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Texas Gardening: Hollyhocks in Dallas?

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casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2007
4:38 PM

Post #3511201

Hi!

Several years ago I planted some Hollyhocks. Although they have grown up beautifully (and they are blooming so nice this year), I am constantly fighting off the spider mites. I purchased them from an online gardening company so I am concerned that they may not be suited to the area.

I live in Dallas. I will post pictures shortly so you can see what type of Hollyhocks I have. Unfortunately I don't recall. They get quite large!

Has anyone else had success with Hollyhocks? Do you have the same problem with spider mites? Should I just replace them with a less fussy plant?

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2007
5:13 PM

Post #3511312

I have had them for about 3 years. This year I have a malady on the leaves that I can't ID.
The front of the leaf has yellow spots and the back has little brown corresponding spots that are almost embossed. Inspite of it, they are blooming and thriving.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2007
7:04 PM

Post #3511582

Lou, I have the very same problem with my French Hollyhock! I've tried spraying it with hydrogen peroxide, which helps some. I'm wondering if it's some kind of fungus or rust type growth.

Stephanie
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2007
11:06 PM

Post #3512174

Steph,
I sure hope someone will access this forum and help with this problem. I have cut off all of the leaves with this disease and they still bloom.
SteveIndy
Greenwood, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2007
3:32 PM

Post #3514000

Hollyhocks do very well for me. They reseed themselves every year and I get more and more. Love them. One thing I have had to fight is fungus/rust. I now usually spray right as they emerge with a fungicide to prevent it.
SteveIndy
Greenwood, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2007
3:34 PM

Post #3514001

Lou/all,

That is rust and yes it is a fungus. Hollyhocks are EXTREMELY prone to this. Spray early and often with any rose fungicide - will prevent this from becoming a problem. Moist conditions as we've had recently make this problem much worse.

This message was edited May 19, 2007 10:34 AM

This message was edited May 19, 2007 10:35 AM
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2007
6:39 PM

Post #3514316

Thanks, Steve. I have more problems than ever before and I am sure it is because the weather pattern for April was so unusual. Not only a lot of moisture (Yea!) but also cool.
Just have to learn to adapt. Last year everything went dormant by the first of June and almost died before the summer was over. Many of my plants I simply dug and potted so I could put them under the canopy together. Replanted later and they seem to be doing ok now...except everything and I mean everything appears to be a month behind.

We humans can never be pleased. I'm just happy everytime I walk into my garden..regardless. Also very thankful for the people on DG.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2007
9:53 PM

Post #3514724

Steve, thank you! Will try something different (not sure what, yet) and see if that works. Might also try some dry garlic powder on the ground under the plants and maybe a baking soda spray on the leaves.

When I find something that knocks it out, I'll be sure to share my 'secret'!!

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2007
10:56 PM

Post #3514954

Got this info somewhere and it worked on my roses. 10 parts water to 1 part milk...put in spritz bottle and spray. It Worked!. I have over 100 people expected in less than a half hour. Our annual HOA picnic is in my back yard. Third year in a row. I just love it.

Will doctor hollyhocks tomorrow.
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2007
3:55 PM

Post #3516778

Thanks all! I wonder if rust or fungus is my problem, although I thought it was spider mites.

I took a picture of one of the leaves - what do you think? There are a couple of leaf miners on this leaf (but I am not too worried about those).

The leaves have that web-like fuzz on the back of the leaf, which I can sometimes spray off with a hose. (its hard to take a picture of that - especially with my camera!)
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2007
4:03 PM

Post #3516801

oh, and here is a picture of one of the hollyhocks... I am not sure what variety they are. They are pretty - just sort of a pain at times.

Are these french hollyocks?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2007
11:05 PM

Post #3517749

Casshouse, it sure looks like spider mite damage. Put one teaspoon of liquid dishwashing soap, not the dishwasher kind, in quart spray bottle and fill with water.
Spray them once or twice, on consecutive days, and be sure to get it under the leaves all over the plant.
I don't think what you have is french hollyhock but I am not sure.
They are very pretty.
Josephine.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2007
1:58 AM

Post #3518328

Casshouse ~ those are really pretty. I am not sure they are the french hollyhock but then the only one I have grown is Malva sylvestris Zebrina...
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2007
3:33 AM

Post #3518769

Thanks frostweed! I will give that a try! I appreciate the help :)

That is a beautiful plant podster!

I looked up Hollyhocks in the plant files on this site. I believe you have french hollyhocks (Malva sylvestris) while I have I guess regular hollyhocks (Alcea Rosea).

The French Hollyhocks are gorgeous... I am going to have to find some of those! The leaves look much greener and the flowers are beautiful.

bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2007
4:32 AM

Post #3518872

If you can wait to the fall,I will give you some. They are generous reseeders.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2007
12:03 PM

Post #3519165

They also don't have as much of an upright habit as the regular hollyhocks and I have found them to be more "care"free. I am not growing any this year but had kept them in a large pot and enjoyed them immensely. The color snagged me. They are a biennual but will self seed freely...
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2007
4:54 PM

Post #3519970

Thanks bananna18! I would love some! I definitely can wait until fall... maybe that way a spot will open up in my garden for it. I have taken to gardening for my parents-in-law since I no longer have any space in my garden... and I know my husband dreads those little words "honey, I need a new flower bed"... hehe
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2007
4:36 AM

Post #3525989

I will be happy to pot for a little plant this w/e.
I have a new problem...a little puppy who likes to "repot" I will be looking for some outside shelves to keep my green babies safe.
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2007
5:38 AM

Post #3526084

hehe... congratulations on your new pet...and my condolences on your new pet (just joking!) I just know how hard puppies can be... but one look into those big eyes and it really makes it all worth it. We have two mini schnauzers (brothers) and we had our hands full when they were puppies (well, now that I think about it, we still have our hands full) I can't imagine life w/o them though!

Hang in there!
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2007
3:39 AM

Post #3533206

I vowed not to get another animal...You are right about those puppy eyes and soft fur. What was I thinking?
I have had to reinforce the gate and fence with chicken wire.What other challenges will gardening with a puppy bring?
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2007
11:51 AM

Post #3533724

I would mentally prepare to go with the flow. I would buy up shrubs and plants and have them ready to plant in all the new gardening spots he/she is going dig for you. If it is a male, it will cut back on the time you spend watering. If you have a garden hose, it will soon be turned into a soaker hose. Be sure and mulch those beds so he will have a nice place to lay around and rest... You will get lots of exercise wandering around looking for those garden tools you were sure you left right here. Or, you will be able to get alot of gardening done as you won't let him go out of the house without you along to look over his shoulder. Aren't they fun? : )

This message was edited May 25, 2007 6:54 AM
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
3:49 AM

Post #3537050

Podster,how many dogs do you have?
Also, back to the hollyhocks...have any of the remedies helped? My hollyhocks look like they are made of rusty metal.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2007
11:41 AM

Post #3537621

LOL ~ Just two adult males. I love puppies... when they belong to someone else. We found an abandoned 6 mo old we brought home last fall. After he ate, dug and destroyed everything around here, I gave him away! No more. There are many adults out there that need adoption. This is Podster, camera shy and trying to hide behind his tongue. pod
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2007
1:21 AM

Post #3539719

LOL!!! He is quite a character. You must need a shower if you get a kiss with that tongue!
Hopefully ,my pup will not be so enthusiastic about gardening. Although I did catch him pruning on a rose stem.What kind of puppy destroyed your garden?
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2007
1:56 AM

Post #3539835

He was a terrorist... a bored "curr" dog the vet call him. He was charming and too cute for his own good. Pod loved him... My old lab Ralph and I reserved judgement.

In the middle of November Red tumped a pot of Texas Sage over, pulled out the plant and chewed it up. I found few pieces of it but not salvageable. Too bad it wasn't detrimental to his health. Then I caught him feasting on razor sharp lemon grass, plum trees, cast iron plant, tall ruellia. I was scared to go outside and see what was next.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2007
12:47 PM

Post #3540852

Wow! What a iron mouth and stomach. Your garden didn't stand a chance!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2007
12:51 PM

Post #3540859

Glad I shipped him. I got so discouraged I let the freezes get more plants than I meant to. I couldn't cover anything as he would disrobe it. I didn't start many seeds as I couldn't visualize what laid ahead with him. He definitely reminded me to enjoy other peoples puppies and stay with adult dogs. Good luck! LOL
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2007
4:04 AM

Post #3543751

Now I am terrified. Off to puppy kindergarten!!!!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2007
11:42 AM

Post #3544217

Aren't they cute! I think all dogs are prone to get into trouble when bored. Keep him occupied and tired. It will help. If you have another dog, that will help too. We have three but would leave Red alone during the day. That's when the trouble began and I wasn't here to catch him doing...
You will be fine ~ enjoy the puppy days. He will soon be an adult dog.
casshouse
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2007
4:12 PM

Post #3545036

HAHA!!! How horrible for a gardener to get a plant terrorist for a dog! What irony!

Well I am now thankful that my two boys (brothers, and quite the handful) only choose to run through my garden beds chasing squirrels. A past-time that can be truly destructive to my plants. I have learned if I leave a path through the beds which only has hardy plants we are all much happier. Of course there is the occasional daylily which tries to grow over the path which eventually will be shredded.

It doesn't help that I have put bird feeders all around these beds, which attracts not only a wide range of birds but a whole gaggle of birds which also are attracting the birds attention.

But then they come and snuggle for their nightime pets and I forget all about it!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2007
5:06 PM

Post #3545236

How adorable. What a charming photo. Those boyzos are doing you a favor by protecting your plants from the squirrels. LOL

You know, the plants will grow back ~ the pets you have just once. Enjoy them... pod
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2007
2:57 AM

Post #3551056

They are adorable! You were smart to leave a path. I used to have a chow lab mix that thorny roses and hollies could slow her down if there was a cat or squirrel involved. It was an added challenge to plant placement.Thankfully, she only ate rose petals if you fed them to her.Not like the Red Terror.

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