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dave

January 18, 2007
4:52 PM

Post #3096869

This forum is here as a special place where you can ask ANY question about your landscaping. It's our hope that this forum will make a comfortable introduction to gardening for any of our members who need it. Have fun!

Dave
ginnylynn
Blyth, ON
(Zone 5b)

January 18, 2007
6:58 PM

Post #3097293

Hi there, and please allow me to add my welcome to Dave's. There are many, many people here in the Dave's Garden community who are more than happy to help out our newcomers, so please don't be shy. There's a wealth of knowledge and experience here for you to draw on.

Enjoy the time you spend here, and feel free to ask us anything you want to about landscaping. Although I'm certainly no expert in this area, I'm looking forward to being able to help you out with your questions whenever I can. Happy gardening!

--Ginny
Allison_FL
Dunedin, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 19, 2007
1:52 AM

Post #3098532

Hi Everyone New to Dave's Garden Well Come much !!
I enjoy all types of gardening House plants, Tropical's, Growing by seed is a joy too my Hubby and I both enjoy ! We just like growing everything ! Were growing more outside now than in as living in Florida Tropical weather makes it even more fun we have fount we can grow everything ! Each day I enjoy reading Dave's News seeing new photo's in Plant Files learning about new plants and finding where I can buy them ! Amazing all the beautiful plants there are we have been trying a lot of new ones and most Thanks to nice caring people on DG's sharing with us ! I'd like to share with you all too !
I like to share information and answer any questions I can . I enjoy trading and sharing what ever I have too !
Have fun ! Allison
GuardanGirl
Palm Bay, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 20, 2007
11:48 AM

Post #3102729

Hello everyone.
Just wanted to say I think this is GREAT!
dldbrou
Scott, LA
(Zone 8b)

January 20, 2007
1:47 PM

Post #3102973

Hi,

I am no expert by any means and after living in my home for 22 years, we are redoing our landscaping. When we first built our house, there were no trees and the yard was full sun. Now the backyard is almost all filtered shade and the front yard is half sun and half shade. I altered a flagstone path to make it wider and include an area for a hammock. We had a concrete and wrought iron fence installed. The next thing is redoing all the flower beds and adding a sprinkler system. The biggest problem I have is the grass. We have St. Augustine grass and the weeds have taken over. Not sure what the weeds are called but the blades are very thin and spread fast. These weeds will travel through larriope and get into the flower beds. I have tried pulling them out by the roots, but they spread faster than I can pull them. We also have dollar weeds in the lawn and flower beds. Does anyone know of a product that will eliminate these weeds without killing the grass? Also, I need to add dirt to a flower bed that already has bulbs, (iris, amarillas, daffodils, paperwhites and spiderlillies). Is it too late to disturb these bulbs to add dirt? I cannot put dirt on the top of these because they will be burried to deep. Lastly, what is the best type of mulch for flower beds? I now have cypress mulch and not sure if I should add more of the same or switch. We tend to have problems with termites and I thought cypress would be less likely for them to live in. The pine bark that I use to have was always infested and we had to treat yearly. Is there another type or is it a loss cause with the termites? I will add pictures as soon as the weather straightens up.
Thanks for any input.
sos210_14
Dillon, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2007
3:36 AM

Post #3130114

Hi! I'm brand new to Dave's Garden and have been enjoying reading the threads, etc. This is the best thing I've ever found on the internet!!! This is my first question, but you can be sure there are many more. Years ago I rounded up all the irises that my mother had planted in front of the shrubs which had long since overgrown them. I put them in a big bed with nothing but irises under a walnut tree. They were beautiful there for several years, but have been declining because I think they need to be separated and replanted. My problem is that I want to put them in a more visible area, but since they all bloom about the same time, I don't want only irises. I have prepared an irregularly shaped bed around an oak stump that I'm thinking of covering with clematis. Then I want to add daylilies, allium, daffodils and maybe some oriental lilies and spider lilies. Does anyone have any ideas, or better yet, pictures of a bed planted with only bulbs?
Brinda
Yukon, OK
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2007
2:08 PM

Post #3130832

Hi sos...I have no help for your question as I don't garden with bulbs. (The moles/voles eat them faster than I can plant them) But I just wanted to say welcome to DG...you'll soon find that this is your home away from home and I'm sure you will come to love this place like the rest of us. Welcome!
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 28, 2007
5:57 PM

Post #3131703

sos--I don't garden with bulbs either (not much at least), but I don't think people usually plant gardens entirely full of bulbs because while they're beautiful in bloom, the foliage often isn't very exciting by itself, and especially when the foliage starts to die back it can look downright ugly. So most people plant companion plants which will bloom when the bulbs are not blooming and will cover up some of the ugly dying bulb foliage.
sos210_14
Dillon, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2007
6:40 AM

Post #3144660

Thanks, Brinda and ecrane3, for your response. My gardening is pretty much trial and error. I think you're right, ecrane, about all the dead foliage being an eyesore. I thought if i used bulbs that bloomed in different seasons, that would take care of the problem of having everything bloom at once, but I forgot about the dead foliage. Those other bulbs wouldn't cover up the dead foliage the way perennials or something else would--they'd just make more dead foliage! I guess that's why I haven't been able to find any "just bulbs" beds in any of the books and magazines I've looked at. Maybe I'll just find a good design suggestion that includes irises and other things and go with that. (I'm trying to type on my husband's laptop because my desktop crashed yesterday. Am about as computer challenged as I am garden-design challenged.) Just mainly wanted to say thanks to both of you for your welcome to Dave's.
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:43 PM

Post #3148680

Hi sos - Just thought I'd send along a few pics of what I've done with a combination of irises, lilys (bulbs), and other perennials to get blooms throughout the season. This bed has iris, daylilys, oriental lilys, asiatic lilys, groundcover perennials, and mums for fall. Hope these give you some ideas. The area is sun to part-sun. If you see anything you'd like additional info on, just let me know - I'm in 5a for everything here should do fine in your area. Dax

First - In May 5/25 - close-up of Iris -

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:44 PM

Post #3148686

Another Iris in on May 25 - I have six different kinds of Iris in this bed.

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:45 PM

Post #3148690

On July 19 - bed is transformed by oriental, asiatic, trumpet lilies and daylilies -

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:47 PM

Post #3148698

Another view - you can see the iris foliage between the lilies -

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:48 PM

Post #3148701

In the Fall - October 10 - the hardy mums have taken over the spotlight -

Thumbnail by dax080
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dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
2:52 PM

Post #3148718

Here's a front long view of same area, the iris foliage is in the background - hope this helps - Dax

Thumbnail by dax080
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Brinda
Yukon, OK
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2007
3:04 PM

Post #3148777

sos, a great filler for your perennials would be coleus & caladiums. Come on over to the Coleus Forum and we'll get you addicted! LOL

Thumbnail by Brinda
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
3:15 PM

Post #3148811

You bet, Brinda, I also LOVE caladiums and coleus - are they hardy for you in OK? Dax
Brinda
Yukon, OK
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2007
5:50 PM

Post #3149313

Oh no dax! They are not hardy here. That would be a dream come true for me! LOL
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 2, 2007
6:39 PM

Post #3149542

I know what you mean - they are such a colorful addition to a shady garden, I keep hoping to have a microclimate in which they survive, but no such luck - Dax
sos210_14
Dillon, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2007
3:42 AM

Post #3151584

Thanks, dax. I love your combinations--beautiful pictures. The irises with different kinds of lilies is just what I have in mind. And the mums in the fall is a great idea. I'm also thinking of sprinkling the whole bed with something like white alyssum or annual baby's breath to provide a sort of background for the bulbs and a groundcover to keep the weeds at bay. Brinda, I also like your idea about coleus and caladiums--they would add color when none of the bulbs are blooming and would do well behind the stump where they wouldn't get too much afternoon sun. It's amazing that you and I are in the same growing zone. Until very recently I thot I was in zone 8, but it seems it's actually 7b. Most of the rest of my county is in zone 8. We have pretty hot summers, with temps climbing above three digits occasionally. I'd imagine you do, too, but it's probably less humid. Our summer days can be like a sauna at times.
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 3, 2007
2:16 PM

Post #3152331

Hi again - sounds like your summers are much hotter there than up here in 5a, although we are also very humid. Another annual that thrives here in the heat in full sun are marigolds, I forgot to mention them, but they are also in the pictures, and do well in controlling those pesky weeds - be sure to send some pics when you have them - happy gardening! Dax
Brinda
Yukon, OK
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2007
2:33 PM

Post #3152385

Hi again sos, there are many coleus and many caladiums that can take full sun, but will also do well in the shade. If you'd like to know which caladiums are for the sun, you can go to http://www.caladiumworld.com and it will tell you which do well in sun. I have many coleus and caladiums in full sun (all day 100% blazing hot sun) and they do fine.

And I agree with dax...marigolds are a great full sun annual.
sewnfool
Moncks Corner, SC
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2007
5:57 PM

Post #3160229

I am a newbie to landscaping . I thought I'd start by enriching the soil in the front of the house, place a flagstone walkway, then worry about planting. This land has been fallow for 10 yrs. and is sandy with crotilaria and thunder vine ugh! along with some other enchating weeds. Lots to do!
sos210_14
Dillon, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 7, 2007
2:01 AM

Post #3165085

Sewnfool, it sounds like you do have a lot of work ahead of you. I'm a novice at landscaping, too, and have just the opposite problem as yours--too much clay. I think the solution is the same for both of us though--lots and lots of compost. Sounds like you're starting at the right place with putting your walkway in first. Several years ago I asked a landscaper to work up a longterm plan for landscaping the 3 acre yard that surrounds our old rambling farm house but he advised me to put in some walkways, patios, fences, etc. and then do the landscaping. Trouble is--I couldn't afford his services and I don't know where to put the pathways. Plus my husband wouldn't want his mowing interrupted by walkways. (By the way, someone, what does DH mean?--dear husband? I'm new to blogging and don't know the lingo.) How big is your yard, Sewnfool? Hope it's small enough to be manageable.

Thumbnail by sos210_14
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sos210_14
Dillon, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 7, 2007
2:27 AM

Post #3165161

Trial balloon. Have attempted two posts with no results. If this doesn't make it, what am I doing wrong?

After several communications with Terry, who was VERY patient and helpful I learned how to refresh my brower's cache. Thanks, Terry, I can see it all now. I have as much to learn about computers as I do about gardening!

This message was edited Feb 7, 2007 11:02 AM
Ninnian
Sautee Nacoochee, GA
(Zone 7a)

February 18, 2007
2:21 PM

Post #3201413

Ive been peeking in!
A fairly newcomer to Daves and a struggling veggie/wildflower/ lanscaper in the shady Ga mtns! Just thought I'd say hi and thank ya'll for your inputs for us begginers. It can be alil daunting to speak up in a forum where I might look like a total moron!
I look fwd to scavenging posts on raised beds,shaded spaces, pathways,forest lanscaping,.. oh heck- why make a list when I'll be hoping to use most anything come my way? LOL Bewtixt my trees and my soil it's been a never ending battle- but I wont give up!

Hats off to you here at DG's!(new and experienced alike- I appreciate you all!)
Nin

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 18, 2007
7:27 PM

Post #3202285

sos- you already have gorgoeus house with nice landscaping around it,looks to me!
one way to lay a path might be to observe if there already is a path worn, by your daily travels. that tells you you could put a permanent walk there and would use it. I woudn't put walkways across lawn for no reason.
I would consider enlarging planted areas around existing trees.

I would suggest that you re post your question in a new thread, because I for one, haven't been looking at this thread for any questions.
kingl57
Morgan Hill, CA

February 20, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #3206437

Hi All,
Am new to gardening and have discovered that I bought plants because I liked how they looked. I did not consider their growing needs...so now I have a bit of a mess to sort through and many plants to relocate. I also "pruned" (or rather hacked) several of my plants and now they are not only in the wrong spot, they are ugly as well. I'm pretty sure I could use lots of advice.
ginnylynn
Blyth, ON
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2007
12:01 PM

Post #3213955

Hi there kingl57, and welcome to our garden! Do you have any pictures that you could post? That would be a big help if you're looking for some "remedial assistance" :-)

--Ginny
kingl57
Morgan Hill, CA

February 27, 2007
6:56 PM

Post #3230798

Hi Ginny, I will send some pictures a bit later in the season. Many of my plants are in containers as I live in a 5th wheel and have a small, mostly shady area to use for landscaping, approx 60 sq ft of lawn and my "garden" areas that vary in the amount of sun they get. In the late spring and summer I have almost too much sun in one area while the others remain shady. Anyway, we had several nights of freezing temperatures here in California and many of the plants froze. I'm not sure which ones will revive so will post some pix when I can tell what I have left to work with this season. And thank you for the warm welcome and the willingness to take a look-see. Leesa
superpetunia
Petersburg, VA

March 2, 2007
5:30 PM

Post #3241389

I planted a tree many years ago because the tag said fast growing. Now the tree is big and provides great shade but the roots grow on top of the grown. Any way to disguise this or cover it up. The roots are dangerous to the lawn mower too.
ginnylynn
Blyth, ON
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2007
6:16 PM

Post #3241480

Is this tree in a section of your yard where it would look acceptable to allow ivy and periwinkle to grow as groundcovers instead of grass? That way, you would hide the tree roots without harming them and also remove the need to mow in that spot.

--Ginny
bzas
Falls Church, VA

March 24, 2007
6:53 PM

Post #3316286

Hi, I'm putting in raised planters in front of my house on either side of the little porch, and was wondering if anyone could tell me if pressure-treated lumber is ok to use. Someone told me that, nowadays, this type of wood is not as toxic to the soild and plants as it used to be. Is that true? Thanks for any info you have.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 24, 2007
7:18 PM

Post #3316327

It's not treated with arsenic anymore like it used to be, but it's still treated with chemicals so I probably wouldn't use it if you're going to be growing herbs or veggies. But other stuff you should be able to grow just fine.
liebkostdrache
Ashland, OR
(Zone 8a)

December 6, 2007
12:22 PM

Post #4267084

Great Dave!

Thanks! I'll have tons of questions and problems this spring (once this darn cold weather is over) and I begin planning and landscaping for the first time :)
doccat5
Fredericksburg, VA
(Zone 7b)

December 6, 2007
2:46 PM

Post #4267648

Wow, welcome to all the new comers. I to am a beginning landscaper. My area of expertise is mainly organic veggie gardening and roses. We also have fruit and nut trees. However, I retired in last January and things have gotten more interesting. LOL I just completed the Master Gardener classes in November, a goal I've been trying to reach for a long time. I found online courses on beginning landscaping on About. com. I've slowly been working my way through those and find it very enlightening. The program is written in such away as to be easily understandable with pictures. I love those visuals. And best of all it's free! They also have courses for more advanced students. Same deal. It's worth checking out. http://landscaping.about.com/
I've not been on DG very long, but I'm am so thrilled that I decided to subscribe. Best money I ever spent. There's so much information available and so many friendly, and highly experienced gardeners here that are more than willing to share. It's just great! WTG Dave!
ms_chriscross
Asheboro, NC

July 28, 2008
5:11 PM

Post #5332803

Hi everyone!

I'm new to the forum, my first post. My DH and I just moved into a new home after 26 years of marriage, and I have a landscaping issue already. The humongous oak tree in the yard (that really sold the house, you know) used to have an equally humongous wisteria vine growing in it. Someone had the sense to cut the vine before it killed the tree, but now there are hundreds of baby wisteria vines popping up all over the yard. We have already realized that mowing isn't going to help; they grow back faster than the grass does! Short of the shovel and a pair of really tough gloves, does anyone know of an environmentally-friendly way of removing them, orshould I go ahead and get out the pick-axe? My husband wants to fry them with chemicals, but I fear that will leave big brown spots all over the place! HELP!

Christi
Melissande
Chillicothe, OH

August 4, 2008
6:51 AM

Post #5365820

This is such a long and rambling thread I just cut to bottom, so don't know if this has been addressed, but somewhere in there someone asked about paths. Paths are easy, really.

Just go about your daily business for a few months and let your grass get a bit long and you'll see right away where your paths should go. The grass gets flattened, and grows more slowly from walking on it and your paths will be plain. Follow them for your first, basic, utilitarian paths, then let your creativity lead you from there.

Something that's fun to contemplate is the creation of 'rooms' or discrete areas of garden within your yard. Instead of trying to design a conprehensive design for the whole place, use structures (like arches and arbors and vines, benches, birdbaths, focal points like vases, statues, sundials, shepherd crooks with various things on them, wind chimes, hummer feeders, bird feeders and houses, flowers,etc.,) use these things to create 'rooms' with walls, paths into and through these, make walls with shrubs, create smaller sections with themes, perhaps one could be a bird or hummer or butterfly garden, another, a shade garden, based on the fact you might have a shady corner created by some buildings or trees, or some other anomaly in the yard. Get out paper and pen and play with the idea.

In the UK, Biddulph Grange is a great giant version, really the granddaddy of this kind of gardening. *Totally* worth studying:

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-biddulphgrangegarden/

It's actually easier to garden in little sections like this, I've always thought. This isn't 'plop the fountain, flamingoes and garden gnomes right in front of the house so the neighbors can all see them' gardening. This is 'Secret Garden' gardening. Wonderful private spaces you create for *you* that others can't easily see unless you invite them to explore your creation.

Here's a pic of my 'secret garden' in the midst of some upgrades. Normally the porch swing is under the arbor in the background. You enter through the arch which has yellow trumpet vine, honeysuckle, and Don Juan rose growing on it. Like most gardens it's a work in progress.

Melis

This message was edited Aug 4, 2008 2:57 AM

Thumbnail by Melissande
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Surreybrit
Big Lake, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 4, 2008
2:03 PM

Post #5366619

This thread was intended to just be a welcome when the forum first started, you will notice that apart from yours and the one above have really old dates.
To ask your question so it has a better chance of being seen go back to the 'communities list' and re-enter, once in the forum ,scroll to bottom of page where it will say something like "start new subject" and retype, or copy and paste the one you have here, and it will come up at the top of the list where it will be seen. Hope this makes sense to you.
Melissande
Chillicothe, OH

August 6, 2008
8:55 PM

Post #5377973

If you'll look at my post, there's no question in it. In fact, someone else in the thread asked a question which, after reading the thread from beginning to end, I saw (or at least thought I saw) that no one had answered it. I was trying to be helpful and answer that person's question regarding paths.

M
polly1947
Avalon, NJ

August 21, 2008
1:24 AM

Post #5444338

I'm new to gardening (and don't have much more experience on the computer so I hope this will end up where it's supposed to).
Question for you experienced landscapers: What compact (2-3 feet) shrub/bush would make a good companion to my false indigos (which are in the same size range)? I'd like to have a border beside the walk going up to my front door. The 3 indigos are already in place (and spaced about 3 feet apart) but I need to fill in the space between them. (I'll probably plant annuals in front of the bushes to add color.) The area gets some sun/some shade. Thanks for any help.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

August 21, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #5445098

Caryopteris incana 'Sunshine Blue'


Common Name: “Blue Mist Shrub”

Googled this for you:

(www.provenwinners.com) (Blue Mist Shrub) The bright chartreuse yellow foliage of Caryopteris Sunshine Blue™ PPAF is accented with dark amethyst blue flowers from late summer through mid fall. The shrubby mounds of bright foliage look delightful all summer long. Lovely fragrance and a strong grower.

Primary Color
Blue Violet USDA Hardiness Zone
5-9
Height
3 Feet Spread
3 Feet

also peony, iris, spring bulbs.

PS. I am glad you want to work around your baptisia because it won't be moved - once it finds a home...it has to stay there.
jams001
manila
United Kingdom

November 8, 2008
1:42 PM

Post #5765843

wow this really good post interesting to read thanks for that kind of topic you have post here in the forum

Programmable Thermostat
ty1on
Woodland, MS

February 11, 2009
7:22 AM

Post #6122920

Hello...We recently bought a small house that has absolutely no landscaping. I am very new at any gardening/landscaping. The house has a small front porch with white wooden banisters and white wooden hand rails on both sides of the front steps. A carport is on the left of the steps and the rest of the front of the house is to the right. There are no plants at all arount the steps or the front of the house. We live in Southeast zone. The yard is slightly inclined and retains water from the carport end down toward the front of the house which faces the East. Can anyone give me any ideas about what to plant on each side of the steps and then along the front of the house? The soil is a mixture of clay and sand and very moist. I don't know where to start. Any help appreciated.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 11, 2009
1:33 PM

Post #6123391

Learn your zone. Then google plants that do well in moist conditions facing east---then you can refine for sidewalk plants etc. etc.

You will get lots of help here (welcome!!) I am at work so this is just a quick off the top of my head response to something you can do to help start your research. Also check out local nurseries and ask for help/recommendations.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 11, 2009
2:39 PM

Post #6123636

You might think about starting a new thread with your question--this is an old thread so I'm not sure how many people are still watching (to start a new thread, go back to the main page in this forum that lists all the different threads/discussion topics, and at the top of the page just under the navigation tabs you'll see a link that says "post a new thread". It would help too if you could post a picture of the area you want some help with.
ty1on
Woodland, MS

February 11, 2009
6:51 PM

Post #6124688



Thank you so much...good advice, and much appreciated.
Hopehillconnie

February 20, 2009
9:07 AM

Post #6164012

Hi I am new tonight to this forum. I have a specific assignment for my son's Aug. wedding. I am suppose to plant in two long narrow planters ...Vines that will be placed at the base of an arbor/archway that they will be married under. i need to pick a vine that will be a very rapid grower. My husband and I have decided to construct a temporary structure with twine for the vine to grow on that can be moved to the site after construction is complete and it is closer to the date of the event. In the mean time I can start these planters in our green house and then move out to the sun and tend and fertilize so as to get the most growth possible. What plant would you suggest would be the most apt to be successful and with the best growth ...both height and fullness. We are in a zone 4 but it really doesn't matter because I can transplant later if possible or not. That is not really all that important to me. I am considering a Hall's Honeysuckle or possibly a clematis. what do you think? thanks
swissy
Laurentians - Quebec, QC
(Zone 4b)

February 20, 2009
5:34 PM

Post #6165398

A very fast grower is The Virginia Creeper. We have an old wooden fence toward the road and wanted to cover up the wood. We planted last year a few of this Virginia Creeper and "voila" it covered up the fence quickly, in the fall the leaves had a beautiful red colour, it is very hardy. Of course we are in Zone 4b

Thumbnail by swissy
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JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2009
9:21 PM

Post #6166328

An outdoor eatery that I frequented in Germany had plant boxes on lockable wheels. they were about 1 1/2 feet wide and 8 or so feet long, by 2 feet or more tall, with a latticework trellis built on a 2x4 frame holding the vines. They protected the wood by painting it white and stapling heavy plastic inside the plant boxes. Looked great and lasted for years - looked new when I moved there, and still looked brand-new 3 years later when I left.
GREEN59
Palestine, TX

February 26, 2009
4:02 PM

Post #6193092

I am in East Texas and have a "virgin" yard. There are established "flower beds" on three sides of the house (south, west & north) Nothing in them ! ! !
My house faces West, but have 3 large trees near the street that partially shades house.
Expansive empty lot on South side with partial sun all morning and full sun rest of day.
Can I plant azaleas on the North & West side of my garage? (sun in afternoon)
I also want calla lilies, hydrangeas, carpet phlox and hostas.
Where should they be planted?
Partial sun on side yard & front of house til 3pm - then full sun
Shade on North side all day because of shadow of house & garage.
I would appreciate any suggestions and ALL your help
Thanks
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2009
4:24 PM

Post #6193206

I'd look up your favorite plants and see where they would be happiest at being planted. The hostas love the shade, so they would go well on the north and if it is going to be bright shade that you will keep moist; the hydrangeas, & etc...

Lots of plants that are described as full sun actually like a bit of afternoon shade if you are down in SE Texas, if Palestine is in the NE then they don't have to have it, but I think that a ton of gardening websites are written by folks that have no clue how hot and humid a deep south afternoon can be. :-)
ty1on
Woodland, MS

March 2, 2009
7:08 PM

Post #6211797

Hello everyone. I was wondering any anybody could suggest some inexpensive landscaping design software that would help me figure out what to plant in front of my house. Currently it is bare...nothing on either side of the front steps or along the front. I like color. Blooming shrubs, Annuals and Perrenials also. My house is located in Zone 7, North MS and faces East. Any help appreciated. Also any info on how to build pathways (easy). Thanks.
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2009
5:31 PM

Post #6242843

Hmm, I think you need to start a new thread with JUST this question in it. At the bottom of the "beginner landscaping" page there is a "start a new thread" thingy. there may even be one at the top...

edited to add: Yeah! it is right under the words "communities"! That will help everyone to see it - if it is in it's own thread instead of tacked on to the bottom of this "welcome" thread.

This message was edited Mar 9, 2009 12:33 PM
ty1on
Woodland, MS

March 11, 2009
5:06 AM

Post #6250402

Thanks...JuneyBug.. I will get the hang of using the threads...I hope..
beadmom
Bend, OR
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
1:16 AM

Post #6258803

I decided last year I could get nominated for "Desperate Landscapes" (I can only dream that some camera crew will show up and redo my yard for free...*sigh*) but since that is unlikely.. I've never seen them do a show with a yard full of donkeys & goats...

After watching many landscaping disaster shows I started on my own in the non-livestock populated areas. As soon as everything unfreezes for more than three days I'll see what lived besides my pine tree...My apple tree is questioable and no way to tell on the shrubbry.

This year I think I will need advise on sprinkler systems.

Ginger
Bnorr63
Galesburg, IL

March 22, 2009
9:37 PM

Post #6304857

I recently bought a house with a backyard void of every thing except bricks. If I tear out the bricks of an area approxiamately 8'x8' , what would be a good idea to re-use the space with that would be original and cost-efficient?
curvesarein
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2009
2:51 AM

Post #6528241

A question. What is an easy way to clean up china berry seeds? I have tried raking, brooming and picking up by hand. I love the tree , but don't like this mess. Is there something that will vacuum up the seeds and not pick up my landscape rock? For the flower bed I thought maybe some landscape cloth over a five gallon bucket and I could sift out the dirt, but that might be too big for china berries.
Thanks,
Linda in AZ

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bonbon1944
Grand Island, FL

May 18, 2009
4:05 PM

Post #6565083

Hi I am very very new to gardening and have no idea what I'm doing but I want to landscape my front yard with Florida native flowers and ground cover. My yard is about 25' by 25' mostly sugar sand and full sun also zone 9a. It is a flat area and right now mostly weeds. I would appreciate any help anyone can give me.
peaceman6
Honea Path, SC

April 25, 2010
6:55 AM

Post #7735131

hey there y'all! i planted a shrub about 4 years ago that i forgot the name of. it resembles a loropetalum with it's deep burgundy foliage but doesn't flower, like the white or pink flowers i've been seeing on the loro's around the area this year. does anyone have any idea what this shrub may be??? i'm perplexed. thanks in advance for any help!
huechera

(Zone 4a)

May 10, 2010
3:35 PM

Post #7781329

Hi, I'm new. Nice to meet everyone! I have been reading through the site, and have learned a lot. I look forward to learning more!
~h
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

May 10, 2010
4:08 PM

Post #7781414

Hi Everyone,
I just looked through the last few posts and realized that some of you might be frustrated because no one has answered or responded to your questions. While I can't help with any of these questions specifically, may I offer other places to post? The best way to get a question answered is to start a new post with a brief descriptive title. For instance, there are a lot of threads titled " I need help..." While this might be how you feel, It's best to state the topic you need help with and make sure it's in the right forum.
For basic landscape questions: Beginner Landscaping
For basic garden questions: Beginner Gardening
For plant identification: Plant and Tree Identification
For questions about how to use the forums: FAQ:Forums

This is big community so don't get frustrated if no one answers right away. Try a new forum or add some photos to your thread.

Welcome and Good Luck!
edwardmartin
CASTLETOWN
United Kingdom

January 4, 2011
4:29 AM

Post #8291506

Hii All I am New in Davesgarden ,,

Thanks to all,,,
edwardmartin
CASTLETOWN
United Kingdom

January 4, 2011
10:36 PM

Post #8293043

sos210_14 wrote:Sewnfool, it sounds like you do have a lot of work ahead of you. I'm a novice at landscaping, too, and have just the opposite problem as yours--too much clay. I think the solution is the same for both of us though--lots and lots of compost. Sounds like you're starting at the right place with putting your walkway in first. Several years ago I asked a landscaper to work up a longterm plan for landscaping the 3 acre yard that surrounds our old rambling farm house but he advised me to put in some walkways, patios, fences, etc. and then do the landscaping. Trouble is--I couldn't afford his services and I don't know where to put the pathways. Plus my husband wouldn't want his mowing interrupted by walkways. (By the way, someone, what does DH mean?--dear husband? I'm new to blogging and don't know the lingo.) How big is your yard, Sewnfool? Hope it's small enough to be manageable.


Nice Threads,,

Thanks,,

edwardmartin
CASTLETOWN
United Kingdom

January 4, 2011
10:40 PM

Post #8293044

Here many landscaping post and all are really good post but i like more Mr. sos210_14post looking for more updates

Thanks,,
lingst
Summit, NJ

December 11, 2011
8:57 PM

Post #8925725

Hi everyone--happy to be joining Dave's Garden. Looking forward to some interesting discussions.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Beginner Landscaping Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Landscape Transformation - join me! LarissaH 7 Mar 4, 2007 10:31 PM
Hello everyone, I'm new , and I need some landscaping help. Mrsfed04 32 Mar 9, 2012 9:12 PM
Encourage growth to Arborvitae carbo3595 15 Jul 2, 2010 8:11 PM
Update on our lanscaping situation. Mrsfed04 8 Jun 12, 2011 11:31 AM
inexpensive groundcover Michiline 35 May 26, 2009 2:46 AM


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