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Mid-South Gardening: Chinese Wisteria 1st Blooms

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2007
4:53 PM

Post #3359077

It's worth the wait; This Wisteria was planted in 2002, moved into a half whiskey barrel the next year. And this Spring it finally bloomed for us. A mesmerizing beauty it's.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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slcdms

slcdms
Ripley, MS

April 5, 2007
8:01 PM

Post #3359685

Very pretty, looks like you put a lot of thought into where it should be and have been rewarded.
I did not realize it took them so long to bloom
Sandra
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
8:20 PM

Post #3359748

What beautiful blooms and a lovely setting!

I am amazed it is growing in a 1/2 whiskey barrel and must ask if it needs a lot of water?
That is an excellent way to contain the roots although I have heard the Chinese wisteria is not quite as invasive... pod
Fitsy
Hayesville, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2007
9:16 PM

Post #3359936

Wow! It sure looks happy.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2007
9:22 PM

Post #3359959

Sandra; Wisterias in general take at least 5 years of age to produce blosoms. And yes, the Asian kind; Japanese and Chinese are very agressive growers. Their cousins the native Wisteria are lot more constrained. Each blooms slightly different but all are beautiful.
Pod; these are very tolerance of drought. Though, in pots I water them as often as they need. I fill the big half whiskey barrel with other "filler plants" such as trailing vines, these help me gaze the need of the water requirement. I siphon a hose to our irrigation system's main valve with stop-cock. I simply turn the stop-cock on/off when I water the garden - to water my container-plants. FYI; my Chinese Wisteria is trained as a standard (tree-like). It will bloom again in Autumn (as it was signaling me last year). The Japanese blosoms are already spent in mid spring. But the American "Amethyst Falls" is now forming buds. BTW; I've all 3 kinds. Those that are on the ground needs lots more care with pruning, and pulling out roots that ran rampant in the vicinity. I've two white one climbing up my porch which haven't bloomed yet.

This message was edited Apr 5, 2007 8:25 PM
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2007
10:03 PM

Post #3360133

Looking forward to more delightful photos... Thanks for the info, pod
n2birds
Lakeland / Memphis, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2007
9:03 AM

Post #3361170

Yes Lily - more pix please. Your grounds look beautiful !
justfurkids
Toone, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2007
9:10 AM

Post #3361195

wow...awesome pic of that wisteria in bloom.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2007
10:13 AM

Post #3361382

:) Thank you all. Here is another view of the Chinese Wisteria.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jeri11

jeri11
Central, LA
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2007
10:43 AM

Post #3361477

Lily what is that grassy plant to the right of your wisteria? I like it with those little flowers.
n2birds
Lakeland / Memphis, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2007
1:00 PM

Post #3361904

... and I am curious what size pot you have that wisteria in. What beautiful scenery - on the water's edge.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2007
2:29 PM

Post #3362167

Jeri11; the grass-like flowers bush is scotchbrooms, it's in full bloom this time of year. And it's hardy in our zones.
N2birds; the pot is a half whiskey barrel. Wisteria has a currious habit. When the root is bound (in this case it's). It will try to send out long strand root off to the size in search of self proliferation. I cut those off, and it's said to stimulate the plant to flower even more. (keeping them on the dry side, also helps). I only fertilize my Wisteria with tripple phosphate, no nitrogen for wisteria, unless if you would like to spend lot of time to prune off new growths.
n2birds
Lakeland / Memphis, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2007
2:35 PM

Post #3362180

That is very intersting what you do with the roots. I have heard that if you cut into the roots, it helps them to bloom (the ones in the ground). So, there may be some truth to that since yours blooms so well. I purchased one about 5 years ago that said it was a 9 year old plant and it never bloomed. We recently cut it down when we tore our deck out, and there are still shoots coming up. Maybe I should dig one up and plant it up like yours and see what happens. It was extremely invasive where it was.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2007
3:04 PM

Post #3362277

N2birds;
It's known that certain plants when faced with advert conditions, e.g. Injuries, fires, storm damages etc. There is some sort of intrinsic mechanism being released so that they can self-propagate. Apparently Wisteria falls into these groups of plants. Perhaps, that explains why they do seldom bloom when they're in fertile garden soil. Drough, also a factor to induce wisteria to bloom (once established). A case in point. Remember our last year drought? One of our neighbor's wisteria bloomed its heart out. One wouldn't believe one eyes! I'll see if I can find the picture of this particular one to post it soon.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #3362481

I found the pic.! This Wisteria bloomed profusely (more so compared to years past), after severe drought.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

justfurkids
Toone, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2007
7:12 PM

Post #3362987

wow...think I will withhold the water just a tad. Awesome!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2007
8:23 PM

Post #3363209

Sounds like Wisteria abuse is the answer... LOL

I have always loved Wisteria but after seeing it kill some magnificent trees, I have resisted getting a plant. I will have to give your pot method a try. Thanks...

This message was edited Apr 6, 2007 7:25 PM

jeri11

jeri11
Central, LA
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2007
8:25 PM

Post #3363220

Don't tell DEQ but Jim dumped oil on mine and it just laughted at him.
Early_Bloomer
Springboro, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2007
8:35 PM

Post #3363249

I recently purchased a Chinese Wisteria but have not planted it yet. I'm hoping it will do well on this rustic arbor I built a couple of years ago. Do they like a lot of sun?

Early_bloomer

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Riverland
Northeast, LA
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2007
10:47 PM

Post #3363736

Wow I love that arbor. Love the wisteria too. I have planted several but they are a little too young to bloom. My white one had one bloom so I at least know it is a white one.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2007
7:24 AM

Post #3364316

Is the white as fragrant as the purples?
justfurkids
Toone, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2007
9:14 AM

Post #3364593

love the arbor!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 7, 2007
12:45 PM

Post #3365310

Early_Bloomer; I love your garden setting, Wisteria is known to pull down many a structure. I hope that yours will stand up to the test. Your garden is lovely, oooh yahhh, I just love it. Wisteria do enjoy basking in sunshine. The Wisteria above, in some season. I've noticed it only bloomed on the sunny side. For those of us loving these vines. Training them into "tree-like" specimen is the way to go. We can enjoy the blosoms without a lot of fuss.
Ordinary garden soil will serve the purpose for these potting. It's dense, retains water longer (and useful in drought-treatment, or like Pod's has mentioned, "wisteria abuse" lol). And it helps stabilize the "tree" against winds and such. Good lucks, and enjoy everyone.
Early_Bloomer
Springboro, PA
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2007
1:43 PM

Post #3365521

Thanks Lily. It sounds like the arbor is the perfect place for the wisteria. It should hold up. I built it out of locust trees I cut on my property. Locust was always the farmers wood of choice for fence posts in this area because it lasts for many years without rotting.



early_bloomer
maisied1
Brookland, AR

April 8, 2007
11:11 PM

Post #3370273

my aunt has a wisteria that the previous owner had planted as a twisted tree, so it cant encroach on anything, and it is absolutley beautiful this year. How do you do that? Wisteria here in AR can totally take over, so if I plant any, it has to be under control. Thanks for any advice.
justfurkids
Toone, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 9, 2007
8:17 AM

Post #3370870

I'd love to train some as a tree too. A number of folks here have them trained as bushes, so I guess its just a matter of time before the bush turns into a tree. Is this correct?

carol

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2007
11:13 AM

Post #3371390

Maisied, Carol;
Wisteria "vines" are easy to sort of braid them together as a standard when young. (A tree-like structure with many weavy stalks). In order to make a single tree out of any bush. You'd need to select one desirable trunk and cut off ALL other side growth. In time it will look like a tree. Maisied; Wisteria are very vigorous growers. (As noted above). The only way to contain it, is literally CONTAIN it in pots. They root easily too, so discard your pruning branches or they just root in place where you left them.
Carol, to speed up the process of having Wisteria to bloom early with your new plant. Try to propagate your 'new' plant from a mature specimen in your neighborhood who is willing to share a few cuttings. They root at any time of year from cutting (like that of willows). Have fun, and good lucks.
Kim

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 26, 2007
1:29 PM

Post #3659978

Dona,
I'll post some more info. on this Wisteria's development. :-)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 26, 2007
2:25 PM

Post #3660187

The wisteria prolific blooms in the spring; only yielded few successful seedpods. Apparently its main proliferation mean is via the spreading of the root-system. But, since it's confined in a pot. ... there you've it. You'll have success keeping it in check.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 27, 2007
10:09 PM

Post #3666841

I love wisteria, I bit the bullet last fall and bought a pink one, it didn't flower this year, and I'm working on keeping it a tree, hoping I do a good job at that. I hope to see blooms on it next year though.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2007
1:06 AM

Post #3900345

I'll bump this thread back up, so if anyone is interested to discuss about different type of Wisterias.

Kathy_Ann; we've come along way. Wow, forgive me, but I didn't know anything about anyone here in MSF then. Now, I feel like we're all connected. :-) How is your Wisteria faring this summer?
Kim
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2007
8:34 PM

Post #3902750

How's my pink one doing? it's doing great, but desperately needs to be staked, it fell over, and is growing sideways now, I asked dh to stake it several times, but he keeps forgetting and I keep forgetting to remind him, my poor wisteria is growing sideways now, If I don't hurry and stake it , it will stay like that.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2007
9:02 PM

Post #3902851

Ah, then you'll have a semi-cascade specimen! The drought that we shared, would do well for all the wisteria. The Japanese Wisteria (Dark purple/blue blooms) that belongs to my neighbor already signal a great blooms for next year. It has been showing scattered blooms for weeks now. Then in the springs, it will explode.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2007
9:51 PM

Post #3903029

I hope mine does as well.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2007
3:49 PM

Post #3939980

My above Chinese Wisteria gave me one single bloom this summer (after the very 1st flush in Spring). But here is the above Japanese Wisteria which belongs to my neighbor is putting on a pretty good show at present.


This message was edited Sep 5, 2007 10:50 AM

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2007
3:52 PM

Post #3939992

The 'tree' form Wisteria...

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haighr
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
5:11 PM

Post #4590987

Abuse is the word. Here is mine that was several years old and never bloomed. Then we got a hurricane force winds that split the trunk and you can see my ducttape handiwork. My local nursery said it could not be saved. Then to my amazement the following spring it bloomed profusely for the first and only time, that was 2004 and have only had about 2 blooms since. I have done the no cutting back, cutting in the fall, cutting in the winter, cutting in spring and in summer, no season seems to make a difference, this plant just has a mind of its own. I hope this is the year of blooms again as it is a beauty.

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haighr
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
5:14 PM

Post #4591001

Here it is in bloom. I read somewhere that a plant that won't produce may produce if traumatized. The fellow even suggested rolling up newspapers and spanking the plant if necessary.

Thumbnail by haighr
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kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2008
7:17 PM

Post #4591547

They are beautiful, seem to do best when left completely alone, unfortunately I can't do that around here. I hope I get some blooms on mine this year. I have decided that my DH needed to pull up my regular wisteria cause we have to keep them trimmed where they are located now and they never bloom, He attempted to dig one up wth the tractor and couldn't do it, even put a chain around it to pull it out of the ground, it wouldn't budge. It's about 6 years old. So now one of the three is deformed completely, but we left the other two intact. If we can get that front one out of the ground I may be able to leave the other two alone so they can bloom. That front one was growing over the faucet and I had to keep it cleared from snakes, so I was constantly trimming it.

I know a lady in Searcy that planted hers by a dead tree that had been chopped down but still had about l0 feet of tree there, that wisteria grew up that tree trunk and made the most beautiful tree I had ever seen. It blooms profusely every year, and she never has to prune it cause it's so high up that it doesn't get in the way of anything else.

wish mine were like that.

kathy
haighr
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
7:21 PM

Post #4591554

Me as well, mine gets in the pines and dogwoods and can't have that. I have read about the hard and soft pruning and tried those at different seasons, but nothing seems to work, the only time it bloomed was after it was split in that storm.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2008
9:15 PM

Post #4591984

That's not very encouraging news there LOL do we have to have ours split in half in order to see blooms? My mom had one too and it never bloomed.

I see them all over the place that have over grown in the trees, and their full of blooms. This tells me i'm not suppose to prune mine,

I think when the time comes that my pink one looks like it's taking over, I"m going to take the vines and entangle them into each other and wrap them through andthrough sort of instead of trimming, so it's all inttact, but a little less mess LOL we'll see how that goes.
picabo
Nashville, TN
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:54 PM

Post #4592170

Beautiful blooms on the Wisterias.

Mine got hit hard by the late freeze last year. It was killed back to the ground. It is about 20 years old and has bloomed maybe 3 times. I am hoping that the stress of the freeze last year may encourage it to bloom this year.
It usually sets buds too early and gets frost bit.

They are so beautiful when they bloom
Betty
tomatofreak
Phoenix, AZ

February 27, 2008
3:21 AM

Post #4594160

Misery, as they say, loves company. And so I am somewhat pleased to learn that others have this stubborn plant that never blooms. I bought two several, maybe ten, years ago. One promptly died; the other grew like topsy, up over the pergola, way up in my old chaste tree - and just refuses to bloom. I've root-pruned the thing as that was supposed to help. Not. This year, I decided to give it the Lizzie Borden treatment so I chopped off tons of roots and nearly all of the top. Maybe I should split it down the middle and beat it with a newspaper! Now, whenever I complain to a nursery about my non-blooming wisteria, they say "don't buy one unless it's in bloom." Well, now they tell me.

I do love your pictures, though.
haighr
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
12:26 PM

Post #4595070

The plant that I got was from one that a friend has that has bloomed every year for many years and she does nothing special with hers. It was well rooted and about 2' tall when I got it from her, and I still can't believe that it has only bloomed in full that one time. Her's is still going strong and blooming like crazy every year. Guess it is the soil or something as I can't believe that it is the pruning after all my different attempts over the years. Last year I believe that it got 2 blooms and the tree is quite large? Go figure, will be anxious as always to see what this year brings.

I think if it is nice this weekend I am going to go out and hit it a few times with my rubber mallet, just for the heck of it. Now that it has been a few years the split part has come apart and I guess healed itself like a bad wound. Will have to take another photo.
Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
12:33 PM

Post #4595079

I have a small one I bought a few years ago, it is slow growing,and hasn't bloomed since I bought it.But, I have it by the pond,so I'm going to dig it up,and put it in a large pot I have been trying to figure out what to plant in it.Thank you for the info all...

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
4:14 PM

Post #4596042

Cat54,
Putting your Wisteria in a big pot could be the solution to having it blooms soon for you. Best of luck. So far, I've one that's full of buds, the currius thing about wisteria is that they make flower buds on both old/new woods. But pruning them down to a manageable size, seemed to help them budding out. This tiny Wisteria in my bonsai-training pot is full of flower buds. However, other hasn't gotten this advance. It's too early yet, I think, but this baby (purchased pring before last, while it was bearing flower from local Lowes or HD). For those of us just now starting out to experiment with this gorgeous flowering vine in the early spring. Purchase them in blooms, or take cuttings from mature vines from friends and neighbor is THE thing to do -- since they don't general bloom until 5-7 years of age. I'm glad this thread could offer some helpful tips to enjoy this lovely vines.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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2vernes
Blytheville, AR
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
5:16 PM

Post #4596346

Lily_love, I'm really interested in how you did the bonsai of the wisteria. Sounds like something I would like to do but can't figure out how to keep it in a small bonsai pot. Laverne

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
6:16 PM

Post #4596582

Laverne;
I'll spend some time this afternoon and walk you through it. I'm new too, but got some good result. So hang with me. We've a little bit of sunshine outdoor today, and I'm out there take advantage of the sun shine. Thanks the lord above for a sunny day. Will get back this evening.
Kim
2vernes
Blytheville, AR
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
6:29 PM

Post #4596626

Kim, Take your time. I probably won't be back on the puter until tonight. Thanks, Laverne
Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
3:28 AM

Post #4598944

Lily_love,
Thx for the info,the plant is about 4 yrs old,so maybe it will do well in the pot.It was blooming when I bought it at HD,so I know it can.LOL
I'm so ready to get in the yard,spent the winter working on the inside of the house,have the new bathroom(original one actually) almost done,the house is from the 20's,so it was in dire need.
I need some help figuring out what to plant in the front beds,I have some autumn fern, which is doing good,but need some more,any ideas? It faces north by the way.
Photo of my dragonfly at the pond,they have been here since I put the pond in.So many beautiful ones drop by in the summer...these are my favorites.

Thumbnail by Pyewacketcat54
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2008
3:53 AM

Post #4599058

So you've a few years old Wisteria but it doesn't bloom? Problems could include;
1. Rich garden soil.
2. Regular watering
3. Too much fertilizer
4. Needs root prune

To correct the problem;

1. Keep your soil lean. Do not add any amendment.
2. Withhold water; keep the soil on the dried side. I plant top dress with some decorative living mulch such as creeping plox, verbena. I add 1 purple conflower. I only water the Wisteria by looking at the purple coneflower if it begine to droop. I water the pot, allow it to completely saturate, and will not water it again, until the coneflower wilt again before I repeat the watering process. (Your coneflower may not look at its best - but it serves as a water-gauge for your Wisteria needs of moisture).
3. In early spring before the leave bud unfurl. I prune the wayward growth; don't be afraid to prune, that only stimulate the vine to put out more growths. Shape the vine/tree to your desired shape. Fertilize it generously with tripple phosphate. No nitrogen, since notrogen only stimulate leafy growth.
4. Prune the roots, once the vine is in a pot, long strand of roots may escape the parimeter of the pot. Cut those back to its boundary.

* Also, do not prune the "spurs" those stubby short stems near the base of the trunk, those are your inflorescents (future flower stalks). Wisteria are currius, they put out flowers both on the old woods, as well as those one year-old branch. So leave those alone. Soon you will see flowers. Hopefully this spring.

Another thing I need to stress, the vine will not flower unless it's 5-7 years of age.

My Wisteria as posted above from last year, it was at least 2 years old when I planted it. 5 years later it bloomed for me.

The dark purple Japanese Wisteria of my neighbor (as picture later in the post above) is a much older vine which was prune back down to roughly 2.5 feet tall. The wayward branches were allow to form a canopy to shape the "tree" like form.
The tree blooms best in a drought crisis. The neighbor doesn't water the vine at all. It thrives on total neglect! Most of us gardener will not consider this treatment. But, wisterias need those condition to flourish and blossom.

Feel free to ask specific question, I'd try to assist if I could.
Kim
haighr
Hagerstown, MD
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
12:42 PM

Post #4599870

Kim,
Thanks for the great information. Mine must be a soil problem as the plant is very mature (8-10) years now and as stated only bloomed profusely after the split. I have only had 2-3 blooms each year since and have tried trimming each year in a different season.
Think I will try cutting the runners along the ground this year in early spring, plunge the shovel into the ground around to sever a root or 2 and then twist the rest of the long growth as if braiding its hair and see what happens.
Candee

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2008
10:15 PM

Post #4602103

Best of lucks, Candee. Currently I've two little Chinese wisterias in bonsai-training pots, they were bought at the same time, and were both in blooming age from the garden center. Last year they both bloomed for me, though I don't remember if they bloomed the exact same time. This past year, I've given the two the exact growing condition, the exact size of container. One is putting out flower buds left and right. The other isn't.
So I may just take a rolled up newspaper and "slap" it (the one without the flower buds) couple of time, talk to it sternly and perhap threaten to trow it into a junk pile if it doesn't bloom? lol, I'll keep y'all posted as how it turns out.
Kim

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2008
10:25 PM

Post #4602150

This is another Chinese wisteria that I hope to make it into a bonsai. I allowed this wisteria's roots to escape the pot during the growing season last year. The trunk has increased considerably (compared to that of the other two) if we allow the long tap roots to run on top of the garden surface (that help us from having to dig those up because they could tunnel a long way before they re-surface and sprouts up rampantly in the garden - which will be difficult to rid off later). This one is large enough to be trained into a real bonsai pot. I'll wait until it blooms this year, then I'll gradually prune the vine to the shape that I like. Our shaping/pruning of the vine will be gradual. I'll take pics. and share with everyone how I go about doing this in the spring/summer ahead of us.
Kim

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 29, 2008
10:40 PM

Post #4606175

Slowly but surely these flower buds are getting bigger and bigger everyday. :-)

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Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2008
8:53 PM

Post #4617810

Kim,
I dug my wisteria up,and replanted it in a large planter,like you said,I cut it back... so now we'll see if I did it right. I hope so, I love the plant,and have always wanted one in bloom.You have helped me with your photos and information,thank you! Becki

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2008
9:11 PM

Post #4617884

I hope the transplant alone will stimulate the plant to flower for you, PWC54, pruning too is definately going to help it some. Did you use just ordinary garden soil for it? No fertilizer, only give it tripple phospate if you must. As a rule when we freshly pot any type of planting, do not fertilize them heavily (that could injur the wounded roots), wait a week or two before you give them the triple phospate. Then watch them bloom. :-)

Ahh, BTW, my other small pot of wisteria is now beginning to put on buds, flower-buds! :-)
Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #4618274

It was a mixture of garden soil and some potting soil... nothing else put in it.It got a good rain today,after my watering,so maybe the natural water will help too.
Photos of your wisterias,please! You all are better than any gardening magazine,I can get the info and pics I need or want,and plus everyone is so nice in their responses... ya rock ,ladies!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2008
4:52 PM

Post #4621581

These are a few of the last spring pics. of the standard Chinese Wisteria that I planted in my half whiskey barrel.
#1

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2008
4:55 PM

Post #4621592

#2, notice how the Chinese W. Flowers open up before the leaves emerge.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2008
4:58 PM

Post #4621608

#3 The long inflorescents dangling in the spring breeze.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2008
5:02 PM

Post #4621622

#4 More of the 'Standard' Wisteria.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 6, 2008
12:33 AM

Post #4627298

Today is the first day I spotted some flower bud on the same Wisteria above. Oh Yes!!!
Kim
Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2008
12:36 AM

Post #4627313

Kim, ok, Yesterday it rained snowed around here,today it is in the 70's ,tomorrow more snow rain. *sigh* About the time it gets pretty, I am ready to buy flowers,then it gets cold the next day...I wish it would quit teasing us!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 6, 2008
12:44 AM

Post #4627344

You aren't kidding, but it's good to know we aren't alone. lol. For us that live in the South, spring is right around the corner though. I've noticed my viburnum leaf are budding out and getting ready to unfurl. Wooohooo.
Pyewacketcat54
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2008
1:11 AM

Post #4627476

My japanese maple has buds too,I have it in a pot ,in the back,so it's protected to a point.
I have to say,I did get some bulbs,and they are sitting...waiting...
guspuppy
Warren, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2008
6:29 AM

Post #4697893

Every year my wisterias get eaten alive by japanese beetles. I spray them but it doesn't help. Are these creatures eating the flower buds? Is this why it doesnt bloom? It gets plenty of leaves, I dont water it or fertalize it. It is at least 7 years old. I tried root pruning it last year but that didn't help either. I keep it shaped.
Thank you, Kathy

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4699427

Kathy, I'll share some experience with how to control JP in the garden. Unfortunately those bugs love Japanese Maples, adore Roses, and they also love Wisteria (young leafy growth). But, in my zone, when the dreaded JPs erupt -- which is around 3rd weeks of May. Some Wisteria if they blooms, they are pretty safe from those munching critters because the blooms are well on the way and spent by then.

Foliage growth is essential for most any plants. Control the JP is to help your garden in the long run... Wisterias like I've shared with my past experience; they won't bloom if the soil is rich, and especially if they receive abundant water in the growing season.

The most effective control of JP is the biological control agents called "Milky Spores" I recommend that you do some research on those and decide for yourself if it's right for your garden or not. It's expensive, and it takes time to be most effective.
Happy gardening.

Here is a small Chinese Wisteria I raised in pot. It's putting out flower buds. I've forced these into blooms among others...

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2008
6:44 PM

Post #4699448

This is the same Wisteria that bloomed last year for the first time for me. It's in a half wiskey barrel pot. Which is once again putting out many flower buds at present.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2008
6:46 PM

Post #4699453

A close up of those flower buds...

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2008
6:48 PM

Post #4699463

Another close up...of the Chinese Wisteria above.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2008
6:54 PM

Post #4699482

Here is a different Wisteria. This one is a Japanese Wisteria. The difference? Their foliage leafed out while the flower buds are forming. This one is also in a large pot, which is trained onto my swing arbor. This one has signaled its readiness to bloom last year. But not until this year it's first noticed with abundant buds. Another one on the opposite site has yet putting out bud this year...both were planted at the same time, so I'll wait a while and see if the buds will come up...

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

guspuppy
Warren, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2008
8:12 PM

Post #4699740

Thank you LL
PerennialGirl
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 4a)

March 31, 2008
2:30 PM

Post #4734855

Lily the blooms that you forced are amazing! What is the trick to make Wisteria bloom?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 1, 2008
2:48 AM

Post #4738351

PerennialG; I've posted all the tricks that I know how to get them bloomed. I'm a little disappointed though, because I was hoping that I have 5 wisteria to bloom this year, but as it turned out there are only 4. Remember, what ever tricks we utililize, Wisteria needs to be 5-7 year old in order to bloom as mentioned earlier.

Here is the update on the Chinese Wisteria today.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2008
1:14 AM

Post #4753485

It has been 2 days to the date when my Chinese Wisteria first bloomed last year. I realize it's time to begin a new thread for "Chinese Wisteria; the second year". So I'll initiate a new thread. Please stay tuned.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 4, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #4753615

We continue here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/830549/

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
8:27 AM

Post #9051332

Revisit the once exuberant Chinese wisteria. It must be in some type of grievance since the year it first bloomed back in 2007, it hasn't bloomed well since. The environment has changed ... nothing good lasts forever!!! The once sunny side where it was located has gradually turned into a shady land, then we experienced several spring floods. Then I decided to move the plant to a sunnier location last spring. This spring, dispite the additional attention. The tree just refused to bloom.

Only 2 inflorescents were seen this year.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

cperdue

cperdue
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:02 PM

Post #9051932

Sorry your wisteria decided to quit blooming!!! I just love wisteria but don't really have room to grow it. It was growing on a fence when I first moved in this house about 29 years ago but it would never bloom. I did everything but nothing helped. I finally cut it way back - can't kill it - it's still growing but just don't have as much of it and it has never bloomed in 29 years. Last year I bought one I was going to keep in a pot but it didn't make it over the winter. Think I'm going to give up and just other peoples wisteria!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9051939

They're quite tempermental. I saw buds, but not sure if those may just be leave buds. Seem as if the main ingredient they require to bloom are sunshine. Our yard is becoming more and more shady...that could be the pitfall of it all.

cperdue

cperdue
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9051942

That's definitely the problem in my yard now. However, 29 years ago I had a lot more sun than I do now and my wisteria would never bloom. But your right about the sun. The wisteria around Little Rock is just beautiful right now.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:22 PM

Post #9051958

To make it up, I've another pea-like blooms. Here is a Texas Mountain Laurel in bloom currently. The color is off a little, it's more purple rather than blue as it appears here due to lighting I think.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

cperdue

cperdue
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9051964

That's gorgeous! Love the leaf on it also. Bet it also needs sun.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
5:34 PM

Post #9051971

Yes, as much as I can provide. I've transplanted it from a shadier area, and after several years, it finally bloom for me.
Riverland
Northeast, LA
(Zone 8a)

March 21, 2012
6:25 PM

Post #9052038

Mine has been in the full sun 5 yrs and this is the first year it bloomed

Thumbnail by Riverland
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
6:35 PM

Post #9052052

Cindy's color of the bloom are true to life. Yes, they prefer lot of sun, and not too rich soil. They prefer rocky condition...but I've this small part of the yard that still has little bit of sunshine.
GreenThumbSuker
Mobile, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 10, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9159067

It is a beautiful plant with a beautiful bloom... We have two different places on our 5 acres that we have to literally FIGHT it to keep it from killing our very large oak trees. It was here when we bought the place. While its very pretty, it's not worth the fight or the possible loss of the large oaks. In some places (here) it is considered invasive and I know first hand why.

As long as you can keep it containerized it should be fine but I have found that if you so much as allow it to touch the ground you may be in for a very rough ride. Good Luck to you..

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 10, 2012
9:11 AM

Post #9159156

Well stated, GTS. I wished what I know now that I didn't know then when I first became infatuated with this beautiful flowers. Most of mine are containerized, but I have one that's in a big container that has never bloomed due to sun/shade condition. DH and I are making plans of cutting that huge vine down off the arbor that we planted years ago.

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