok for them to stay in the oven during the self clean cycle. So far it has worked fine. The regular stainless steel racks turn blue if you leave them in during self clean.

The grates over the burners are cast iron ~ but they are in 3 pieces and perfectly fit in my dishwasher.

Hope this helps

arlene
somermoone
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2006
6:20 AM

Post #2845005

All my pieces are porcelain, looks so great, thanks guys!
PLEASE help me declutter!!!! Anyone around my area for rent???? K~
catka
Saskatoon
Canada

October 26, 2006
6:10 PM

Post #2852825

Can you clean oven grates with the ammonia in a bag system or will it discolor the grates?
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

October 27, 2006
1:45 AM

Post #2854129

catka, are you talking about your oven racks?
I haven't cleaned anything with the amonia except my burner grates.

My oven racks are stainless steel and really need a good cleaning so I suppose I'll need to use a garbage bag for them.
Hopefully they won't discolor, but if they do at least I know they'll be clean.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

October 27, 2006
1:55 AM

Post #2854157

Hello folks,

Funny I should find this thread, I just spent about half an hour
looking at a variety of stove burner covers. Round, square, rectangle,
ceramic, metal, porcelain and more.

Not to cover up dirty grates as much as they make your stovetop look
nice.

http://www.jmcutlery.com/BurnerCovers.htm

No, I don't work for them, know them or have any idea who they are. :-)
But a very nice selection worth checking out. They sell on Ebay, too.
clutterjunky
Arlington, MA

November 16, 2006
7:02 AM

Post #2918301

Ok, I have a really dumb question...?

My stove top grates are not grey in color like the one in the photo but are black.
Is it ok to use on mine as well.

Not only are mine a different color but it also looks like a different kind of iron (or whatever they are made of).
As you can see, I am totally new to this and domestic goddess...I am not...LOL!

I am assuming since I will be using the amonia, when I take it out of the bag, I need to rinse the grates really well?
Just use clear lukewarm water to rinse?

A wonderful tip that I can't wait to try! I get sooo discouraged cleaning the stove in general but this tip sounds great! I am going to try it soon!

This message was edited Nov 16, 2006 3:09 AM
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2006
8:20 PM

Post #2919888

clutterjunky,
Since I've only cleaned mine, which are enamel coated, I wouldn't know how well the amonia would work on another finish. You might try a little spot first.
And yes, I just rinsed them off under running water using one of those green scrubber things in case there was a stubborn spot, but all the grime came off.
Good Luck...
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2006
10:44 PM

Post #2920260

Ginlyn I cleaned mine too. Put one in the freezer bag with enough amonia to cover the grate. Put them on the back porch and let them sit overnight. I did one each night for 4 nights.
I didn't know there was so much crud on them. BTW, I used the same 1/2 gallon of amonia for all of them. I guess if you have a big bag, you could clean them all at one time.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2006
11:04 PM

Post #2920321

Liz, did you really use a half gal of amonia ? I just put some into an empty windex spray bottle and sprayed into the freezer bag after putting the grate in. There probably was a quarter of an inch laying in the bag. Each time I put another grate in I sprayed some more.
I bet I didn't use a cup total. I made sure the top part of the grate was laying in the liquid.
I think the fumes did a lot of the work too.
purplepetunia
Savannah, GA
(Zone 8b)

November 16, 2006
11:30 PM

Post #2920407

would this work on stainless steel grill grates?
lizh
N.C. Mts., NC
(Zone 6b)

November 16, 2006
11:42 PM

Post #2920446

Ginlyn, I thought it had to cover them, so that is what I did. Anyway they are clean. next time I will try your way.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 17, 2006
11:54 PM

Post #2923405

clutterjunky, if yours are cast-iron (like an old-fashioned cast-iron skillet), I'm not sure I'd try this technique on them...that's what I had on my last range, and (confession time) I don't think I ever cleaned them...at least not with anything harsh. Ran 'em through the dishwasher occasionally if something had boiled over and made a big mess, but they never showed the burn marks or crusted-on junk like these enameled ones do.
clutterjunky
Arlington, MA

November 18, 2006
12:06 AM

Post #2923444

Thanks to those who answered my questions directly. I will need to have my husband look at what the grates are made of. They definitely look different from the photos posted. It must be iron of some sort???
See what my husband says. I'll keep everyone posted and if I try something besides amonia, I'll let you know how it goes.
Thanks again!
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 18, 2006
1:22 AM

Post #2923647

The book on my new range says my cast iron grate can be put right in the self clean oven. I do it every time I self clean.
They also are designed to fit in my dishwasher. They go in there . . . every big cooking job. Seems to me dish washing soap is harsher than amonia.

IMHO
dutchmom
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 10b)

January 31, 2007
7:15 PM

Post #3142683

I just finished cleaning my first grate using the amonia method. I could not believe how easy it was to get it almost totally clean. I used a kitchen sponge with a "scrubbie" on the back. I have NEVER been able to get my grates really clean before and had largely given up. My grates won't fit in a gallon-size zip-lock bag, but fit nicely in an oven bag with a twist tie (the kind you can roast meat in). I left the grate in the bag with a little bit of amonia overnight (I don't have amonia in a spray bottle so I just poured some in).
purplepetunia
Savannah, GA
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2007
6:44 PM

Post #3163769

After spraying my s.s. grill grates with "Dawn Power Dissolver", I left them in the sink to soak and thought I would catch up on DG. Wow, it is amazing that I went right to these post. I already called my dh and told him to stop at the store on his way home and get more Dawn. If mine don't come clean, I will use the amonia.

What great tips.
Will let you know if the dawn works.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2007
11:53 PM

Post #3164749

Hello everyone,

You've done it to me. You convinced me to buy ammonia today. I have
a spray bottle all ready and will try this later on this evening.

On a side note, several of us in the chat room were discussing use of
ammonia, when someone mentioned their father had a terrible run-in with
bleach mixed with ammonia. Apparently it makes a toxic gas and is NOT
a good pairing.

I realize many may already know this, and some would never mix the
two, but if it reaches one person, well, you get the idea.

Ammonia + Bleach = BAD

Karen Marie





Equilibrium

February 7, 2007
12:02 AM

Post #3164779

I'm sold too!

Hey WUVIE! I'm eating the cookies you passed out. They're all ending up in my rear.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

February 7, 2007
1:37 PM

Post #3166103

good reminder, Wuvie

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


February 7, 2007
10:05 PM

Post #3167490

This method works, no doubt about it. But after witnessing other people having the same serious problems with porcelain-coated grates, I think I'm ready to throw in the towel and get a new range for two reasons:

a) we're re-doing cabinetry and countertops around the range, so it's the right time to switch to a slide-in model with a continuous grate system. (Lack of counterspace is a huge issue in my kitchen, and more models are featuring continuous grates, which will be a nice way to have full use of the cooktop surface area); and

b) my grates are disentegrating so badly I will have to buy a new range before we sell (still a few years down the road most likely) and I might as well get some good out of this investment instead of making-do until I buy a new one just in time to please a would-be-buyer.

But lemme tell ya, one of the first things I look at on every model is the grates. Anything other than cast iron, I move on - it doesn't matter how pretty it is, how many other bells and whistles it has that I want - if it doesn't have cast iron grates, it gets scratched off my short list.

I'm really surprised this issue has apparently not surfaced with Consumer Reports. I bought back into their month-by-month subscription so I could check out their recommendations for this and a new washer/dryer (when it rains, it pours.) Bottom line with Consumer Reports - no to the KitchenAid I was eyeing, as they seem to have higher-than-average repairs; I'm now leaning towards a Frigidaire with a convection oven.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

February 8, 2007
1:43 AM

Post #3168110

You are right; I love the cast iron on my new range.
jeannebee
Mobile, AL

February 12, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #3180966

I'm trying to clean my stove for resale. Everything looks great
except for the stainless grill where the oven vents. This is a slide-in
range where the oven vents from a small grate behind the burners.
The grill is attached to the porcelain stovetop.

The center of the grill is blackened. I've been rubbing on WD-40 for
days. It softens up the burned bits and the sides have cleaned up
nicely. But the center is still a blackened eyesore.

Do you think it would work to put an ammonia-soaked rag over it, then cover that with a garbage bag?
purplepetunia
Savannah, GA
(Zone 8b)

February 17, 2007
5:41 PM

Post #3198993

Have you tried the Dawn Power disolver? IT is very strong and worked well on my grill grates.
I have to admit the ammonia is much less expensive and probably about as effective. Do you have a pilot light? It wouldn't be safe to use if there is a flame nearby.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


February 18, 2007
2:25 AM

Post #3200566

I've used the Dawn Power Dissolver and I like it for our outdoor gas grill grates (which are also porcelain), but I didn't find it to be very effective on the range grates. My stove is pilotless (I think that's the right word anyway - the burners have an elecronic ignition)

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2007
3:13 PM

Post #3247003

I think all i have is "sudsy amonia" will that do the trick too?

and funny - as i was cleaning my stove top just yesterday, i was thinking -- how the heck do i get these clean??
and now i just stumbled into this forum. very cool.

terese
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

March 4, 2007
6:08 PM

Post #3247487

Terese, I think the sudsy amonia would work just as well. I haven't cleaned mine since August, and need to do it again soon.
I guess the only way to have a clean stove all the time is to never cook. Ginny

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2007
7:53 PM

Post #3247735

Ginny -- i say that everytime i have to clean the stove... i mean, no one else ever cleans it.
Blues_Cookin
Saint Paul, MN

April 30, 2007
11:31 PM

Post #3449506

TO CLEAN CAST IRON GRATES

Thanks for all the great notes above...I have cast iron grates on my stove top, and after reading the thread here, did a little more research. I found buried on the Viking site a description of how they recommend cleaning the grates. I followed it today, and it worked amazingly well. Here's what I did:

1. Get yourself one can of Easy-Off oven cleaner, rubber gloves, and a bucket large enough to hold the grates. The instructions on the site call for newspaper to set the grates on, but I opted for the bucket.

2. Get outside...the fumes from the Easy-Off are mildy toxic and very irritating, so you dont want to breath them

3. Put on the gloves, then spray each grate, one at a time with the Easy-Off. When they are well coated, set them in the bucket (or on the news paper...make sure you are on cement, not black-top if you chose not to use a bucket or other container)

4. Let them site for a couple hours

5. Now for the fun part! Bring the grates inside (the fumes are gone) and rinse in a large sink or laundry tub. Once the initial rinse is done, lightly scrub each grate with a long bristle brush or the blue or white scotch -bite pad.

6. Dry

7. Look at your grates in amazement at how clean and new they look! If there are a few burn spots remaining, repeat the soak and rinse steps.

8. Now, you can put them back on the stove and be done, or, if you are really a clean freak, carry on to step 9

9. Place grates in oven at 200 degrees for 30 min

10. remove grates from oven one at a time, and lightly coat with mineral oil

11. Let cool, and use a clean dry cloth to remove any excess oil. You have now successfully re-seasoned your grates! Put the grates back on the stove

12. partake in an adult beverage or other indulgance of your choice and gaze proudly at your sparkling range!

Hope this helps,

Blues_Cookin
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2007
2:32 PM

Post #3548544

Very cool, thanks!
Equilibrium

May 29, 2007
3:49 PM

Post #3548757

Sounds as if Blues_Cookin's grate cleaning method is a keeper too!
stellapathic
Cambria, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 22, 2007
4:15 AM

Post #3644029

Blues_Cookin's method is what I've always done. Works wonders on oven racks or just plain pots and pans that have crusty stuff or stains on them too.
pamelanipper
Columbus, GA

June 29, 2007
5:40 PM

Post #3675458

I am so excited to find this tip. I have had a nightmare of a time trying to clean my stove grates since I bought my new stove. I thought the gray grates looked very nice with my kitchen decor :) but the time with a brillo pad my husband, son and I have spent with the grates to not really get them clean is too long to determine. I soaked each one and the top of the burner and the thingy around the edge overnight in the ammonia and practically everything went down the drain when I used the sprayer to rinse them! Just a little rub with a green scrubber and my stove looks new again. I wish I had found this 2 years ago when it was posted
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

June 29, 2007
7:37 PM

Post #3675894

pamelanipper, I'm glad you found this tip useful. Ginny
JameBonds
Renton, WA

May 3, 2008
5:19 PM

Post #4901296

Thank you Ginlyn for the tip on cleaning stove grates with ammonia. I'm trying to put my house on the market and the gas stove really needed cleaning. One thing I learned though - I will never buy a Sears product ever again. I own a Sears refrigerator, Sears dishwasher, & Sears stove and I found out that the grates cost $50.00 apiece to replace. Also, the round burner caps (where the flames come out off) cost about the same. One of my caps cracked and according to Lowe's and Home Depot, Sears/Kenmore brands are highly proprietary and not a whole lot of other companies carry their parts.
stovetop
Bunkie, LA

May 12, 2008
4:37 AM

Post #4939415

I have the gray porcelian grates on my stove, they had caked on, baked on, greese. I've tried scrubbing with sos pads, soaking over night in a sink of hot soapy water, my husband even tried presser washing them. Nothing worked. I came to this site and asked what is the easiest way to get them clean and there was only one person at the time that said to put them in the oven & press the cleaning button. I thought, thats too easy, it would never work. So after about a month still thinking about it and still not doing anything about it I finally decided to try it out. I could not believe how amazing they look. My stove looks brand new again. Thank you soooo much. I just had to let as many people know,if they have a busy life like I do, to stop scrubbing and just press the cleaning button.
detheo
Macomb, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2008
1:05 PM

Post #4940117

I am sooooo trying this out this week sometime!!
I even thought about buying new ones but I think they were like $150.00
and I truly don't remember if that was just for one or not and I have two...
I've tried everything to...I "did" have little rubber things on the bottoms of them
and I did put them in the oven to "clean" them as well...and helloooooo
no rubber thingy's left!?!? Duh. And the oven didn't clean them like I thought they would either. Probobly baked the crud on more...ughhh...

So I'm crossing my fingers for this one ;o)
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2008
11:27 PM

Post #4947180

In my "shiny" kitchen I finally found that vinegar in a spray bottle would clean everything including oily/greasy stuff.

My old oven I always cleaned by putting a (dirty) broiler pan filled with a couple of cups of ammonia in it overnight or until I remembered it was there. It was an easy wipe - out after that.

Light_for_Jesus

(Zone 6b)

June 11, 2008
2:56 PM

Post #5087336

I bought some old skillets that are supposed to be100 years old from ebay. I have been trying to clean those. Wonder if ammonia would work on them? They said they are tin. I bought a wire brush that hooks on to a drill was trying to use. It works ok, but it takes so long.

Imagine 100 years of grime. :)

I bought them because I was reading that many of our new metals we cook with can leach heavy metals that could be poisonous. So I was really planning to use these skillets for cooking. Also, tin nourishes the adrenal glands. Since I was diagnosed with lupus, I know my adrenals are weak and need all the help they can get.

Karen
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

June 13, 2008
12:02 AM

Post #5095068

Fire up the gas grill to 500+ and burn the stuff off. Don't forget to re-oil after cleaning...

Jeannie63

Jeannie63
Mequon, WI
(Zone 4b)

June 27, 2008
3:14 PM

Post #5167994

OMG This works like MAGIC!!

Thanks so much for the tip :)
suemckee
Iuka, MS
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2008
5:44 PM

Post #5332965

Light-for-Jesus,You can get a can of Draino and put it in a 5 gallon bucket of water and put your cast iron in it and it will come out soooo clean.Then just wash and re season it.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

August 3, 2008
2:42 AM

Post #5360794

I am with the posters above. I put mine in my self cleaning oven and it all turns to ash and they look brand new. I have also done that with my enamel pans to renew them.
mrskitty
Lucedale, MS

August 3, 2008
5:17 PM

Post #5362901

In response to the questions about a way to eliminate streaks on your stovetop. I had the same problem and have discovered that good ole windex will do the trick everytime. But...do not get the potpurri blend. It has the opposite effect. Happy Cleaning.
Heidillyho
Stanwood, IA

August 13, 2008
2:06 AM

Post #5406485

Gotta'love ammonia. When my husband was in the service and we lived in base housing that is exactly how we were instructed to clean the stove racks and grates. They told us to put it all in a black garbage sack, add some ammonia and set the whole thing out in the sun for several hours. We left the stuff for about eight hours in the hot California sun and the stuff literally wiped clean with a rag. Stunk like crazy though!
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2008
7:57 AM

Post #5407333

Ammonia fumes are great for cleaning, aren't they. I "gotta'love" a chemical that does all of the work for me, too. Seem to burn the airways if you breathe those fumes tho'.
MargaretK
PERTH
Australia

December 18, 2008
4:28 AM

Post #5903691

I tried the ammonia method yesterday. Armed with ammonia, a spray bottle, a large plastic bag, an elastic band and a fair bit of scepticism, I took one of my really grotty stovetop grates, did as suggested and left it outside, in the the bag for 12 hours. When I took it out and started to clean it in the laundry trough, I was amazed. It really does work. I've got the other one out for the same treatment today. Brilliant. I'm so glad I discovered this thread.

Light_for_Jesus

(Zone 6b)

December 18, 2008
6:10 AM

Post #5903887

Vinegar is good on bathtub ring too.

Glad somebody bumped this thread up, I had forgotten where it was.


podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2008
11:38 AM

Post #5904076

Yes, thanks for reviving this thread. I want to say, I am scared of ammonia as I knew a woman that damaged her lungs using it. A couple of things I have found over the years.

Oven cleaner (used outdoors), even a cheap oven cleaner will work much better with using a garbage bag or even just covering it with a plastic wrap. As long as the cleaner stays moist, it will keep working. When it dries out, it quits. I do use oven cleaner on newly acquired old and nasty cast iron cookware slipping it into a garbage sack. It can sit for a long time like that and works great. I then scrub well and reseason.

I have a gas range and to clean the burner grates and even the burners, I remove two at a time and soak them in a stockpot of hot water with a dose of Dip It. Simmering for a short time and washing will clean them well. The reason I only do two at a time is so I can use a burner to simmer them. It will also do a good job of cleaning the stockpot too. Dip It is a commercial product designed to be run thru a coffee pot to clean it. Now, I wish I could put the whole oven in the stockpot! LOL If I recall, the cleaning instructions that came with my gas stove 20 years ago recommended Dip It. I thing that is how I discovered it. I may need to try a cast iron skillet in it and see how it does.
MargaretK
PERTH
Australia

December 18, 2008
12:04 PM

Post #5904107

That's good to know. I think we have what sounds like an equivalent to Dip it over here.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 28, 2008
3:21 PM

Post #5935757

I have to say... after I found this thread last year... i have started using ammonia, vinegar and baking soda for most of my cleaning. I go thru A LOT of baking soda and vinegar, mostly because i add it when doing laundry.

the ammonia i keep in a spray bottle in my kitchen, diluted, and i use it for general cleaning in the kitchen. Amazing stuff.

as for the streaking on the stove... i use those microfiber clothes, and they nicely get rid of the streaks.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 28, 2008
5:53 PM

Post #5936160

tsc, do you ever use the Arm and Hammer washing soda to clean?
When I make coffee I always pour it into a thermal coffee carafe as soon as it's done to keep it fresher.

Eventually the carafe does get a buildup of coffee stains, so I pour a little washing soda into it and add hot water. Put the lid on, give a few shakes and let it set for a few hours. You only have to give it a few swishes to get the residue off. I used to use baking soda for that, but found the washing soda works best for me.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 28, 2008
6:07 PM

Post #5936208

washing soda??

do you mean the powder laundry detergent?

or just baking soda?

I get the 12# bags from Sams... I use dht powder to clean, and yes, i do use it to clean my decanter.
the grunge that the soda does not get out, i'll use a Magic Eraser thing.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

December 28, 2008
6:47 PM

Post #5936301

tsc, this is not the Arm and Hammer laundry detergent, but you do buy it in the laundry soap isle. The box has the same look as the bk soda and detergent but it's called, All natural Super Washing Soda .Detergent Booster and Household Cleaner. It is not sudsy.

You can add it to your laundry to boost cleaning power or as a household cleaner.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 28, 2008
6:51 PM

Post #5936314

Oh,... interesting... i'll look for it next time i'm at the store.

i do add a scoop of baking soda to each load of wash ... i wonder if the one you are referring to would be better, more
for whitening.

for deoderizing... i add the 'soda', and use vinegar in the rinse. I never have to use softener now.
Wvdaisy
Buffalo, WV
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2009
5:56 PM

Post #6247635

Cleaned my grates in bags with ammonia a couple nights ago. Thanks so much for that tip ginlyn! Same night also poured ammonia on the sealed top getting it on the flame elements and all around. Covered with plastic wrap and let it set overnight got all the grunge off just wiping and didn't have to remove the elements just the grates! The stove was atrocious(sp?), looks like a new stove now :)

Lana

ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

March 10, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6247682

I'm glad it worked for you Lana...

The next warm day we have I'm going to do my outdoor grill grates. Just have to use a larger garbage bag .


Ginny
Wvdaisy
Buffalo, WV
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2009
2:59 AM

Post #6250076

Hmmm, yeah, I need to do those, too :) Need to get some more ammonia!
bseward
Kilmarnock, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 22, 2009
9:58 AM

Post #6302586

Wow, what a find this information is. I've been at my wit's end here trying to get these grates clean. I think they are the grates that are coated with something -- possibly porcelain and there are 2 continuous grates on each side of the stovetop. I tried the ammonia trick yesterday afternoon and went to check on them this morning. I was a little bit disconcerted when I found out that the liquid had leaked out. However, it still worked because the grates came out perfectly clean with only a little scrubbing. I have one grate left and need to find some way to keep the liquid in the bag. I used a white kitchen trash bag. Do you think a big black garbage bag would work and not leak? Because there are 2 grates together I can't use a Ziploc bag; they're not big enough. Hope someone has a good suggestion. Thanks.

Betty
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

March 22, 2009
11:13 AM

Post #6302652

I've had good sucess with kitchen size and the big black garbage bags.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2009
12:06 PM

Post #6302721

I'd try the black bags ~ they seem sturdier. I think too that part of the success is to keep the grates moist and the plastic will do that even if the liquid leaks out.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

March 22, 2009
1:39 PM

Post #6302963

I think also, that brand name bags seem to be thicker than store brands, so may not be as apt to leak.
I've found that true with the kitchen garbage bags at least...

Gin
time2009
Annandale, VA

May 29, 2009
3:32 PM

Post #6613844

I've tried using the Dawn Power Dissolver and it works magic for me. Try it out too.

I've stumbled on this site that sells it, you can try it too..

http://www.thehardwarecity.com/?sku=4115465
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2009
11:57 PM

Post #6615663

Do you know what the ingredients are right off?
gavafriend
northeastern, AZ

June 1, 2009
5:41 PM

Post #6626945

Does anyone remember the old oven cleaner that come in a plastic jar with a brush that hung around the top of the bottle. That was the best stuff for cleaning the grates and white porcelain surfaces. They seem to have taken it off the market. I love the Dawn Power Dissolver. It works much like the old brush on stuff. I have gotten sprays on the wrong places and damaged formica surfaces even. So be careful with the stuff that works so well. (Wash hands really well - don't let anything stay under your wedding band.) Maybe it's like my son, the almost doctor says, "If the drugs work, there are side effects. If the drugs don't work, there are no side effects."

I'm almost looking forward to getting my stove dirty so I can try the ammonia on the grates. :0) Years ago my aunt told me that she cleaned her oven by putting a pan of ammonia in the bottom of her cool oven and letting the fumes soften the gunk over night. Sometimes the old ways are the good ways.
fizzbomb
Lenora, KS

June 6, 2009
4:54 AM

Post #6648852

My aunt taught me the ammonia trick 20-odd years ago using a black garbage bag (sealed with tape), but with the extra kick of setting it outside in the sun for an afternoon. The crud should rinse off with the garden hose; if not, put back in the bag & reseal for another afternoon.

Has anyone tried that 3M Stovetop cleaner? I think it's great and use it on a lot more than just my stove top.
gavafriend
northeastern, AZ

June 6, 2009
10:46 PM

Post #6651306

My brother in law talked my sister into putting the grills from outside barbeque pit into the dishwasher. It made a huge mess. It got greasy scum all over the inside of the dishwasher, the silverware and the dishes. DONT EVER DO THAT!!!

I told her about the ammonia in the black plastic bag.
huggergirl
Columbia City, IN
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2009
11:18 AM

Post #6667542

I run my blk.stovetop grates through the dishwasher on a regular basis,before they get real bad,would never run the bbq grate through,I can only Imagine that mess,also I have used good old no fume easy off oven cleaner,Iam sure the amonia will work very well also,alot of fumes though.
smileymom343
Kenmore, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2009
12:17 PM

Post #6833956

I've never been in this forum before, but can tell it will be one of my favorites! All you out there, be careful with ammonia... It's nasty stuff. I work at a chemical company, trust me. And DON'T EVER mix it with another chemical.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

July 20, 2009
2:14 PM

Post #6841317

The fumes are deadly - 13 people were killed in Houston when a tanker truck of ammonia overturned in an interstate intersection (US59 @ IH 610) years ago. - also it is heavyer than air.
Killed all the vegatation in that intersection, too.
smileymom343
Kenmore, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2009
4:31 PM

Post #6841937

yeah, it's really nasty stuff. we had it segregated in a separate room, away from any other chemicals in our building. Luckily, we don't use it anymore in any of our products. I personally would not ever use it for anything, but that's me. Too many horror stories.
Rumble40
Van Nuys, CA

August 4, 2009
4:34 PM

Post #6906222

Thanks for the advice. Mine is a bit dirty and needs some cleaning.
jcoakley
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2009
3:33 AM

Post #6908861

Just stumbled on this thread (still going for almost 3 years!) and am excited to try the ammonia trick on my grates. Someone mentioned not being able to keep the ammonia in a garbage bag and that ziplocs were too small for the oven racks . . . Ziploc & Hefty both now make over-sized bags . . . I use them for storing baby clothes & extra bedding. I bet one of those would work great for cleaning all the grates and racks at once with ammonia.
WigglyPaw
Hastings, MI
(Zone 5b)

October 2, 2009
2:41 PM

Post #7126694

We buy Janitor strength ammonia from the "GFS" stores in the area. I am sure there is a food/restaurant
supply store other than them that might have the same item.

We use it for cleaning the window of the woodstove.

We also mix a tablespoon of ammonia,add a T of alcohol and then water to fill a quart bottle and use that on everything.
That's an old recipe from everywhere.

Hey, thanks for the tip to put my grates into the oven when doing the self cleaning cycle.
Lot easier than ammonia in the bag for me.
Sher
onaemtnest
Rigby, ID

October 5, 2009
6:44 PM

Post #7137834

I have a GE Profile Gas Range with the procelain coated grates (grey) in less than 3 years of use the grates have crazed with mini cracks which are now chipped leaving raw rusted cast iron showing through. What I've learned...they cannot go in the dishwasher, apparently that is what caused them to craze. Get this, GE says its because of high heat...Hello? They are gas burner grates???? Can't take high heat of a dishwasher but should stand up to gas flames????...GRRRRR!

With GE it's the consumer's fault I'm guessing, rationale thinking not allowed. Purchased at Sears with extended warranty...only thing not covered on range within warranty is the grids. Not acceptable to me for a $2K appliance, store manager agreed superceded on my behalf new grids are now on the way...parts cost $300+ for the three grids Sears is covering the cost. Had a GE gas range for 20 years with porcelain grids no problem...guess they don't make em' like they used to.

Thanks for the ammonia solution the new grids will forever more be cleaned this way by me can't take a chance on that high heat of the dishwasher again. :o) My question is this... does it harm the grids to sit in ammonia or should there be a container of sorts placed in the bag just to hold the chemical? Now I need to find a plastic bag large enough for grids as they are each 20" X10"

We're a retired couple that hoped this was our last range appliance purchase but now I wonder if it's going to be a huge headache...just wanted a range that would last 20 years...
gavafriend
northeastern, AZ

October 6, 2009
3:46 AM

Post #7139908

There are bags that are very thick and have strong zippers. they come in very big sizes and are made by ziplock. I bought the first set of them in the camping department of walmart.

However, if you want to keep re-using them, maybe you should lay an old towel in the bottom so the grid won't make a hole in the bag in case it's got a sharp edge on it. I'm looking forward to getting my grids dirty just so I can try this method.
gavafriend
northeastern, AZ

October 27, 2009
1:49 AM

Post #7212118

Oh - this is the coolest method. I did not scrub my grates for several weeks just so I could try it. And they were the dirtiest that they had ever been. I bought some huge heavy ziplok bags and put all 4 grates in there. I put a cotton towel in the bottom so they would not make a hole in the bag. Then I poured in about 1/2 cup of amonia and sealed it up. I left it to sit about 24 hours and when I removed them I held my breath. They came clean like magic. I rinsed the bag and towel really good and can't wait to do it again. AMAZING!!! I thought it would require scrubbing. I just came off like it was soap. My stove looks new now.

Thanks for sharing this method.
rainycity1
Seattle, WA

November 4, 2009
5:52 PM

Post #7240977

Wow, nobody knows the easy way. I was an appliance repairman for over thirty years and found the easiest way to clean grates was to take out the oven racks, lay the grates in the bottom of the oven and set it to self clean for two hours. After they cool simply wash them in soapy water and they look like new. I have been doing that with our grates for years. If your grates are not the heavy cast iron type you might want to try one first to see how it comes out. If you don't have a self cleaning oven (why not???) I guess the ammonia method is your next choice but ammonia makes me gag.
Also if you have a self cleaning oven and accidentally leave your racks in, during the clean cycle, you don't have to replace them because they don't slide in and out easily. Sure you have ruined the chrome finish but by simply soaking a paper towel with cooking oil and rubbing it on the side rails of your racks they will slide better than when new. DO NOT use spray oil. Then you can leave them in to clean again and just re-oil them when finished.
juney73
Waco, TX

January 28, 2010
7:55 PM

Post #7505901

hello there cleaning gurus - I have a question for you. I have a 15-20 year old gas range top that came with my house. In the circular area between the actual range-top and the burner itself (the lowered depression around the burner) there is a black, flaky, sooty type residue. It basically covers the entire circles around the burners and almost seems like the metal itself is damaged or something. I have scrubbed with comet, bar keepers friend, 409, pine sol, even bleach water. Some will always come off (just wiping it will leave black marks on your cloth) but it does seem to all come off. I keep hoping I'll scrub enough that I'll find the metal underneath but it hasn't happened yet. Any suggestions?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 28, 2010
8:26 PM

Post #7506001

have you tried Ammonia?? I keep it diluted in a spray bottle. [do not mix with any other cleaner, especially bleach]
but the exhaust fan on.

not sure -- but is the 'paint' [finish] gone on your stove?

sometimes i use baking soda and water.. but if comet didnt work...
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2010
9:50 PM

Post #7506256

Yeah, try ammonia and after you put it on, cover it with plastic wrap and let it work for a few hours. You may have to do it twice, but ammonia works pretty well on that black gunk.
cjctalley
Akron, OH

February 6, 2010
6:56 PM

Post #7535728

I used this method to clean my stove-top grates and it worked fine. Use four bags, clean them and use them again for something else. I hope this addresses the issue for those who are too frugal to clean them all at once by using four different bags. I wish I had tried this before devoting time and effort using brillo pads. I just hope my renter appreciates a spotless stove and will keep it as clean as I have. I'll share this with him. Thanks for the tip.
psdaengr
Chicago, IL

February 7, 2010
7:54 PM

Post #7539039

Just FYI, to correct some misconceptions and add a few pointers

1. The ammonia shipped by liquid transport trucks is at a MUCH higher concentration than that sold as household ammonia.
2. If you leave your oven racks in during a self-cleaning cycle, they will "blue" temporarily, but are otherwise unharmed. Re-lubricate them by wiping the outer edges with a sheet of wax paper.
3. Porcelain coating of steel and cast iron is accomplished by applying a water suspension of ceramic and glass particles to the metal and heating it in an oven at 700F or higher for a sustained time, followed by slow cooling to avoid creating internal stress.
4. Cast iron stove grates and barbeque grates are dishwater safe, and self-cleaning oven safe, as are ones coated with porcelain, which is a glass-ceramic. The maximum temperature of a self-cleaning oven is approx 500F- well below the melting points of iron and glass.
5. Scrubbing porcelain, glass or enamel with scotch brite pads of ANY grade will scratch the surface, making it much more prone to cracking when repeatedly heated and cooled, food will get into the fine scratches and burn, making it much harder to clean.
6. Prolonged soaking of cast iron or bare steel in any liquid containing water will cause the outer layer to become oxidized (rusted). The rust is water soluble and will wash away, leaving the surface pitted and more prone to accelerated oxidation. Heat accelerates oxidation (rusting). The primary reason for "seasoning" cast iron is to prevent oxidation. Every manufacturer of barbeque grilles recommends that the grill/grates be preheated, residue scraped off at high temperature, the grates immediately re-tempered (lightly re-coated with oil) and cleaning/re-tempering to be done at the end of every cooking session.
7. The easiest way to minimize buildup on a oven racks, stove tops, stove grates, and drip pans is to apply paraffin or automotive paste wax to them while they are still clean. The wax will retard food from sticking to the surface, and if the wax is heated excessively, it will burn off leaving no residue (think candles).
8. While household ammonia will soften and assist in cleaning encrusted and scorched food, it is most effective on burners that have not been previously abraded by mechanical cleaning. If a burner's porcelain coating has been scratched through, water/ammonia soaking will cause the exposed metal at the bottom of the scratches to rust, expand, and worsen the cracking.
9. The simplest way to keep a stove or oven clean is - to keep it clean.
10. Most of this is covered in the owner manuals that are provided with cooking appliances. They are a more reliable guide to operation and cleaning of your specific appliance than advice from an appliance salesperson.
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2010
9:01 PM

Post #7539255

:-) Big thanks for all that good info!
MargaretK
PERTH
Australia

February 7, 2010
11:35 PM

Post #7539684

Really good information, psdaengr. Thanks.
shuggins
Houston, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 10, 2010
1:42 PM

Post #7781074

Okay, so after WAY TOO LONG, I finally tried it and it worked like a charm! I am telling everyone I know! Thanks so much!

Also, does this work for the oven racks in the oven? Obviously, I would need a bigger bag, but would love input.

Thanks.
Zyrena
Swansea, MA

June 12, 2010
4:57 PM

Post #7882829

Definitely going to try the ammonia trick. Maytag gas stove with gray grates. Big family lots of cooking. Grrr. Any body tried to paint them? Mine are also chipped from heavy use, and big pots.
DaveStan
Battle Mountain, NV

August 29, 2010
1:53 PM

Post #8068983

The grates on my stove have small rubber feet on the bottom of them. Does anyone know if the amonia will harm the rubber feet? Great tip. Thanks.
I put one grate in a plastic bag and put some ammonia in it and when I checked it the next morning most of the ammonia had leaked out. I used a large plastic storage bin that our grates barely fit in and put enough ammonia to cover one grate and covered the bin. It did require quite a bit of ammonia (2.5 gallons). The next morning I removed it and all that crud that was just impossible to get off just rinsed off with the garden hose. The little bit remaining just wiped off with virtually no effort and the grate looks brand new. It also did not affect the silicone feet on the bottom of the grate. The other grate is in the ammonia bath right now. Thank you ginlyn for the amazing tip. We had tried everything we could think of to clean the grates and nothing else even came close to gettings them clean.

This message was edited Sep 5, 2010 10:26 AM

This message was edited Sep 5, 2010 10:27 AM
annamae1934
Broken Arrow, OK

September 2, 2010
8:41 AM

Post #8076375

Please be careful of Ammonia. My sister in law cleaned houses and used ammonia all the time and it ruined her lungs. I put my porcelain grates on my patio in a large garbage bag and sprayed each with oven cleaner that has no fumes. They all fit lying flat in the large bag. I used rubber gloves and sprayed each and then sprayed each burner top. Closed up the bag and left then for half the day and then cleaned them off at the outside faucet. Worked like a charm. Thanks for the tips on cast iron grates as I am getting a new stove with cast iron grates and wondered how to clean them. Can you put the grates on the bottom of your stove when using the self cleaning cycle and if so does it cause damage to the bottom of the oven?
jimsonburg
New jersey
United States

September 8, 2010
2:24 AM

Post #8086598

If acidic liquid spills onto the burner grates while hot, wipe with a dry paper towel or cloth right away. Then wash with soap and water after it has cooled.


Kristi_L
Kalamazoo, MI

October 11, 2010
2:21 PM

Post #8150806

Bump
zuzushihtzu
Granite City, IL

November 5, 2010
12:34 PM

Post #8196157

Someone suggested spraying PAM on the grates after cleaning. I would think that would be messy.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2010
2:34 PM

Post #8196335

and doesnt Pam get sticky after a while??
shuggins
Houston, TX
(Zone 9b)

November 8, 2010
1:57 PM

Post #8201482

I wouldn't do Pam. Even on my baking dishes, once it gets hot it is yucky and almost impossible to get off, so I would think it would be the same on the grates.
crazzee
Algonac, MI

January 22, 2011
9:52 PM

Post #8325179

to clean your grates use about a cup of fabric softener i the cheap stuff from the dollar store & hot water let soak for an hour the greasy gunk almost melts off just soak then wash no nasty fumes & EASY!!! works on lots of other burned on greasy things too im just finding out alllllll it works on lol use a fabric softener sheet & hot water in pots & pans & to clean the inside of your deep fryer are just a few

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 23, 2011
4:42 AM

Post #8325388

I dont use Fab Softener on clothes... so i dont have it in the house... but just may get a bottle of cheap stuff just to try this.
DH hates the smell of ammonia -
skudy
El Campo, TX

May 24, 2011
12:21 PM

Post #8584595

About 2 years ago I got on this forum and learned the ammonia trick...works wonderful...but will cause the enamel to crack and fall off after too many soakings! Just wondering if anyone has any other suggestions for cleaning them. Hate to keep soaking in ammonia as the problem of breaking off is getting worse with each soaking. I vaguely remember reading somewhere about baking soda and something, question is don't remember what the something was, and seems like it was stated to boil the grates and let soak till cool. Any one hear of this before?
shuggins
Houston, TX
(Zone 9b)

May 24, 2011
4:57 PM

Post #8585067

I have done the ammonia thing twice and haven't had any adverse effects. I did it about every 6 months or so. From the things I have tried, only the ammonia thing works really well. Hope we don't have things start to crack...
stablemom
Augusta, MI

May 29, 2011
1:10 PM

Post #8594874

I too have a GE Profile range that came with beige colored grates. After trying evey solution in the book, I researched Power coat and places that powder coat in my area. I found a small business that deals in specialty coating and he was willing to try painting my grates. Attached is a pic of the stove with the New/old grates. Now I don't have to completely clean the grates every time I cook or even warm up a small item. The have with stood a large family dinner, massive soup preps, (large pots, long cook time) without any flaking or discoloration. Evidently this process is a powder coat and is often used on race car engines. They look wonderful and don't look redone at all. The whole stove looks new again!
Feel free to contact me if you would like further information on this process. My set was prototype/experimental job so you would have to negotiate your own rate with the owner.

Thumbnail by stablemom
Click the image for an enlarged view.

JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2011
6:54 PM

Post #8595518

Oooh! My DSon likes unexpected pops of color and I am going to mention this to him☺Powder coating can be done in any color and I have a feeling that he is really going to like this idea.
Sozi

July 23, 2011
12:32 AM

Post #8710108

Very good suggestions, personally Iím gonna have to bookmark this and come back to it. Do you have any feedback on your most recent post though?
testking
Fleur_2011
Yucaipa, CA
(Zone 10a)

October 6, 2011
1:10 AM

Post #8837910

I bought a new stove for my mobile home a few months after I moved in since the original stove was left behind and only had 2 burners that actually worked. Can you imagine trying to cook on only 2 burners! I was constantly rotating my pots & pans. The new stove I bought from a local business near where I live is a "Frigidaire". The color is a light cream, black oven door and black enamel coated burner grates. I believe they are made of cast iron, since they're so heavy. I've cleaned them the old way of just scrubbing with cleanser and an abrasive pad which I can still feel some of the "grime" left behind. After reading some of these posts about using ammonia, I'll definitely try that method next time. One of the burner grates will fit easily inside a gallon ziplock bag. I've never noticed any of the black enamel color come off when I've scrubbed, thank goodness!!

This stove is like a luxury model for me ~~ it has all the functions to make my cooking and baking much easier. I love the built in features! :) Once I try this cleaning method, will post a "before and after" photo. Thanks for all the great ideas!
Goldenberry
Northeast, IL
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2011
11:20 AM

Post #8947792

Last night while the oven cleaning cycle was going, I put the stainless-steel oven racks in a bag with ammonia and let them soak overnight. This morning I used a green scrub pad to take off the residue, then rinsed and wiped dry with paper towels. It worked great. The racks have small discolored areas where stuff was thickly burned-on, but all the gunk came off easily.

The only thing I would do differently is to do this OUTDOORS next time. Fortunately, the window over my basement utility tub can be opened, so airing out the fumes wasn't a problem.
A_La_Cart
Ottawa
Canada

February 11, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #9002947

Thanks so much for the great advice!

Can anyone help me with a kindof-related subject?

The "fingers" of my now-clean Frigidaire Gallery cast-iron porcelain-coated grates are warped, which means my fried eggs head south (or wherever) on deposit, as the pan cannot sit even, but tilts back and forth at will.

These are the individual-style grates, one for each burner.
I bought the stove used, and they have been this way since I got it.

I am hesitant to force them in any way, for fear that the enamel will further crack or the finger end up breaking off.

Much appreciated :-)
MsKatt
Mid-Michigan, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 2, 2012
2:20 PM

Post #9067218

I have a somewhat related question.. I have a black stovetop, black cast iron grates . However, the burner pan (non removable) always gets burned on junk (thanks Hubby and teenagers) that I can't get off. Any ideas?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 2, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #9067444

Have you tried spraying with ammonia and water ? [i dilute it as it's pretty strong]

after a soak with ammonia, try using baking soda to 'scrub' it.

I use this cleaner called "Thieves" -- it gets all the junk off.
MsKatt
Mid-Michigan, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 3, 2012
10:40 AM

Post #9068231

Thanks!
I will wait til I can open the windows!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 3, 2012
11:12 AM

Post #9068274

I do a pretty weak solution, and it takes off the gunk, and since it's the stove, i turn on the fan above... that seems to do the trick.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 3, 2012
9:01 AM

Post #9150179

I haven't seen it mentioned here , but Cascade JELL, painted on works to melt crud . I use it to clean filter vent over stove and drip pans under my electric burners . It's a blessing to be able to wipe it on the hood , underneath , to dissolve the built up grease and just wipe off .On the filter , I run a little hot water in the sink just to cover the filter , then squirt the jell on it and swish up and down . Instant clean . Saves hours of work . Used it on oven grates before I got a self cleaning oven and it worked there too.
ginlyn
Harford County, MD
(Zone 6b)

June 3, 2012
2:36 PM

Post #9150531

That's good to know digger...sure wouldn't smell as bad as amonia. I will definitely try it.
roadrunner
Hereford, AZ
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2012
4:16 PM

Post #9150640

Digger...U so Smart!! Jo
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 3, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9150666

I wish , Jo , I wish . Thanks , tho .
Malynn10
Cascade-Fairwood, WA

June 22, 2012
8:59 PM

Post #9176707

Wow. Cleaning gas grill grates seems like a huge hassle. It sounds like even if you somehow manage to get them looking brand new again it takes considerable effort. And then how long is it before you have to go through all that hassle again? Unless you just put up with the grates looking crummy between cleanings? I've been thinking about replacing my electric range with a gas range (because it will be a little better for re-sale value down the road) but maybe it will be a mistake because I like to keep things looking as brand new as possible. My present ceramic smooth top electric range top looks as good as the day I bought it which was a good 10 years ago. Yikes, I guess I'd better think more about this because I just can't imagine fiddling around with ammonia & garbage bags all the time.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 23, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9176992

I don't have cleaning issues with smooth top . I have another electric in a winter home and hate the d- - - thing . The drip pans needed replacing after the first use . It's a high end stove with cheap pans . Couldn't they do a bit better ?I'll replace that thing as soon as I can afford it .
gamesveta
london
United Kingdom

September 28, 2012
5:32 AM

Post #9288647

Our team are professional, hard working, reliable workers living in your community. We take pride in our own homes and take pride in yours. We are committed to delivering a high quality, professional, reliable service. Your Satisfaction is our number one priority and we will work closely with you to ensure quality control.



Clean and Clutterfree works with Real Estate agents completing End of Lease and Moving Out cleans for their clients. Attention to detail is our priority, so you can be assured your home will sparkle.





wood burning stoves
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 28, 2012
6:09 AM

Post #9288678

You would have your hands full with my house and it would cost me a fortune . I don't clean before the cleaners get here , like my sister does .
It is a very good business for a man or woman to get into if they own the business . My B-in-L had an office cleaning business in Denver . Easy , cheap ,fast, and no personal dirt , except toilets .
prescottcitizen
Prescott, AZ

January 3, 2013
10:52 AM

Post #9374232

For those of you who do not like amonia, take your burners outside and spray then down with WD-40 allow them to sit and soak, clean them off, this may take a few times depending on how much is built up, but it does take a lot off, gease reomoves grease. WD-40 is also great for built up scum on shower doors, spray on take a green scrub pad and wipe down with a clean cloth. Once this is done water will bead off for months. Just make sure you dont use on shower floor or you will put a new spin on slipping and a slidin.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 4, 2013
2:39 AM

Post #9374880

Prescot , you're
right . I've used this for years on shower doors .

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