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Winter Sowing: Milk jugs

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TurtleChi
Danville, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2007
2:43 AM

Post #3088393

Hello,
I am very new to the WS thing... I just put out 4- one gallon milk jugs... I have read and reread the WS website and I may be blind or just tired of reading over and over but I can't find the answer to my question... So here I am .. :-) Ok I put drain holes in the bottoms and the cap is on the jug what I would like to know is do I have to put holes in the top also or do I leave the cap off??? I know I read this somewhere and I can't find it... So if you could help me I would be very thankful...
Susan
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2007
2:44 AM

Post #3088398

Susan, Just leave the lid off and discard it. Good luck- you'll love wintersowing.

Karen
TurtleChi
Danville, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2007
3:09 AM

Post #3088454

Thank you so much for the answer and so fast... Ok will go out now and take lid off.. and that it? Will it still get enough moisture with the cap off ? I am going to put out a few more things maybe tomorrow or this week at least... I think I will like this... I will also try to sow in the house this year...
Do you know anything about planting bulbs in containers in the house? I will try and look for a bulb site... I am kinda new to Daves... Not sure where everything is as of yet but I am learning allot thanks to this site and people like you... Thanks again..
Susan
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2007
3:59 AM

Post #3088569

Susan this is a great site and it shows different things you can use :o)
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/How_to_Winter_Sow.html

Connie
TurtleChi
Danville, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2007
4:01 AM

Post #3088573

Thanks Connie. I got this url off of one of the pages you had posted before... Great site... It is just that my eye where tired of rereading the same thing... Now it is off to bed for I work tomorrow... I was thinking about you today... :-) Chat at you later...
Susan
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2007
4:03 AM

Post #3088577

Night Susan, pleasant dreams.

Connie
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2007
4:55 PM

Post #3152937

I don't think I have seen anything in any thread about what I am going to ask now. I have a bunch of milk jugs that came from our Costco, they are solid white, if that makes sense. If I put dirt into them, you can't see where it comes up to from the outside, like you can with "regular" milk jugs. Also, the pour hole is at one corner, not in the middle. I can't provide a picture right now (DH not here), but I hope this description is good enough. I am concerned that maybe it might not be light enough in the jug and the placement of the hole may not be good, being off center???
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 3, 2007
5:07 PM

Post #3152983

Clementine, I'm glad you asked about the opague containers. I was going to ask the same thing! Tamara
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2007
5:19 PM

Post #3153032

I think they may not let enough light in to assist with germination. That's just speculation though:) I'll be watching to see what the more experience WSers have to say:LOL:
Lala_Jane
North West, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 3, 2007
5:22 PM

Post #3153047

Me too! Well actually I was wondering about 2 liter containers. Would Mountain Dew bottles work since they're tinted green instead of completely clear?

La
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2007
6:37 PM

Post #3153297

Well, let's wait for the experts. I do remember seeing someone say that green bottles are ok, Jane.

OK, I am leaving, seeing what I can scavenge up in town. LOL
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 4, 2007
1:56 AM

Post #3154726

I am by no means an expert, but I think that the transparant green bottles are fine. I don't think that the solid white jugs would let in enough light. However, not all is lost... you could cut the top off completely, and then either duct tape some plastic wrap over the top, or pull a big baggie over the top and tape it or otherwise secure it. Be sure to poke in a few air holes. The containers need to act as a mini green house, so they need to get enough light and ventilation while still being covered.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2007
12:10 PM

Post #3155550

Yes, Marie is right. Tinted bottles, like green Sprite bottles, will work fine. The solid ones, either white or colored, will block too much light. If you can't see your thumb through it, don't use it. But as Marie said, topless with a tent of some kind over it will be fine. The seeds just need light.

Karen
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 4, 2007
1:54 PM

Post #3155888

Well I will chime in here. Last year I used the white Cosco milk jugs with the top off and had great germination. They are translucent enough to work.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2007
2:53 PM

Post #3156096

Good to know! =) I wouldn't have thought they would so that is great, more containers available to use:LOL:
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 4, 2007
3:00 PM

Post #3156126

Just to clarify (pun intended) this is a photo of the milk jugs that I used, they are from Cosco. I don't know if they use the same jugs where you are.

Thumbnail by zenpotter
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2007
4:52 PM

Post #3156582

Thanks for the picture, Zen. Those are not the jugs I meant; our Costco, and apparently some other ones as well, carries the white opaque ones here. BTW, our Sam's has the translucent ones like on your picture and like the one on the right in my picture below. So there is another source!!

dmac: I think your Costco has the right ones (from having been there just once).

I will have to cut the top off of mine like Marie suggests, but fortunately I had a suspicion about this early on and have made only one of them and sown it.

Thanks, Karen for your input also.

Edited to clarify last sentence (i,e, thanks to Karen ...)

This message was edited Feb 4, 2007 3:33 PM

Thumbnail by Clementine
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 4, 2007
4:59 PM

Post #3156618

Karen,

I sure hope our Costco doesn't change to the opaque ones.

Pauline
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2007
5:42 PM

Post #3156779

The sad thing is it is actually better for milk to be in an completely opaque container or cardboard carton. The less light it has contact with the better:LOL:
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2007
7:34 PM

Post #3157150

Zen, please see my edited post above your post, sorry for the confusion.

Clementine
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 4, 2007
8:14 PM

Post #3157254

Got it.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2007
10:50 PM

Post #3157742

That jug on the left in Clementine's photo doesn't look clear enough to me. The one on the right is comparable to those I've used and they work great. Notice, you can see your thumb through it, That's the same test I use for plastic bags for tenting.

Karen
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2007
12:17 AM

Post #3157950

Karen, the object of the picture was to show both types of jugs. I had said that I had gotten those from our Costco and then Zen showed the bottles she got from her Costco. My picture was meant to show them next to each other. You are right, the white jug is not transparent enough, i.e. you could not see your thumb from the outside.

This afternoon I fixed the problem by cutting off the top from the wrong type of jug and put clear plastic (with holes) over it with duct tape. And I looked very hard to see if there was anything green in there - but nothing. Whic is good because we are expecting 14F tomorrow.

Good luck to you.
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 5, 2007
1:09 AM

Post #3158070

Clementine

You could try just one of the white jugs with a few seeds in it. And sow the same seed in one with the top cut off... Do a little test with it. As far as the off set of the hole. you could punture a couple smaller holes on the solid part of the top... to even it out some... But keep in mind, it will be a tester type only. Then if you have luck with germination. next year you won't have to worry about cutting the whole top off :o)

Just a thought...

Connie
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 5, 2007
1:34 AM

Post #3158149

Good idea pepsidrinker! I did one solid white jug. I will do the same seeds in a transparent jug as well and note the germination difference. Guess I won't be getting milk from Sam's Club during winter! :-) Tamara
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2007
4:52 PM

Post #3160022

Wow, Connie, great idea, but in this case (this was my first jug ever) I have two different seeds in it, so I can't really duplicate this one. But I can try another set today, so they will have been sown on the same day, and the only difference will be the jug. Zone5girl, I'll be curious how your experiment will come out. And, z, I am not sure I understand correctly, but our Sam's has the jugs we want, the transparent ones. It is our Costco that does not. So you should be able to start collecting for next year, LOL, if you buy milk at Sam's.

C
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 5, 2007
5:01 PM

Post #3160044

C,

I can't bring myself to shop at Sam's, but that is a political issue not to be pursued here.
moretz
hickory, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2007
7:01 PM

Post #3160430

ok dumb question
"how are you getting the seeds in the jugs and then dirt on top of them in the milk jugs?",it dont look like youre cutting the tops off,sorry people but i just wanted to know lol and the 2 litter bottles are you cutting the tops off and then tape plastic wrap tot them? plmk and thxs for answering a dumb question lol
moretz
lizren
Coaling, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2007
7:25 PM

Post #3160484

I am not expert -- this is just my 2nd year WSing -- but, I did use a number of those fully opaque white milk jugs last year and had good germination. I also have used them this year, as this is what I had on hand. I did open the tops last year pretty soon after I had seedlings emerging, but I am in zone 7b and the temps were consistently pretty warm once most everything sprouted. I don't know if the quantity of seedlings suffered from having the darker jugs or not, but I didn't have a single jug fail to germinate at all.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 5, 2007
8:24 PM

Post #3160666

You need to cut them to plant in them. Here is a photo of mine from last year. I cut them and then taped them back together with duct tape. I tried posting this a while ago and my browser reset itself. Let's see if it works this time.
No photo, for some reason I can't send one right now.

So I cut them about half way down and only on three side so the 4th side was a hinge. Then taped them back together. When the seedlings are ready to fend for themselves to cut the top half all the way off and let the sun and rain do their trick.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 5, 2007
9:05 PM

Post #3160799

I actually did not cut the 'hinge' off last year. Instead, I folded open the jug and stuck a rock in the top part to hold it open. Then, I was able to close it again when necessary (heavy rain or snow or hard freeze) and I am going to reuse the same containers this year.

Here is a good visual with directions from wintersown.org.
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Photographer_Phred/IMAG005A.JPG
moretz
hickory, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2007
10:22 PM

Post #3161065

ok great thought that is the way you did it but wasent sure but i thought i seen it where you could cut it off and put plastic on it or in a baggie too? guess i was wrong lol thxs for the info very helpfull
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 5, 2007
10:43 PM

Post #3161118

No you weren't wrong...using the plastic over the top is just another option.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2007
11:34 PM

Post #3161278

liz: I'm shocked that your seeds would grow with so little, if any, light. I'm sure it helped that you're in a warm zone and popped the tops early. It would be interesting to see a comparison of the 2 types of milk jugs. I'm happy with my clear ones, though.

Karen
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2007
2:47 AM

Post #3161920

I had a few in a bleach jug, totally opaque. I put lots of holes everywhere, and didn't know what to expect. I can't tell you right now what they are, but they sprouted and are still hanging in there. When it gets warmer I'll probably put more holes just to make sure they get enough light. Since those sprouted I have two regular pots, and put plastic plant pots on top of them with extra holes...also opaque,...We'll see.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 6, 2007
11:39 AM

Post #3162473

I am going to try posting my picture again. You will see how I did my milk jugs and large cottage cheese containers with plastic over them. I used a fairly heavy plastic with holes in it. I wish I could remember where the plastic came from it really worked well.

Thumbnail by zenpotter
Click the image for an enlarged view.

grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2007
5:09 PM

Post #3163470

very neat. by the way, zen...love your patio!
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 6, 2007
6:35 PM

Post #3163736

Thank you we love it too and it has a great view.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 6, 2007
11:03 PM

Post #3164589

zen does have a lovely patio and a fabulous from her home. I would think that cutting up a zip-lock bag would work for the plastic. It is pretty sturdy. What does anyone think about Press and Seal Wrap? Is it heavy enough? Would it 'stick' it out til Spring?
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2007
11:07 PM

Post #3164597

I had that on my tops in the begining, and it stuck very well. Later, I learned you don't need the tops. I think it would hold up pretty well as long as you didn't remove it. It looses it's stick once the seal is broken, well some of it. It stood up to the hole poking too.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 6, 2007
11:13 PM

Post #3164622

Thanks...I may just need to use it if I find that I need to use containers that don't have transparent covers.
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2007
11:29 PM

Post #3164673

Oh, I forgot to say tops of milk jugs and juice jugs. Small tops, not larger containers. Of course cont. without a dome of some sort needs something for the greenhouse effect.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 6, 2007
11:32 PM

Post #3164679

Ahhh...thanks for the clarification. I was definitely thinking containers, not jugs.
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2007
11:40 PM

Post #3164703

Just so we're crystal, I do think it would work well on containers that are not jugs. Nicely:) Sorry about the confusion.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 7, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #3164915

I'll have to give it a try.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 7, 2007
10:55 AM

Post #3165689

I'm confused.
Marie, I like the idea of cutting up the zip lock bags. I may just use your idea of a rock to hold the top and reuse the milk jugs next year.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 7, 2007
4:48 PM

Post #3166683

The hardest part of keeping the containers to reuse is storing them for the rest of the year. I've got mine roped together in two clumps hanging from the rafters in the garage.

I actually got the zip lock bag idea from the guy that ran the seminar at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. He said that they use a lot of zip lock bags, and had a cut up one when he was talking about the air-layering. He said that something about zip locks keeping the moisture in but still being able to breathe.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 7, 2007
4:54 PM

Post #3166700

I had totally forgotten about that, I wonder how much I forgot?
I was thinking about the storage and then realized that I store them as I get them so they are here anyway so why not store the ones that are ready to go.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2007
7:49 PM

Post #3167145

Last year mine were pretty mangled by the end of the year so I pitched them. First I had gouged big holes when the weather warmed, then chopped the tops off completely. When planting out I cut all the way down the side of some to get them out more easily. They were in no shape to re-use.

Karen
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2007
7:54 PM

Post #3167161

I probably won't reuse the milk jugs, but my juice bottles were seriously hard plastic...I'm sure they'll work again next year. I could barely put holes in the bottom of them.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 7, 2007
9:26 PM

Post #3167389

nikki...a power drill works great for making holes.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 8, 2007
12:10 AM

Post #3167860

I don't store my jugs at the end of the season, I just simply rinse them out and add them to the recycle bin. We drink a lot of milk, water & juice, so we seem to have plenty of plastic containers when I wintersow.
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

February 8, 2007
5:45 PM

Post #3169723

My local Costco also switched over to those white milk jugs as well...I hate the things! I keep meaning to send a letter or an email because it is impossible to pour a glass of milk without spilling milk all over the counter. God forbid one of my children would want to try and pour their own glass of milk. ;-)

Oh yea...Winter Sowing...I did a test with the Costco milk jugs and I found that a 1 gallon baggie fit over the jug real nice. Probably would not even need to secure it with tape. Once I finish with the "regular" milk jugs I plan on giving this a try with the Costco jugs.

- Brent
kbaumle
Northwest, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2007
8:12 PM

Post #3218237

Just wanted to post this picture of my milk jugs the day after our blizzard last week. LOL. Take my word for it, there are 15 milk jugs under all that.

Thumbnail by kbaumle
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2007
8:16 PM

Post #3218246

Oh, I believe it! I'm in NE Ohio and we got socked as well! That's what my yard looks like too! Tamara
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2007
1:46 AM

Post #3221955

kbaumle: How many inches of snow did you receive? Looks like your containers have a nice soft insulating blanket of snow to keep them protected throughout this winter!

Tamara: If you received all that snow too, than your containers will be fine. I thought you said on another thread that some of your containers didn't receive enough precipitation. Are some of your containers under an easement or too close to your house? If so, they probably need to be moved to an area of your yard where they can take advantage of the snow blanket provided by Mother Nature.
kbaumle
Northwest, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2007
2:55 AM

Post #3222141

We got about 13 inches out of that storm. And now we're on the leading edge of that ice storm going through...
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2007
3:02 AM

Post #3222154

Bet your sore from all that shoveling! However, I'll take snow any day over those horrendous ice storms! We got ice instead of snow from that storm last week. Plus, we lost power because of downed power lines & trees.The Weather Channel is predicting another round of it tomorrow...GROAN!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 25, 2007
3:52 AM

Post #3222318

we had some snow earlier - starting late afternoon... it was coming down pretty good - but now it's rain -- the temps have gone up a few degrees - enough to turn snow into rain... then tomorrow it should be snow again -- but yea -- ice is the scariest stuff. we're hoping it doesnt get heavy/thick enough to take down power lines.

but -- my milk jugs are now covered again in snow.
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2007
7:57 AM

Post #3222547

How often is everyone watering their milk jugs? Water from the bottom?
Thanks,
Teresa
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2007
11:34 AM

Post #3222689

We got freezing rain and ice again last night. That stuff can be awful.

Bluegrassmom: Are your jugs frozen? Any germination? I haven't had to water anything yet because mine have been frozen for weeks. As of yesterday I couldn't pick them up yet because they're still frozen to the ground, stuck in ice. We had snow, then ice, then more snow last week.

I'm attaching a picture of my maple tree that I took about a week ago.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 25, 2007
2:12 PM

Post #3223054

Well, I think I still have milk jugs out there. We got 13" and should get 3-5 more. The wind is whipping it around so there are some nice drifts. I will venture out to take some photos when I can get out the door.

Teresa,
While they are frozen there is no need to water, as a matter of fact that would be a mistake. I only watered once last year. We had a wet spring and the jugs keep a lot of moisture in. You don't want to drown those little seeds. Go by feel and water when needed. They won't dry out as fast as if they were planted in the open. It doesn't work to say every day or every three days because there are to many variables.

Karen nice photo.

Pauline

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 25, 2007
3:31 PM

Post #3223277

Pauline,

many of my jugs were dry to the touch and defrosted. I only added snow to a few of them - but with the weather that just past through - they all got snow/rain -- so i'm sure they will be good for a long while.

Terese
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2007
3:41 PM

Post #3223309

Shirley--yes, they are on my porch, which is the only place they are safe. But, like you said, they are blocked from the snow and rain. Someone suggested covering them up with snow, so I think that's what I'll do. Tamara
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2007
2:28 AM

Post #3225386

I put another 2 containers outside just in time for the 4" of new snow today followed by more sleet and freezing rain. Don't believe there are any new sprouts, but it's kind of hard to tell since they were stuck to my deck and surrounded by ice. We're suppose to have warmer temps this week, so a lot of it will melt and water my containers.

Karen: Lovely picture of your Maple tree sparkling in the sunlight.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
12:11 PM

Post #3226140

Here is my winter sowing.

Thumbnail by zenpotter
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
7:41 PM

Post #3227433

Okay...I finally started my winter sowing today, and after cutting four milk jugs nearly in half and trying to tape them back together (after filling) I was somewhat frustrated. DH happened to come downstairs at this point and asked "How's it goin'?" When I told him, he asked if I thought a door would work better than cutting nearly all the way around, so I tried it. It's going much faster, and I think it might work better. What do you experienced WSer's think?
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
7:45 PM

Post #3227443

Sorry, I clicked "send" instead of "browse". Here's the photo:

Thumbnail by jasmerr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
8:00 PM

Post #3227490

Not bad, eventually you will need to cut all of the way around to open them up to the elements before you plant them. It might be harder with the seedlings growing in them.
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
8:01 PM

Post #3227493

Here's how I cut the first four:

Thumbnail by jasmerr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
8:02 PM

Post #3227498

That is what I do.
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

February 26, 2007
8:03 PM

Post #3227500

It sure is going faster this way, so I think I finish and just cut them open when it's planting time.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 26, 2007
11:12 PM

Post #3227999

that's how i cut mine too -- thought i had my images in this thread - but must be a different one.

Though i think i cut mine about a half inch higher, right under the handle, using that as the hinge, like you did.

MUCH easier than the first few i did.

-- then use the twistie tie to hold it closed.
tina5333
Sylvania, OH

February 27, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #3228418

Wow! I just found this site. I was looking for the proper way to germinate coneflower and strawflower seeds. I didn't know how much I don't know. May I winter sow my seeds?
lizren
Coaling, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2007
1:17 AM

Post #3228434

I have successfully germinated coneflowers using WS...
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #3228480

zen: Where did they all go? :~0 Your containers are tucked in for the Winter with a nice soft blanket of snow until Spring thaw. Not a thing to worry about. Mother Nature is taking excellent care of them.

jasmerr: Good lookin' containers. Do you have any critters that may get into the ones with a "window"? If not, go with which ever one is the easiest/quickest one for you to make.

tina5333: Welcome to the Winter Sowing Forum! The best place to read all about it is at http://www.wintersown.org Both coneflower and strawflower seeds will do fine via this method. Ask lots of questions and we'll be here to help out and encourage you. Remember to post some pictures too. Good luck!
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 27, 2007
10:45 AM

Post #3229372

tina6333. Welcome. If you didn't find it yet this link in the winersown site it has lists of plants that can be winter sown in each zone. It doesn't cover all, but has a lot. Don't forget to look at the zones below yours as well.

http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Seed_Lists.html
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2007
2:12 PM

Post #3263999

Here is how I have been working with the opaque milk jugs from Cosco. I kind of like how they work.

- Brent

Thumbnail by Brent_In_NoVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 9, 2007
2:35 PM

Post #3264063

Brent, How big is the bag? It looks like it is big enough to tuck under the jug, is it taped to the bottom?

Pauline
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2007
3:25 PM

Post #3264280

I do the same thing for all my gallon milk jugs, except my bag is upright. They are 2 gallon bags, and I leave them open about 2 in. Tamara
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 9, 2007
5:56 PM

Post #3264660

Tamara, where do you get those 2-gal bags. If I used Ziploc bags (1gal), they are not inexpensive if you have to use a lot.
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2007
9:54 PM

Post #3265435

Aldi's! It's the only place I've seen them and they're cheap! Gotta love that! I do plan on reusing them next year, so that makes it an even better deal. Tamara
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

March 10, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #3266021

The bags that I am using are standard 1 gallon baggies (Safeway brand). They fit snuggly over the container. I have not taped any, at least not yet. I will probably need to tape the bag on some of the first few containers that I used to keep then from slipping and filling with water. Keeping the handle portion of the jug in place helps and with this round I kept the rim 2" above the soil line.

- Brent
thistle5
Alexandria, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 10, 2007
12:47 AM

Post #3266088

I went out today & scored a bunch of 1 gallon jugs from Costco from my neighbor's recycling. They're perfect for cutting in half & turning upside down for self-watering containers. I have a zipped plastic bedding bag to tuck them in, until it warms up...
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2007
10:34 AM

Post #3267022

Thistle: What do you mean "turning upside down for self-watering containers"?
thistle5
Alexandria, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 10, 2007
11:42 PM

Post #3268954

I'm going to tuck the top half (w/ the cap off) into the bottom half & probably drill a hole just below where the top rests for overflow-I don't know if self-watering containers will be good for seed starting, but if it doesn't work, I will use them for patio containers for this summer, when watering constantly is a pain! The soilless mix should wick the water in the reservoir up, I'm going to block the hole w/ a coffee filter. I tried Earthboxes last year & everything seemed to grow well, I stil had to water, but not quite as much...
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 10, 2007
11:54 PM

Post #3269002

This site has some pictures:

http://toppertwo.tripod.com/pop_bottle_pots.htm

2-liter bottles make good plant waterers, too. You cut the bottom off the bottle, drill a small hole in the bottle cap, and jab it in the soil next to a plant. It works well in containers, too. They sell spikes that screw on 2-liter bottles, but it's a little pricey if you need a lot of them.

This message was edited Mar 10, 2007 8:07 PM
thistle5
Alexandria, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 11, 2007
12:22 AM

Post #3269099

I felt a bit guilty raiding my neighbor's recycling bin (I did ask her first), but her milk jugs were nicer than mine...
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

March 11, 2007
3:00 AM

Post #3269485

What a great way to make self-watering pots. Thanks for the link...it really helps to see exactly what is being done. This is something that I am going to try...but maybe not for WS.
RatherBDigging
Akron, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2007
8:00 PM

Post #3292671

Thanks to you all. This is my first year to wintersowing and you have given me such good ideas for containers.

Being March 17th today, am I too late for winter sowing? I will be looking up what seeds will do well (esp ones that I currently have) tonight.

In past years, I have done all my seeds on a germination mat and under the grow lights. This way, I could certainly grow even more. And it seems sooooo simple. Thanks.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2007
8:11 PM

Post #3292698

RatherB,

good to see you in WS forum.

as a newbie -- i dont know too much about timing -- but i think now it may be called Spring Sowing
I guess it depends on what your weather is right about now... i know i'm still sowing seeds.

here is a link to the wintersown.org zone6 seed page
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/WS_Database_Z6.html

Terese
bjoan

(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2007
9:28 PM

Post #3292896

RatherBDigging ... It is not at all too late! I'm in zone 7b and have barely begun to sow annuals. Last year from March 17 through May 8, I sowed alyssum (gold dust and Maritime tall), annual phlox, African daisy, baby's breath, balsam impatiens, basil, bat-faced cuphea, breadseed poppy, brocccoli, bachelor button, cabbage, Canterbury bells, carnation, castor bean, cauliflower, celosia plumosa, chives, cleome, Convoluvulus, cucumber, datura, dill, forget-me-not, 4 o'clock, foxglove, hyacinth bean, Johnny jump up, kohlrabi, love-lies-bleeding; marigold (several varieties), millet, morning glory, motherwort, nicotiana, okra, onion (white Lisbon bunching), pansy, parsley, pepper (several varieties), petunia (several varieties), pumpkin, Queen Anne's lace, scabiosa, snapdragon, squash (winter and summer), sunflower (several varieties), tomato (several varieties), vinca, wildflower mix, and zinnia (several varieties).

Everything germinated. Go for it!
RatherBDigging
Akron, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2007
10:14 PM

Post #3293046

Thank you, bjoan and terese (terese, what are you doing over here...I was just dmailing you!)

Wow...looking at your list, bjoan, one would really need a huge grow light set up to do that inside, huh? Impressive.

The link was helpful, thank you. It did give me the answers I was looking for regarding the types of seeds best used. Althought, bjoan, some of the ones you grew I would not have even thought could be done with WS. Wow. I think you many have another dedicated WSer in the group.

If the weather now will not be as harsh with the major freezes and then thaws, could this now affect the ability of the harder seed coats to break open as well now? I was thinking about soaking some of those in warm/hot water for a day prior to sowing to catch up...does anyone think this is necessary? or helpful at all?
bjoan

(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2007
10:41 PM

Post #3293114

RatherB, this is only my second year, so I hesitate to give advice other than from my own experience. Last year the really hard seeds (peach pits were the hardest) I sowed in late December and early January because they definitely needed all that freezing/thawing to crack the pit, let alone the seed inside! I did not nick any seeds I sowed, annual or perennial. I did soak the morning glory seeds in water over night simply because the packet instructions said to do that. I don't know if it is necessary in winter sowing, though, and if I sow them this year, I will skip that step.

Maybe the experts will chime in on this one for you.
RatherBDigging
Akron, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2007
11:14 PM

Post #3293208

Thanks, Bjoan. Anyone else have any thoughts on soaking to help if you sow a little later in the season? Or should I start a new thread to allow other WS gardeners to see it?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 18, 2007
12:50 AM

Post #3293470

Yesterday i put my bean vine, and 2 kinds of Morning Glories in water, and sowed them tonight (yea... i'm up late)

last time i asked about soaking the morning glories, i was told that the freezing and thawing when winter sown would do the trick -- but I wasn't sure how many freezes i'd be having from this day on... so i soaked.

>>new thread to allow other WS gardeners to see it?

sometimes threads tend to go off topic...as i see this is the "milk jug" thread... I do find it helpful to have something i'm looking for in the topic line... but that's up to you.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 18, 2007
2:05 PM

Post #3294728

We would probably get more advice if you started a new one.
RatherBDigging
Akron, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 18, 2007
3:09 PM

Post #3294908


That is what I will do...I need to catch the eyes of all those experienced WS experts. This is off topic now. And others may be thinking the same thing...
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 18, 2007
4:29 PM

Post #3295191

I spring sowed Morning Glories last year without soaking or any type of "extra" preparation. They germinated & grew just fine.

It's best to start a new thread as this one is getting fairly long.
RatherBDigging
Akron, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 19, 2007
12:20 PM

Post #3297870

T hank you, Shirley I did start a new thread on WS. Thank you for your reply. It is appreciated.

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM
Will these seeds work for Winter Sowing? CapeCodGardener 49 Mar 4, 2007 5:39 PM


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