Asiatic Dayflower, commelina communis

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

Am I the only person in here who disposes of 60 - 100 lbs. of this stuff twice a seaon? http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/653/index.html . It's a legacy plant left to me by the previous owner of my home. I wish I had taken pre-pull pix of my property before I started trying to eradicate this stuff. It positively chokes out all other vegetation, and extends out into the lawn.

It also laughs at Roundup.

I despise this plant.

-Joe

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

Oh my gosh! You have positively IDed my weeds for me! I posted a pic over in the ID forum and nobody could positively ID it for me. When I posted over in ID, I had no idea it got a blue flower on it. I found that later when I was weeding around a peony left by the PO and found one with a blue bloom. I don't have near what you do, I might get a 5 gallon bucket full over the season.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Now, joe, don't sugar coat it (or sauté it for that matter).

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

Mmmmmm. Butter ...... :p

:)

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

Hmmmm..........1 down, 19 more to go.......

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

LOL, yes Terry, I was just reviewing my list of plantings, and as I review it I am considering alternatives based on what I am reading here.

:)

-Joe

There are a two burning bushes I hadn't yet added. And a few other plants. :(

This message was edited Jan 28, 2007 5:06 PM

Quoting:
Hmmmm..........1 down, 19 more to go.......

Oh oh oh, I get it. You made a funny. Took me a while. That's hysterical. At least to me it is.

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

Isn't Fothergilla a nice native alternative for burning bush?

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

What other plants do you have to remove Joe?

Yes, I think it is. Probably the best possible choice given the color is more spectacular. Excellent suggestion for joegee.

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

On the eradication list:

Bishop's weed, Japanese barberry, climbing euonymus, crown vetch, burning bush. I am probably going to put incense cedar in place of the burning bushes. Out front where the barberry is lurking I want to put in something that is more controlled, but a similar height, and easier to trim without it looking so horrible. I am always thinking about fragrance. I notice a nice hardy abelia in the plant files. Something native might be witch hazel, h. virginiana?

On the watch closely list (these are all my doing :( ):

A princess tree, a silk tree (supposedly not hardy here), variegated arundo donax (ditto). By looking at other peoples stuff I see the buddleia is highly questionable, as are the orange tiger lilies and the fountain grass.

Can I garden without guilt? :)

Is there any nastiness about heptacodium miconoides, Seven Son's Tree yet? I am considering either an h. miconoides, or more likely a Franklinia tree, which is a lovely little native tree. I want something fragrant, and less than twenty feet, but a tree-like form for the back of my property by an alley.

I like the exotic, but I don't want to think my little garden is responsible for creating massive native plant die-offs. :(

-Joe

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Quoting:
Can I garden without guilt? :)


Sure, and with prowess, wit, and success. Knowledge helps, and practical application thereof. Only you can create the recipe for yourself through trial and error.

So, to the knowledge bit. If you are leaning native, many of the plants mentioned above fit. Not for purists, mind you. Fothergilla are great species from the coastal plain of NC down through FL and AL, and in the Appalachian area of NC, TN, and AL. Hardly upper midwest territory, but perfectly hardy and functional way up into southern WI at least. If you want a great fall colored shrub that also does some bird feeding that IS from your neck of the woods, you might add to your consideration one of the compact Aronia types (especially black chokeberry) or one of the compact Viburnum dentatum.

Hamamelis virginiana is a great fragrant large shrub/small tree, but not a substitute in form/function for a barberry. A Ceanothus might work for restrained height. A Symphoricarpos orbiculatus might be even better for ease of care, toughness, size, and wildlife value.

That's cool as the dickens that you are investing in a Calocedrus (or whatever the current name is); you'll be the only one on the block with that.

If you want fragrance during the growing season in a relatively small tree, you might want give another coastal native a shot. Magnolia virginiana (or M. v. var. australis) is a fine plant that can be grown as a single stem tree, though it is seen more often as a multistemmed plant (more flowering stems). Here in KY it is early June blooming, so you'd be getting the incredibly great lemony scented blossoms rocking your world around late June and early July. Creamy white, a couple inches across, you'll wonder why you haven't had this heavenly horticultural heirloom before now. There are many named selections wafting around: Moonglow®, 'Green Shadow', 'Henry Hicks', and others are grown for varying levels of evergreen-ness and hardiness. It'll come down to what you can get, or what you learn about local successes.

If you favor fragrance....and you don't avoid the allure of the alien...but you implicitly ignore invasives...you could do worse than a voluptuous viburnum. There are only twenty or so that would "fill the bill" and provide many more seasons of interest in mid-northern OH. To wit:

Viburnum carlesii and clones
Viburnum x carlcephalum and clones
Viburnum x burkwoodii and clones
Viburnum x bodnantense and clones
Viburnum farreri and clones

There's one (or ten) for everybody. Make a matrix of the form and function you want, then go to town with it. There are quite a few viburnum threads in the backlog; take a gander at them for more info.

And have fun with it all; being right isn't the point.

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

These links are all from Ohio State University

http://ohioline.osu.edu/b865/b865_01.html
http://ohioline.osu.edu/b865/index.html
http://ohioline.osu.edu/b865/b865_18.html
http://ohioline.osu.edu/b865/b865_01.html#woody

and this from The Nature Conservancy of Ohio on alternatives for certain plants

http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/ohio/science/art8163.html

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

Oh and.........

I never heard Joe say he was a purist. I'm not a purist, that's why I suggested the Fothergilla. It's actually on my list of must haves. Most people who buy the burning bush buy it for the color, Fothergilla is alternative.

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

Heh, with my love of palms and cold-resistant semi-tropicals I'll never be a purist, but I'll gladly consider alternatives. I am not fond of the burning bushes, so that's an easy choice. The same with the barberry's. Thank you everyone for your suggestions. :)

Coralberry is really pretty, actually. That would look lovely, as would any of the California lilacs.

Thank you!

-Joe G.

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

Terry, 1 down, 19 to go. Did you mean I had 20 invasives in my journal? I know about the ones above. What have I missed?

-Joe

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

No Joe, it wasn't directed at you ;)......I will go have a look at your journal though.

Have you seen this book? Not too much money and really a good read.

http://davesgarden.com/gbw/c/2094/

Another good read is 'Noah's Garden: Restoring the Ecology of Our Own Backyards' and again, not for much money.

http://davesgarden.com/gbw/c/1136/

Bucyrus, OH(Zone 6a)

Oooh good prices, and I need a nice winter read. :)))

Tankee,

-Joe

I'll second the Viburnum x burkwoodii suggestion above.

Speaking of winter reads... I just wiped out reading 4 publications. Mostly all on wetlands reclamation but I keep meaning to get to that "Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants".

And Joe, please try "Noah's Garden: Restoring the Ecology of Our Own Backyards". I think you will really like it.

Bureau County, IL(Zone 5a)

Hey Joe, if you don't mind the ribbon grass taking over your whole gardening bed and jumping into your turf, and then into your neighbors yard, then you're okay.

Here's a read about your Princess Tree
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/pato1.htm

And one for your Silk Tree
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/alju1.htm

Who said your Albizia julibrissin wouldn't grow there in zone 6? They grow in zone 5. Some people will tell you they're tender, but when you see one that put out 8 ft of growth in one season, I don't see how that's tender. Just my opinion, but if you're serious about not wanting your plants to spread into other area's, the plants you know to be invasive should be removed. I've got pictures of 2 Albizia trees doing just fine in zone 5b. Below is the Albizia that put out 8 ft of new growth. Does it look tender?

Thumbnail by terryr

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