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Winter Sowing: Lessons learned for next year #3

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zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 20, 2007
12:22 PM

Post #3207590

I am starting a new thread since #2 is so long.

This is the link to #2 if you wish to read it.

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/682914/#new

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 20, 2007
12:26 PM

Post #3207602

Thanks Zen - since i'm still a WS noob -- i'm taking pretty good notes and hopefully will be able to contribute next year... but i did learn a lot from ready these posts.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 20, 2007
12:31 PM

Post #3207614

I still have some to sow as well. I also am waiting for an order so then there will be more. I didn't keep a record of the order so I don't know how many more. I sure hope I don't have to buy any containers. My DH has to drink a lot of milk since the kids moved out and I can't drink milk.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 20, 2007
12:39 PM

Post #3207636

>>I didn't keep a record of the order so I don't know how many more.

Oh man... that would drive me nuts. I have this lil system of internet shopping (we do it A LOT)

I pretty much know when the UPS guy is gonna show, or even Mike the Mail Guy.

I know I dont have any orders coming in... but DH - it's like Christmas every day for him... again - drives me nuts.

as for containers... it's funny now, when i shop, i say "wow, that'd make a nice greenhouse."

and now I'm not yelling at the kids for NOT recycling, I'm yelling that they recycle my greenhouses.
One i just found will work good - though small, is those Naked Juice containers. They are square, and will hold 4 seeds nicely.
(I've already got 3 on my counter waiting to be filled) but yeah -- we don't go thru a lot of milk... only about a gal every 5 days.

and my son (bless his heart) could be bringing home milk jugs from work (Starbucks) but keeps asking if i need grounds. I told him... "Wait til Spring".
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

February 20, 2007
12:44 PM

Post #3207648

ohhhhhhhh my your turning down coffee grounds??!! Put them down on top of future beds your planning to make and the worms will turn them under for you and make castings.. they LOVE coffee gounds. Top dress evergreens with them... Put them in a compost bin if you have one.. I'd take all the coffee grounds I could get!! I've done a starbucks tour and gotten all I could get. :) And they smell so nice too! :)

Susan

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 20, 2007
12:58 PM

Post #3207684

Susan -- once the snow melts and the ground softens up a bit, i will start adding grounds again. with the coffee and espresso we go thru here - my lil composter has plenty... i usually have grounds coming out of my ears.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 20, 2007
1:00 PM

Post #3207691

It is driving me a bit nuts about the seed order. It is one of the few places in the world that still will only take orders on a piece of paper mailed to them with payment enclosed. I forgot to make my own copy, I am to use to my computer doing that for me.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 20, 2007
8:47 PM

Post #3209034

i'm curious on soil "dampness"

do you thoroughly soak the soil and let it "drip", so then it's still quite wet when you put the seeds in, or
do you just slightly dampen the soil -- or is it somewhere in between?

I'm thinking my soil may have been too wet on my first few, but they froze soon after (did those when we were below zero)
but they are starting to thaw, as they are now in the sun on my back patio.

the ones i did yesterday and today were not as wet, but some from a few days ago are already seeming dry to the touch.

any input on wetness of soil ?

OH and is the soil "fluffy" or sort of packed down?

TIA,

Terese
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 20, 2007
8:53 PM

Post #3209052

I thoroughly soak the soil and then let it drain until it is done draining. I just make sure the soil level is even and then plant I don't pack it down.
arachide
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

February 20, 2007
11:59 PM

Post #3209614

Dave47, my 90% germination was based on 1 container of 15 not germinating at all. I didn't keep track of how many seeds were sown in each jug because it was pretty much a HOS for every one. This year each jug is getting less seeds because I'm more confident of germination.

Terese, that's a good question about damp soil and packing it down. I don't have a large area to work in (my kitchen) and it took forever last year to get each container ready. This year I changed my method. I fill a large bucket with soil, add warm water and let it sit until everything is good and wet (not dripping). I line up my jugs on a tray and fill each one with premoistened soil, thump each jug on the counter just to settle the soil, sow the seeds, label and tape, then out the door.

Last year the soil seemed to settle lower than what I anticipated, so that's the reason for the "thump" on the counter. Just to make sure I got enough in each jug.

I just ordered more seeds, even though I told myself I was done for sure now. Internet shopping is hazardous to my budget :)

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 21, 2007
12:55 AM

Post #3209814

arachide,

>>Internet shopping is hazardous to my budget :)

tell me about it. this plant shopping is quite time consuming -- i'm trying to maximize the s/h charges - getting everything from one site... everything is starting to look the same. LOL

I too have to work in my kitchen - I do it on days the DH is out of town - i get soil everywhere.
I must have read your soil in a bucket/add water comment - because that is what i did today... I ran out of SW'ing containers - so i just have soil in that huge tupperware bowl.

where you at in Chicago? I'm out west, with 290 in my back yard - literally.

Terese
arachide
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2007
1:46 AM

Post #3209982

Hi Terese:

I used to live out in the western suburbs, it's nice out there. I'm down by Midway Airport now and like it but you guys have a better nursery selection out that way I think LOL. That's why I do almost all of my plant shopping online now. I know how it can make a person crazy though, too. It seems I want 2 specific things from 10 different companies. I will also confess to placing 3 different orders from one seed company this year. Need to get a better handle on this, but it so much fun as I find new things each time I look.

The bucket and water idea wasn't even my idea, I read about it somewhere else and it was a duh! moment for me. Why didn't I think of that myself?

I was going to start my annuals now but then heard that some annuals planted too early have the potential to rot in their containers. I don't know any specifics and am curious if anyone has ever had this problem.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 21, 2007
3:09 AM

Post #3210248

ah yes... i know midway well. my DH's family is from there... plus he has worked there for 21 yrs.

I think i've planted some annuals... right now, i don't have a method to my madness -- but i'm taking good notes... so if i have a lot of failure, i'll make adjustments for next year.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 21, 2007
12:19 PM

Post #3210862

This is my first year to winter sow annuals, I am taking good notes as well. I have just been planting them along with the perennials. Last year I planted everything at the same time and the seed just seemed to come up when it was ready. Beginners luck?

The last packet of seeds arrived yesterday. Six packets to winter sow and five to wait and sow outside when the weather is warmer, those are all succulents and say to plant when warm. I got them from J.L. Hudson and like to order from them they are very good about indicating plant when warm or the seeds need cold etc.

I have planted 78 containers, mostly gallon milk jugs and have 8 to go as long as I don't get some more. I am just starting to put in native plants at our cabin so I have a place to plant them all.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2007
1:17 PM

Post #3211021

zen: I did 80 containers last year and am really trying to cut back. I think I have about 35 so far, but haven't done many annuals yet, and I have quite a few of those I want to do.

You're going to be very busy at planting time!

Karen
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 21, 2007
2:05 PM

Post #3211152

Karen,

I know I did 80 last year. Fortunately DH enjoys it to and helps me. I was talking about cutting back and he said no we can do it. I still didn't get all of the seeds I wanted to, I need to leave some for next year.
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

February 21, 2007
2:19 PM

Post #3211205

Pauline, you have me beat! I only planted 78 WS containers. Some milk jugs and most ice cream buckets.
Going to look at garage sales this spring for more ice cream buckets, as I begged all I could from friends and relatives. We very seldom have ice cream in the house. I'm not supposed to eat many dairy products, but do cheat on the cheese.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2007
2:21 PM

Post #3211214

I don't have that much planting space , either. If I find the time and materials I might expand a couple of beds a little, lasagna style, after the weather breaks. But it won't be until after my husband starts cutting grass since that is a major lasagna ingredient for me.

So many seeds, so little time.

Karen

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2007
2:24 PM

Post #3211221

I'm thinking of standing my 2 liter bottles in a kiddy pool so they self-water from the bottom via the drain holes. That may mean standing water in the pool for a few hours with a hard rain. Any thoughts?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2007
3:19 PM

Post #3211368

You need to remove the jugs from the pool after watering or drill drainage holes in the pool. I keep mine in sterilites with drain holes and just squirt the hose in to water, they take a few minutes to drain. If the jugs aren't saturated I fill the sterilite again. Usually I drag the sterilites into the lawn to do this so the water isn't wasted on the patio.

Karen
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2007
1:50 AM

Post #3213105

Thanks Mobi & Arachide! That really clears it up for me.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2007
2:12 AM

Post #3213186

I meant to add above that my kiddy pool has holes in it already but it doesn't drain in under 2 hours in a heavy rain.
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 23, 2007
2:36 PM

Post #3217315

Just read a good use for the Top Half of Soda Bottles. I thought I'd share. Protect young transplanted seedlings from slugs by making a "cloche" to cover the seedlings once transplanted in the ground. Would be excellent for hosta seedlings. I think I'll try this once wintersowing is over.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2007
4:48 PM

Post #3217686

Cordele~ that's a great idea..thanks for sharing!
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2007
7:38 PM

Post #3218123

Hey dawg, my dad saved a bunch of water bottles for me, now I know what I can use them for, Great Idea...

Connie
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2007
12:44 AM

Post #3218891

Terrific idea!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2007
3:40 PM

Post #3220239

Darius: I think a couple of hours standing in water is a long time. Mine generally get plenty of water within a few minutes. I think I'd drill a few more holes in that pool.

Once seelings sprout, the roots need air for the plant to live. I don't know but I think standing in water for that long might not be good.

Karen

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2007
8:42 PM

Post #3224411

Karen, I believe you are correct about standing water suffocating seedlings! So, more holes in the pool are in order.

Joy

Joy
Kalama, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2007
8:57 PM

Post #3224460

I just want to add that #2 pencils do fade, but it does take some years. So using them for marking winter sown seedlings is fine. For a more permanant marker once the plants are planted out I've learned to use grease pencils and paint markers. Both of these have held up over the years better than #2 pencils or sharpies.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 10, 2007
7:30 PM

Post #3268329

question -- do you sow all you seeds in containers, or save a few to direct sow, just in case the WS seeds don't germinate?

I was going to do more seeds today, but I was going to do ALL the seeds and really not save any.
good or bad idea?

when is a good time to start marigolds? I have a TON on them - and last year i just put all my seeds in some soil, and when they were tall enough, i moved them around the yard... but was gonna do them in a foil tray.

OH and i did find one of those zippered "comforter" bags... i think i can fit a lot in there.

TIA,

Terese
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 10, 2007
7:49 PM

Post #3268368

I rarely sow all of one kind for two reasons: just in case they don't make it; I don't want that many of any one kind of plant.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2007
5:59 PM

Post #3277281

Iíve been reading on here that a few people have put there jugs where they are sheltered? Does this mean where they will get sun just part of the day? Last year I had mine in the full sun I thought this was where we were suppose to put them should I move them to part shade? I didnít have much luck with most of my jugs last year but thought it was due to slugs, I found several in the jugs last year but then again the sun might have had something to do with it?
Lea
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2007
6:24 PM

Post #3277357

I live in an area with a lot of sun and is also very dry, so I always put mine in shade (north side of my house). They rarely get sun and they have always done great.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2007
6:43 PM

Post #3277418

So they don't really need the sun, that seems so odd. If I can do that I can sit some on the back porch and keep them from the slugs too.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2007
8:42 PM

Post #3277824

I have a few jugs that are sprouting, maybe 3-4 so far. They get morning sun. It has been warm for a few days but snow forecast for the weekend. I may move the germinated ones to the root cellar before the temps plunge back to 20ļ at night.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2007
9:51 PM

Post #3278029

I'm worried about the ones that germinate early too, so far I just have one for my bird garden that came up so I figure they are pretty tough macrocephala centaurea, I put one of my little big lots gh's up for the ones that start germinating early, the ones I have planted right now are perennials anyway.

I planted a whole pack of canterbury bells, I thought about that bunch of them that you planted darius ;-)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2007
10:48 PM

Post #3278177

I'm hoping my canterbury bells started last summer do well. I may have lost 50 or so over winter, won 't know for 2-3 weeks or more yet.
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2007
11:29 PM

Post #3278300

Last year, I had ones that germinated early and I was a little worried but I left them out and they did fine.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2007
12:32 AM

Post #3278509

I had a couple of canterbury bells in the shade garden and it flooded everytime it rained, they washed out once and I planted them again and they did great the next summer I had a bunch of blooms!

Mobi, I guess the ones that germinated in the jugs early were in the shade? Did you keep the lids on them the rest of the winter?
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #3278643

I did keep the lids on until I was ready to plant, and kept them in the shade.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2007
4:09 AM

Post #3279252

Thanks Mobi :-)
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 14, 2007
12:01 PM

Post #3279731

My jugs are where they get sun from sunrise until about 1 pm and they did just fine last year. I have the tops off and only had one jug out of 80 that didn't have any germination.
The snow melted enough yesterday so I can see them again. I figure I have enough winter left that I am going to pot up some more today. We have been having weather in the upper 50's low 60's but are getting freezing nights and highs in the upper 30's starting today for awhile.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #3279972

Our temps. change a lot here too, Iím getting ready to plant some more, this week in the 70ís and next week will be freezing lol Mine have only been under the snow once and that was only for a day it melted the next day, I have 72 jugs so far.

Well my jugs are coming out of the full sun and into the back yard, the part sun/shade sounds good, Iíve got to do something different from last year, I want all of mine to come up too! lol

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2007
10:04 AM

Post #3301286

whoops -- this thread was getting lost on page 2

anyhooo -- my lesson learned from this year... use bigger (higher) boxes. Shoe box size is not tall enough.

other than that... everything else seems to be going well.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2007
1:20 PM

Post #3301807

tcs1366: What do you use shoe boxes for?

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #3301892

oh -- that was in the "Tupperware" thread...
http://davesgarden.com/forums/p.php?pid=3205925

they were plastic shoe boxes.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2007
6:11 PM

Post #3302814

I sowed about 40-50 jugs (2 liter soda bottles) in early February. They are in morning sun, and some nights temps have been down to single digits. So far almost 1/3 have germinated which I consider remarkable because some seed was old. You betcha I will do this again!!

My jugs sit in a kiddie pool full of drain holes.
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

March 21, 2007
11:55 AM

Post #3305233

On lesson that I learned from my previous go at winter sowing is that you do have to think about mature sizes when planting out your babies. I will let many of my seedlings mature for a month or two in pots, but even then they are such tiny plants. I had such a hard time convincing myself that these puny plants would soon be 3' wide.

I was really surprised by how fast my winter sown plants matured and how quickly some of my plantings became over crowded. In general I do like to plant new perennials close to get that full look earlier with the ideas that I can thin them later. With my seedling I though that the thinning job would be in a year or two, but many plants were too crowded after just a few months.

Below is a picture taken in June 2005. Look at the recently planted garden to the left of the bench that is about 50% wintersown plants.

- Brent

Thumbnail by Brent_In_NoVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

March 21, 2007
12:09 PM

Post #3305272

I seem to be seeing some oddities with images, but I here (what I hope) is a picture of the same garden bed taken in August 2005.

- Brent

Thumbnail by Brent_In_NoVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 21, 2007
12:12 PM

Post #3305275

it looks about right... Very nice.

what are those taller purple flowered plants?

I see the coleus by the fence... were those from seeds too?

Terese
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

March 21, 2007
12:20 PM

Post #3305310

The two taller plants are Verbena bonariensis and Agastache (Anise Hyssop).

Yep the Coleus by the fence was winter sown. It is one of those plants that took forever to get going and by the time they got to a decent size I did not have the motivation to find a spot for them. I should have moved them inside or taken cuttings. I have a packet of seeds this year that I plan on sowing soon.

As a follow up to the bed shown...this was my kids "butterfly garden" and a primary reason that I got into winter sowing. I wanted to get my kids involved with some gardening but I did not want to spend $100 on plants. I supplemented the bed with some annuals and some other plants because I did not want it to look empty all year long. I really thought that it would take a year or two for the winter sown plants to take off. I was so wrong! I saw the same type of results in the other two beds that I loaded with winter sown plants.

BTW, the only plants in that bed that were purchased are the marigolds. While many of the other plants (lambs ear, cannas, plus a couple others that got swallowed up) were not winter sown, I traded a number of winter sown plants at a local swap to get those plants.

- Brent

This message was edited Mar 21, 2007 12:29 PM
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

March 21, 2007
9:01 PM

Post #3306888

Brent: They remind me of "before" and "after" pictures! What a beautiful butterfly garden you now have!!
Pameliap
Florence, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2007
10:03 PM

Post #3310361

Lessons I've learned from this first year of winter sowing (so far)...
A. Fill opaque cups with planting medium as close to the top as possible to prevent lanky plants trying to reach the sun.
B. Remove nasturtiums from boxes as soon as they germinate, as they tend to get too wet and rot (I almost lost my first ones before I realized this).
C. I've learned that this method really works and I love it. It will definitely be a part of my gardening plan from now on.

Out of 193 containers (so far...yes I have more seed, lol), only about 24 haven't germinated. Some of those have hopeful little green bumps and some I know need more consistent warmth than we've had so far or are long germination types, so I haven't given up on anything.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2007
6:13 PM

Post #3313022

zen... anyway to "unsticky" #'s 1 & 2 and sticky this one... so this is on top and the others don't get new posts... or even just sticky this one up above the other 2 ??
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 24, 2007
9:09 AM

Post #3314948

There is a way I will check with the powers that be.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 25, 2007
11:31 AM

Post #3318333

I asked yesterday to have this made a sticky hopefully when the weekend is over it will happen.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 25, 2007
1:05 PM

Post #3318593

thanks zen...
Hineni
Paris, TN
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2007
3:09 PM

Post #3333237

193 containers? Egads, surely that must be a prize winner of some sort of WS Queen/King for the year or something! I started small for me (a rarity) - I only did about 30 or so. But I'm hooked :)

I did learn that heat is far more deadly to sprouts than cold this year - and that the containers hold moisture pretty well. Next year as soon as it hits 70 I'm taking down the tops on my sprouted ones. I only lost a few sprouts thankfully.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2007
5:02 PM

Post #3333563

How do you guys manage with the annual seeds that are SO TINY? My manual dexterity is not great, and they stick to my palms and get under my fingernails and end up with all the seeds in one container when I wanted it in 10 different containers!

xxxxxxxxxxxxx(I finally have sprouts!), Carrie
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

March 29, 2007
5:23 PM

Post #3333634

Sometimes it helps to mix them with sand if you're direct seeding, though that might not help with trying to divide them among containers.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2007
5:47 PM

Post #3333714

Yeah, I thought of that, then I thought of that!

Somebody makes a tool to dispense carrot seeds and other tiny seeds one at a time. How small are carrot seeds?

xxx, C
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

March 29, 2007
5:49 PM

Post #3333721

I have the little green bulb that you squeeze to pick up tiny seeds with air suction, but sometimes I throw it aside in frustration because it's not super efficient.
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

March 29, 2007
5:51 PM

Post #3333734

Put them in a salt shaker.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2007
7:56 PM

Post #3334189

Good idea! Probably a pepper shaker for some, like Lobelia.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2007
9:07 PM

Post #3334499

I'm glad someone brought up this topic--because I ended up with all my really tiny seeds going into one jug because I didn't know to separate them! "Sowing thickly," indeed.
I'm going to try the salt-shaker method next year . . . meanwhile, I'm watching those jugs--two or three are germinating--yippee!
--Emily
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2007
9:09 PM

Post #3334505

Love the salt/pepper shaker idea.. maybe with some sand to mix and spread easier?

Susan
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

March 29, 2007
10:20 PM

Post #3334952

Susan,

I should have mentioned sand helps, but forgot. Thanks!

Jody
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2007
10:54 PM

Post #3335051

That is a great idea. (Taking notes for next year) It could have saved me a lot of grief and seeds today as I was trying to untangle Coreopsis tinctoria "Dwarf Red Plains" to plant out the seedlings. I finally said, "I give up, and just planted the rest out in hunks."
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2007
11:25 PM

Post #3335136

Lessons Learned...What works: Initially placing several markers inside the jugs at the start of winter sowing...
One thing I'm glad I did do when I first sowed my seeds... I placed several plastic forks and knives marked with their plant names and date in with the jugs. As I was planting some of the seedlings into groups, I'd just take one of the plastic markers from the jugs to name the seedlings. I planted 3, or 5, or 7, or 9 in a group depending on the plant. One marker per grouping. Now, I can relax and make a "real' marker at my leisure, giving these seedlings an opportunity to grow on further in their new bed. Most will get a nice looking metal marker, later when I'm not so tired after planting.

I'm never original so I'm sure I read this from ya'lls last year lessons learned.LOL

This same information was also written on the outside of the jugs. However, what I plan to include next year will be the plant's maturity height (& bloom color if known) on the outside of the jug. Since there's not enough room on the plastic forks and knives for this. I did have this information on file, but not quite as organized with my maps when I take them with me to the beds. I change my mind to often when it's all said and none (really ready to plant).
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2007
12:18 AM

Post #3335277

Dawg, an excellent idea of the multiple markers! I wish I had done that.

Suzy

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 30, 2007
5:23 AM

Post #3335515

Excellent idea of salt/pepper shakers and a little sand! I tried plastic knives but I just couldn't write well enough or maybe mine are extra petite knives or something! And the condensation inside my containers caused the writing to wash off in the cases where I put both a marker and an outside number.

xxxx, Carrie
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

March 30, 2007
9:36 AM

Post #3336012

Believe it or not pencil works well. I use pencil on one side and paint marker on the other, just-in-case. The ones from last year made it till now right through the winter.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2007
3:10 PM

Post #3337138

I used the paint marker thing on wooden craft sticks. (they look like wide popcicle sticks)
it has worked well for me... plus just the writing on the outside of the container with the paint marker.

I plan on using it yearly since it worked well.

for the containers where the lid/cover wasn't that high, i broke the stick in half.
(though that doesnt leave a lot of room to write)
freebirdusa35
Ferndale, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 31, 2007
10:31 AM

Post #3339500

I begun my first round of winter sowing I've learned from you guys in early March here in northwest WA state. 5 milk jugs numbered, and the seed packets kept. 15-30 seeds in each, and they have sprouted. I am so happy. They look so much better then the leggy indoor starts from february. My only problem now, is where do I plant them all? I guess I'll plan on thinning later.
Thanks for this great idea. Love, FreeBird!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
10:39 AM

Post #3339521

Ok folks, I didn't have any sand, did NOT want to use salt (I'm not that dumb) so I used sugar. Will that do anything bad to the tiny seedlets? It worked well; I could see the little seeds among the sugar and it melted nearly instantly.

xxx, Carrie
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

March 31, 2007
10:44 AM

Post #3339531

Carrie, Are you growing sweet peppers?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
10:57 AM

Post #3339568

No, they give me heartburn! LOL. Plus I believe my soil to be unhealthy for children and other living things.

xxxx, Carrie
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

March 31, 2007
12:19 PM

Post #3339773

Quoting:I believe my soil to be unhealthy for children and other living things


I was puzzled at first, but now realize you must be growing flowers only. Have you tried veggies in containers?
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

March 31, 2007
3:26 PM

Post #3340255

Carrie, Get it analyzed. Doesn't cost much.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2007
7:23 PM

Post #3340993

By whom, Doug? And I'm the only one who eats veggies around here, anyway.


x, Carrie
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
12:11 AM

Post #3341950

UMass. agricultural extension service. Who is Doug?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 1, 2007
5:29 AM

Post #3342294

Sorry, Dave, I meant Dave but you know, Dave, Doug, Dagwood, Dan, Dale, Dean, Damion, Dante,there are a lot of names out there, Dave,and while I'm typing I have to look at the keyboard and not at your post, Dave. Sorry.

xxx, Carrie (hanging head in shame)
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

April 1, 2007
7:43 AM

Post #3342390

LOL
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2007
8:57 AM

Post #3342627

Usually the extention services in any county can do soil testing. If you have a large property (I saw this on HGTV and on my local PBS gardening shows) put soil samples in paper bags, mark what area they are from and turn them in. The analysis will tell you what you have and what amendments are needed which can vary from one area of a large yard to another area.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 1, 2007
10:44 AM

Post #3342976

We can pick up bags at garden center that the U of Minnesota supplies them with and send in our soil samples to the horticultural school.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 1, 2007
12:01 PM

Post #3343232

But I really am the only one who eats anything remotely resembling a vegetable. It's ok... I'll continue to fear wood dust from pressure-treated wood, etc., e'en though it be totally irrational.

xxxx, Carrie
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
1:01 PM

Post #3343474

Carrie,
I understand.
Doug
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 1, 2007
1:23 PM

Post #3343536

Oh I eat vegetables, I get delivery from an organic farm co-op. I don't rally have the room to grow enough of them. I live in an urban area and all I can manage is flowers.
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
1:31 PM

Post #3343565

One could make the arguement that buying vegetables is cheaper!
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 1, 2007
1:39 PM

Post #3343589

We hope... it can be hard to compete with commercial grower's economy of scale. Ever see this, "The $64 Tomato" ?

http://davesgarden.com/gbw/c/2045/
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
3:08 PM

Post #3343862

I heard the author being interviewed on CBC radio - it was sooooo funny! Obviously, this man has much, much more money than I have! He spent a fortune in landscaping, bringing in topsoil etc. Then he does a cost-benefit analysis!

This is like the "This Old House" syndrome. There is no way we can afford to restore Our Old House the way it is done on the tv show. Some people may have a spare 40 grand to redo the kitchen - but not me. Anybody with enough money can hire others to make their homes, gardens, etc. look spectacular.

Those with more modest means must be creative - and smart. Any dummy can throw money at a problem.

As to whether one should grow or purchase veggies - if one factors in the cost of one's labour, opportunities lost (I could be doing something else rather than weeding) obviously buying veggies is the choice. But, if the objective of gardening is something else (for me it is the sense that I am attempting to create beauty in the world - a rather worthy goal, I thought), then the benefits clearly outweigh the costs.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 1, 2007
3:15 PM

Post #3343887

There is no way I could buy the joy I get out of gardening. I had a choice buy the flowers or vegetable and I chose to buy the vegetables. Now if I was buying them at the grocery store that might make a difference.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2007
3:17 PM

Post #3343895

My benefit is the quality of the vegetables as well as the sheer joy of the flowers and shrubs/trees.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 1, 2007
4:06 PM

Post #3344035

Believe me if I had room I would have both.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2007
4:23 PM

Post #3344099

Growing up in Connecticut my parent's bought a large 2 level 2 family home which are pretty common in New England. The yard was completely barren--I mean nothing in it except for a large outcropping of rock sticking up in the center of the large yard making it into a weird U shape. My pop had tons of soil hauled in and worked like a maniac to have his trees, grass, roses and veggies. The upstairs neighbors thought he was nuts but once they saw the veggie garden thrive they asked if they could have an area to plant for themselves. We only lived there 6 years but we've maintained out friendship with that family for decades--my parents have passed years ago but we all still stay in touch.

Their family even began a large family garden at one of their homes. Everyone makes the trip out there on the weekend to do the chores and maintain the garden and they all get to spend time together. They do big group canning, freezing and baking with the stuff from their garden.

Sometimes it's not just about the food...=)
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
6:24 PM

Post #3344425

Claypa, Yes I know the book.
And yes I will continue to grow my own veggies even if it's not cost-effective. Sad thing is that by the time I'm picking them, they are dirt cheap and decent at the market.
But nothing is as good as what you've grown in your own garden. It's a hobby, not a part-time job:)
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
8:26 PM

Post #3344797

Lesson learned: Sow the seeds and allow them to germinate - then transfer them into little paper pots :-)

And do fewer of each type of seed - who knew so many would germinate?
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

April 1, 2007
8:52 PM

Post #3344858

isn't it great!!!??
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2007
9:11 PM

Post #3344927

Oh - something else! The clear plastic containers that Costco sells grapes in appear to be absolutely perfect for winter sowing containers :-) I plan to eat a lot of Costco grapes between now and December.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 2, 2007
8:09 AM

Post #3346106

Oh what a wonderful reason to eat grapes. Time for a Costco trip. I love the red ones frozen. Just wash, drain and freeze. Then pop them in your mouth.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 2, 2007
11:17 AM

Post #3346679

from a gardening supply store:

How would you like to be eating tomatoes from your garden before anyone else in the 'hood? Plant seeds and seedlings earlier, and protect your young plants from spring frosts. Protects from snow, frost, wind, drought, birds, insects, chemical sprays, and excess moisture. Durable Jiffy Hot Kaps have a 10" X 10" base, and are approximately 9" high with a hole in the top for ventilation. Stacks and stores easily. 5 plant covers per package.

at $12.99 for 5, I still think we're better off with 2L soda bottles. Plus, we get to drink the soda first!

xxxx, Carrie
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 2, 2007
11:20 AM

Post #3346698

Carrie,
How true.
grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 3, 2007
7:47 PM

Post #3352158

I tried a couple of 24oz soda bottles...didn't have any 2liters handy. I like them. think I'll do more next year.
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 3, 2007
10:35 PM

Post #3352830

Eighteen 24 oz. soda bottles fit just great in a standard 10" x 20" nursery flat. And I got some 'totes' that the beverage distributors transport 2 liter bottles in at our town's recycling center, very handy! There are different sizes for different numbers of bottles. Worth looking around for, I think.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 4, 2007
8:15 AM

Post #3353612

I figure with the temperature at 17ļ and flurries this morning I am going to do some last minute winter sowing. Nine days ago the temperature was 81ļ here. That is Minnesota for you. My DH reminded me that 3 years ago we had a total of 26" of snow in April. The poor little seedlings don't know what to do.
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2007
10:24 AM

Post #3354083

Zen, we were HOPING for some precip last night and today before temps plunge tonight, but NOTHING, not a drop. We are going to go from a high today of about 80 to a low of 40, then a high tomorrow in the upper 50's and lows in the lower 30', then mid to upper 20' for the entire weekend, then slowly rising again. That's Central NC. I misted all my wonderful seelings today.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 4, 2007
12:41 PM

Post #3354538

That sounds like a real roller coaster ride there.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 4, 2007
2:08 PM

Post #3354855

Cut milk jugs in half. Use the bottom to sow the seeds, use a gallon-size zip-lock baggie as the top. Much easier to cut the corners for ventilation.

Use the top of the milk containers to protect wee plants early in the season from frosts.
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 13, 2007
5:02 PM

Post #3387543

Learned the hard way: if you use 2liter soft drink bottles, and remove the big label that goes all around, be sure to write the container number on the lower part. When I started taking off those tops, I just stacked them one on top of the other, and if I did not recognize the seedlings, it was really hard to reconstruct.
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2007
7:01 AM

Post #3389233

I made that mistake once too - I always mark the top and bottom of each container.
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 14, 2007
11:11 AM

Post #3389979

Even better!!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 14, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #3390976

One thing i learned this year was... not to "soak" the seeds.

every single seed i soaked - because i read to do it (though not on a WS forum)
the seeds molded, or just plain, didn't germinate.

I lost all of my Bean Vine (and i wasn't sure what they were, now I can't "watch" them to see what they were) and I lost a bunch of morning glories... though i had A LOT germinate for me.

Has anyone else found this to be true? the soaking - i mean.

as for the 2ltr bottles, i wrote on the bottom portion.

seandor -- i will use your idea of using the tops of the milk jugs to cover newly planted plants from cold weather or frosts... good idea.

terese
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2007
5:43 PM

Post #3391293

Terese, I must confess, the idea didn't originate with me . . . someone else did that, but I couldn't remember the thread. I did remember the idea, and have since used it myself. I thought it was good enough to be recorded on a sticky.
merryma
Auburn, MA
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2007
9:12 AM

Post #3393370

I'm pretty sure I posted this before, but I guess it can't hurt to mention it again.

I put all of my containers in cardboard boxes when I put them outside (not my idea, but I wish I'd thought of it). I tried it for the first time last year, now it's part of my routine. Having the bottoms of the containers in the shade seems to keep the soil moist, but the tops still get sun. And when it rains, the boxes hold the water just long enough to bottom water...the rest of it drains away. Plus...I can use the cardboard for mulching when I'm done.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2007
9:19 AM

Post #3393382

Now that is a good idea!
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 15, 2007
9:35 AM

Post #3393419

I like that idea.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 15, 2007
10:47 AM

Post #3393700

merry -- i read that too... i am using 1 box, and it seems to be working well.
next year i may stock up on them too.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 15, 2007
12:08 PM

Post #3394063

I like the idea too! Some of my soda bottles are on top of container plants but it's not the same thing just means I don't have to bend over.

xxxxx, Carrie
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2007
1:30 PM

Post #3394293

merryma, I heard you before and put about 1/3 of mine in boxes. I liked it and will do it next year.
Dave

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 15, 2007
1:45 PM

Post #3394339

Mine are in cut-down boxes.
soulgardenlove
Marietta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 15, 2007
1:56 PM

Post #3394362

Hey yall... Great idea.. if any of you go to Costco or Sam's club, I often find these extremely heavy duty cardboard boxes that bananas are shipped in.. I used them this year to store and organize my bulbs wrapped in newspaper before planting. :)

:)

Susan
grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 15, 2007
11:47 PM

Post #3396392

I put mine in boxes to carry them out and keep them from blowing away in the wind. But it worked out well, so I guess I'll do it again.
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2007
12:17 PM

Post #3401357

Next year I will sow annual vines like cardinal climber vine into peat pots and then sit these into the container of soil. These plants do not like to be transplanted.
Brent_In_NoVa
Sterling, VA
(Zone 6b)

April 17, 2007
1:04 PM

Post #3401500

Clementine: Maybe your lesson learned is to study the lesson learned threads. Back on Jan 11 I posted "This year I will: Mark the bottom of my containers as well!" (in bold) on the #2 thread. ;-) (note the smiley...I am just giving you a hard time)

Zen: Were you the one giving me a hard time about using a soldering iron? You will be happy to know that I have given up my soldering iron ways. I got a Dremil-like tool for Christmas and I have found that a drill bit chucked in that thing will make drainage holes in record time!

Now I am just waiting for some more warm weather so that me seedlings will start growing again!

- Brent

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 17, 2007
4:04 PM

Post #3401982

Quoting:
Next year I will sow annual vines like cardinal climber vine into peat pots and then sit these into the container of soil. These plants do not like to be transplanted.


I'm doing this this year.

I bought a bunch of peat pots, and i'm transplanting a few things when they are small -- then i can just plunk them right into the ground.

all my tomatoes are this way already -- but will do the morning glories next week... they are getting big.

but as (I believe Shirley) stated... they do dry out fast.
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

April 17, 2007
4:35 PM

Post #3402077

Brent,
Yes it was me giving you a hard time about the soldering iron. I am glad that the fumes didn't kill all of your brain cells before you figured out not to use the soldering iron. ;-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2007
5:22 PM

Post #3402208

LOL LOL LOL LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
1:59 PM

Post #3455376

OK, here's ONE of my numerous lessons learned for next year: If you use soda-type bottles, with indentations in the bottom, plant them out before the roots get so long that they have wedged themselves into the crevices. I may have performed a rootectomy on several of my most adorable noids! :-(

xxx, Carrie

summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 2, 2007
2:07 PM

Post #3455403

hmmmm ... wonder whether it's too late for me to start winter-sowing ... perhaps get an early start on NEXT year?!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2007
2:57 PM

Post #3455556

LOL, summerkid -- I've got all the supplies ready -- just never did get those seeds planted! I'm thinking maybe next month for Winter in June sowing (AKA sowing the way I used to do it before I learned about winter sowing).

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2007
3:48 PM

Post #3455753

I don't think it's too late at all; I'm planning to do some more - quick annuals. This is a great way to start perennials, too. Hap, take the plunge!

xxx, Carrie
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2007
7:07 AM

Post #3457930

I've done that - just check the germination days, some can be as short as a week.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2007
9:58 AM

Post #3458453

To have faith. I really, really wanted delphiniums so I planted Pacific Giant Blue Bird, and clear springs mixed (like magic fountain). - But nothing seemed to be happening . . . so I planted Connecticut Yankee . . . and nothing seemed to be happening. And I really, really wanted these, so I thought - well, I will plant annual mixed larkspur.

Needless to say, everything germinated . . . I have about 50 Pacific Giant Blue Bird, about 60 clear springs mixed, about 20 Connecticut Yankee, and about 75 mixed larkspur!

Next year, I want to plant fewer plants and be more selective of what I am growing. I don't mind starting perennials for the neighbours if they will cover the cost of the potting soil, etc.
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2007
10:03 AM

Post #3458472

I love the idea of putting your ws soda bottles into cardboard boxes! What a brilliant idea!! You guys are the best!!!!!

carrie: "rootectomy on several of my most adorable noids!" You had me cracking up and laughing out loud!!

The best thing (another one) I've learned is that wintersowing can be done all year long! Don't just sow during the Winter months, but in the Spring, Summer & Fall. We all have been sowing annuals, tropicals & some veggies now that the weather is warming up. Some seeds such as Hellebores, Clematis, and Cyclamen NEED to have a season of warm temps followed by a season of cold in order to germinate. So, don't stop sowing those seeds! You can also sow more seeds during the Summer months so the plants will be ready to be put in your garden in the Fall. Get a 'jump start' on wsing by starting your seeds in the Fall. What a wonderful way to keep our hands playing in soil all year around!!!
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

May 4, 2007
6:26 AM

Post #3461471

One thing I've learned both years that I have tried this is not being able to get away from over-sowing. I tend to be heavy with the hand when sowing the seeds. I have about an 87% germination rate on my containers so far, but within those containers the germination rate varies. I don't want to be stuck with one plant, so I sow more seeds. This sometimes leads to all the seeds germinating or sometimes just a few. It's a toss up.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2007
11:24 AM

Post #3462158

shirley,

a great thing about using the boxes is... if you have to move them - it makes it so much easier for transporting.

lately i have been "away" for 3-4 days... and gosh forbid my kids water my seedlings... so i give them a good drink before i leave and put them in the shade, so they don't dry out. when i get back... they get moved to partial sun -- but i'm home to keep track of the watering... plus -- as someone else mentioned... you just "water" the box, the containers take up what they need and the rest seeps out of the box.

terese
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2007
7:27 AM

Post #3464829

Well I am starting over on most of what I winter sowed, I lost almost all of my seedlings :( the last frost we had got them. I am really heart broken. (and I can't find any of my 4 o'clock seeds) I had bunches of them in all colors and poof they have all disappeared :( I have no idea where they disappeared to either.

I also had dh to stop buying the Miracle Grow Garden soil. It is full of weed seeds (big time). and rocks and wood chips and lord only knows what else. I had better luck with just the cheap potting soil that I had here and used.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2007
8:51 AM

Post #3464987

pepsi -- i have tons of "magenta" 4 -o'clock seeds if you need some.

and i did find that when i used MG soil... i did get a few weeds, where i didnt with the first soil i used.

so sorry you lost all your seedlings...
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2007
9:04 AM

Post #3465024

tcs would love some of your megenta seeds, thanks
jasmerr
Merrimac, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 5, 2007
9:50 AM

Post #3465156

When we had that last cold weather I brought all the containers that had germinated onto my enclosed back porch. When I took them back out I put them near the house under the deck for a week...seems to have worked.
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2007
10:24 AM

Post #3465226

Wish I would have done that jas but had so much going on at that time. (oh by the way, happy belated birthday to you)
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 5, 2007
1:07 PM

Post #3465644

This is my first year wintersowing and I have had great success. I felt really wimpy when I brought all my pots inside when we had the last frost - but they all survived. I think that we have put so much work and expectation into this project that we should protect it. I don't feel bad about "pampering" my seedlings.

I am so sorry for everyone who did loose their seedlings.
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 5, 2007
1:10 PM

Post #3465652

what makes the difference, if they have lasted the winter? sticking up out of their enclosures too much at this point?
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
12:10 AM

Post #3481756

Stupid question...but what does making a thread "sticky" mean? Oh, and I can't wait to wintersow now...I think I have a new project for this winter...if only it weren't so far away...

claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 10, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #3481802

It means the thread will stay at the top of the list, whether there are new posts or not.
There's lots of planning that can be done the rest of the year - choosing plants and finding the seeds, collecting containers and maybe cutting them in advance so there's no rush, especially with all the winter holidays too.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2007
6:22 AM

Post #3482061

Things to do over the summer include saving seeds to sow :-)
I was lucky - very nice DG members shared seeds with me. Now I must return the favour.
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
9:54 AM

Post #3482562

I have a whirlwind hosta I want to save the seeds from so I can wintersow them...I think I will also try vegetables for my garden next year...any hints for either of these would be great :)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2007
10:08 AM

Post #3482611

kls,

You can "wintersow" now! You can use the same method to sow perennials now that will be old enough to flower next year.

xxx, Carrie
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
11:09 AM

Post #3482818

Carrie,
Do you mean the ones that say " won't bloom the first year but will bloom the next"? I like the wintersowing idea, but in a case like that, what's the difference between me sowing them directly as opposed to wintersowing? And, what exactly is the difference between wintersowing and starting seeds inside? Is it just that the cold keeps them from damping off etc? I tried starting seeds inside this year, and they sprouted ok, but I have absolutely no sunny windowsill to put them in, so they stalled and I eventually killed them. I restarted more, and by that time it was warm during the day, so I was taking them outside during the day and bringing them in when it got cold. They seem to be doing fine and haven't died. I guess that's kinda like wintersowing, only not with the little green house...

Kristie
Mobi
Denver, CO
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2007
12:54 PM

Post #3483132

Winter sowing is where you plant seeds in covered pots like milk jugs or 2 liter bottles. You cut them in half, plant then put the tops back on so it's a mine "greenhouse". (I use milk jugs), put them outside in the winter and then basically just leave them alone. No green house, no lights, no bringing them in or out, no buying pots, no covering, no space taken up indoors. No dampening off, no hardening, no birds eating them, no wind taking them away. Very very easy. I don't touch mine until they are ready to plant out, though I may water if needed when it gets warm (around mid May). Much easier to sprout hard to start seeds and you end up with TONS of plants. NO BABYING. (though some people can't help but baby their seedlings).
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
1:17 PM

Post #3483214

It sounds perfect to me...especially since I don't have a sunny spot inside to start seeds. I was wondering if you could use the cups from like McDonalds' with the clear lids for single plants...like I said, I want to do hostas and veggies for sure, and maybe just one plant in a cup would be best for that?

Kristie

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2007
1:30 PM

Post #3483266

Kristie,

this was my first year, and i did tend to baby them a bit, especially when we got "really" cold in (was that April?)
-- but you remember when, the whole mid-west was frozen again.

browze the wintersowing forum, you will find many photos -- the Lessons Learned 1&2 (this is #3)

here is also a link that may help
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/wtrsow/2002050141031613.html

Oh and the thread about taking pics of your seedlings
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/701931/ you will see various ways to sow/containers used


Terese
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2007
3:40 PM

Post #3483602

Kristie: Welcome to this forum. The most informative website is at http://www.wintersown.org It will answer all your questions & concerns about this very easy and natural way of germinating seeds. Plus, it is a wonderful recycling project too! We'll be here to answer any of your questions, cheer you on and commiserate, if needed. It's fun, very affordable, and a great way to grow a wide variety of plants that many times aren't available commercially.
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #3483758

Thanks guys for the links. I'm really excited now!

Kristie

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2007
4:37 PM

Post #3483759

OH Kristie... it's totally addicting!!
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2007
9:03 PM

Post #3484532

One thing I have learned is that maybe I misinterpreted - and I paraphrase - that one could just use the cheapest soil from Wal_Mart. I know, people have discussed soils for starting seeds and there have been differing opinions. So, being cheap I once found some bags - reduced - at Wal-Mart Expert Perfect Mix.

I am not sure whether it was the soil or the timing, I think I probably started using this soil around early March. Most of the seedlings I sowed in it are really pathetic, although they did germinate. The tomatoes don't look good, and the Summer Poinesttia Mix (Amaranthus) has been 1/4" for the past 6 weeks and is useless. Marigold 'Vanilla Ice' is perhaps an inch high and looks strange, not green but more reddish.

So, lesson learned - DON'T buy cheap soil, it is not worth it.
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2007
9:17 PM

Post #3484584

I believe you...I'm addicted already and I haven't even started...
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2007
11:30 PM

Post #3485172

Clementine: So sorry to hear about your Wal-Mart soil mix, but it's a lesson well learned and next year you won't make that mistake. I believe that in Sticky #1 it says to use a good name brand soil mix such as Miracle Gro or ProMix. Nothing is worse than having soil that is like concrete.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2007
11:34 PM

Post #3485191

I work for WM and don't care for the store brand soil. I found a huge shard of glass in one bag and to me it also turns almost, I guess, sour maybe is the word I'm looking for. I try to stick to well know national brands and have had much better results. I can't find Pro Mix around my area though and I'm dying to try it but I cannot justify ordering dirt online:LOL:
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2007
5:21 AM

Post #3485483

My wintersown plants were in sown in Walmart Expert perfect soil - and everything seems to have germinated and thrives. . . .
Shirley1md
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2007
9:21 AM

Post #3485915

dmac085: Oh my gosh! "I found a huge shard of glass in one bag..." plus, the soil turning sour is absolutely horrible!!!!! I hope you didn't hurt yourself on that piece of glass. I would have brought the bag back to the store where I purchased it, filled out a complaint form and spoken to the store Manager. Definitely stick with the name brands.

Seandor: It has been proven over and over again that inferior brands of dirt will dry out quicker, will contain more debris such as sticks and eventually the dirt (not using the word soil on purpose) will become rock hard and have the consistency of concrete. You were lucky this time! I know of many wintersowers (at another website) that tried to save a few dollars by buying cheap dirt. They lost almost every one of their sown containers because the seedlings died when the dirt became rock hard. This is a very avoidable problem!!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2007
2:34 PM

Post #3486211

Well you are right about the sticks and twigs . . . Haven't had it turn to hard rock, but I have been vigillant about watering. In the future, I will heed your advise.

Cheers,
Seandor.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2007
6:36 PM

Post #3486958

I've been using MG soil, which I am morally against but I can't argue with its efficacy. I have sproutage in almost every actual WS container, whereas my spring sowing annuals in flats and peatpots has not been nearly as successful.

xxx, Carrie
Clementine
Chapel Hill, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2007
10:16 PM

Post #3487637

I don't really know what was wrong with my WM soil, mine never turned concrete-like, but it was way too coarse, I think that was the problem. Anyway, it is really worth it to spend a few dollars more and be assured that one is using good materials 9 so any failure cannot be blamed on the soil, lol).
grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2007
11:38 AM

Post #3489257

I used several different kinds of soil (nothing cheap!) and kept track of what seeds were planted in which soil. so I can match failures to soil and see if there are any trends.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2007
12:35 PM

Post #3489384

i used 2 types... i'm thinking the first bunch of bags were Jiffy and the last was MG.
my seeds did great in both. my only seed failures were due to "soaking".
pepsidrinker
La Salle, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2007
1:38 PM

Post #3489555

My dh bought me the MG garden soil, and it was full of stones, sticks and WEED seeds. (and lord knows what else) I won't use it again for anything.
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2007
3:37 PM

Post #3489859

I used a seed starter mix on some, and a regular potting soil (MG) on others. The seed starter was too dense, not airy enough. It was very hard to divide the seed starter mix. I also had to fertilize those, since they didn't have anything in them. It seems like the tiny roots were more sealed in there, more than the loose mix.
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2007
7:14 PM

Post #3587427

My lesson learned for WS is to not be stingy with the seeds. A lot of containers I only planted 3 or 5 seeds, and was lucky to end up with 1 that actually became a plant. I'll definitely oversow next year and thin out what I don't need. Tamara
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

June 7, 2007
8:48 PM

Post #3587765

My lesson is don't plant so much. I am still planting and planting. I am just about out of room and then it will be time to start giving plants away.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 7, 2007
11:15 PM

Post #3588264

I learned that this is the only way I can afford to mass plant - today I planted 35 snapdragons, about 9 old-fashioned carnations, about 15 pinks, 20 viola (blackberry cream!) Plus I have already planted about 50 larkspur, and there are still more to plant!

I also planted about 100 or so impatiens (started inside - then moved to veranda). Also planted about 15 foxglove, and I still have to plant the delphiniums!
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

June 8, 2007
1:44 AM

Post #3588855

Wow Seandor! You really did well.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2007
9:34 AM

Post #3590028

How much space do you have, Michaela?

xxx, Carrie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2007
2:34 PM

Post #3590758

Is this what you mean by mass planting?
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/730772/
xxx, Carrie
zone5girl
Painesville, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2007
6:21 PM

Post #3591624

Carrie--OMGosh! That's amazing! I can't imagine planting 15,000 bulbs!!! I thought 100 was a lot! Tamara
nikki_conway
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 9, 2007
1:36 AM

Post #3593024

Please show me your Blackberry Cream when they are blooming! I just love Viola!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 9, 2007
9:36 AM

Post #3593984

Well - obviously I haven't attempted to plant 15,000 of anything (yet!) but yes, that is the generally idea, Carrie. I still have about 60 or so impatiens to plant today, and I will also plant the delphiniums.

Nikki - I am new to this, so I have no idea whether the viola will bloom this year or not. But it sure would be great - they encircle two mini roses - Scentsation - which is lavender coloured with a cream underside to the petals. These mini-roses were selected because they (supposedly) have a strong scent. I think that these roses (they will grow to about 24") will be beautiful framed by purple and white violas.

Anyway - both the roses and the violas are new this year - if I get blossoms, I will definitely take pictures and post them :-)

Cheers,
Michaela
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 9, 2007
11:34 AM

Post #3594134

I think we need some pictures Michaela

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 9, 2007
5:54 PM

Post #3595293

You guys understand, it was not I who planted 1500 muscari. I wish I could but DH doesn't get the effect in my head, he just hears me saying "don't mow there yet; the foliage has to ripen."
sjweld
Reedsburg, WI
(Zone 4b)

October 6, 2007
9:59 PM

Post #4055479

Ok, I did my best to read everything. This year will be my first year winter sowing. My sister is planning to do it too. I rely on her for information as she retains much more of what she reads (she is also a DG member). If I have this right,
1) I will keep saving milk jugs NOT cutting and tossing the tops, - Get lots of those as I have in home Day Care.
2) I will cut through three sides (do you keep the handle side intact? Would this hinder the desired "hinged" effect?)
3) Buy Miracle Grow soil NOW if on sale (any particular type?)
4) After winter solstice (or whatever that word was) then I will:
a) Put drainage holes in all my jugs (guess I could do that earlier)
b) Pre moisten soil in a bucket of some type (totally soak it and let it drain over night?)
c) Fill jugs to the edge of cut (give a tap on counter to settle and top off again?)
d) Add seeds on top of soil? Or
e) Sprinkle a little more soil on top of seeds?
f) Close jug and tape shut
g) Replace lid to jug? Or do I leave that off for ventilation?
h) Place outside in sunny area on picnic tabletop (or do I want them directly on the ground?)
i) Let Mother Nature do her work and await spring to enjoy

Is that all? Do I do anything with them from the time I set them out until time to plant them in the ground?

If this list of "to do's" seems accurate, I will print it out for reference. If I get some comments on changes, I will revise it, and then print it out.

Thanks so much! Dave's is the best site for learning from others who are so much more experienced.

Sheri

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2007
10:14 PM

Post #4055525

Well, I can't really comment on your list, but I totally agree on your comment re: DG.

xx, Carrie
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

October 6, 2007
10:37 PM

Post #4055581

sj, i don't think you need to worry about getting it down to a science. it's all about making LESS work & worry, not more.

what you basically want to do is create a slightly protected environment that still gets moisture & lets it drain out.
sjweld
Reedsburg, WI
(Zone 4b)

October 6, 2007
10:47 PM

Post #4055603

Summerkid, so does my list seem appropriate or are there errors? Is it over kill? I like the idea of little work, big results but I also don't want to neglect them TOO much and end up with a bunch of empty dirty jugs on my picnic table in the spring.
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

October 6, 2007
11:20 PM

Post #4055693

Don't put the lid back on; remember, you want them to get some rain/snow.
Put them on the ground if nothing will disturb them there because they will be more protected. The ground helps insulate them.

Why don't you experiment a little & find what works best for you?

As for planting depth, put them at the normal depth or perhaps a bit shallower -- remember, you're letting Mother Nature do the work, a la the wildflowers that just drop their seeds on the ground & spout when they're ready.
sjweld
Reedsburg, WI
(Zone 4b)

October 6, 2007
11:33 PM

Post #4055734

Thanks, I am also reading on the winter sowing.org website that was mentioned earlier in this thread. Hopefully by early January I will feel confident. Maybe I will do half the jugs on the ground and half on the table? I see where a lot of DGer's have thiers on a deck so that would be similar to the picnic table.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 7, 2007
12:50 AM

Post #4056000

I had mine on a table so i wouldn't have to bend over to see if I had sprouts.
sjweld
Reedsburg, WI
(Zone 4b)

October 7, 2007
1:14 AM

Post #4056110

Also, I am thinking up here in WI we can get several feet of snow. I am assuming we don't want the containers litterally burried in the snow right? On the table they would get the snow, the cold ect. All the elements, but still not be completly buried in it.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 7, 2007
1:25 AM

Post #4056163

Actually, I believe buried in the snow is good. It's all insulation.
Dave47
Southern, CT
(Zone 6a)

October 7, 2007
2:13 AM

Post #4056353

Carrie, that's what I always tell my children!
Candyce
The Monadnock Region, NH
(Zone 5a)

October 7, 2007
9:07 AM

Post #4056958

Dave!!!!
bluegrassmom
Lewisburg, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 7, 2007
9:13 AM

Post #4056962

How do you maintain moisture in the gallon jugs? Do you set them in a wading pool? I lost several seedlings in the Spring from drying out. When working a lot of hours I neglected to keep a close eye on them. Any suggestions?
Anitabryk2
Long Island, NY
(Zone 6b)

October 7, 2007
12:31 PM

Post #4057108

I have w/s for two years. Both years I've use milk containers and miracle grow soil. I start planting in the January and continue through April. I fill the container, pour water until the soil is saturated, let it drain, sprinkle the seed, sprinkle a fine later of dry soil on top and put out side on my patio. It is not covered and gets southern exposure. I don't do anything to them or move them about. Once the sprouts look like little plants I start paying attention to them. I start flipping back the lid if the weather is nice and I pay attention to the water need. Seeds don't soak up water, plants do. I've planted out as early as April if the plants are big enough.

This fall, I'm planning on creating a list of the plants that I've planted and what month I w/s'd them. This year I can make an educated decision on when to w/s as not all plants need the Jan/Feb cold to germinate.

If anyone's interested, once the list is done I'll post it here - http://www.lakehousecreations.com/winter_sowing.htm
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

October 7, 2007
12:35 PM

Post #4057116

Like Carrie, I think buried in snow is great. In this pic each hole in the snow has a milk jug under it. Great results.

To maintain moisture when weather heats up:
Place jugs in shade.
Bottom water
Use misting sprinkler on a timer.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 8, 2007
10:11 PM

Post #4062440

Has anyone heard if we are going to have a dry winter, if it's dry we may not have much snow, I don't have much here anyway. If it's going to be dry I'm debating on WS not sure if I want to worry about all of those jugs not getting watered and if I water them I'll worry if I washed the seeds away unless I water them from the bottom lol I don't really want to be watering all winter like I have this summer, what do you all think? I can't just do a few jugs it's not in me lol

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

October 8, 2007
11:30 PM

Post #4062748

you wont need to water them when they are frozen.

i didnt water mine until there was already seedlings and they were getting dried out from the spring sunshine.

just like Anitabryk2 stated... when preparing your containers, get the soil wet, sow your seeds, put them outside. They will then [eventually] freeze, and just forget about them until Springtime.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 8, 2007
11:49 PM

Post #4062825

I'm probably just crying for nothing lol I know I'll end up doing them anyway lol Wouldn't be a winter without WS!
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
4:29 AM

Post #4063845

Anitabryk2, your site is a huge help! Thanks, I'm book marking it. I'm already saving and prepping containers.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2007
4:33 AM

Post #4063854

I don't think I ever stopped saving containers lol

Anitabryk2, I marked it too, thank you!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
2:22 PM

Post #4064768

Can I reuse containers? If i wash them with bleach or lighter fluid or something?

xx, Carrie
Cordeledawg
Cordele, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
3:50 PM

Post #4064954

I think that would be a wonderful idea, Carrie.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2007
4:47 PM

Post #4065128

Sure Carrie you don't have to worry about the containers being that clean when you are WS them outside they aren't as particular. I probably won't even wash mine maybe just rinse them out I have a big pile of them from last year lol

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

October 9, 2007
7:30 PM

Post #4065542

I saved a few of mine... most were mutilated just getting the seedlings out.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
8:29 PM

Post #4065706

None of the sterilizing and bleaching and nonsense?
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2007
8:37 PM

Post #4065728

Carrie: Since most of my milk jugs come from other people, sometimes they're stinky and nasty. Those I rinse out in bleach water. Most I just rinse once with tap water . No problems in 2 years of WSing.

I don't reuse jugs only because I have usually cut them up at planting time, if not before. If I were going to reuse, I would just give them a good rinse.

The purpose of all that sterilizing stuff for indoor seed growing is to prevent disease, the most common of which is damp-off. That isn't an issue with WSing.

Karen
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2007
8:39 PM

Post #4065734

Carrie you don't have to do that I would just rinse them real good, take a tub of water put some dish soap in them swish them around rinse and let dry they should be fine :) That's what I'm doing and that's what I do with my pots outside that I plant in and those plants are fine. Now if your were planting in the house that would be a totally different story bleech those seed trays, rinse and let them dry! lol Too many things can happen in the house under lights but the ones outside will be just fine :)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
8:53 PM

Post #4065783

Hurray! I just held them open with a clothes-pin when it was time to open the lid. But we stopped getting milk delivered in those half-gallon containers. : (
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2007
9:26 PM

Post #4065899

Carrie,
If you need more you can go to the recycle place if you have one sometimes I go there to get jugs. They don't mind at all sometimes I even get 5 gal. buckets if I'm lucky that day lol

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2007
9:43 PM

Post #4065957

I need less! Last year was fun but pretty overwhelming when it came time to transplant all these things that, amazingly, had sprouted and grown! I'm not telling how much DIDN'T make it.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

October 9, 2007
10:11 PM

Post #4066040

carrie -- i too will do less this (next) year.

last year was my first stab at it, and i had way too many seedlings.

as i mentioned -- way somewhere up there - that i will do less seeds per container

plus i will be more choosy when it comes to seeds.

certain seeds i will direct sow, like sun flowers, since the bunnies eat them anyways... so why go thru all the trouble SW'ing them only to have them on the bunny buffet.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

October 10, 2007
1:04 AM

Post #4066671

I have to do less this year. After 2 years of wintersowing and cramming seedlings into every visible inch of soil, I'm running out of bed space. Plus, perennials which stayed small this year and didn't bloom will need more space next year than this year.

I sowed 80 some containers the first time, 60 some containers the second time. I just have to cut back.

Karen

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 10, 2007
9:20 AM

Post #4067493

I don't remember how many I sowed - maybe 50 according-to-the-book containers, and then once I realized those were actually sprouting I planted 3 46 cell trays of annuals but most of those dried out. Some of them I transplanted in time and gave me pretty flowers, eventually!
Grow_Jo
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

October 11, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #4070520

I'm keep telling myself I'll do less than the 50+ milk jugs I did this year, but I already have 26 seed varieties on my list for next winter and it's only October...oh dear.

My biggest challenge was getting rid of all the seedlings I didn't have room for - I had to pot them up and label them to give them away - that took me weeks to do. Must be more organized next year.

Joanne
Candyce
The Monadnock Region, NH
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2007
10:12 AM

Post #4071090

Joanne:

Isn't there a local Farmer's Market or somewhere similar that you could take your extra seedlings?
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 11, 2007
11:52 AM

Post #4071205

I am starting a new thread this is way to long. Here is the new one. Now to remember how to make this a sticky. Would someone remind me please?

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/779338/

This message was edited Oct 11, 2007 6:53 AM
Grow_Jo
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

October 11, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #4071503

Candyce - my post wasn't really clear - it wasn't actually a problem to find people to give them to, it just took me a long time to pot them up to do so...

Joanne
zenpotter
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

October 11, 2007
3:42 PM

Post #4071852

I have #4 started and it should be a sticky soon.

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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