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Cottage Gardening: Annuals in the Cottage Garden

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ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 21, 2006
2:31 PM

Post #2933657

I would like to talk about Annuals mixed into the cottage garden.

What kind, and why?

How do you plant them, single plants, scatter seeds, start your own seeds and then plant here and there.

And of course pictures for your Annual - Perennial combos if you have them.

Thanks,
Chris
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 21, 2006
2:45 PM

Post #2933722

Chris, the answer is -- yes.

I can't post pics as, having bought the house in late spring I barely have anything to talk about. I think deciding on color and height is about the most important decision. Then, it would depend on what you already have. You mainly want to fill in spaces -- a sprig of zinnias here, some marigolds there. I'm putting in a swath of daffodils, and think I will scatter zinnia seeds over them -- keep the color going, that sort of thing. It's not the best advice, but I'm still in R and D, myself. Start with what you like, and adjust it to what you have.

This year, before the fenceline shrubbery will get big enough to do what it's supposed to, I will probably plant peas or pole beans behind the shrubs. It will fill the space, add color, and feed me.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2006
3:32 PM

Post #2933869

Great thread, Chris, and I'm doing my cottage garden with annuals, one bed soley annuals, but won't start until next year, so I have absolutely nothing to share. I have a daffodil bed and dig into it every year and can't have any perennials in it (I also don't want those big root systems). I could probably have bienniels.

Some annulas do best when you throw the seed out -- they are marked in the Thomp[son-Morhan catalog as "Hardy Annual". Larkspur, poppies, alyssum...there are a bunch of them. You could wintersow them, ut on DG it's easy to end up with 1/4 cup of seed by doing trades and if you have that much seed, youcan direct sow.

Here are a couple of things I think I know: Orange Cosmos --aka Bright Lights -- is absolutely the earliest plant you can grow from seed to bloom. It would be easy to use this after the poppies, I think.

Zinnias don't get mildew under some circumstances: If they are sown late -- say June 15 here in Z 5, or if they are deadheaded (or used as cut flowers) and the soil kept moist in the dog days of summer. At my house, overhead watering is a myth, and so is close planting. I threw out seed and some of the zinnias were 2" apart.

When annuals are grown with perennials and you let them reseed, you have to look critically at the seedlings the following year and pull out the ones that are in the wrong place. Using them for cut flowers is the easiest way to do this since often times you don't know they are in the wrong place until they bloom!

Plant perennials with plenty of room between them, but plant annuals really close together. I know this, but I am not sure HOW close I can get. If the package says 9-12 inches, do I use 8-9 inches? Or 6"? I ran into a flower yesterday in my seed stash -- Celosia cockscome (Celosia cristata) to use as a cut flower and they say 2-3" apart! Yay looks like I can use a lot of seed for a small patch.

Visually, I like annuals to be in a drift the same size, or a little larger, than the size of the perennials nearby.

One combination I had last year that was to die for was giant hybrid Trumpet Lilies in whites/creams fronted by tall orange cosmos... it was gorgeous and so fragrant it made the jasmine seem just so-so.

Another combination was oriental lilies and Orienpets with the Oriental colors or maroon and white with a tall dahlia that was purple & white. There are about 4 dahlias that would work as they all have the same color, but the one I have sent a picture of is called Mystery Day. One of the lilies closest was 'Silk Road', but the others also picked up on the color.

The third combination isn't so great, but I have a place with dry shade going down in a slope away from my patio. I need tall plants so I can see the flowers over the bushes that outline the patio. Feverfew, especially the bright green (they call it yellow) foliaged one or the double flowered one with Cleome and Adenophora comfusa (lady bells-- looks like a campanula) with those same lilies with the Oriental colors was beautiful...and if not the MOST beautiful, then it bloomed in the shade without irrigation and that's good enough! I also slipped in some dark red impatiens so when I walk around to the other side, I could see more color. The impatiens reseed, same with the cleome. The Adenophora is supposed to be invasive, but it isn't for me.

I hope other people jump in here because I know I didn't really answer your questions...right now I have some roses, some clematis, and some boring daylilies (especially compared to Lincolnitesses and Geminii's) new last year. I have systematically been getting rid of my perennials that are 7 -20 years old to start over.

Suzy






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gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 21, 2006
4:47 PM

Post #2934038

Suzy, you know more than you think; you listed all the annuals that came to my mind and all your suggestions sound great!

I love all the self seeding annuals, even the ones that can be thugs sometimes. Forget me nots (Myosotis) are a really pretty blue that can be allowed to grow almost anywhere they show up. Last year was my first experience with them and I loved them. Hope lots of babies show up in spring! I can't find a single pic that shows them, but the shade of blue is amazing.
PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

November 21, 2006
9:59 PM

Post #2934750

Lady - I've been using annuals to try out color combinations in my perennial borders.

I am finding that some act almost like perennials, ie come back the next year, if they're close enough to the south side of the house. Like black & blue salvia, and dusty milller.

I also found that Torch Flame annual blanket flower was a better bloomer and a stronger plant for me than Fanfare perennial blanket flower. They have similar colors, dark yellow with red centers. I'll probably buy more next year, to replace the Fanfare that rotted out. They're in my front yard, and I want something that goes all summer into fall.

This is the best reason I can think of to use annuals. Long bloom time, and lots of them! :0)
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 22, 2006
1:51 AM

Post #2935489

I have been having good luck with the white alyssum that I planted a few years ago, using it as a boarder, it has been reseeding on it's own and I like the sweet smell it gives off when it is in mass. In fact I think it may still be in bloom, I'll have to post a picture if it is.

I was thinking about blue Bachelor Buttons, and Love-in-the-Mist.

I really need to get organized next spring. I fell like the garden is getting out of control.

Keep the ideas coming.

Chris
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:24 AM

Post #2935702

I like alyssum too. I mixed it with verbena along the edges of my bed last year. The Babylon series of verbena do the best for me. This is Babylon Blue. It spread about 2 ft.

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lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:33 AM

Post #2935723

I picked up a Clarkia at the farmers market this spring and really liked it. Hope it reseeds for me. It looks sad here all by itself, but I think a clump of them would be very pretty.

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lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:42 AM

Post #2935742

I like lantana too. The white in this photo is dew. I get home from work about 7:30 in the morning, so take a lot of early morning photos. The blue plant is an annual salvia called Sapphire.

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lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:48 AM

Post #2935758

Annual vinca is a favorite too because it never needs to be deadheaded.

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lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:53 AM

Post #2935769

Sonata cosmos start to bloom early and stay short and compact.

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critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 22, 2006
4:26 AM

Post #2935816

Wow, another thread with lots of lovely photos and great suggestions!

How "short & compact" is that cosmos? The regular kind of cosmos is "supposed" to get 24-30 inches tall, I think, but it gets over 5 feet tall in my yard. I'd love to find a shorter one! Is 'Sonata' a hybrid, or will it reseed?
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
4:48 AM

Post #2935846

Susan,

These pics are better than a seed catalog! This year I had the kind of Cosmos that gets over 5'0 tall and doesn't bloom. :(

Do you buy Lantana every year? Or take cuttings? Or does it come back? (Would love to hear it comes back on its own!)

The Clarkia is wonderful, too...I thought it only like cool seasons, so I always stayed away from it. What happened to yours in the hot-hot summer, presuming Lincoln gets hot-hot in the summer?

Suzy

PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

November 22, 2006
12:52 PM

Post #2936240

lincolnitess - love that blue & orange combo! The other orange flower is zinnia, right? Annual or perennial? thanks.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 22, 2006
1:25 PM

Post #2936315

Love those Sonata cosmos! I had clarkia show up in a wildflower seed mix this year and it did better than most of the others in the mix. It was in a dry area and I'd like to try it again.
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 22, 2006
2:28 PM

Post #2936463

lady, I'm thinking "out of control" is the point!

Gorgeous pics, lincoln!

Illoquin, admittedly a different zone, but lantana won't quit down here. Butchering them seems to make them happy! I have stuck a sprig in dirt and gotten whole new shrubs. As long as there is a little bit left of it, you'll have a new one come summer.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 22, 2006
2:34 PM

Post #2936474

A friend of mine in CA was getting "into" Clarkia a couple of years ago, and I think he said he thought "dry" was the key to being able to grow them... we decided they probably wouldn't fare well in MD's humidity.
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
3:02 PM

Post #2936563

The Sonata cosmos get about 2" tall. I don't see anyplace that they are listed as a hybrid. I did same some seeds this year from the hot pink one and am going to try growing them again next year. One year I grew the white ones in my back raised bed and really enjoyed them too. I don't grow too many because they do need deadheading to keep blooming and that can time consuming. Here is a photo of the different colors they come in.

http://www.parkseed.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/StoreCatalogDisplay?storeId=10101&catalogId=10101&langId=-1&mainPage=prod2working&ItemId=0613

The Clarkia bloomed for at least a month before it dried up. I'm not sure if it dried up due to the head or the fact that I let it go to seed. I'm hoping it reseeds around the tall lilies I have in that bed. Annies Annuals in California has lots of different types of Clarkia. I never tried it before, but talked to a lady at the farmers market that grow a lot of it and says it does fine for her.

Lantana is an annual here. I did try to take some cutting this fall, but they all died. i like them because of their late bloom and use them to weave in and out of the daylilies after they have stopped blooming. Has anyone grown them from seed?

The orange plant with the blue salvia is Flammendes Katchen Helenium. I moved it this fall, so hope I did not kill it.

susan
PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

November 22, 2006
3:28 PM

Post #2936630

Oh thanks, I love it! I hope it makes it for you too.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
5:14 PM

Post #2936908

Durn it! I was so hoping lantana was hardy there (cuz then it would be hardy here.)

You know that Babylon verbena picture? I have some stuff that looks like it, is your hardy? I covered mine with a boatload of leaves to try to over winter it. I doubt ine is Babylon -- would be a long shot.

The only thing I can keep over winter are bulbs, corms & tubers.

Suzy
lincolnitess
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2006
6:06 PM

Post #2937064

The Babylon verbena is not hardy here. I tried to take some cutting of it this fall too, but they all dried up. There is one type of verbena that is hardy here, I think it is called Canadian verbena, but I don't like it very well. Usually end up buying 5 or so of the potted verbena each spring. Sure wish I did better with taking cuttings. The verbena only come in indivual pots. Would be nice if they could be bought as small plants in 6 packs.

This message was edited Nov 22, 2006 6:25 PM
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 22, 2006
10:29 PM

Post #2937661

I like lantana. I buy one every year, I'm going to try rooting cutting so I can have it growing more places. Another I buy each year is helitrope, the purple annual one that smells so good, but this spring I want to start seeds in the basement, so I can also have it more places.

I want to get some coleus, too. Start some from seed and then take cutting of the ones I like, they are so easy to root. And instant color! I also like one or two in my combo container planter.

Chris
PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

November 22, 2006
11:54 PM

Post #2937848

I've saved some cuttings from both, hope they make it for me. The front porch is sunny, but unheated.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

November 26, 2006
6:44 PM

Post #2945494

Was outside today, boy is it beautiful out, just sweatshirt weather. Here is a picture of my sweet alyssum. still blooming after Thanksgiving.

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Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

November 26, 2006
11:48 PM

Post #2946221

Lady, It was great here, too. I got an enormous amount of season finishing done, and for the frst time in a long time, I am finishing with leaves and planting on Thanksgiving weekend! Of course all that means is I have time to run to the garden center to buy more bulbs at 50% off, but I suppose that's not all bad. LOL!

I hope everybody saw the www.seedman.com sale. He has fertilizers, coir and all kinds of things besides seeds.

Also, there is a 60% off rose and clematis sale. Somebody in the CG forum advised me to get Clematis for my CG, so I bought 4 of them. The shipping is outrageous if you only buy 1-2 things, but as you add, it seems to get cheaper (not really, but the cost to ship, per plant, is drastically reduced.) www.merrygro.com. Unfortunately, I have no idea what to do with them over winter and people on the rose forum all seem to have different ideas: plant them, put them in the garage & put them inside the house are the 3 main ideas right now.

Suzy





PrairieGirlZ5
Thornton, IL

November 27, 2006
12:40 AM

Post #2946358

Well the other is send them here, along with the other goodies, Mwha hahaha!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 21, 2008
4:31 PM

Post #5915009

Thought I would try to resurrect this wonderful thread... Thanks for all of the wonderful photos and great information.

Also wanted to add a link to a book which may be of interest to those thinking of CG Annuals - Clive Lane's Cottage Garden Annuals: Grown from Seed for Summer-Long Colour. I just happened upon it while visiting the British CG Society's web page and ordered it for a steal on Amazon. Haven't actually read it yet though.

er, that link: http://www.amazon.com/Cottage-Garden-Annuals-Summer-Long-Colour/dp/0715304291

This message was edited Dec 22, 2008 10:06 AM
PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:03 PM

Post #5918370

Here's one example of an annual. This is blue Bacopa that I just threw in the border this year. What a surprise! It flowered well into mid Autumn. It looked great just rambling amongst the other flower stems.

The next photo is the white Bacopa in a traditional hanging setting.

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:03 PM

Post #5918372

White Bacopa, Red pointy Geranium, Sweet Potato 'Blackie'.

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:09 PM

Post #5918392

This is my daughter's garden (that I maintained). There are Bachelor's Buttons, Marigolds, Poppies, and a few other jumbled items.

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:12 PM

Post #5918402

Larkspur on the left, red Flanders poppies on the right. (edit: yellow/orange in the middle is African daisy.)

This message was edited Dec 22, 2008 10:27 AM

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:17 PM

Post #5918417

Candytuft with mini roses.

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:25 PM

Post #5918446

Here's Nicotiana (flowering tobacco) and Bachelor Buttons. Nicotiana is one of my all-time faves - it is one of the night-scented ones - heavenly!

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 22, 2008
3:29 PM

Post #5918465

Chris, thanks for asking about annuals - I enjoyed taking a stroll through my garden via photos!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 22, 2008
3:34 PM

Post #5918486

Oh, what a precious garden for your daughter, Primrose! I love it & methinks it shall grow a wonderful gardener. ;)
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2008
5:53 PM

Post #5922161

I definitely have lots of annuals. Sweet allysum can be a perennial here, they are still blooming in areas of my yard. I let the poppies, cosmos, zinnia, and larkspur reseed and just pull the ones I don't want in the spring. That way I don't have to worry about saving seeds and planting. The more done by Mother Nature the better my yard looks I think! Annuals fill in around the perenials and give the garden a lush look with different pops of color at different seasons and times.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

December 24, 2008
2:15 PM

Post #5924515

I did a bit of experimenting with Ornamental sweet potato vines as a ground cover in the garden. I think they turned out pretty well. However some one made a comment on another thread that hers self rooted along the vine and was growing all over the place. I'm thinking a bit of a controlled trimming would help out that situation.
Sorry I don't have a better picture to show the over all effect. But I think they add to the lushness of the garden.

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PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 24, 2008
3:10 PM

Post #5924679

I think they would look lovely as a ground cover. I dug up this photo from a few years ago of a neglected pot. It was so interesting how it just rambled around.

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TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 25, 2008
3:11 PM

Post #5927062

do you all overwinter your SPV? I have both the blackie and margarite in pots in the house trying to overwinter. Even the smallest plant will grow tremendously if given the chance.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

December 25, 2008
3:34 PM

Post #5927133

[quote]do you all overwinter your SPV?[/quote]
Yes! Do both ways, over winter the plants that I have in pots in the summer & dig up and save the tubers from the large pots I can't bring into the house.
I am trying to overwinter a Tri-colored that I bought last year, out of 5 cutting I still have 3 growing, keeping fingers crossed. Some one said that the tri-colored tubers do not come true the next season, I think I saved some of thoses too, so will see for myself.
The 2 I have pictured above are from plants I bought in 2007.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 25, 2008
4:04 PM

Post #5927206

Great thread...

PrimRose... great photos.

At my old house, where i grew up - then lived with my DH and kids for 12 yrs ... i had perennial gardens, then i did not have to add to it every year... it was well established, do i had color from spring til late fall.

When we moved here, 7.5 yrs ago ... i wanted to do the same, though it was a new house, so we started with only what i brought over from my other house [which it turned out, was not enough ... plus the new owner yanked out most of my plants]

With the extra property i have behind my home ... i have a lot more room to play, and since i 'found' Daves, and all it has to offer ... I have gotten back into annuals. With seed trading - i have gotten plants i have never heard of before.
Some of my new favorites are Celosia and Amaranthus ... though there are many others.

I got some neat annuals in the Summerhill Co-Op that i am very excited to get sowing.

OH - and another thing..i have a new appreciation for Marigolds. As a kid, i always found them boring... now i LOVE them. So many different varieties and they add such a variety of colors and heights ... ya just never know what you are gonna get.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

December 26, 2008
11:13 PM

Post #5930711

Wrightie, Just wanted you to know I ordered a copy of CG Annuals - Clive Lane's Cottage Garden Annuals: Grown from Seed for Summer-Long Colour. from Amazon, A Christmas present to me ha ha. $6.00 that included shipping. It will help me pass away the rest of winter dreaming about my summer garden.
Chris
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 26, 2008
11:25 PM

Post #5930758

That's about what I paid, too, LadyG! I'm still waiting for my copy to arrive, but am looking forward to it for the same reasons as you! ;>)
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

December 26, 2008
11:48 PM

Post #5930813

I did not see an entry for the book in DG bookworm, guess it is up to us to write a review of the book, hope it has lots of pictures ; ^ )

I refer to the Well Tended Perennial Garden book a lot, got a few helpful tips out of it.
PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2008
2:28 AM

Post #5931399

Liz, I take cuttings from my SPV's - in water they root like crazy!
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2008
12:31 AM

Post #5941364

Wrightie, The book showed up today, I just paged through it quickly, can wait to see what it has to offer.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
12:44 AM

Post #5941420

LOL, I'm still waiting for mine!
TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2009
2:59 PM

Post #5951319

I tired cuttings from a friend on the tri color - not successful at all - all died. HOwever, the margarite and balckie are growing like mad in pots inside. I will have enough to start agian this spring. Thanks for the tips. I saw at HD and at Lowes new varieties/colors last year. I hope they have them again and will pop for the $6 for a gallon, considering how they grow. One gallon will be all I need.
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2009
7:02 PM

Post #5952441

I had trouble with the tricolor too. The others produced potatoes I could easily save and take many cuttings from in spring. Never got a tuber from the tricolor though, and couldn't keep it growing over winter either.
TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2009
9:42 PM

Post #5953068

thanks - always good to have validation that it wasn't necessarily something you did wrong.

Lizzy
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #5953767

And isn't it typical too, that its my favorite one that does that! lol
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 2, 2009
1:38 AM

Post #5954278

I still have 3 tri color cuttings hanging on for dear life in the basement under lights. I'll let you all know if they make it. 5 more months to go before they can go out side. I just hate winter ; (
PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2009
6:46 PM

Post #5956999

I hate winter, too! But I wonder how much we wouldn't get done around the house without it? LOL!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2009
8:50 PM

Post #5957515

That's true, PrimroseSue - why just the other day I cleaned up all my gardening stuff in the basement, washed all the pots and stacked them, sorted out my seeds . . . you didn't actually mean housework, did you????? ^_^
PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #5957547

Chuckle, chuckle! I cleaned my indoor potting shelving and reorganized my craft stuff! But all the Christmas dec's are still up - I suppose I should take them down this weekend, before home school starts up again Monday.
dividedsky
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

January 3, 2009
9:14 PM

Post #5961704

Illoquin/Suzy - so sorry to hear that your cosmos didn't bloom. I planted some Burpee cosmos seeds, and they seemed to take forever to bloom. But they were spectacular, especially the pink seashell cosmos. I might have some leftover seeds around here if you can't find any this year and want to try again.

You're right - shipping and handling does get a bit pricey if you're ordering only one or two things. And sometimes you get more than you need. I'm looking at some beautiful stuff in a Select Seeds catalog. The seeds seem to be reasonably priced, but many come with several hundred in a pack. So if I order from there, I'll have to find someone to share them with and/or a community garden to donate to.

There are a handful of Indianapolis DGers here, so maybe we could combine some of our orders this season to save on shipping and stuff. I have no idea what I'm getting, at the moment, but I'm definitely dreaming of sunshine and things that grow and bloom.

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cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2009
12:28 PM

Post #5964088

Interesting on the cosmos not blooming. I usually get early and fall blooms from them so I had thought they would do great in a short season garden. By that I mean they come up and bloom early, reseed and those come up and bloom in the fall.

I just got my decorations down, but not all put away. I am trying to pare down my stuff and organize it so it will be less work to put up and take down next year. Funny how we seem to get more and more each year!
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 4, 2009
2:53 PM

Post #5964411

I heard Cosmos prefers poor soil. I grew some in my corner garden one year, they were lush and green, but did not set any buds, by late fall I ended up pulling them out as frost was predicted and I would have an ugly mess on my hands.
I had been amending the soil in that garden with compost so I think the soil was too rich for them to set buds.
dividedsky
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #5964457

I've been reading this forum and the Shady Gardens forum and decided what to plant around a large tree - lettuce! Along with some shade-loving flowers, of course. Lettuce bolts in the heat, so what better natural shade than a big old oak? And there are so many pretty varieties; I think it will look nice. Can't wait to try this out.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2009
3:49 PM

Post #5964591

indy_v, I think that the lettuce is a good idea, indeed. Something to be mindful of, should you intend to eat that lettuce, is all of the pollen/debris that falls from the Oaks in the Spring right around the time when the greens are ready to go into your salad. I only mention it because I have lots of Oaks and I grow lettuce in a small veggie patch near the drip line of one of my Oaks. Sheesh, it's hard to get it all out when I wash the lettuce! ;)

Of course, it won't be a problem if you don't eat it or if you cover it before it gets messy.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 4, 2009
4:01 PM

Post #5964629

Wrightie, did you get your book? I started reading it and so far I give it a 2 thumbs up!
dividedsky
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2009
4:01 PM

Post #5964632

Oh, good to know. You think I could get it off with a salad spinner, or is it too sticky?

Thanks for the comment. I'm moving into this place at the end of the month, so I'm not familiar with this particular tree's details.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2009
4:20 PM

Post #5964680

I use a salad spinner and that doesn't get it all -- ugh! I can get most of it by just soaking the leaves in a big bowl of water and it floats to the top, but never seems to get out all of it.

I love the Oaks, but they also frustrate me because they are always dropping *stuff* - pollen, branches, bark, squirrels nests, acorns ... Acorns, when dropped from 60 feet, HURT. =)
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2009
4:22 PM

Post #5964686

LG, my book *finally* arrived on Friday, but I haven't looked at it yet. I'm so glad that you like it. The cover looks nice. heh
PrimroseSue
Medway, MA
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2009
7:10 PM

Post #5965320

[quote]cactuspatch: I am trying to pare down my stuff and organize it so it will be less work to put up and take down next year. Funny how we seem to get more and more each year![/quote]

I started doing mine yesterday. I'm also trying to minimize some of mine. Especially since my tastes have changed over the years.

Because you can get ornaments so cheap these days, dd and I were doing a different color theme each year for a while. Even with a barn we ran out of storage space! It was fun, but very impractical. Now I stick to my favorite colors: red and white!
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2009
8:28 PM

Post #5965668

I have planted lettuce all over my front courtyard, especially in areas with more shade and had pretty good luck with it once I realized the cottontails were scooting in by the side gate to munch on it. We blocked that entrance and IF I remember to plant it--it does pretty well here except in the heat of summer. No biggie, I can buy lettuce in August. ; )

Yeah Primrose Sue I did the same thing with buying/ and making too many different ornaments. I am donating many of the decorations except for old family ones or those we made to the local Sal. Army resale shop. Just takes time to get through them all! LOL!
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

June 1, 2010
10:49 AM

Post #7848768

Is that beautiful verbena from starter plants or did you start them from seeds yourself? I love that color and would love to know where you found it. Don't recall seeing any of that color or series around here. I live in Md. near DC.area. Zone 7. I love the alyssum and verbena combo. Nice!
pgt
Chalfont, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 6, 2010
12:18 PM

Post #7864179

I haven't read through all of these yet, but my favorite annual for a cottage garden is larkspur.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2010
1:15 PM

Post #7864342

i finally have Larkspur babies... so i will know, hopefully next year, what everyone is talking about.

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