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Lilies: Baby Lily

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blpender
Dowagiac, MI

September 9, 2006
11:35 PM

Post #2707219

At the risk of looking like a total idiot, I have these things growing all over some of my lily plants. Are they babies?

Thumbnail by blpender
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pardalinum
Willamette Valley, OR
(Zone 8a)

September 9, 2006
11:40 PM

Post #2707232

Tiger lily and it's hybrids and some other lilies form bulblets where the leaves meet the stem. Yes, they are "babies".
blpender
Dowagiac, MI

September 9, 2006
11:56 PM

Post #2707283

Thank you. I am assuming they will resemble the mother plant, rather than be a cross as if they originated from a seed?
pardalinum
Willamette Valley, OR
(Zone 8a)

September 10, 2006
12:10 AM

Post #2707321

Yes, you are right on that.
inanda
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 2b)

September 10, 2006
11:32 AM

Post #2708503

Sometimes I pick them all off the mother an plant them around the base of the mother stem. Helps the increase of a clump.
inanda
blpender
Dowagiac, MI

September 10, 2006
1:16 PM

Post #2708707

Good idea. Thanks.
magnolialover
Southern, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 10, 2006
2:22 PM

Post #2708841

When my parents were on vacation in July, I did just that to their tiger lilies. Planted all the little bulbets and you should see them now. Next year they should have quite a few more.
Is this the way tigers multiply? By dropping these? Or do they also do it under ground?
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 10, 2006
8:55 PM

Post #2709931

All lilies that produce bulblets(technically bulbils) in the axils of leaves where the leaf meets the stem do multiply in this way. But said lilies, as far as I know, do not have stoloniferous bulbs that would spread underground. However they do typically produce multiple nose bulbs that will produce multiple lily stems, and can be broken apart to produce more plants.

Of course, all lily species (including tigers) also reproduce by seed.

PotEmUp

PotEmUp
Fremont, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 11, 2006
1:00 AM

Post #2710575

Don't forget our Garden Terms section http://davesgarden.com/terms/go/133.html
All of my tiger lilies produced bulbils this year and I have dutifully collected them.
Texas Ag Extension has the following on their website [quote]The tiger lily is a common inhabitant of many older gardens throughout Texas and the South. It is reported to be a native of Korea, China, and Japan, where its bulbs have long been eaten for food. As it is apparently a sterile triploid, some speculate that it is a very old hybrid. It seems to thrive best in the acid sandy soils of East Texas and the southeastern states. Its bright orange flowers speckled with dark spots are its easily recognized feature. The tiger lily begins growth in the spring, blooms in early summer, and then goes dormant for the fall and winter. It produces no seed but can be propagated by division during the fall or by planting the small bulbils (mini bulbs) that are produced in the axils of the leaves. These should be cared for as would other young seedlings.[/quote]
greenjay
Centennial, CO
(Zone 5b)

September 11, 2006
4:21 AM

Post #2711204

Can you overwinter these seedlings in a container?
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 11, 2006
5:24 AM

Post #2711301

Guess I forgot to include that caveat about tigers, as it is often a general term. My "including tigers" was a mistake of mine. I knew what was being discussed.

Species must possess the ability to produce seed. It is part of the definition of being a species. Of course, that does not mean seed production must be yearly, or even every decade. Think of century plants, or bamboo.
inanda
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 2b)

September 12, 2006
3:31 AM

Post #2714583

Greenjay (IS there a greenjay)?

Your bulbils would be much happier in the ground. Could you plant them in a pot and then sink the pot in the ground -well marked- for the wnter? I've never kept bulbils over the wnter in the house. Another idea is that you could plant them in a ziplock baggie with good growing material (peat moss would do) and then put the baggie in your fridge for the winter. That way they should be quite happy. When you bring the bag out in the spring they should start growing fairly soon. When you see growth, you could pot them up or plant out an area when they wont need to be moved for a couple of years. They would be hapier in the shade for at least the first year when they are such babies.

I do save daylily seeds in a ziplock baggie in the fridge till January, when I start them off in pots. Maybe I'll collect some bulbils and see how they fare in the fridge for a few months.
inanda
greenjay
Centennial, CO
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2006
4:02 AM

Post #2725179

Well I'm not imaginary, so I guess there IS a greenjay.

PotEmUp

PotEmUp
Fremont, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 15, 2006
2:03 PM

Post #2725977

Yes, inanda, there is a Green Jay http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i4830id.html
In fact, there appear to be more than one. ;-}
Moby
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2006
5:13 PM

Post #2726619

I never knew! Quite pretty.
greenjay
Centennial, CO
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2006
3:26 AM

Post #2728321

in re: Mexican Green Jay

I got my nickname after a long collecting trip with some ornithologists from the Field Museum. Someone thought my laugh sounded like La urraca verde, and it stuck. "Urraca " has another meaning in spanish, which made it more amusing. I have had the same online name since 1987.
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 17, 2006
1:31 AM

Post #2730873

Hmmm. I only come up with "magpie" in google and my own spanish dictionary.

What could it possibly be . . .
greenjay
Centennial, CO
(Zone 5b)

September 17, 2006
1:42 AM

Post #2730911

Urraca is slang for an unpleasant woman. The english correlate is not permitted on DG.
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 17, 2006
11:23 AM

Post #2731800

Well, I guess that closes this chapter of: Fun With Language

Tune in next time when . . .
BoopsieTN
McMinnville, TN

September 25, 2010
6:16 AM

Post #8119988

When the tiger lily bulbets are planted, will the produce blooms the 1st year? If not how long will it take?
Sunshines2day
Lubbock, TX
(Zone 7a)

October 28, 2010
6:38 PM

Post #8182147

I'm so glad to see this post with the pictures. I've got bunches of these on 2 lilies and thought they were buds til the leaf emerged.

What do I do with them? Should I wait til the host plant starts to go dormant and cut off the top and plant the entire top or separate the individuals and plant them separately?

Also would like to know what you folks recommend about whether or not to cut the stems to ground at some times or let them die down naturally. This is my first season ever to have lilies and I have enjoyed them tremendously.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 29, 2010
3:17 AM

Post #8182558

I cut mine to within 4 inches of the ground at this time of year.
The lily bulbs have been storing food for the next season , since they stopped blooming in July-August.
We have the Red Lily Beetle here, and while they are probably in the ground already, I dont like to see the lily stems left to spread the voraceous eaters.
I will drench bulbs in spring, when they emerge about April here in the northeast.
Moby
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

October 29, 2010
5:50 AM

Post #8182725

Lilies should always be left to die back naturally. I still have a few that are green but they've done their job for the year so they'll be cut soon. As mentioned above, I leave about 4" so I know where to expect lilies next year.

I'm so glad you've enjoyed your new lilies. :)

This message was edited Oct 29, 2010 7:51 AM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 29, 2010
5:59 AM

Post #8182732

Thanks Moby.
My green ones were cut last week along with the pretty ones that turn yellow.
I also leave a spike so I can tell where to expect them in the spring.
A word of caution tho, last spring I was cleaning dead spikes and snapped off a lily that was emerging up thru the center of the dead spike.
I am an amature as you can tell ,just mentioned this so others dont make the same mistake.
Moby
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

October 29, 2010
3:09 PM

Post #8183672

I'm sorry Boopsie and SS2D, your first question wasn't answered...

What you have growing along the above-ground stem are called bulbils. They can be pulled off gently and planted shallowly, with a bit of the leaf above the soil. Next year they should produce a spindly stem and maybe a bloom or two at the top. The following year should give you a decent sized stem.
Sunshines2day
Lubbock, TX
(Zone 7a)

October 29, 2010
4:11 PM

Post #8183804

Thanks everyone. It sure is nice to be able to count on some folks for quick solutions.

ladyslipper8744
Monson, MA

July 20, 2011
2:35 PM

Post #8704344

Have had problems with those 'lily' beatles and put down some systemic insecticide that lasts all season and it has worked great, also use this Bayer systemic insecticide on my perennial hibiscus and now have healthy leaves all season!

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