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Garden Pests and Diseases: Pests: Calling all slug experts! (Not for the faint of heart)

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candleberry
Courtenay, BC

July 29, 2001
3:32 PM

Post #9543

I'd like to know what everyone uses for slug control. Counted 53 of the beasts crossing my driveway heading for the garden this morning! I had no idea they were a herding animal.
They were all in a group and had evil little smiles on their slimy little faces.
Where I grew up it was hot and dry and a slug was this tiny little grey thing about 1/2 an inch long. Here on the west coast they range from 3inches to 8 inches or longer!
I have put beer out in spots (don't tell my husband!)and the
bowls are heaped with dead slugs the next morning, but unless I start my own brewery I could go broke...besides the dog loves beer as much as the slugs and he can't seem to leave it alone.
My Vedgies have never had the hint of chemicals on them or near them.
Any other suggestions?
Candleberry
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 30, 2001
12:48 AM

Post #102620

Zowie! sounds like you got some whoppers out there! Guess you'll hafta choose from traps (slugs hide from sunlite so you can lay out boards or the like for them to "go to bed" under then go harvest them during the day), barriers like sand, lime, ashes or diatomaceous earth...all of which need to be re-applied after rain or heavy irrigation. (Crushed eggshells last a bit longer or you can also buy a 50# bag of crushed oyster shells from a local farm/feed store. Or you can also use "permanent" barriers if your garden space is not too huge such as copper strips (they prefer not to cross copper); any metal barrier that can be inserted in the ground and sticking up about 2 inches with the top bent towards the outside of the garden at an angle. Or you could go on a nitely scavenger hunt w/flashlite and salt and season them with that...it will tend to dessicate them, and can be great fun with the right attitude! Enjoy your adventure!
candleberry
Courtenay, BC

July 30, 2001
5:11 AM

Post #102763

Thanks for some great ideas.
Oyster shells are easy to get here but I wonder if they would have an impact on the soil by leaching a lot of calcium with all our rain.
Worth looking into.
Nightly slug hunts...I forgot to mention the bear that lives in the woods just beyond the garden, I spook easily
:-) Think I will try the shells.
Candleberry

janeda
HAYWARDS HEATH, Suss
United Kingdom

August 3, 2001
11:02 AM

Post #105060

Weeelll, the big news in England to catch slugs in a friendly, organic sort of way is
BEER.
If you're teetotal, even non-alcoholic beer works. Drives 'em crazy.

My little garden seemed to be the slug metropolis and place to be for in slugs. They ate all my swiss chard, chomped my sunflowers and sloped off by dawn. Egg shells helped a bit, then I read about beer traps, then I made my own. They love it, and meet up round the rims of yoghurt pots sunk into the ground with beer in them and half-covered with a stone (then they hang upside down in the beer fumes, the little sybarites), then slide down into them. Sometimes they even get out a couple of times (!) (to go to the bathroom??) then back into the pool.

Works better than egg shells, VERY effective. Only downside is that hedgehogs live on slugs and have been known to eat the drunk ones, then they get the effects of the beer, and can't curl up quickly to protect themselves when the foxes come round... no kidding. But they used to eat the poisoned slugs and die of that, the traditional non-organic way. So I put the slugs way down in the compost heap, out of harm's way.

Plan B is egg shells for me, and Plan C is getting out there with PMS, salt cellar and a torch. Very effective, human resource use: high.

Good luck!
candleberry
Courtenay, BC

August 3, 2001
4:18 PM

Post #105180

I sure wish we had hedgehogs in Canada! I'd have the fattest ones in the world!
I do use beer in a shallow container and they belly-up to the bar very quickly and die. So far it's been the best thing I've tried. I guess between the oyster shells and the beer, it's my best bet.
Candleberry
ohiorganic
New Paris, OH

August 18, 2001
10:22 AM

Post #112215

For long term control attract toads and frogs into your garden area-make damp hiding places and have water areas. These critters love both the adults and the eggs and over a few years will make a huge impact.

In the eastern US we have lightening bugs who love to eat slug eggs

Ducks and geese also love slugs

Hand picking and tossing the slugs into a can of salt is very effective though it takes a couple of weeks to see the effect.

I have never had any success with beer traps but applying D.E or wood ash has been very effective for me, though wood ash will raise the pH of your soil a bit.
otherdave

August 25, 2001
5:33 PM

Post #115986

I would second ohio's suggestions, and add a further suggestion which works well on the west coast, and serves a couple of additional functions as well...build rock piles in the garden at key spots, and in time garter snakes will come to call them home; they are, in my experience, extremely efficient slug-eaters, and it is nice to feel one's garden provides for more than the just human needs. When placing the piles, consider where they might be most effective:

-Rock piles placed around the drip line of a tree act as condensation traps, and will drip irrigate the tree's surface roots during the day.

-Rock piles as thermal mass can greatly benefit a heat-loving crop, and again act as a stone mulch.

Alternately, one can take a more Taoist "go with the flow" approach, and rather than fighting the beasts, simply provide them with easier pickings...strategically placed piles of cut herbage will attract them, some will eat to their content, and others will be eaten to the content of snakes, toads, and the like...and suddenly, your garden begins to look more and more like an ecology, and less like a battle zone: save the beer for day's end.

Regards.
candleberry
Courtenay, BC

August 26, 2001
1:56 AM

Post #116193

I have rock beds and garter snakes. The frogs are noticable absent this year though and that is somewhat troubling. i always said that if the frogs were about then the garden was happy.

my nearest neibour is a dairy farm and this past month he has desided to clear cut the forested area behind my property and fill in a marsh. There goes the neibourhood!

He has put a lot of wild life out of their homes and I am so sad to see all the old growth cedars come down and many of my shade gardens will now be full sun.
My property is in the path of a lady bug migration and I use to get swarms of them in the early fall. I wonder if that will stop because of all this. So sad.

Anyway, back to my slugs. I certainly over plant every year so it's not so much the loss of produce but the dance i do to avoid stepping all over them in the morning and evening.

Oh well, That's part of the glory of country life.
Thanks for all your good suggestions.
I have by no means conquered but i have begun to manage.
Jen
Baa

September 9, 2001
8:18 PM

Post #124290

You could try upturned potatoes, oranges, grapefruit etc ... just pick them up in the morning and you'll find a whole bunch of slugs in there.

We don't use chemicals in the garden because of our animals and the beer, yoghurt or milk traps never worked for us either. Our best slug and snail reducers are the chickens and ducks who are allowed out of their pens for a few hours a day and watched carefully while they try and ruin the garden. No slug and snail problems this year.
John_Yeoman
Ivinghoe Beds
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

September 25, 2001
8:37 PM

Post #134365

Hate to be a heretic...

but the best way to get rid of molluscs is to mix crushed camphor (eg. moth balls) with bran.

Then lay it thickly around your plants.

'Tain't organic but my grandfather did it every year And I do it now. And it works.

Failing that, grow your plants in bottomless flower pots and smear the sides with grease (eg old cooking oil) mixed with soot or salt. That works too.

JOHN YEOMAN
Village Guild UK


This message was edited Tuesday, Sep 25th 4:38 PM
eyesoftexas
Toadsuck, TX
(Zone 7a)

January 26, 2002
5:35 PM

Post #199542

John...what exactly is in the moth balls??

"eyes"
Sis

February 1, 2002
2:50 AM

Post #202951

Contents of mothballs:camphor or naphthalene,used for repelling moths'

Naphthalene/Chem,a white,odorous,crystaline hydrocarbon.
Usually prepared from coal tar and used in making dyes and moth balls.

Camphor/A whitish,translucent,volatile and aromatic crystaline substance,obtained chiefly from the tree Cinnamomum camphora,the camphor tree,used in medicine and as an irritant and stimulant.HTH Sis'
John_Yeoman
Ivinghoe Beds
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

February 4, 2002
6:34 PM

Post #205286

Sis

I could never improve on that :)

If you don't like using camphor on your organic garden (it does horrible things to hedgehogs and other creatures, I suspect), just use bran by itself. Molluscs eat it, swell up and turn into gnocchi.

Or so I'm told...

John Yeoman
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2002
7:08 PM

Post #205304

AHAH! Someone after my own heart! I agree John!...I use wheat and rye bran (must be somewhat fine tho) for dusting my tater plants! The larval form of the potato bugs ingest it while nibbling the leaves...it mixes w/their body fluids, expands and POW!!!POP!!! Great fun to pull up a lawn chair and a cool "soda" for a bit of entertainment! Much more fun than watching the neighbors bug zapper! (ZZZZZAAAAPPPP!!! "Gee Maww, that was uh biggun!! Yuck yuck yuck...").
And now you tell me it works on slugs! I'm totally elated now! Can't wait till slug season! (Hmmm..maybe I can sell tickets at the gate!)
Brook
Richmond, KY
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2002
9:26 PM

Post #205402

Put me down for seasons tickets, Shoe.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2002
4:23 AM

Post #205629

Ha! Will give you front row seats Brook! And be sure to bring John! (I even have a BB gun we can take turns with, just to add extra entertainment!)

{EDIT}..Oh my, I just re-read the above paragraph. So sorry! HAH, it looks like I just invited Brook to take turns with me shooting a BB gun at John...NOT! I meant to say the THREE of us could take turns BB gunning swollen slugs and POP(!) them. My mind is getting weirder and my language usage is getter "worser"! I'll learn!!



This message was edited Tuesday, Feb 5th 7:00 PM
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 5, 2002
12:18 PM

Post #205700

just so I get the right thing, what kind/form of bran do I use? couldn't take smelling the mothballs though.
arne
Westbury, NY

February 6, 2002
5:19 PM

Post #206594

I make "slug bread" and find it very effective. Put 1Tbs sugar and I Tbs Yeast in a quart container. Fill 1/4 full with lukewarm water. Let mixture do its thing. When nice and bubbly add more lukewarm water to make 3/4 full. Stir or shake (depending on container you use). I set out catfood cans, filled with the slug bread mix about 1/2 full, scattered around the garden in the late afternoon. Next morning they're full of quite dead fat slugs. If the weather is fine you only have to empty the cans out once a week, or replace them is you're squeamish. And it's much cheaper than using beer which I'd rather put into me, instead of them.
John_Yeoman
Ivinghoe Beds
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2002
6:24 PM

Post #206650

Wow! I like that.

But here's an even simpler version of slug bread. Go to your favourite pub at closing time. Carry a LARGE jug. Ask for their beer slops.

Use that as bait. It's free.

Or... if you make your own beer, use the yeast slops you have to scrape off the head of the beer - as slug bait.

'Tis yeast, the critters yearn for.

Makes them seem almost human, doesn't it?

Yours, mollusc-baiting

JOHN
Sis

February 6, 2002
6:44 PM

Post #206659

John,please it's the malt at the bottom,lol' From a seasoned home brewer' :D
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2002
3:04 AM

Post #206911

DOGS! Now I need to set my alarm for when the bars close at 2 a.m...there was a day when I, well...never mind!
Linnea
Tilton, NH
(Zone 4a)

February 7, 2002
3:22 AM

Post #206917

This thread has me laughing so hard...
I remember my great grandma Ella handing my sister and I (I must have been about 8) a squirt bottle full of strong salt water and sending us slug hunting. Then, of course, we'd hang out to watch those banana slugs shrivel up and die, being bloodthirsty young ladies.
You've brought back a lot of memories, and incidentally, given my pansies a fighting chance next year.
arne
Westbury, NY

February 7, 2002
1:35 PM

Post #207021

Ooops! I forgot to mention that enough flour (usually 1/2 to 3/4 cup) should be added to the yeast /sugar mixture to produce pancake batter like consistency. Try it. Really does the job. Arne
John_Yeoman
Ivinghoe Beds
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2002
6:10 PM

Post #207178

Folks...

Whatever you do, do not bribe the neighbourhood kids to zap your slugs, and bring them to you - at the rate of one pence per slug. (Okay, maybe that's two cents, over the pond.)

Those wretched little entrepreneurs will be importing a thousand molluscs from your local community garden, into your garden, as fast as I can say 'Bill Gates'.

I speak from experience.

(In my case, it was the local cricket pitch they exploited. Be glad. You do not have cricket pitches...)

Yours, mollusc-troubled
JOHN YEOMAN
Kelly333
Longview, TX

June 23, 2002
3:07 AM

Post #288109

I heard Sluggo was good, and safe. I bought some.
Roger
Enkoping
Sweden

June 23, 2002
5:23 AM

Post #288189

try to pot as many slugs as you can find (I took 100 myself)in a pot in gasoline it will be only slime left of them then you tell them not to come to you again (if you dont succed it must be that I have only done it in swedish language) then you pot the pot in the garden so they could smell there dead friends,I grew cale and they where there in hundreds but after that they stay only 5 meters from the cale but none on the cale.here in sweden they call the spanish orange slug for murder slugs because of there hunger
but I dont have any problem with them if they come to close to my vegs I put my foot on them if they dont come to close I let them live.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


June 23, 2002
7:00 AM

Post #288217

Kelly333: We have slug problems in our moist cool climate. I, too, use Sluggo. I would consider it organic, since it is just iron phosphate suspended in some sort of oat base pellets. It is harmless to other creatures, but causes the slugs to quit feeding... gee, that breaks my heart!
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

August 28, 2002
3:42 AM

Post #340175

When I lived in western Washington state my solution to the slug problem was a shovel. Chop! One slug becomes two pieces and does not crawl any further or eat any more! I had a lot of slugs in the 2 to 6 inch range. I went hunting and counting, the first two or three days were very productive. My large yard/garden area yielded about 200 kills. About an hour before dark and an hour after daylight were the best slug hunting hours. They are canabalistic, so last night's chopped slugs were covered with newcommers feasting (disgusting!) and so the morning chopping was easier. In about 2 weeks it was hard to find anything to chop.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


August 28, 2002
5:49 AM

Post #340234

Good idea, MaryE. I carry a pair of little scissors with me when I'm out in the yard. Our slugs are not the big sort you have, so I just snip them in half when I see them.
QUEENIEBIRDD

March 18, 2003
8:39 PM

Post #493277

I use beer traps, putting the beer in plastic soda bottles laid on their side. If it rains, the beer doesn't get diluted or washed away. I also spread diatomacous earth (the stuff you put in swimming pool filters) around my plants. It doesn't hurt them, and the crawly slimers don't like to cross anything that scratches their tender little tummies.
yvana
Stone Mountain, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 18, 2003
10:05 PM

Post #514360

I had a bad problem with slugs a couple of years ago. My flower bed levels were too low, so I raised up all my flowerbeds to above ground level. I haven't had a problem since! I also heard that slugs hate "gumballs" from gum trees. You can crush them and sprinkle them around your plants and they will stay away!
Good Luck!
yvana :)
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2003
1:08 AM

Post #514457

Say what!!? You mean there is something good that comes from them ever-present gumballs!? I'm so happy to hear that I could choke a slug with my bare toes!
Thanks yvana!
yvana
Stone Mountain, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 19, 2003
1:55 AM

Post #514508

Horseshoe,
I felt the same way when I heard about it! I had been cursing the gumballs all over my yard, but now I throw them under my hosta!! yvana :)
Giorio
Nashua, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2003
3:16 PM

Post #559191

I found that by keeping the garden clean (raking and cut back some of the ground cover) I've disrupted the balance that promotes the ideal breeding ground for them.
I also go hunting at night with my 6 year old nephew, he just loves it! We pick them up with tweezers, when the tips of the tweezers get slimy, just poke the tips into the ground a few time and the slime comes off.
I've read that in England nematoes are been investigated as a potential control method...lets hope that it works
frogsrus
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2003
7:31 PM

Post #575608

You need some box turtles. Ours kept his area slug free. Gotta love those onnivores. Watching him "chase" them keeps small children amused too.
plantnutz
Austell, GA
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2003
10:37 AM

Post #580776

yvana, are you referring to sweet gum balls? I hate them almost as much as the slugs but if it works, I'd be game to try.
Brenda
yvana
Stone Mountain, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2003
1:25 AM

Post #582151

Yes, plantnutz!! We hate the sweet gum balls too, but love the sweet gum tree in our front yard. I have tried this and it works...either whole gumballs or crushed up! Why don't you try it and let me know how it works for you!
yvana :)
farmerajf

July 16, 2003
9:28 AM

Post #584550

Hi, my name is Adam. I was wondering if any of you guys or gals wouldn’t mind answering some questions on slugs, its Slug week on my website (http://redpie.co.uk) next week and I could get a few questions together from my friends we could ask, like sort of an interview. Its nothing serious they’ll just be silly questions as the website’s sort of a comical thing. If your up for it, drop me an email on farmerajf@hotmail.com
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2003
12:53 PM

Post #584601

the link didn't work farmerajf, but I'd be happy to take your 'interview'. I'm up to my eyes in slugs.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


July 17, 2003
4:04 AM

Post #585400

Me, too. Our Southcentral Alaskan town gets lots of rain and lots of slugs. I've got lots of helpful hints to offer.
farmerajf

July 17, 2003
9:27 AM

Post #585493

Thanks Much appreciated :-) I’ll get some questions together. :-)
yvana
Stone Mountain, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2003
4:41 PM

Post #585780

The link works if you take the ) off the end. Didn't see anything about slugs though.
Giorio
Nashua, NH
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2003
7:22 PM

Post #585899

All that you would ever want to know about slugs control:
http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/research/biodiversity/staff/wocs2.html
farmerajf

July 18, 2003
1:54 PM

Post #586558

Ok Ive got some Questions together. Id be really grateful if anyone could answer them and if you have a website etc you’d like me to put on the site too. The longer the answers the better. Thanks muchly. :-)

You can email any answers too if its easier: Farmerajf@hotmail.com

1. Do slugs have blood?
2. Why are slugs slimy?
3. Are slug’s really just snails without their shells?
4. Where do slugs go in the summer?
5. Would a slug eat cheese?
6. Can slugs hear?
7. Do slugs sleep?
8. Can Slugs and Snails mate?
9. Whats the longest slug you have ever seen?
10. Why does salt kill slugs?
farmerajf

July 29, 2003
9:01 AM

Post #596547

Id just like to say thank you very much for the questions answered. Very much appreciated. :-)

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

July 30, 2003
4:44 AM

Post #597660

I have read that putting out beer etc. will attract and
drown your slugs-but the smell will also call every slug
within 300 feet to come as well. We had an unusually
wet summer 3 years ago and our garden had literally hundreds
of the things (ours were the small variety). I tried
everything but was reduced to lifting every pot, rock,
etc. and hand picking the little monsters!
Laural
Madison, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 3, 2003
3:00 AM

Post #602005

Yuk, I think I'm gonna be sick! haha...I have tons of slugs, but am working on chipping away at them. I love the sweet gum ball idea! Will definately give it a try. I also grow bonsai. The copper wire I wire the trees with I wrap around the bottoms of some pots, like my geraniums and it keeps them off anything special. But in the garden... whew! THAT"S where the gum balls will go! Thanks!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


August 4, 2003
5:55 AM

Post #603656

Once again, I want to mention the Iron Phosphate pellets available under the names 'Escargot' or 'Sluggo. They are safe for use around birds, kids, pets, etc. Slugs are attracted to the pellets, but the iron phosphate in them causes their little guts to turn to mush and they quit feeding, then die. You spread it thinly around the plants they are feeding on. It even withstands a bit of rain.
Laural
Madison, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2003
10:44 AM

Post #604982

I will definately look for the "sluggo". I dont recall seeing it anywhere.
Gardener4Fun
Sweetwater, TX
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2003
1:09 PM

Post #605102

Wow - on the Biocontrol Network, you can buy 50 POUNDS of Sluggo for $135.! That should knock 'em out. Heh, heh, heh...here, sluggy, sluggy, sluggy!

http://www.biconet.com/crawlers/sluggo.html
poppysue
Westbrook, ME
(Zone 5a)


August 5, 2003
1:13 PM

Post #605107

Wal Mart carries a brand by Shultz. It's called "Garden Safe Slug and Snail Bait"... it's the same stuff as Sluggo. It runs around $7 or $8 for a 2 pound bag.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


August 6, 2003
7:33 AM

Post #606161

If you try any other product, make sure it is the iron phospate kind, since many baits are quite dangerous to other critters. I buy Sluggo from a Pleasant Valley Farms in Oregon or Washington (can't remember). Fifty lbs. is around $60, but it cost about $60 to have it shipped up to Alaska by parcel post.
Callaman
Portland, OR
(Zone 8a)

October 4, 2003
1:36 AM

Post #669439

I don't think I've heard what I use so I'll throw it in the soup. I love to go out at night with a flashlight and see what's eating and crawling around. A mixture of water and non sudsing ammonia works on my slugs, they fiz and ooze a lovely acid green, I'm sure it's a slow painful death. Be careful not to spray delicate foliage, it can burn. You folks rock my world, happy hunting!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 4, 2003
4:46 AM

Post #669770

Hi, Calliman I'll be you have some lovely little Sluggies in your neck of the woods. I used to go out of an evening and looks for he slimey little buggers, but I've lost my joy de spray or salt. I'd rather leave them a tasty meal that makes their little guts turn to goo. 'The prisoner enjoyed a last hearty meal!' Guess I'm getting too old to bend over that much!
aknapp
Cassopolis, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 16, 2003
11:18 PM

Post #683155

I have 2 places that I have put pine needles in for mulch (info from Tom Clotheirs web site) and one of the side benefits is that I have not seen a slug anywhere near any of the plants with the pine needles around them.
I can hardly wait until I can find enough more to cover the rest to see if it works on everything or if I just got lucky. This is a link to his site. Good Luck
http://tomclothier.hort.net/page24.html
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 17, 2003
5:15 AM

Post #683456

aknapp: My only concern with pine needles or spruce boughs as a mulch is the tanic acid that does along with them. If you've ever tried to grow plants under a spruce tree, you may notice that nothing much lives inside the drip line of the boughs.
aknapp
Cassopolis, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 17, 2003
11:18 AM

Post #683524

So far everything looks fine, one spot has been down for all most 2 months and the other for about 3 weeks. I only used needles that were on the ground dried out and didn't use any boughs at all. Everything I put down was all ready brown and dried. I don't know if that makes a difference or not.
So far everthing looks great I will let you know in the spring if it still looks okay.
Tom Clothier has entire beds made out of pine needles and says everything grows better than the same items grown under different conditions, so I thought I would give it a try. I just didn't have enough for a bed so decided I would use as mulch until I could collect more.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 18, 2003
5:25 AM

Post #684327

Aknapp: your growing and dormant periods are probably quite different than mine. We have lots of winter rains here, and consequently, lots of leeching. If pine or spruce needles work for you in your area, give it a try and let us know!
aknapp
Cassopolis, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 18, 2003
10:52 AM

Post #684394

Weezen, your growing sounds quite different. We don't get the winter rains here, just lots of snow. The rains would have to make it like a completley different challenge. I took pictures just before I put the needles down and another set just before I covered stuff with mulch, and I'll let you know in the spring how they look after I get them unburied.
I am hoping it works not only because I like the way it looks, but it was certainly nice not to see any slugs in there for a month or so.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 19, 2003
4:27 AM

Post #685099

Yes, Aknapp, please let me know how it goes.
aknapp
Cassopolis, MI
(Zone 5a)

October 20, 2003
10:11 AM

Post #686094

I will post in the spring as soon as I uncover everything and see how they have come through the winter.
luvdirt
Saint Charles, MO

May 19, 2004
4:02 PM

Post #876211

Thanks so much for the great information about those nasty little slugs. Practically over-night my hostas have developed tiny little holes all over them. I'm assuming that slugs are the attackers. I'm going to try the beer. I like the idea of putting it in soda bottles on their sides. That way my dog won't be intoxicated. I just joined you guys today, so this is my first message. I'm sure I'll have many more questions. Thanks!
kudzu9
Seattle area, WA
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2004
5:24 AM

Post #878039

Where's the best place to buy things like Sluggo in bulk? I couldn't find the Pleasant Valley Farms referred to above. The best price I found online so far is $56 for 10# of Sluggo. That still seems pretty steep given that its active ingredient is 1% iron phosphate, a common chemical.
someradiantpig
Buffalo, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2004
2:49 AM

Post #878882

I was surprised to see how old this forum is, did anyone mention coffee grounds around your plants, slugs hate them, this is my first year and not one hosta has even a pin prick hole. The roses love the coffee grounds, all the plants that I've put grounds near seem in great shape, and the acidity of used grounds is 6.9, isn't 7.0 ideal for most flowering plants?
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


May 22, 2004
4:07 PM

Post #879502

I haven't tried coffee grounds to deter them. I'm afraid our sprinkler would wash them away, not to mention our summer rains. I live in a coastal town, so we get lots of precipitation... and a lot of slugs! Ours are not the huge banana slugs of the Northwestern states, but damaging, none-the-less.

I misspoke, the name is Peaceful Valley Farms and is located in California, Kudzu9. Here is a link to their website: http://www.groworganic.com/ and here is the page for Sluggo: http://www.groworganic.com/a/a1.html?pMode=Search&sText=Sluggo&sCategory=catalog As you can see, you can get a 25lb bag for $49. That would last the average gardener several seasons. Since we live in Alaska, the freight costs about as much as the Sluggo, unfortunately!
flowerschild
Angelica, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2004
7:06 PM

Post #906097

I would like to thank everyone for almost killing me.. I'm reading this at work and dying! (and getting alot of stares) Excellent tips on slug control. I don't have the 3 - 8" ones but I have thousands and thousands of the little ones. I also have raised beds - SURPRISE they climb! Who would have thought! The woodchuck climbs the fence eats the plants down to about 3 inches and then the slugs move in...I think it's a partnership.. Anyways,,I have used the Ecargot (spelling) and it's works.. I just need alot more of that,,,(bank loan) so I will try a web site that was so generously offered for a bait that is sold in BULK...!! I was also just told by a lady that cheap baby powder works (also on rabbits) They cannot breath in the stuff.. Poor babies!! Thanks again! I'll be back...
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


June 15, 2004
4:48 PM

Post #910961

flowerschild, we have the littler variety of slugs here, too. Some are dark and others are much lighter in color. I call them the palominos. LOL! One of the nice things about Sluggo or Escargot is that the pellets seem to hold up pretty well in the rain or under the sprinkler. Baby powder would turn into a sad goo around here, I'm afraid. For wetter climes, the safe slug bait seems the best option.

Little hotels or inverted pop bottles or saucers of beer will all work, but you still have to 'deal' with the little buggers. It is also less than attractive in the garden... "Come see my lovely hostas... oh, and see my lovely slug terrarium... care for a saucer of 'Snail Ale'?" No, I'd rather feed the Sluggo, let them get a tummy ache, and crawl off to expire under a delphinium leaf.
spankmerob
North of Toronto, ON
(Zone 5a)

June 24, 2004
1:55 AM

Post #923122

Hi Folks, HELP!! I need help identifying and dealing with something that is eating my asiatic lilies, favorite rose bush and all the nearby annuals. OK - here goes - I found this mud looking substance on the stem and underside of leaves on my asiatic lilies. When I wiped some off there was a small, orange slug looking kind of bug in the black muck - sorry this is soooo gross. I got rid of as many as I could and put some beer out but I'm still seeing chewed leaves (my poor rose) and some of the slug like things in the soil. I've looked in all my garden books but can't identify this insect. Buy the way, no results at all from the beer. Thanks, Anne.
(Dave's Garden staff - please, please don't remove my posting - I can't afford a membership).
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2004
2:56 AM

Post #923284

rhonda..are you sure the orange-looking thing was the culprit?

Do you see Jap Beetles anywhere? Small caterpillars? Let's see if we can narrow this down.
spankmerob
North of Toronto, ON
(Zone 5a)

June 25, 2004
3:01 AM

Post #924837

Hi Horseshoe, We had a very heavy rain last night so this morning I went to check on the asiatic lilies and have learned a little bit more about the orange bugs. I found clusters of very tiny orange baby bugs on the underside of some of the leaves - they look like premature orange grubs. The black stuff got washed away from the larger ones I missed the other day. I think the black stuff the adults live in might possibly be bug poop - sorry... I have seen a couple of Jap beetles in the garden. Could these orange things grow up to be Jap beetles? If my problem is beetles how do I fight off the little gobblers? Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 25, 2004
3:14 AM

Post #924852

Nope...Jap beetles come from grubworms that live in the ground, pupate, and eventually become adults.

Your orange bugs might be stink bugs/squash bugs that have recently hatched or could also be harlequin bugs. (Squash bugs will hatch out en mass and hang together for a while...wonder if that is what you saw.)

Could the "black stuff" be honeydew from aphids by any chance?
spankmerob
North of Toronto, ON
(Zone 5a)

June 26, 2004
1:56 AM

Post #926098

Hi Rhonda, I'm really at a loss here. The black stuff is defenitely not honeydew from aphids. Looks like pea sized blobs of black, greasy mud. Whatever these creepy crawlers are they sure grow fast-from aphid size to rice size overnight and I'm killing them as fast as I see them. One of my asiatic lilies has lost the bottom 2/3rds of it's leaves. Whatever these are they seem to like the asiatic lilies best and are thankfully leaving my daylilies alone.

I don't think we get harlequin bugs this far north. The closest description I can find in my gardening books is "larval stage Fuller Rose Beetle" but there are no pics of this bug. Thanks for your help, Anne.

This message was edited Jun 25, 2004 10:00 PM
hpluver
Canadaigua, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2004
5:01 PM

Post #926823

They sell these little ceramic slug catchers up here. We have em BAD! The catchers look like frogs standing on their hind legs with their mouths OPEN WIDE... you put beer in them, but the dogs can't get their snouts in there. My dogs also looooove to booze! They're just prettier in the garden than an empty 2-liter bottle. I didn't think they would work b/c the little devils would hafta crawl all the way up the frog, but apparently they are Jimmy Buffet of bugs. Mere
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


June 26, 2004
8:39 PM

Post #927018

LOL! Little Buffets! The little hatchlings are starting to come out now... quite small, but just as invasive. I'm getting my Sluggo out early this year.
spankmerob
North of Toronto, ON
(Zone 5a)

June 26, 2004
8:40 PM

Post #927019

Hi hpluver, Thanks for the suggestion. I agree that ceramic frogs are much nicer than bottles or saucers. Might just keep the skunks out of the beer also, lol. They make a nightly tour of the garden. These little orange things aren't attracted to beer but we do get slugs here also. So far I'm just hand picking off the little orange gobblers. Thanks, Anne.
hpluver
Canadaigua, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2004
1:35 AM

Post #927293

No problem... I just hate it when I spend so much time making my garden look pretty and then have to resort to recycling things that aren't so pretty to help it. Don't get me wrong, I recycle, but I don't buy pop. We're a kool-aid family! Mere
norahs
Fairfield, IL

July 16, 2004
1:16 PM

Post #954333

Pine Needles

Like yourself I had a very big slug problem. I do not like to have to dispose of anything so I ran them off. I have hostas and furns around each tree in my yard. I water often so I really encouraged slugs. I go the the country and gather sever bags of pine needles and lightly spread them under the hostas. The plants seem to be able to handle the acid and the slugs do not like the feel of the pine needles. They just disappeared. Several years ago when we built a deck I even layered under the deck with a lot of pine needles to try and help.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 10, 2004
4:22 AM

Post #1137836

I'm a Sluggo fan myself - although there's a comparable product at home discount stores that costs about a third which is really what I buy.

I put a lot of Hostas, Clematis and Dahlias this year and I've had to use a ton of it. I probably put in down twice a week during the spring -- We have Escargot snails here too. Then at least once a week or until I couldn't see any any more. Up to the fall I've been using it too. I am going to put some earth, beer etc. I am seeing some good results and I'm hopeful for next year. However, it can cost a fortune depending on how much space you need to cover.

My mother used to go out at midnight and do what she called her "snail dance" whereupon she would squish snails and catch slugs.

Gross story: In the California costal redwood forests we have bright yellow slugs that can grow to almost a foot long. Youth group leaders used to have the kids lick the slugs to overcome fear. Now it is against the law to lick Banana slugs here because they were becoming endangered and the saliva is bad for them. Maybe you can pay the neighborhood kids to lick your slugs for you?
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 10, 2004
5:27 AM

Post #1137867

My goodness! Slugs a protected species! Who'd a thunk it!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 10, 2004
6:15 AM

Post #1137883

Well, you know that we California people are a little strange. Yes I can say it - been here a lot of generations and it rubs off on you (or we rub off on them). Wish that they hadn't brought the snails from France here with their wine grapes.

It was pretty fun to have snail races as kids. The tempo of everything was slower then. : )
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 10, 2004
4:44 PM

Post #1138529

We don't have snails up here, as far as I know... just slugs... not the big ones, but quite destructive, just the same. I'm going to have to look into the generic type Iron Phosphate treatment. The cheapest deal I've found so far is to have Sluggo shipped up from the west coast. A twenty-five pound bag costs about $60, and postage is slightly more than that, making the total closer to $130 for 25 lbs. Ouch!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 10, 2004
5:14 PM

Post #1138593

If you have a home depot you're in luck! You might also just web surf on Iron Phosphate. Let me know what you find.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 10, 2004
6:19 PM

Post #1138721

Closest Home Depot is 120 miles away... of course the closest town is about that far away! I did a search last year, but should probably try it again, now.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

November 10, 2004
9:32 PM

Post #1139004

What website do you use? Please call Home Depot before you go. Sluggo has been uniformily priced here no matter what size the bag is but your price looks pretty good. I'll call the nursery.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 11, 2004
1:15 AM

Post #1139420

Shipping to Alaska is the biggest expense. If Home Depot in Anchorage has an Iron phosphate product, it might be cheaper, but they will allow for shipping, as well. Thanks for the suggestions.
jerodsmom
Livermore, CA
(Zone 9a)

December 28, 2004
7:52 PM

Post #1211218

I want to thank everyone that has posted for this tread. I have enjoyed it immensely and laughed so hard . I moved into a new home this past Fall and don't have slugs here so far, but I sure did at my last house. I am the only one on the street that has flower gardens other than shrub type landscaping so I know that they are going to find me eventually. My method at my last home was going out at night and hunting them down. My neighbors used to get a kick out of seeing my husband and I in our nice clothes searching through the flower beds with our flashlights after having dinner out. They thought that was so funny. But when we would get home , we would see hundreds of snails crossing the driveway and lawn marching towards the flower beds.I tried beer traps, snail bait, copper and every other remedey that I heard off and I never saw a reduction in my slug population. I think they put out a message that I had the best of delicacy's in my yard, so every slug in the entire neighborhood would make their way in my direction. I have truly enjoyed having a year of slug free gardening. But like I said, I know that eventually they will find their way back to me.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 28, 2004
8:41 PM

Post #1211264

Yes, jerodsmom, that's what I call a 'gardener's honeymoon', the time before a new gardener or garden becomes invaded by bugs, snails, slugs, and invasives!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 29, 2004
4:05 AM

Post #1211648

I had a great thing happen this winter. I had a lot of Fuyu persimmons and the squirrels would leave parts of them on the ground. The slugs would climb on and the squirrels would eat the persimmons AND the slugs. It's an ECOSYSTEM. All you have to do is hire squirrels and grow a persimmon tree.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 29, 2004
5:35 AM

Post #1211680

Got any Alaskan persimmons?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 29, 2004
6:18 AM

Post #1211691

I don't know if they grow there very well, I'll have to ask the persimmons in my freezer waiting to be made into persimmon bread! Maybe you'll just have to throw some salmon out there and wait for the bears to eat the slugs. This is the first time I've thought that the slugs might freeze. Why don't they? Do slugs like salmon? Want me to ship you some frozen persimmons (and you thought shipping snail bait was expensive).?
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 30, 2004
4:08 AM

Post #1212760

LOL, Doss! Slugs seem to like mushrooms and dog poop, so I don't know about salmon! I've thought about ducks, but they play as much havoc with the plants as the slugs!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 30, 2004
6:06 AM

Post #1212875

Ah ducks! The Mallards land in our pool every fall and try to make nests in garden around it. They make a mess if we leave them there even though, so we have to send them on their way. It is fun to see them. Now, you could get duck herding dogs.I'm not kidding, they have them. In fact they have dog herding contests with ducks. I guess when sheep are in short supply. I swear my mother's Miniature Australian Shepard could keep them out of your plants and only eat the slugs. - well maybe a slight exaggeration. But the dog's amazing.

And see, I've been picking up my dog poop every day. What a waste! Well sometimes I miss it, my dogs are little. Have to pull every mushroom here so the pups don't munch them - they come mostly in the spring anyway.

These dogs of mine thwart all slug removing activity! Deadline works like a dream, but I worry about the dogs - and the environment. So luckily I have an orange tree. I don't think there are any Alaska hearty cultivars of those either.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


December 30, 2004
6:45 PM

Post #1213499

Doss, it sounds like you are a prime candidate to try the Iron Phosphate slug bait. It is pelleted and holds up well in average rainfall, and the best part is that it can be eaten by pets and livestock without ill effects.

We've got a couple blue healer mix dogs, and they are born herders. They also go out in the woods to do their business, so I don't need to go on scoop patrol. I've considered getting them a goose to keep them busy, but they are getting pretty old now for that sort of thing.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 30, 2004
9:24 PM

Post #1213693

Now if you've got blue heelers, you've got duck dogs for sure! I think that we are going in circles about the Iron Phosphate though. You and I had a discussion about that a while back. (remember, we were commiserating about the cost of shipping to Alaska - that's where the comment about shipping Persimmons came from.) I use the Phosphate and use and use it. The deadline is really the only thing that works consistently. When I had bigger dogs I used the granular and spread it really well. They didn't have a problem with it - they weren't diggers, but Zora loves to munch plants and she's only 11 pounds so the slugs are munching away on my ornamental cabbage while the rain washes the phosphate away. I am a die hard. Want to have my plants that snails love - like Hosta - and have the slugs respect them. Anybody want to start a slug etiquette school?
sfk
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 16, 2005
11:28 PM

Post #1292473

I'm going to repeat the coffee ground suggestion- the jolt of caffeine kills the critters. Our Starbucks has offered bags of it for free in the past. I've also had better luck with Deadline than with the pellet bait. Love to go out in the morning and count the dead critters! I'd love to have toads or turtles, but I haven't seen one in several years. Probably too much gunk running into the pond down the street for them (toads anyway).

Susan K
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 16, 2005
11:55 PM

Post #1292509

The slugs and snails are at it again already. They put holes in my Ligularia before I noticed. Luckily the Hostas are still in bed. I'll try calling Starbucks. How much do you use?

I love Deadline too. Especially the gray-line type. Can't use it cause of the dogs, but it is the only thing I"ve found that does really work.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 17, 2005
3:05 AM

Post #1292841

The iron phosphate products are safe for animals, and it works in a less dramatic way. When the slugs eat it, their insides turn to goo and they cannot feed. You re-apply every two weeks, and they may linger on a bit, but they won't be on the buffet line.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 17, 2005
4:25 AM

Post #1292949

Thanks Weezingreens, I know about Sluggo and use it regularly. I just wasn't expecting an invasion so early. But still, nothing works as well as deadline.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 17, 2005
4:32 PM

Post #1293861

You're probably right, doss. I have so many birds and critters in my yard that I just can't bring myself to use a regular slug bait. Does Deadline hold up well in rain?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 17, 2005
5:50 PM

Post #1293998

The other is a sticky sort of gray liquid that you squirt it in a line around the beds and plants. I never found that my bigger dogs bothered with it and it worked really well, but because I have a 10 month old puppy and she puts everything in her mouth, I can't use it. It is specifically made to resist rain.. The information for it does say NOT to use it around pets and wildlife but to use Sluggo instead. Too bad, it really works.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 17, 2005
6:06 PM

Post #1294034

Being rain resistant is a big plus around here. The sluggo holds up pretty good. I think the iron phospate is suspended in compressed pellets of grain. It takes awhile for them to break down in the wet, and you don't really need to use much for each application. All I know is that I have a lot less problems with slugs since I started applying it two or three times season. The slugs love my big sweet honeoye strawberries, so an application of sluggo before they ripen really saves the day for me!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 17, 2005
9:29 PM

Post #1294330

Wow, two or three times a season. I'm using it at least once a week in the season. But then I use sprinklers too. It's an expensive proposition, even with the cheaper generic stuff. But my garden's worth it. And you have to feel better using something like sluggo around things you are going to eat.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 18, 2005
5:26 AM

Post #1295146

We had a rather dry summer last year, so that may have added to my success. I know other folks who use it more often. I think the results from Iron phospate is a little more subtle than some other methods.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 18, 2005
7:39 AM

Post #1295203

No kidding! Subtle is a good way to say it. On the other hand, I guess I could give up growing Hostas, Ligularias, Dahlias, Clematis...Luckily I grow a lot of plants that they don't like too.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 18, 2005
6:38 PM

Post #1295988

I have to say, each year I have less and less slugs to deal with. As I said, the weather could have a good deal to do with it. Normally we have lots of rain all summer. On the other hand, I've come up with other techniques for discouraging them.

Number 1 Rule: Don't Make A Slugs Life Easy.

Clean my beds in the fall, remove dead leaves, etc, turn top of soil to look for eggs... about the size of tapioca and opalescent... in strings. I put them in an old coffee can and let them freeze over the winter. They don't melt with salt, so I'm not sure what to do with them but contain them... sort of like a nasty computer virus!

During the summer, I keep the bottom leaves trimmed, if possible, remove chickweed, etc... anyplace they can go to sleep through the heat of day. Slugs are pretty sluggish, so they don't usually venture far from the buffet to snooze. They also seem to like a communal spot... social slugs, what a concept.

I try not to water in the evenings, since the wetness is to their benefit. Our summers are pretty mild, so I'm not limited to morning or evening, but morning watering is better for me.

I don't plant the tastier veggies in the garden, but rather in containers I can move... oriental greens, lettuce, etc go in big bowl type pots that I can move if they start bothering them. Usually, when I move the pot, they're snoozing under it.

I leave hiding places for them near the beds... old boards, rocks... I can turn these over when I am on slug patrol during the day while they are sleeping. I can generally harvest 'herds' of them that way.

I've been told it is effective to have sacrificial plants to offer them... marigold, etc, but that just invites them in, and eventually they'll finish off the sacrificial plants and begin on my hostas, etc. Copper wire or tape is supposed to help, but if it keeps slugs out of your garden, it also keeps them in.

Number 2 rule:No slug goes unscathed. No matter what I am doing or how much of a hurry I am in, no slug lives. Each slug is potentially going to be responsible for thousands more. I used to keep a yogurt cup with some salt in the bottom. I'd drop them in there and they'd become slug soup. However, the stench when you open the container is pretty disgusting, and I've almost confused it for my coffee cup, so I don't do that anymore.

Now, I carry a pair of manicure scissors in my pocket and cut the slugs in half. They don't regenerate. They stay dead to be eaten by other slugs or turn to compost. You don't have to touch them so you aren't going to be scrubbing your hands with a brush to get the goo off of them. You can stick the scissors in the dirt to clean them. Of course, they're pretty much history for manicuring, but c'est la vie.

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 19, 2005
12:41 AM

Post #1296491

Thanks for the slug manifesto! I'm afraid I don't have the slug fighting energy you do. My mother used to go out in the middle of the night and crush snails. She called it her "snail dance". Someone suggested oranges upside own. A good idea since I have a tree with way too many oranges. Now I just need as much energy as a slug. :->
Pete2
Richmond Hill, GA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2005
12:51 AM

Post #1296498

When you find out how to get that energy, please let me know. I need some desperately! ;-)
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 19, 2005
1:19 AM

Post #1296535

Sorry about your energy. I hope that you aren't ill.

OK. Hrer's the answer. Don't get a lot of migraine headaches and don't take a lot of meds (which have side effects) to control it. :-) Seriously, giving up sugar and white flower worked for me when I wasn't in this shape. It made me lose weight and get a better cholesterol number too. But it''s sort of drastic. And the first three days are hell. You feel like you've been run over by a truck. But I'll bet it can make you boogie as fast a those slugs. (LOL)
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 19, 2005
3:19 PM

Post #1297283

Doss, I think the use of the word 'flower' instead of 'flour' was a Freudian slip! LOL! I really don't spend that much time on slugs, thanks to Sluggo. When I take time to get down and weed my beds, I also do the other maintenance things. I don't hunt for slugs while they are feeding... I do it during the day when they are sleeping under things and feeling sluggish. It's funny that they seem to sleep together. They seem to like to bunk up.

No one would accuse me of being too energetic... maybe 20 years ago, but not now! I'm probably a hundred pounds overweight and 58 years old. I have no problem kneeling down to garden, but it takes a crane and a good strong cable to get me back up! LOL! I've been known to crawl on my hands and knees from one bed to another just so I don't have to get up and down!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 19, 2005
3:33 PM

Post #1297307

Well, yep, don't be eatin the flowers if you want energy - or if you want strawberries this summer! If you don't have energy then you do have dedication. I noticed a couple of other typos too. Must have been half asleep.

After all of this being careful about snail bait, my little dog climbed up on a chair, got up on the kitchen table, and took some medicine. Luckily I she threw up - but I had to race her to emergency last night and the predictions were dire. However, she seems to have sailed through it. I can pick her up this afternoon. Yikes! was I shaken. She even lapped up the activated charcoal that they gave her instead of needing to be force fed. Everyone at the vets was smitten. She is pretty cute. But darn expensive!

I'm 57, only a little overweight, but I've been there - sorry you've got that to contend with. This medicine makes me tired, but it also takes away my appetite.

I had to buy a new pair of glasses last week and had to run all over finding a pair that I could use because I need a big bifocle. Finally a lady said that they don't carry too many pairs like the one I chose because their clientele tended to be between 35 and 60 and the frames I chose were one's that someone about 58 would wear. I kind of gave her a blank stare, but I was laughing hysterically inside. I guess it was a compliment?
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 19, 2005
3:47 PM

Post #1297335

When my mother was in her 80's, she told me that 'getting old was vastly over-rated'. I come from a long line of chubbies. We start out thin as adolescents, then blossom... I think it is the curse of a hardy appetite! This obesity is mostly self-inflicted, so it's not worthy of too much sympathy... just mentioned to let you know that all my gardening is done carrying a 100 lb sack of potatoes with me everywhere I go!

Glad to hear your doglet is OK. My granddoglets are so old they can't get on the counter anymore.

We don't have snails here, just slugs. Since the snails have shells, where do they hide out in the heat of the day... or do they?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 19, 2005
4:31 PM

Post #1297388

Having played around with so many prescription chemicals and seen their effect on my appetite, I'm not willing to say that weight is self inflicted. I gained almost 40 pounds just dealing with drugs that made me eat all the time. I just really couldn't stop. It's come off now - having changed drugs - but I truly believe that appetite is chemically induced. Just saw a show last night that said that not sleeping enough can make you hungry. They charted the amount of sleep American's were getting since the 60's and their weight. It was pretty impressive. They also showed studies of students eating more and more, the less sleep they had. Turns out that there are hormones that cause increases of diet, and ones that cause decreases and that they both are affected by sleep. Weird, huh?

Snails were introduced here from France as a food "crop". In the day they go the same places slugs go - mostly the underside of everything. We used to have races with them when we were kids. Can you tell that life was slower then?

I'm going out today to tie up the Cycloglossa Iris. They are beautiful but they fall over if they aren't staked and although they are only 12" tall they are already leaning. They get about 3 feet tall so I have to start staking early but they are worth it. I'll get some photos this spring.

I actually don't mind staking stuff. It's a fun thing to do. My daffodils are up and it makes me happy. Now you have the weather report for the day at my house.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 19, 2005
4:55 PM

Post #1297425

Sounds like spring has struck in your neck of the woods, Doss. Not having experienced snails, I just couldn't imagine them slipping under rocks and boards to sleep. It would seem difficult with those shells.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 19, 2005
6:00 PM

Post #1297519

The big ones actually get on the bottom of the leaves and crawl down into the insides of the plants where you can't see them. The little ones do get on the bottom of boards, etc. They can be really tiny.
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 19, 2005
6:19 PM

Post #1297547

In Japan (monami-tora-shima) known as "South bird Island". We harvested sea snails.

Placed them on a charcoal grill (upsidedown) filled the opening w/soy sauce. When the soy sauce was gone, they were done & ready for consumpsion.

They were a lot like clams, very sweet, but much more tender, almost the taste of a good scallop (the real ones, not the skate you are served in most resturants).

Now - I need Seafood, Gonna open some canned Salmon from my sis.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 19, 2005
7:16 PM

Post #1297636

I've found the common slug has just a hint of musty flavor. Caution, do not salt them until after you've cooked them or they will melt.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 20, 2005
1:57 AM

Post #1298123

Think I'll pass on the slugs. I'd rather eat ...well a lot of things.

Snails are only good with garlic butter - but you don't overcook them or they have the subsistence of rubber. Best served in their own shells. :-) Since you don't have them in the garden there you can get them canned in a package with shells included. Can't wait, huh?
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2005
2:44 AM

Post #1298173

I'll try anything once, maybe twice if my memory clouds about the first time.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 20, 2005
4:19 AM

Post #1298261

Well, pickled slugs are OK, but you've got to catch them fresh to really appreciate them. If you catch one with eggs, you can have a rare delicacy... slug caviar.
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2005
4:26 AM

Post #1298268

Weez - stop it, not good to laugh that hard, I may damage myself.
handbright
Coral Springs, FL
(Zone 10b)

February 20, 2005
3:19 PM

Post #1298754

My buffo toads are really good at controling this problem, although they are a kind of danger to the(small) dogs, and the kids who love to go "toad licking" to get high! (The poison they excrete when feeling threatened is akin to digitalis, slowing the heart rate; haven't tried it myself.)
That and the "snail bait" is keeping these rotten critters at bay in my garden anyway...otherwise, the tip about beer in bowls hidden under low boxes, or upside down pots placed in the garden is a real winner.
They hide there at night and while its yucckie to clean it all out, your plants will prosper!
But- still~ ULGH and Oooooo-the eight inch blighters would be too much for me- blgh, shudder...
Courage!
:)
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 20, 2005
5:49 PM

Post #1298987

Laughing is good, even if your sides give out. I don't know that poison toads are what I'm going to introduce into my yard tomorrow though. (LOL) Snails are actually very good. But it's the garlic butter that is really really good, and you can eat that on a lot of other things that aren't quite so - well you know. Not too many French restaurants even serve them anymore. Probably your Buffalo Toads would get too cold here anyway (sigh).

I know that I've mentioned our foot long banana slugs (bright yellow) before here. However, your kids may lick the frogs, but the banana slugs are protected here and it's illegal to lick them. Not so good for the slugs. Now there is an answer to the problem. Get your kids to lick the slugs. Think you can convince them it's as good as toad? You are already half on your way!
handbright
Coral Springs, FL
(Zone 10b)

February 22, 2005
12:06 PM

Post #1301986

These toads are protected too (?????)Go figure! They came from australia, and nobody knows what to do with them...
They can get as big as kittens, are dry but kinda loose and gushie feeling,
Woah! MY kids dont go toad lickin' ( I live in Miami for goodness sakes, home of the drug culture extrodinare! No one goes toad lickin when there is pharmecuical grade cocaine right down at the port!) Raising drug aware kids is totaly hard here. Mine dont do drugs, at least not yet, anyway, and my eye is so alway peeled...picture it!
Thank God!!!! (Really...I thank Him every day.)
Still, I have not heard of a slug that hated beer and a dark place. The original lounge lizard.
Maybe if you play a little blues and black light to back light, too? Get them little chairs...and save your mai tai drink umbrellas!!!!!!!! But still I shudder at the mere thought of 8 inch slugs, at least the toads go run and hide when its light out...
LOLOLOL!!!!!
:)


Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 22, 2005
5:08 PM

Post #1302438

A sluggy blues joint! I love it! Maybe we should start painting the inside of our slug hotels and adding those little battery type music things you can get in greeting cards!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 22, 2005
10:45 PM

Post #1303170

At the silly juice again huh? Sure you folks haven't been imbibing under old pieces of board with the slugs?

And why aren't those toads out working at night eating slugs? Do they belong to some union that doesn't allow night shifts. If you're going to have toads croaking the least they could do is earn their keep.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 22, 2005
11:14 PM

Post #1303225

It seems to me that just about anything that eats slugs also likes the plants in the garden. Chickens pop them like Ju Ju Bees, but they also scratch around the plants and peck away at things. If I could convince folks that slugs are tasty, maybe they'd eat them out of existance.

OK, here's my extermination method: Put about a 1/2 cup of seasoned flour into the bottom of a paper lunch sack. Go out into the garden and each time you find a slug, drop it into the bag. When you have enough... about a half cup per person, heat some butter in a saucepan, shake the bag, and dump the little fellows in. If we all ate a cup of slugs a week, eventually they'd be an endangered species.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 23, 2005
12:21 AM

Post #1303366

Don't forget the garlic. :-)
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 23, 2005
4:08 AM

Post #1303735

OK, doss, s bit of garlic, no need to add thyme... they've been munching on that, so they are seasoned internally.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 23, 2005
4:57 AM

Post #1303776

Could my dogs eat them for me? Or maybe my imaginary friend. I'm getting cold feet here and I don't even live in Alaska. YUCHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 23, 2005
6:10 AM

Post #1303818

Give it a try, Doss. The big yellow ones taste like bananas.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 23, 2005
5:02 PM

Post #1304475

Weezingreens, You've forgotten, banana slugs are protected here in California. There is another key to cooking snails. You put them in cornmeal for a few days before you cook them to "clean them out' so to speak. You should try it with your slugs.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 23, 2005
5:17 PM

Post #1304510

I don't 'clean them out' because they are already stuffed with fresh garden veggies and herbs. Come on, Doss, don't you 'poach' those banana slugs... I mean that in both the legal and culinary sense.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 23, 2005
5:18 PM

Post #1304511

Now that's really funny! (LOLOLOLOLOL)
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


February 23, 2005
5:19 PM

Post #1304515

;)
maxxy
Aurora, IL

April 11, 2005
7:16 PM

Post #1396397

I have tried traps, bait...they work to some extent, but, I had to add additional procedures. I take the undrunk coffee from the day, and hook it up to my garden sprayer, and spray the bed. There was research done in Hawaii, seemed they had an overpopulation of a certain frog...well, to make a long story short, they sprayed the experimental gardens with coffee, it didn't kill the frogs, but they found hundreds of dead slugs. So, I use that method, and it works. I also use an ammonia and water mixture, in a garden spray bottle, add 1oz of non-sudsy ammonia, and fill the bottle with water...the only downfall with this is you have to spray the slug directly...I go slug huntin' every night in the summer. My DH calles me "the great white slug hunter"...lol...I still use the traps, and I still use the bait, oh, heck, I'll try anything. Thanks for the additional ideas!

Maxxy
maxxy
Aurora, IL

April 13, 2005
1:24 AM

Post #1399557

If anyone gets "The Hosta Journal", there is a book, published in the UK called "The Little Book of Slugs"...it is a compilation of tips from 300 UK gardeners. They seek to offer alternatives to the use of chemical poisons in the garden. Some of the methods have not been tested by the editors, and not all of the techniques have been found to be practical or substantial for any long term effectivness.
I am going to look for it, and see what's inside!

Maxxy
annabelle15
Niles, MI
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2005
11:48 AM

Post #1618101

I have a method of stopping slugs... Several years ago when I lived in California, where they seem to grow right out of the air... I almost lost a pet to slug poison., So I started to experiment. Guess what stopped them!!! Plain old Comet Cleanser, I sprinkles it anound the edges of the flower bed and waited. The comet cut thru the mucus layer and killed them. Pets left it alone because of the smell. And I replaced after each watering. Didn't hurt the plants either. Living in Michigan now it still works here
tiffanya
Sumner, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 27, 2005
5:25 AM

Post #1722745

Hello from just South of you (Seattle/Tacoma)! One thing that I always remembered from my integrated pest management class was about the "breathing hole" on the slug. So, how I help reduce the slug population around our place...

I have a spray bottle filled with ammonia (yes, straight ammonia!). I take this out in the evenings at dusk and spray the little sluggies right in the hole. They curl up and die, then shrivel up and dry. It's a pretty clean method; just requires time and persistance.

Thumbnail by tiffanya
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


August 27, 2005
5:46 AM

Post #1722768

I'll have to look for that breathing hole!
Grassygirl
Linton, IN

February 22, 2006
9:37 PM

Post #2063963

Ok folks . . . I've spent hours reading and researching how to get rid of the little buggers:

Here are the several methods I've tried and have worked successfully -- and no chemicals to harm pets:

Take a styrofoam plate and pour beer on the plate -- put the plates on the outside of the garden so the slugs get to the plate before they get to the plants. I've seen them head right for the plate even when they were originally headed for the plants. They drink and either drown or get alcohol poisoning.

Another method is to sprinkle salt on them -- oooooeeeee -- yucko, but they disintigrate. DO NOT SPRINKLE SALT ANYWHERE NEAR PLANTS -- it will kill the plants (and grass and anything else).

Another method is to put a copper strip (at least 2" tall/wide) around the garden. The chemical makeup does something nasty to them and they won't cross the threshold.

Another method is the spritzer of ammonia.

Another method is to surround your garden with something coarse -- like cornmeal -- HOWEVER, and this is a big however -- I have tried putting gravel, sand, coarse mulch and a variety of other items around the bases of their favorite plants and none of that has worked. If they are hungry enough, they'll travel across even white sand to get to their food supply.

Their homes: I've found them laying eggs under logs, under terracotta planters and all other variety of things in my yard. About once a week, I lift up whatever they could be under and sprinkle them with salt -- but be careful -- salt will kill your plants and grass and whatever else it comes into contact with.

The only other non-chemical method I've found is to smash them -- and I have an old 2x2 piece of wood that I carry around in the evening for just that purpose.

Remember that after a rain the slugs harvest (and they come out most after the dew sets because it is easier on their bodies to travel when its wet). I am on the prowl after a rain to kill the buggers.

Good luck!
frankford
East Lansing, MI
(Zone 5a)

March 3, 2006
4:33 PM

Post #2083891

I usally use slug bait to kill when I notice holes in leaves early in the season. The funny thing I noticed this january a mostly empty beer can
in boxwood shrubery. As I was just about to clean and empty out the can discovered several snails inside the can. I thought what a great idea. In the future I think I'll do as the neighbors>drink up most of the beer in the can , then throw the can in the bushes to capture the slug pest. I'll probably have to place the can in an inconspicuous place so no one picks up the can !
Soferdig
Kalispell, MT
(Zone 4b)

March 5, 2006
7:15 AM

Post #2087717

Your theory may be true but maybe not. Who really got the beer?

Thumbnail by Soferdig
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Soferdig
Kalispell, MT
(Zone 4b)

March 5, 2006
7:19 AM

Post #2087720

Your theory may be true or maybe not.

Thumbnail by Soferdig
Click the image for an enlarged view.

fchilders
Clatskanie, OR
(Zone 9b)

November 1, 2006
9:41 AM

Post #2871087

You guys are all a kick. Here is a slug story I like to tell. One summer while I was at a museum on the weekend, I noticed that the person working the counter in the bookstore, sounded like Boston.. So I struck up a conversation and asked what she had noticed to be characteristic of the beautiful Pacific NW... She said slugs, we don't have them back home. So I said that is why every Oregonian has a dozen umbrellas. Once the rainy season begins, the wind blows the slugs out of the trees right into your hair and they stick just like chewing gum. I never cracked a smile, and told here to never cut a slug in half and walk away. I said they know how to fake you out, as soon as you walk away, they suck their guts back in, and then the tail end growes eyes and a mouth and now you have two slugs laying eggs every where.

All kidding aside, the best way to control slugs, is to keep you place imaculate. Don't allow yourself to accumulate lumber scraps that you might use someday, especialy plywood and the such . Stacks of this kind of material here in my climate, are maternity wards for slugs. Keep your moles killed off. Their underground runns are overwintering places for slugs. They hide in refuse, and in dark places. When I had ducks on my place, there weren't any slugs. The ducks earned their keep eating slugs.

We should offer a prize for the biggest stug lie. Here's one now. I went out to strech my legs and get some fresh air before bed on night, and as I stook at the end of the sidewalk, an apple fell into the back of my pickup making a gong sound. There was a large slug in the 12" culvert at the end of the sidewalk. Hearing the sound of the apple
bonginh in the truck, he came slathering out of that culvert so fast you would think he was racing all the other slugs Hiding in there. He crawled the 6' to my truck and sat up like a dog begging and flopped onto the tailgate. In no time me made it all the way to the apple, which he swallowed whole. I would never have beleived that a slug could get up to 300# unless I saw it with my own eyes. I poured a 50# bag of salt into the culvert in the morning. It took and hour and half a roll of quarters to hose the slime out of the truck . Frank
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 1, 2006
8:08 PM

Post #2872745

Good information, and a great yarn, as well! We don't have your banana slugs up here, so they don't reach the 300 lb. size you have noted. However, we have so many of the smaller sized slugs that I could readily come up with 300 lbs, if need be. I have tried all sorts of methods to get rid of them, including most everything mentioned in this thread, but I'm beginning to think that the best method would be consuming them. As you know, we have a tendency to deplete our natural resources by over hunting or harvesting, so why not consider slugs a resource and create a market.

To get the ball rolling, I attempted to saute a few in butter and a splash of wine, hoping for a shell-les escargot, but the salt in the butter turned them into a fluorescent green rue that tasted very much like ranacid blue cheese dressing. I've tried dipping them in chocolate, but the results were no better. I have finally settled on a delicacy that should be a good seller... slug roe caviar! Just think of it, lovely white pearls of flavor artfully served upon rye melba! We could make it a fall special nationwide. (That's the best yarn I could think of at the moment.)
fchilders
Clatskanie, OR
(Zone 9b)

November 1, 2006
11:03 PM

Post #2873269

Weez, thanks for a great laugh. I am taking notes and writing down all the recipes for the day when the country is ready for the Natianal Slug Cookoff. I would like to see Emeril welcome a Chinese Cheff to demonstrate how to prepare slugs exactly the same way as a sea cucumber. Maybe a poor man's Sea Cucumber Kung Pao.

I m thinking we could have a halloween slug roundup like they used to do with rattlers in Texas. We could take 100 tons of slugs, cure them in rock salt, until they are the size of olive pits, stuff them in olives, put in some jalepeno brine, and market the olives
as JALEPENO FLAVORED OLIVES. But what to do with all the left over slime. I don't think I want to go there. But wait a minute, I just had a blinding flash, yes we sell the slime to Pharmaceuticals. every thing they make comes with side effect warnings of nausea, diareah, headaches and vomiting, and they coul sell it as a laxative.

Enough for now Frank
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 2, 2006
1:20 AM

Post #2873696

Frank, you are a positive gold mine of slug barnstorming! Since the slug slime is practically impossible to wash off one's hands, and since it is so sticky, how about using it for sticky note glue. We could call it 'Slug-a-Note'.
fchilders
Clatskanie, OR
(Zone 9b)

November 2, 2006
6:41 AM

Post #2874352

BLESS YOU Weez, but I just can;t beleive you would touch them with you hands, and get it on you. That is why I never step on them on the sidewalk. But that is just the bulls, the cows just squirt out their guts for 15 minutes or so to gag you and make you goe away so they can suck their guts back in and go on like nothing ever happened. The bulls always stick to shoe, and make you walk like something is really stuck to the bottom of your shoe, because it ISS.,, That is how they get to come in the house and then, Oh God, don't make me tell you the rest...please.. Frank Haaaappy Holloween


Frank
fchilders
Clatskanie, OR
(Zone 9b)

November 2, 2006
7:19 AM

Post #2874361

Weezzz, I just went out for a walk on the sidewalks, to get some fresh air, and i thought I saw a hose over the sidewalk, and it turned out to be, three bull slugs... I stepped on them and no it is 3 oclock aan I am still tryig to get them off my slippers. Good luck, and good night. Frank
linedancer
Fort McCoy, FL

November 3, 2006
3:16 PM

Post #2878116

I lived in RI and we used beer to trap them. They love the tast and die happy. If you see one, sprinkle salt on it. That kills them too.
Gail
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 3, 2006
5:04 PM

Post #2878345

Pooooor Frank! Bulls & cows... never thought of them that way! Slug milk... perhaps another delicacy.

Linedancer, I think most of us have used beer or salt in one form or another. Both are affective, but I can't stand to look at bowls of beer-soaked slug floaters when I walk through the gardens, or watch the neighbor dogs lapping up the stuff. As for salt, better to put it in a container and drop the slugs in, as all that salt can't be good for the soil around your plants. I'm still an advocate for cutting them in half and setting out an environmentally safe slug bait.
mulchmania
Ennis, MT
(Zone 4a)

November 27, 2006
9:16 PM

Post #2948548

When I lived in the San Juan Islands we were in the woods on the edge of a marsh. So many slugs the poor ducks got their beaks stuck together from eating the slimey things. Then I had to clean up the ducks.

So I resorted to a screwdriver, a big long one, first thing every morning. Walked around puncturing all the slugs. Disgusting but no chemicals. It kept things fairly manageable.

Now I live in a high dry desert climate and do not miss those buggers at all!
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


November 29, 2006
7:38 PM

Post #2953763

Oh, my! I can't imagine what you used to clean those duck beaks! If I get slug slime on my hands it is almost like trying to remove rubber cement! Maybe slugs are duck bubble gum.
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 12, 2009
2:30 AM

Post #7053766

Well, with five years' worth of slug experience, this looks like the thread to go to! I have had a persistent problem with delphinium that I think is probably slugs/snails. (See "Recurring problem with delphinium" in this forum.

Has anyone tried putting cans over newly emerging plants? Or around late season new growth, as found in delphiniums? That is, the can has both ends removed and is set around the plant like a collar. I've been using Sluggo a lot, but it's been a cold wet summer, and my worst affected plants are in front of a stone wall. I'm guessing the slugs and snails live there.

TIA
LAS
LAS14
Albany, ME
(Zone 4b)

September 30, 2009
12:26 AM

Post #7118055

Success!!!! I have put cans around the "dead" delphinium, and the late regrowth is coming along great. The seedlings from nurseries that I bought on line are thriving. I do believe I have solved a problem for delphs, campanula medium and asclepius that has been plaguing me for years!!!!! Plants that I had marked as "disappeared" in August are returning, now that they're safe from the slugs. My garden is in front of a stone wall, and I'm sure hundreds/thousands of them live there.

Copper is recommended for repelling slugs, but cans seem to work just fine. I'm so excited! I did get 20' x 8" of copper at Home Depot, and it's very good for plants that have grown too large to slip a can over. I connect it with two paper clips.
Weezingreens
Seward, AK
(Zone 3b)


October 11, 2009
6:41 PM

Post #7158169

Slugs work on the foliage, so the roots should be fine, as long as they get a chance to regenerate foliage. Delphinium are a favorite of slugs, as are hostas. I live in a rainy, cool summer climate, as this is a coastal Alaskan town, and slugs like it here. It must be their Miami Beach. I use Sluggo for slug control. I use it sparingly and regularly. I put it out before the slugs eat everything down, and I try to avoid places for them to snooze during the heat of the day. I want them to have to slime as far as possible before eating my plants, so I removed the bottom leaves that afford them shade, and I avoid wood chip mulches or other ground coverings they can crawl under. Your rock wall could afford them their protection, for sure.
CharlysGardenPl
Ferndale, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2013
12:11 AM

Post #9550653

What's the best slug trap... the best slug attractant in the world (well, maybe)?
First, a few words on the modern standards:
---SLUGGO-type killers are too expensive and don't really attract...
---COREY'S-type killers can damage plants and beneficials, and don't perform after rain like advertised... and is expensive to keep reapplying every two weeks (Western Washington State)...
---Deadline-types (liquidish stinky sludge) don't attract much and dry out...
---BEER is only useful for a couple days (my slugs sip at it and don't drown once it is stale... :), is no good diluted from rain, and is useless when it evaporates... and it's expensive!

What Works?????
BREAD!
...Pet-and-kid safe
...Doesn't damage plants
...Easy to make
...Cheap
...No chemicals
...Rain doesn't hurt it
...Slugs still like it if it dries out
...Adds to the soil nutrition
...No salt problems (especially if you make or buy salt-free)
...No salt, ammonia or Corey's damage to worms
...Bonus worm food and other beneficials (beetles and other predators)

If you put the bread next to a board, you can collect everyone in the morning.

I picked 200 slugs in two sessions within1.5 hours, and the ducks loved them!!!
That's 400% more than I get with beer or ammonia (which the ducks don't like).
The slugs were so happily filled, they were turning around to go take a nap, so I caught them just in time.
Mind you, I live near a pond with many fruit trees shading the area, so there are lots.

I'm one happy gardener tonight! :)

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2013
8:59 AM

Post #9551014

And the battle continues...funny how we face the same problems 11 years down the road...
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 8, 2013
3:39 PM

Post #9551350

Ah, but this one was very entertaining. It also reminded me that it's time to put out some Sluggo.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
6:07 AM

Post #9551847

8-)...and beer and DE and...
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 9, 2013
2:21 PM

Post #9552502

I don't need to go overboard this year. It's been too dry here for snails. I'm sure there are millions of eggs underground, just waiting for the rainy season.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
3:28 PM

Post #9552597

So far the toads are taking care of the slugs and I have seen 3 garter snakes around the pond. We had a fairly wet winter...I am pleased for that because it keeps the Lubber grasshopper population down...most of the larva drown in wet winters. last year we killed over 300 of them...cost me big time cuz I bribed my Grandson into helping...10 cents a carcass...picked up $30 just hanging around outside around dusk...
lalea878
Mobile, AL

June 18, 2014
7:41 AM

Post #9870943

Slugs are rampant in Mobile, AL...our rain fall usually surpasses every region in the country, even Seattle! Seattle has more rainy days but they rarely have more inches of rain than we do (: Anyway, makes for one wet garden that I have an angel trumpet tree in along with some hostas. The slugs never bother the tree untill i planted the dern hostas (:...They seem to like the AT tree better than the hostas and dishwashing liquid diluted with water seems to have run them off the hostas, but not my angel trumpet tree. I read sevin dust wont phase snails...I am planning to do a beer trap using the beer left in the bottom of the can that i dont finish (I love beer). I was wondering if i use a plastic coke bottle and cut windows in it about 4 inches up, then fill with 3 inches of beer or so, and set it right side up with top on to preent escape, if that would work? Or should i bury it top down and cut some windows? Ideas are welcome

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