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Beginner Vegetables: Onions and Garlic- do they come back?

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JMCFAN
Corrales, NM

March 15, 2007
1:01 PM

Post #3283705

LAst year I planted a row of each with plants purchased from Gurneys. We had a family emergency and the garden was left to basically die off. Now I am getting ready this year and am cleaning it out etc and notice that bot the onion and garlic that were left in the ground are "growing".,,, nice green shoots form both... do I leave them or tear themn out and replant with new?

have no clue...
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 16, 2007
5:08 AM

Post #3286836

The garlic bulb consists of cloves that each grow a new plant the following Spring. You could carefully divide these and plant them several inches apart. If you do this now, you will have a nice round garlic bulb for each plant. If you leave them to grow in a clump, each bulb will be smaller and misshapen. You need to divide soon if you want each plant to recover from transplant shock and have time to develop properly.
I don't know about the onions. they might be biennial, in which case you will get a seed stalk this year. I'm not sure.
notmartha
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2007
10:07 AM

Post #3291050

when would i do that here in michigan- i have one lil plant last yr!
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2007
12:50 AM

Post #3293469

You can divide a garlic clump as soon as it is showing growth and you can see how many individual plants there are. Pull roots apart gently if they are intertwined. My garlic plants here in the Northwest are already 4 to 6 inches high, getting a little too late to divide those that came up twins. I used to live in the midwest, but I was a city kid with not much opportunity to garden, so I don't know about when your garlic would begin to show new leaf growth there in Michigan. What is your weather like at the moment? Any signs of Spring coming soon?
I've been growing garlic for 25 years, so you can both ask me any questions and I'll do the best I can to answer given the difference in our climate zones. One last question...what variety are you growing? This can make some difference in what to expect from the plant (flower stalk or not) and when to harvest.
summerkid
Rose Lodge, OR
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2007
12:54 AM

Post #3293479

not a beginner, but for the first time i missed harvesting a whole bunch of garlic plants last summer, or else a bunch of cloves got broken off. so even though i normally plant my garlic in late fall, it is OK to take these year-old plants & divide them up right now?
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2007
11:17 PM

Post #3296669

Yes, you can divide them up now. they may not become as large as they might have if planted separately in the Fall, but I think they should do just fine.
notmartha
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2007
7:54 AM

Post #3297104

well it stnowed today but temps in the 50s after this!!! i will look and see when the growth starts
rondaweber30
West Salem, OH

May 12, 2007
12:17 PM

Post #3489340

i had 2 rows of green onions come back from last year. we pulled them and ate them. they were delish!! not mushy at all. i plan on planting a couple of rows and heavily mulching for another early crop next year.
allysgram
Sedalia, MO

May 12, 2007
12:26 PM

Post #3489361

I just have to tell you all a funny story aboute my daughter and her garlic. They live in Ne. Last summer I went to visit her and we were talking aboute our gardens, she had planted garlic, and told me her garlic didn't get very big. She went in the kitchen and brought out a jar, it was full of the seeds. I couldn't help but laugh, I told her she was suposed to dig the garlic. She had been doing this for a couple of years, told her she had to dig and seperate, then dig it each year when the tops turn brown. Now we tease her aboute her small garlic.
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

June 21, 2007
8:44 PM

Post #3642346

Mauryhill- I am so glad that you are there to answer questions. I live in Zone 5a and planted garlic last year when I bought a bunch of drastically reduced herbs for the garden. Don't know squat about garlic and I left it in the ground last year. It has been growing well this year. Even more came back but didn't have a clue what to do with it. It is too late to move it now but I may harvest a few this year to see what they are like. I guess it will be okay until next year and then I can catch it early and divide them. Is this okay to do? Any input would be appreciated!

Elaine
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 23, 2007
3:56 PM

Post #3648902

Procrastinator, this was my first year growing garlic as well. I planted in the fall and just harvested last week...I don't think you should leave it in the ground until next year, because it may rot. My mother-in-law planted her garlic a week or two before I did last fall, and when she dug hers up she had some that were kinda smushy and starting to rot. You're supposed to harvest garlic when the bottom two or three leaves have turned brown. Hope this helps and that I haven't given you the wrong information!

Kristie
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 3, 2007
2:41 PM

Post #3690032

Thanks Kristie - Your info is a big help. Now I'll know when to harvest. Thanks for the input as I really didn't have a clue since I;ve never grown it before!

Elaine
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #3690278

No problem! Its not often I can be of much help...glad it helped you out!

Kristie
jeannegreen1
Lucerne, CA

July 4, 2007
4:48 PM

Post #3694594

Wondering if it's OK to feed my dog the cobb from cooked corn?
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 4, 2007
7:54 PM

Post #3695388

jeanneg-don't mean to be a smarty-pants but my first thought is
WHY? Does your dog like them? Never knew a dog that did but can't imagine that it would hurt your dog if he/she chews it up well.
Unless your dog is obsessed with corn cobs I'd just pass on the idea. Not much help was I? Sorry.

Elaine
Greenharvest
Hadley, MA

July 5, 2007
2:08 PM

Post #3698046

Jeannegreen1: I used to work on a farm , where we grew corn. Each year, when the corn was ready to be picked, the farm dog, an old black lab, would suddenly spring back to life, like a little puppy again. She was obsessed with eating corn. When I came into the yard each morning, I would see her eagerly waiting in the back of the pickup truck. I think she slept there at night, so as not to miss the early morning picking! Everyone would throw her ears of corn as we picked. I couldn't believe how much that dog could eat! She, like your dog, ate the cobs as well as the kernels, and had been doing so for years. I don't imagine it's too good for the digestion, but she got so much exercise following the crew around that I think she probably worked it all off by noon. What a riot!
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 6, 2007
1:28 PM

Post #3702421

Green - That story is a hoot and gives me a better understanding of the corn cob question. That was so sweet of you to share that story! Now I know why the question was asked.

Hugs Elaine
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2007
3:47 AM

Post #3726364

Sorry to be unavailable for garlic questions the last few weeks. I have been too busy finishing the school year and then harvesting my garlic (about 400 plants). I agree that it is best to harvest whatever garlic you have right now. Then you can plant separate cloves in the Fall, allowing the plants to fully develop with plenty of room during the next growing season.
jonyaplsed
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 17, 2007
5:06 PM

Post #3746646

Fruit bearing vines for fence gardening in South Florida. Zone 10-a or 10-b Any suggestions?
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 21, 2007
10:39 PM

Post #3763455

Jony- Sorry. I'm no help to you regarding the fruit-bearing vines but perhaps one of our more knowledgable gardeners has info for you.

Regarding garlic. How the heck do you store garlic without it drying out? I know that someone out there has a practical answer without me spending a bundle to purchase some sort of garlic keeper. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Hugs Elaine
allysgram
Sedalia, MO

July 22, 2007
2:22 AM

Post #3764052

I leave part of the stem on and tie them together and hang them, you can also store them in the sacks with the little holes(cain't think of the name) like onions come in, just for using I just put them in a jar on the counter with no top on it, but I use a lot of garlic, If you want you can also chop them and store in oil in the fridge, hope this helps
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 22, 2007
3:32 PM

Post #3765326

allysgram-thanks for the advice. I thought there might be another way to store them so they last longer. I may have to put them in oil in our fridge because we don't go through enough of it before it goes bad. The netted sleeve you were talking about doesn't seem to keep ours fresh for long. Does that thingy even have a real name???? But I digress. About keeping them fresh - I thought there might be some magical way to keep them in the kitchen and store them without worrying about them going soft. Maybe not other than hanging them so that the air circulates?

Thanks so much for your advice!

Hugs Elaine
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

July 23, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #3767259

Air circulation is the key. Also, they should not be too moist (but here in the Northwest I don't have a problem with garlic drying out, I need to prevent molding) or be kept in direct sunlight. I make a braid with my softneck garlic (those that don't put up a flower stalk), and hang it on the side of a cupboard in my kitchen, away from the windows, stove and sink. The braid usually has a bulb or two left by Spring and they are still good until June. My hardneck types, I keep in a mesh hanging basket with no lid. they aren't as long lasting in storage, but are still good until January.
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

July 23, 2007
3:17 PM

Post #3768769

maury - You hit the nail on the head. Our garlic is stored next to the sink, close to the stove, the steam from the kettle and is not hung. I'm going to change its location today and hang them in the sleeve ( I keep the occasional one for crafts in case I get inspired by it) and see what happens. A million thanks are going your way!

Can't thank you enough!

Hugs Elaine

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