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Soap and Candle-making: Goat Milk Soap?

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Forum: Soap and Candle-makingReplies: 26, Views: 338
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ceeadsalaskazone3
Seward, AK

February 15, 2007
6:31 AM

Post #3190919

Anybody out there making goat milk soap? I've been using some from a local goat keeper but she isn't in the goat business any more. Been using it for 30 years (I'm 60) and people guess my age in the 30's by facial skin alone. I want some more. Let me know, please.
Carol
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

February 19, 2007
3:16 PM

Post #3204816

I make goatmilk soap all the time, for years now, I use to have goats, had a fresh supply of milk, but sold them all, now I just buy the milk from a friend or use the powdered goatmilk and make my own with the powder.

dmail me...
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2007
9:14 PM

Post #3484575

Goatmilk soap is all the rage among soapers I've noticed. What is it that you like so much? I've never tried the stuff. Does it have to be goatmilk, are there other types of milk that make nice soaps?
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2007
9:45 PM

Post #3484717

You can use regular milk too, But of course if you advertise it's goatmilk then you have to make goatmilk LOL. Milk makes a richer creamier bar of soap.
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2007
4:43 PM

Post #3486601

Does it smell differently?
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2007
5:26 PM

Post #3486741

Depends on how it's made I guess. some folks don't like the smell, but if it 's made correctly you can't tell the difference.

by being made correctly, means NOT burning the milk when you mix it with the lye solution. It's tricky, but it can be done,

I mix my lye solution with frozen milk and it's chopped up into managable pieces, then pouring the lye over the top it never burns this way and disolves just as good, I've burnt milk in the past and nothing is worse smelling LOL

zeoplum
Mobile, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2007
5:30 PM

Post #3486752

I used to make homemade soap. It always came out tan colored but I loved it. I also bought it from other people and their's was usally tan colored too.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2007
7:02 PM

Post #3487027

goatmilk soap or any other milk based soap is almost always going to be tan in color, That's one of the characteristics of milk based soaps, doesn't change a thing, makes it look rustic and that's fine with me. Also, if you ever find a milk based soap that's white. Ask them if their base oil is Lard, or crisco. then you'll know why. if Lard or crisco, yes some use crisco in making soaps, then milk based soaps will turn out white. If olive oil , coconut oil, and palm kernal oil is used then it will turn out tan. Most of my soaps turn out a creamy color, if I use a very dark colored fragrance oil then it changes the color of the soap to a little darker tan
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 11, 2007
7:54 PM

Post #3487195

If you freeze the milk first and then add the lye to it, and add the milk lye mixture to the cooled oils, you will be able to achieve a white bar of soap instead of tan.

kanita
zeoplum
Mobile, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2007
8:33 PM

Post #3487311

Yes, I've heard that too! I think I tried it slushy and it came out a cream color.

It's been a few years so I can't remember exactly.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 11, 2007
11:09 PM

Post #3487814

I freeze the milk completely. So I let it sit overnight, then I add the lye to it.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2007
12:39 AM

Post #3488121

Sometimes when I freeze the milk , it's not froze solid over night, if it's froze solid overnight, then you could use it,

I can't imagine anybody getting a White , white bar of soap using any kind of milk,

I have come close with a pale cream colored soap after the finished product sits onthe shelf for a while.

But it's almost impossible to make it white if your using milk. Just my opinion, if your not worried about making it white , and just a cream to tan bar, t hen freezing the milk mixing it with the lye a little at a time, or rather mixing the lye in with the frozen milk chunks, slowly though, you will most of the time achieve a cream to tan bar of soap.
zeoplum
Mobile, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 12, 2007
2:42 AM

Post #3488630

Actually, now I'm wondering...if memory serves me correctly...the tan color of milk soaps comes from the carmelizing of the milk sugars (lactose). So I wonder what would happen if you used Lactaid (or whatever the name is of that product that is lactose free). Anyone ever try it?

Also, I've noticed that the commercial grade milk soaps are usually white. Makes me wonder what they're doing differently.

Stephanie (who is especially fond of the tan colored milk soaps)
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2007
2:53 AM

Post #3488654

You can bet your bottom dollar their not using olive oils in their soaps, their using the cheapest filler solid form of fat they can use.

I haven't a clue as to your question about lactose free milk
jbren
Jim Thorpe, PA

May 12, 2007
10:39 AM

Post #3489156

Commercial grade soaps are made entirely different than our home made soaps. They are milled and put through extruding machines to get the shape and hardness.

I can get an almost white color in my 100% goatsmilk soap if I don't allow it to gel.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2007
11:27 AM

Post #3489238

I stick mine in the freezer so it won't gel, is that what you do JBren?

kathy
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2007
1:54 PM

Post #3489604

I'll have to try a batch sometime, thanks for the great tips.

I have used Lard and Crisco in a batch of soap before. I'll have to admit, the Crisco wasn't the best soap I've ever used! But for a beginning or a soaper on a budget, it works. Crisco has a little Palm Oil in it too.
As for Lard. Personally, Lard or any other kind of tallow is one of my top 3 favorite fats in a soap recipe. My dear friend has such sensitive skin and it is one of the few bars she can use.

I read an article on commercial soap the other day and I am never using a bar of that stuff again. Ick.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 12, 2007
6:47 PM

Post #3490335

My milk soaps are always white unless I want them colored.
jbren
Jim Thorpe, PA

May 12, 2007
11:47 PM

Post #3491050

Kathy, I've put them in the fridge or on a rack on the table with the ceiling fan going, but I personally prefer gelled soaps. I think they harden quicker to allow unmolding and cleaning. Once I make a batch and it's done it's thing, I want it out of the mold, cleaned beveled and put up to cure.

I usually force gel in a preheated 170 degree oven for an hour, then turn it off and leave it for another 8 or so, or overnight.

And Renwings, I agree...lard and tallow make the best bars ever. I occasionally add a bit of crisco to give the soap a sort of a translucence. Most people who say 'ewww' to lard or tallow in soap don't realize that the commercial bars are made with animal fats.
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2007
3:08 PM

Post #3496086

I get Suet from the butcher on occasion. If i don't, he throws it away! Makes a beautiful hard white soap.

Anyway, I made a batch of milk soap! I used evap. milk. I think it's a pretty color. Reminds me of antique linen. I added the milk to the lye water after it had cooled to the point it was ready for the fat. The only thing i didn't like was the way it altered the fragrance I added. It smells like banana bread now!
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 14, 2007
3:57 PM

Post #3496228

LOL...It will change your fragrances if you're not careful. I know some people mix the lye with 20%water and then once its cooled add the milk to help with keeping the bar white.

kanita
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2007
6:09 PM

Post #3496600

It's not a bad smell, really. Just not what I expected. I'll have to keep that in mind in the future! Well it looks like the majority rules! I do like milk in soap.
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

May 15, 2007
2:44 AM

Post #3498328

I have been doing buttermilk soap as well as goat milk! Buttermilk Lavender is one of my best sellers.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2007
9:20 PM

Post #3566774

I'm not a soaper but I love handmade soaps. I could care less if they turn out white or not. I'd rather have the natural colors than the colored soaps as long and they lather well, rinse well and smell good.
Whitewidower
Greensboro, AL

September 5, 2012
2:05 AM

Post #9265426

Somebody please give me a receipt on goat milk MP soap. From beginning to end. Thank you.

brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

October 10, 2013
10:23 AM

Post #9682919

I need some good pointers for making bar soap as it is completely NEW to me. I would like to add flower petals (and have calendula, lavender and rose blooms). While I still have flower blossoms (and the frost has not killed them yet) - should I harvest a few and dry for soap making later? Is that how you do it? Any good soap starter recipes and mindful thoughts to give me a jumpstart? Can I do it? I also have fresh harvested and cleaned loffah's which I can add to some of the soap-perhaps. Goat milk soap would be fine but I don't have goats now.

Thank you in advance
Moms_Garden
Dammeron Valley, UT
(Zone 6b)

December 25, 2013
8:23 PM

Post #9734452

I know it's probably too late to harvest, but dried herbs/flowers are much better to use than fresh, as fresh herbs can go moldy. Also, most plant additives turn brown after a while, but calendula and parsley keep their color. Keep in mind you don't want your additives too big, or they will be scratchy when the soap is used. You can infuse the oils or water with herbs or spices to color the soap. Alkanet root powder makes beautiful light violet to dark purple soap, depending on the amount of infused oil used. Cinnamon, turmeric, parsley, annatto seed, brewed coffee, and others are fun to experiment with.

When I use goat milk, I cut the amount of water in half, dissolve the lye in that, then add the goat milk half to the soap once it has reached light trace. (This might not make sense until you make soap, but it's just another way to use goat milk.)

You can find step-by-step instructions for soap at http://www.lofthousegardens.com/soappage.html.

And, YES you CAN do it! (Be warned, though, this is addictive!) Have fun!

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