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Antiques and Collectibles: Big Old Bottle

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Forum: Antiques and CollectiblesReplies: 25, Views: 583
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billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2006
2:14 PM

Post #2722036

This was in an old garage attic. We took it to the carwash to clean up the inside. It stands about 25'' tall and is about 14'' across. The opening is 3 1/8'' with a 3/8'' rim. It's very heavy empty! It has just the slightest green tint when you look at the opening. Like a Ball canning jar. My Dad has one a bit smaller. (The cat is optional, laugh!)

The lettering on the bottom says MCAG STD That's in a semicircle.
In the center it says 13 G and under that, 1936.

We thought maybe an old wine making bottle.

Thumbnail by billyporter
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terri1948
Yorkshire

September 14, 2006
5:45 PM

Post #2722754

I could well be very wrong about this, but somewhere in my mind I'm thinking of battery acid storage jars. Here in UK when I was very young I seem to remember big, heavy glass jars with a greenish tinge that were used for acid for wireless (before they became radios) batteries. We had a big old garage in our village and everyone went there to get their batteries topped up...the memory is very hazy because I'd have only been very young at the time and maybe USA didn't have such primative things, LOL.
As I say, I could be wrong but those jars were the first thing I thought of when I saw your picture, and that was before I read that it was found in a garage attic.

Terri

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2006
9:28 PM

Post #2723482

Very interesting. I'll have to ask my Dad. Thanks!
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 14, 2006
11:28 PM

Post #2723825

looks like your cat is kissing the bottle. lol
Hemental
Waynesboro, MS
(Zone 8a)

September 15, 2006
12:25 AM

Post #2724009

I think they are called demijohns [sp] They were used for transporting corrosive chemicals as stated by Terri.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2006
12:03 PM

Post #2725681

Wow, I am always amazed at how fast mysteries get solved on Dave's.

Thank you! I'm so happy to have a use and name to go on!

ROTFL! I never noticed that Zoe is about to give it a smooch! When He was little, I actually covered the opening, because at 5 weeks he and his brother could have gotten into the bottle.

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 21, 2006
12:58 PM

Post #2745204

It is called a carboy, and was used for shipping acids or other corrosive liquids. A special pouring rack was needed for dispensing because of the weight of the full carboy. Once worked in a university supply center and had the task of emptying those into smaller containers for the labs. They do make fine fermentation tanksd for home wine production!!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 22, 2006
5:03 PM

Post #2749157

They were contained in a well built wooden frame when shipped.
Bernie
Hemental
Waynesboro, MS
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2006
6:38 PM

Post #2749454

OK What is the difference between a carboy and a demijohn.Is it size,shape,thickness,type crate/pallet or what.I used to see them
in boxcars when I worked for a railroad many tears ago..
Terri1948
Yorkshire

September 23, 2006
7:54 AM

Post #2751370

That's it, Patrob!! I knew it was called by another name besides demijohn but just couldn't think of it. Thanks for jogging my memory :)
I think...but not sure, that the demijohns are made specially for home brewing. I used to make wine a few years ago and could purchase clear glass for making white wine and brown glass for the red. You fitted them with a special cork and airlock to stop the vinegar flies/fruit flies getting into the bottle during fermentation and spoiling the wine.
Wow! You could make lots of wine in that carboy, but I wouldn't want to be the one to clean it out after it had contained acid :(

Terri

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 23, 2006
6:37 PM

Post #2752371

Thanks everyone. I'm amazed that so many have seen them. I haven't found a picture of this one yet. Been too busy! I think this one may be more like the carboy. The demijohns are pretty and seem to be all shapes and sizes. This has been interesting! I hope people keep adding their stories! I did see the wine making stopper on a website.
Hemental
Waynesboro, MS
(Zone 8a)

September 24, 2006
8:53 PM

Post #2755533

If it contains acid do not put water in it until all the acid is drained.You can slowly pour acid in water but not water in acid.Water to acid may create a reaction and could explode..

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 28, 2006
9:27 PM

Post #2767646

Now you tell me! We've had it for a quite a few years now. DH took it to the carwash to get the inside clean when we first found it. I guess we were lucky it was dry. No idea what it may have held. I don't remember smelling anything.

We also had the idea it may have held embalming fluid, but I don't remember why we thought that. We didn't even have internet then, to do research. Just the old Sears catalogue and a couple of antique books.
Terri1948
Yorkshire

September 28, 2006
9:41 PM

Post #2767694

I would imagine all traces of acid (if that's what had been inside it) would have been long gone billyporter. I think lots of people use them as indoor bottle gardens now. They can be planted up, using long handled tools and a lot of dexterity, and make gorgeous ornaments. They seldom need watering when planted because it creates a kind of eco-system and the water evaporates onto the bottle walls and runs down to rewater the plants. They're lovely when planted up with ferns and prayer plants and anything that likes a humid atmosphere.
Just a little idea of what you could use it for :)

Terri

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 28, 2006
10:10 PM

Post #2767774

Laugh, I'm looking for wine! We planted 5 grapevines hoping to try a batch. I don't know that we will trust the bottle tho. We have a plastic container that was a kit.

Planting in a bottle that large would be really neat! Almost like you could walk into it.
Magpye
NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2007
12:37 PM

Post #3092627

Whew! What a wee, old, glass jug, Sal !! .. (hee)

Some mitey interesting info and history to be read - about ALL sorts of shtuffs! ..

But, Sal .. I'm certainly curious, now .. about your old (resource) books you've mentioned above ..
Quoting:Just the old Sears catalogue and a couple of antique books.

... would love to see more info about the 'old' Sears catalogue and the others. Ya got any titles, dates of publication, etc. on the 'antique' books? Do ya gots some pitters, even -?- (hee)

I remember that my Momma had kept a Sears Roebuck catalogue for a small forever; very old, extremely thin paper printed b&w pages .. with several missing. At some point, it had gotten sopping wet (somehow) .. and was eventually trashed. (out house use, I'd presume .. hee). Can't help but wonder if it was one that my Daddy had actually used during his gunsmithing days.

Some mail-order 'history' ..
Quoting:The catalogs continued to develop through the 1890s and throughout the majority of the next century. They provide an invaluable record of material culture of American life by showing us what people needed in everyday life and what they wished for in their everyday dreams. The Sears catalogs are a vast diary of the times and provide a glimpse into the not so distant past of our ancestors. They also are a record of American progress and technological advances. The catalogs were fondly referred to as "The Farmer's Bible" and "The Nation's Wish Book," and are considered collectors items today as well as valuable resources for scholarly research.

> http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/acs/1890s/sears/sears5.html

- Magpye

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2007
8:01 PM

Post #3094079

HI Magpye!

I'll have to look for the catalogue. It's a reproduction. I wish it was the real deal. I know I have two reference books. One might be packed away as I needed the bookshelves to put my canned goods this year.

This one is: ''The New and Revised Catalog of American Antiques.'' Copyright 1980. 373 black and white pages with a very few color. It has furniture, glass, pottery, tools, toys, weathervanes postcards and a whole lot more. DD has my camera right now, but I can try to find the other books and get all three photographed.

Thanks for making me look. I saw books I forgot about.
plantladylin
South Daytona, FL
(Zone 9b)

March 13, 2007
9:18 PM

Post #3277937

Wow! That is one Nice Bottle! Oh, how I would love that for planting as a Terrarium ... I'm sure I could find a spot for it!

Thumbnail by plantladylin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #3278642

I saw an old milk bottle today. Gonna go back tomorrow and buy it if it hasn't been snatched up yet. It was cool.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2007
7:15 PM

Post #3281236

Wow Plantladylin!! That is quite an accomplishment! I love your collection too!

Pepper, I have a couple milk bottles too. Quarts. They're tucked away somewhere.

Magpye, I still need to find those books.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 14, 2007
7:49 PM

Post #3281312

Milk bottles are my personal collectibles. I have quite a few.
Bernie

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2007
8:07 PM

Post #3281356

I have our old metal milkbox. I don't think any lettering is left. I'll have to think of the name of the milk we got. And get a picture even if it's nothing fancy. It sits on my back porch.
Janett_D
Gamleby
Sweden
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2007
7:29 PM

Post #3284932

Its not Demijohns, The rounded that are for making vine is called Damejeanne. named after a very well rounded Dame (Madam)in france called Jeanne. its pronounced Damm eŽ chann same A sound as in Notre Dame.
Here you have two different looking ones.
Janett

Thumbnail by Janett_D
Click the image for an enlarged view.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2007
7:42 PM

Post #3284979

Thanks Janett, I had fun pronouncing everything :))

Those are neat examples. Are they yours?
Janett_D
Gamleby
Sweden
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2007
7:51 PM

Post #3285000

I have had the one to the left but sadly not any more. The other one I found on the net but I wanted to show how a nice a damejeanne looks like when its made to hold red wine.
Janett

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2007
8:31 PM

Post #3285130

Aawww, that was my favorite. They really have a lot of neat shapes.

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