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Japanese Maples: Transplanting a neighbor's JM

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Forum: Japanese MaplesReplies: 26, Views: 216
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garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 25, 2006
9:31 PM

Post #3024694

I am a tree neophyte that would appreciate some advice in transplanting a 5 -6 foot unnamed JM from a neighbor's yard (about 6 blocks away) to mine. Is it possible tfor such a successful transplant? if so, when would be an optimal time? Currently the ground is not frozen and the JM has been in that site for at least 6-7 years. I have a perfect sheltered site for it to receive morning sun and for optimal gardening pleasure. If it is a lost cause, they plan to "chop it down and dump it" Thanks in advance!
Davidsan
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2006
10:51 PM

Post #3024778

HUMMMM I was just gonna lightly kick ya about NOT looking at previous posts since this was just covered last week HUMMMMM that thread is MIA... hey Todd or anyone else am I blind or is it gone ..oh where oh where I think it was titled "am I just waiting my time" or something like that ... any ideas where it went ???? David
Davidsan
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 25, 2006
10:54 PM

Post #3024782

OOOPS my bad ...I shouldn't post after doing 30 mins. 8 miles on my airdyne ...it was at the garden web ...this should get you there and keep ME at least from repeating stuff ..David

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/maple/msg1215210732560.html?11
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 25, 2006
11:09 PM

Post #3024796

Thanks a million, David~ of course I searched for the answer before I posted. LOL! ..The notes from the link are written in my garden journal and I will set up a date with burlap and DH in hand and rescue my neighbor's JM. Merry Christmas!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 27, 2006
8:35 PM

Post #3028822

I've done it and it does work. JM's are pretty hardy. But then there isn't much I haven't transplanted. I've even done small magnolias and they are notorious for hating their roots fooled with. They do cut the roots on the Bonsai trees every once in awhile after all.
Davidsan
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2006
9:10 PM

Post #3028907

Yes Doss I agree...just about everything can be moved if done so at the dormant time of the year ( and even when not dormant but there will be sufficient shock and more possibilty of injury) ...I think the biggest obstacle is the amount of work involved rather than any harm it may do the tree ;>)... You should be successful as long as enough root sytem is left and you care for it the following season cause it will definilty have a diminished root system for a larger tree therefore less ability to intake water, nutrients etc...I often have mused about myself trying to move a largrer 12 year old upright Jm that I had moved in it's smaller "self" several times in the past with NO problem ...well after about having to get out the crash pads ( 4 hours of work)...I decided it was EASIER to trim the large branches off several trees that were creating too much shade and it was comparatively a BREEZE... DON'T let anyone tell you that JM's have really small hair like roots...this is true when young and more so in pots but a 8-12 year old tree field planted will be a bear to move in most areas where it will also thrive. David
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2006
9:10 PM

Post #3028909

Thanks Doss~ it's encouraging to hear that I can expect success with the ttranspant. I'm working on the arrangements as I write. It's scheduled, according to the weatherman, to rain on Friday, so we'll try to get it before then so it can enjoy the rain in my yard! Then of course I'll take a picture after it leafs out so it can be ID'ed.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2006
9:14 PM

Post #3028915

David ~ we posted at the same time. I'm prepared for DH to dig it up according to tne info I read, we will dig about 9 times the diameter out from the tree. My contribution is to prepare the site which I've started today by gathering organic matter to mix in with the soil. Any other caveats I should consider?
Davidsan
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2006
10:38 PM

Post #3029124

Yah I saw your post ya beat me ;>0 ...Most folks "today" arn't big on amendments unless you have non suitable soil such as heavy clay sand or muck etc ...in fact many are dead set against it although i still after much reading do not know why ...it may not be neecessary but unless you import super rich manure stuff I don't feel it will hurt ...just be extra uneccesary work... If you are in kansas wheat growing area your soil should be fine as is ... Jm's don't need a really rich soil or like alot of N so if your soil is not cruddy i wouldn't amend...it will grow rather quickly out of the amended area anyway . Just make sure it is a good draining area and not near a field where you will get sprayed with round up or other herbicide...and of course the usual adadges of morning sun and afternoon shade away from strong winter winds mulch mulch mulch about 6-8" away from trunk , cage it if critter territory yatayatayata...David

This message was edited Dec 27, 2006 5:40 PM
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2006
12:57 AM

Post #3029463

Thanks David ~there is a farmer's field that halfway abuts my backyard along with a nice forest and creek. Of course the rats with 4 hooves breakfast regularly in the field then traipse off into the forest every morning. They show very little interest in my garden as well as my neighbors, now the bunnies are a different story! The soil drains quickly and I like the idea of not amending, less work for me, heehee! Just the same, appreciate everyone's advice and encouragement.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2006
2:45 PM

Post #3036169

Thanks to all for the input and advice for transplanting the JM. I started out with good intentions , but with help from the one who wanted to get rid of it, well lets say I'm praying it will survive. We received a nice soaking rain last night and we're on tap for some more rain this afternoon. After the butchering it received last night and in the past, well I hope it recovers nicely.

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Davidsan
Springfield, IL
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2006
4:27 PM

Post #3036431

It looks to have a good shape relativly...I'd probably smooth cut any broken ragged places(branches especially the top if it's broken off as it looks, of which, if I am seeing correctly, there also are a few others ( hard to tell from pic)... otherwise I think it looks fine ...if the root system is even somewhat in tact it should be fine ,...you really are likely better off with a less vigorous top ...less work for the smaller root system... from the looks of the tree the neigbor had NO biz having this tree if their was an S.P.C.T. (A.)...They might be in a little trouble ;>) David
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2006
4:42 PM

Post #3036465

Myers~ the the branches and the top were so called " pruned" by the neighbor. They really expressed distaste for the tree and couldn't understand why anyone would want such an "ugly tree"! However, in its old location it was sited in the hot afternoon sun and was badly damaged as you can see!

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garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2006
4:44 PM

Post #3036472

and the next...

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garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2006
4:45 PM

Post #3036475

and last one...

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largosmom
Newport News, VA
(Zone 7b)

December 30, 2006
10:32 PM

Post #3037289

I hope you took the pruners away too. I bet it will be just lovely in a year or two after it has had a chance to settle in and you have been able to prune it up properly.

Best of luck with it!

Laura
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

December 31, 2006
12:17 AM

Post #3037520

Thanks Laura! I'm looking forward to that day! ;0)
balvenie
Marysville, WA
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2007
8:33 PM

Post #3053257

This thread has helped a lot in salving my fears in the transplanting this morning of a small J M. Lots of rain (which we are famous for) and cool weather, along with good free-draining soil helped. The root ball came up without a lot of damage or swearing and went into its new home in the backyard in nice screened sandy soil. I was worried about having to nearly bare root it to remove grasses and weeds, but after reading the posts I believe all will be well and she will enjoy her new home next to the Coral Bark. Thank you for your very helpful information.

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garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2007
9:17 PM

Post #3053418

BOUQUETS Balvenie!
largosmom
Newport News, VA
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2007
2:51 AM

Post #3054415

It looks like it will be very happy there.

Again, good luck with your new JM, and post some pics when it gets its leaves on.

Laura
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2008
8:20 PM

Post #4965380

Here she is... finally...recovering nicely with lovely foliage!!! ...Didn't quite know how she would do... so tried to minimize the neighbor's whacked off top...Thanks again for the encouragement!

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ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 17, 2008
8:31 PM

Post #4965453

What a pretty tree! I'm glad you were able to rescue it!
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2008
9:55 PM

Post #4965751

Thank you!! ;0)
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 17, 2008
10:42 PM

Post #4965898

I'm glad that your transplant was successful. It's a cute little tree.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2008
10:53 PM

Post #4965955

Thank you! Of course thanks to all for the expert advice! I noticed the same neighbor whacking a dwarf alberta spruce the other afternoon..no not pruning.. but whacking and hacking the top off just like my recovered JM. As stated in an earlier post...we do need "an S.P.C.T.(A.)" to report him to!! ;0)
largosmom
Newport News, VA
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2008
2:47 PM

Post #4968455

Some people should not be allowed to own hedge trimmers or pruning shears, lol! Your little tree is doing great and the damage will be covered up in the leaf season at least and eventually maybe all the way.

Laura
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 18, 2008
3:31 PM

Post #4968605

LOL!!! Thanks Laura! I'm glad you all encouraged me to wait more than a year for its recovery...as this is the first season with the beautiful foliage.

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Other Japanese Maples Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
My Japanese maple Ginger_H 6 Sep 13, 2008 11:19 PM
Threadleaf Japanese Maple hczone6 6 Mar 1, 2010 1:36 AM
MY jm's that survived and thrived last winter zone 5b Davidsan 38 Feb 26, 2010 12:05 AM
Largosmom's Japanese Maples largosmom 62 Nov 22, 2007 8:55 PM
Can you tell me what kind this is? nikki_conway 23 Apr 17, 2008 1:38 AM


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