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Shady Gardens: Deep Shade

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2007
2:51 AM

Post #3515656

Help! Does anything bloom in deep shade? I live on a densely wooded hillside, and planted hostas in a particular area, but even they won't bloom there. I'm talking no sun, not even dappled. Impatiens didn't bloom there, either. I need some color! Even what I've read about caladiums and coleus says they at least need SOME light. Sure, we have wildflowers, but they don't bloom very long. Any suggestions? Oh, and deer resistant would be excellent! I don't ask for much, do I...LOL

This message was edited May 19, 2007 9:54 PM
huggle002
Fort Edward, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2007
2:54 AM

Post #3515665

Helleborus will bloom in shade, as will columbine. Astilbe do really well in deep shade, most hostas love shade, I am surprised they didnt make it for you... For pretty greenery, ferns love shade. Heucheras are pretty colorful and are shade loving as well. Bleeding hearts are really pretty shade plants too...
HTH
~Dawn

This message was edited May 19, 2007 10:55 PM
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2007
2:58 AM

Post #3515677

Thanks, huggle, I will check out the astilbe and bleeding hearts! Oh, and maybe painted ferns? The hostas do well, they just don't flower. I'll take some pics tomorrow and upload them so you can see the area.
huggle002
Fort Edward, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2007
3:02 AM

Post #3515689

Anytime Kywoods-I have alot of shady areas in my garden here. There arent that many things that I have found that did well, but by using different combinations of the ones I mentioned, all my shady areas look different. To be honest, I like Hostas for the foliage-half the time I dont notice them flowering anyway-LOL. The Hosta Sum and Substance is huge and a real eye catcher...

My all time favorite is Helleborus-so many color combinations, and columbine as well. I like alot of color...
Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 20, 2007
1:06 PM

Post #3516360

KyWoods,
Welcome to DG! I have mostly wooded property and at best I have part-shade. Just out of curiosity, is this area more of a hillside? Or more of a slope? Will you be walking up & down it or are you looking for something to make it green when you look upon it? I am just wondering, how dry an area this might be if the grade is steep? Also, I'm not sure if you are looking for ground cover or plants to make garden.

Huggle suggested Hellebores and I agree they would be great in deep shade, I have been growing some out in the woods for a few years and they are very happy, mine do receive some dappled light over the course of the day, but I don't think its much. I also have Astilbe out in the damp woods who get only any hour or two of dappled light and they bloom!

If you are wanting a area to mass plant...Pachysandra (I'm not crazy about it but I do grow it out in the woods in a wet spot ) it's evergreen and does bloom. There are some newer variegated varieties out there. There is always Ivy & vinca I have both growing on hillsides in the woods...Low maintenance!! You can even notice when the hill side is in bloom 80' away when driving down the road. Hey, There is a variegated Vinca green with yellow center-Vinca minor 'Illumination' check that out, lots of color!

A mass planting of Ajuga would make a statement in the spring when blooming and there are so many pretty Ajuga's now. Living in the woods I have NOT had luck with Ajuga reptans 'Burgundy Glow' I don't know why it just does not like my place, I have not been able to winter it over...yet any other variety I have lives on and on...With the Ajuga you could have other plants growing up through it.

Asarum (gingers) would do great in the woods there is the native Asarum canadense the deer don't touch it and it has fuzzy leaves. Asarum europaeum shiny waxy leaves. I also grow Asarum splendens which is bluish & variegated with silver spots!

For lots of color I think you need to rely on your spring ephemeral's dog tooth violets, other violets, trilliums (deer food) other spring bulbs...Sanguinaria canadensis pretty spring flowers, the doubles are a knock out.

Oh, what about Yellow Archangel 'Hermann's Pride' (Lamium galeobdolon) I have some growing under a pine tree in deep shade and it is blooming right now. This is the one were the clump gets larger. Not the one that that runs all over the place and back again ( I have some of that if you want it) I feel thats worse than ivy.

Ferns (already mentioned) are wonderful for their texture, but like you mentioned I think you need to stay in the Athyrium family...what about the Autumn fern 'brilliance' that is a great fern, the coloring I feel is brighter and lasts longer.

Mayapples (Podophyllums) like spotty Dotty and Kaleidoscope for little variegation.

Carex (sedges) like 'Evergold' one of my favorites! It grows best with some light, justs grows slow in low light. Another favorite which I have growing in deep shade is Carex siderosticha 'Variegata' it is in deep dry shade it has taken a 3-4 years till it took off but now filling in nicely. I can't believe DG doesn't have a picture of this.. I will need to take one and send in... in the mean time you can Google for images. I also have 'Ice dance' that is doing very well in moist deep shade (only filtered indirect light)

I have an Itea (small shrub) in deep moist shade and has been blooming for the last few years.

I know I have not mentioned anything with bold/bright color, but you will find that is hard to do in deep shade. The only way I grow coleus is if I can buy them large in the spring. In deep shade they don't really grow for me..they stay alive, just don't really grow.

Well, I hope I have been some help for you...
Shadyfolks
huggle002
Fort Edward, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2007
1:55 PM

Post #3516520

Wow shady, alot of great suggestions that will help me too...I am always looking for different things to add into my shady spots-I have so many of them, and they are in my fromt yard. Go figure-my whole front is shade, my whole back is BRIGHT sun...LOL-All my pretty roses, sunflowers, daylillies, calla lilies and iris's are in back, and I struggle with the front.-although Helleborus is always my first choice when anyone asks me what my favorite is.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2007
5:22 PM

Post #3516975

Ooo, thanks so much to both of you--nice to know that I'm not as limited as I thought! There are two areas I want to add color to, One is at the top of a small hill, but the area itself has been somewhat leveled off. There are hostas there, but I'd like some more color between them. The other is actually a little memorial garden I want to plant at my little poodle's gravesite. I hacked out some of the honeysuckle, leveled off an area for a future bench, and filled in her grave with more of the surrounding rich topsoil. I would like to plant on the grave as well as around it. And I would like to get a little sign or stone that say's "Welcome to Bonnie's Garden". Bon loved the woods! I even thought I might find some plants from the company, "Bonnieplants". :)
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2007
5:34 PM

Post #3517030

Try Brunnera and Ligularia. The ligularia blooms late. Polygonatum is another nice early bloomer and if you buy the variegatum it's pretty all year long. Try using various foliage instead of bloom to make things beautiful.

You might want to look at this thread.
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/682922/
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2007
5:43 PM

Post #3517049

Thanks, doss! I checked out the pics of your garden in the shade thread--beautiful!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2007
6:45 PM

Post #3517213

Planting in shade is a great adventure. Since you get to use unusual plants those areas can take on an exotic look.
sstateham
Rockford, IL
(Zone 4b)

May 21, 2007
5:51 PM

Post #3520133

I ahve a lot of shade here, too. There have already been some great suggestions. How about adding...

Toad lily (Tricyrtis). Miyazaki does great in my full shade and is gorgeous in the late summer and ealry fall.

I've had great luck with lobelia siphilitica, too. It get's tall purple spikes in mid summer.

Lamium for ground cover. There are lots of varieties, great color in the foliage, and pretty spring blooms.

I grow a bunch of different varieties of pulmonaria - they're stunning in the spring when they are in full bloom, and they are really easy to grow. Great foliage options when they're not in bloom, too.

chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 23, 2007
1:05 AM

Post #3525197

I have the shrub kerria japonica growing in the shadiest part of my yard, about 3 feet from my neighbors very tall house on the north side. It gets only a little filtered early morning sun and the same in the late afternoon. It blooms with brilliant golden flowers for 3 or 4 weeks in May. It also has delicate bright green leaves and stems. It spreads quite a bit so give it space. It is about 3 to 4 feet tall. I think the single flowered form is much prettier than the double. The single variety can be hard to find but worth the effort. Here's a picture of it in my garden.

Thumbnail by chris_h
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2007
1:20 PM

Post #3526731

chris-h there is that pretty kerria japonica again beautiful this year also. Where did you purchase yours? Can it found on line? I suppose I could go to the plant scout and look it up. Ronna

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2007
1:35 PM

Post #3526775

well chris-h I just ordered two of them for my yard they are so pretty I ordered the singles as you suggested. Cant wait to get them. Thanks for posting the pictures. Ronna
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 23, 2007
9:02 PM

Post #3528334

Here's a few pics for the suggestions made above. I have deep to dappled shade, but chose pics from areas that are in darker shade. I love caladium the most for a shot of color, and many do grow fine, although they won't bloom -

First, astilbe -

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 23, 2007
9:03 PM

Post #3528338

And caladium -

Thumbnail by dax080
Click the image for an enlarged view.

KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2007
9:38 PM

Post #3528466

I love caladiums! I actually picked up three different ones at Wally World for only $3.49 apiece, and yes, one even has a bloom on it! I never knew they bloomed, either, but I guess I got lucky! It's a spadix, like the peace lily bloom--found info on it here, at the bottom of the page: http://www.ajc.com/living/content/living/homeandgarden/reeves/0814.html
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2007
1:48 PM

Post #3530439

Cool! I've never seen a bloom here - you must have a dark green thumb! Just got my caladium in for this year, and just waiting for them to break ground! Dax
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2007
6:39 PM

Post #3531508

I would accept that compliment, but must admit that it was already in bloom when I bought it. Imagine that, surviving a trip in the back of a delivery truck and blooming at Walmart! I better go back and get more before they find out they have them cheaper than anybody else.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2007
7:09 AM

Post #3537449

Chris_h: I'm curious about your Kerria also. There seem to be 2 commonly available singles: one that is just Kerria Japonica, and then the cultivar Kerria Japonica 'Golden Guinea.' I've seen some complaints about the foliage on the latter -- but I don't know if the foliage is the same on the regular Kerria Japonica.

Do you know which you have? It is so lovely! Have any cuttings to root?. . ..
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 26, 2007
3:27 PM

Post #3538083

Well, I don't remember anything but Kerria Japonica. I am pretty sure it did not have a cultivar name but can't swear to it. The flowers actually are a more golden yellow than they appear in the picture.

This shrub spreads by runners and last year I dug up a piece and planted it and it flowered this year. Would there be any agricultural rules against sending rooted runners? I would need advice on when and how to send it. I have never tried rooting cuttings but could send those if you like - again, I would need advice.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2007
7:27 PM

Post #3538718

Chris_h: I'm sending you a dmail.
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 2, 2007
12:41 PM

Post #3565179

Hi KYwoods,

You might also consider adding a bit of color (don't overdo it) by using a painted terracotta pot in turquoise, hot pink, lavender or some other color. Be sure to use a color that matches something else...and just one pot (or other garden art like a small bench, birdfeeder, statue, etc).

I use a lot of annuals/houseplants to brighten up my deep shade. This year those include Plectranthus 'Mona Lavender', wandering jew, jewel orchid, purple perilla, rex begonias, achimenes, iresine, caladiums, and lots of coleus.

A perennial that really brightens up a dark area is the golden form of creeping jenny, which forms a ground cover. Also, the hardy begonia will give you some color in both leaf and bloom. There are yellow hostas that work well to brighten up the shade and the hostas with white in them are great at night.

Hope this helps,
Toxi
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #3565870

We haven't mentioned epimediums yet. They are very nice ground covers and will tolerate even dry shade.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 2, 2007
5:47 PM

Post #3566160

Thanks, everyone, for all the wonderful ideas! Bonnie's Garden will be lovely!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 3, 2007
1:26 AM

Post #3567568

chris_h my kerrias arrived on friday boy i got busy the next day and put them in the ground i sure hope i put them in good spots. cant wait until they grow its going to be so pretty. i like yellow flowers. the flowers kinda look like forsythias dont they? except these do blossom in the shade. well thanks again Ronna
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2007
10:28 AM

Post #3568684

Oh, both hardy and florist's cyclamen are great for the shade too!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2007
2:49 PM

Post #3569233

Any idea where to find hardy cyclamen? I bought some from Parks and they rotted. Other places I have seen them are sold out. I really want some (though of course I can't afford an arm and a leg).
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2007
7:23 PM

Post #3570014

The local grocery store has potted cyclamen for $6 a plant! Anyway, they won't winter over, right? Sure are pretty, though. I have searched for the hardy ones, but it seems they aren't available all year 'round.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 3, 2007
10:55 PM

Post #3570629

i had the same problem with cyclamin they also rotted. i was so dissappointed but thats the breaks huh? i cant afford to lose any plants either. I almost cry when i do lose one
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2007
1:09 AM

Post #3571198

Gardenlady123 -- Parks refunded me the money when they didn't make it through the winter. I'm definitely going to get them again, but I'm going to be very careful to keep them dry.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 4, 2007
3:00 AM

Post #3571903

Ronna,

I think you'll be really happy with the Kerrias. Good luck with them.

Chris
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 4, 2007
6:44 PM

Post #3574234

Hardy cyclamen do need to be dry, especially in the winter. I put one in a low spot and lost it last year. I got mine from Park seed many years ago.

My florist's cyclamen will be lifted and potted this fall and they usually bloom all winter inside. I love the foliage even if they are not in bloom.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2007
12:10 AM

Post #3584344

this is my new shade garden last year.

Thumbnail by gardenlady123
Click the image for an enlarged view.

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 7, 2007
12:51 AM

Post #3584491

very pretty garden lady
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 7, 2007
1:05 AM

Post #3584543

That's lovely! I want to get a bench to go in mine when it's completed. Nothing better than to have a quiet, pretty place to relax.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2007
1:15 AM

Post #3584572

I agree -- I've always wanted a bench. Only problem in my yard is that I'd share it with the mosquitos!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2007
6:10 PM

Post #3587228

this a nother picture of a shady part of the yard

Thumbnail by gardenlady123
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 8, 2007
5:27 PM

Post #3591434

Very pretty gardenlady! What is the name of the ground cover surrounding your hosta?

Erynne
bonitin
Gent
Belgium
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2007
9:35 PM

Post #3592308

I think it is Galium odoratum. A very lovely ground cover for shady places! I have a lot of it in my shady garden.

Thumbnail by bonitin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2007
1:08 AM

Post #3592940

when i bought it the tag said white sweet woodriff and it does smell so sweet when its opened in the spring.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 9, 2007
3:45 AM

Post #3593672

Galium Odoratum is Sweet Woodruff. It's my favorite groundcover for shade. I believe I saw a closer picture of that scene on another forum because I remember how cute the little angel or fairy looked and how the white of the statue went so perfectly with the white of the hosta and the white sweet woodruff flowers. Picture perfect, gardenlady!
Erynne
Orangeville, ON
(Zone 4b)

June 9, 2007
5:45 PM

Post #3595275

Thanks so much for the name! I agree chris_h, the combination of the hosta with the Sweet Woodruff and angel looks perfect. I have a cherub with her arms up like that and laying on her belly but don't have a spot for her yet...this has given me some inspiration (which I so often lack). I love my plants but not so great at combining them for a pleasing effect.

Thanks again,
Erynne
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 9, 2007
8:25 PM

Post #3595675

That's one of the great things about dave's garden. You get to see so many gardens! And it's way way less expensive than buying gardening magazines or books.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2007
9:47 PM

Post #3595864

you are very right about that. I mean in magazines you see the perfect. yard which some of you have on this site believe me. But you know people actually put the blood sweat and tears into the work. Every one is so willing to share their knowledge of gardening. Ronna
Strever
Hiouchi, CA
(Zone 8b)

June 9, 2007
11:04 PM

Post #3596101

bonitin
i thought you had id'd a groundcover plant growing amongst the vancouveria for me
but looking at the petal count i see mine is not Sweet Woodruff ?
i will take the macro out and get a good pict when the rain stops :-)
Dick

Thumbnail by Strever
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 10, 2007
1:08 AM

Post #3596552

I believe that in the front (the bottom of the photo) are wood poppy seedlings -- Stylophorum diphyllum(http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1014/index.html). I'd love to know what is in the back. It is definitely not Sweet Woodruff.

This message was edited Jun 9, 2007 9:10 PM
Strever
Hiouchi, CA
(Zone 8b)

June 10, 2007
1:25 AM

Post #3596602

Happy
the plant at the bottom of the image is Vancouveria hexandra the inside out flower
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/83145/
i have some patches of the Vancouveria as ground cover and there are some (not many)
of the other unknown (looks like sweet woodruff) mixed in with it
and i thought it had been identified but it has the wrong number of petals
and i will take a closeup of the flowers on it tomorrow afternoon when the rain lets up
i think i will also take some good macro picts of the very small inside out while i'm at it :-)
Dick
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 11, 2007
2:54 AM

Post #3600581

Strever: Sorry for the misinformation -- and thanks for directing me to the "inside out" flower, which I had never heard of. Sounds charming!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2007
4:21 AM

Post #3600835

Ooo, what a unique flower! Very pretty! Thanks for the link, Strever!
muddbear

(Zone 3b)

June 29, 2007
8:54 PM

Post #3676127

Astilbe are such great deep shade workhorses. I have also had great luck with perennial lamium, such as "Annie Greenaway". It flowers nicely and brightens up a shady area. You also can't go wrong with a Lime Rickey Heuchera, or maybe a "Stoplight" Tiarella.

Here is a pic of a small, deep-shade garden that is under a cherry tree, from a few weeks ago, so not too much blooming.

Thumbnail by muddbear
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 29, 2007
9:33 PM

Post #3676307

Oh, that Vancouveria hexandra sounds very neat, I am going to have to keep my eyes open for that...

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 30, 2007
12:02 AM

Post #3676896

i love all of the heucheras I have many and as muddbear says they are wonderful color all season long. I also like the iceland poppies they blossom in the spring as well as davids wort or grape hyacinths, epimediums the list can be very long oh and of course jack in the pulpits. oakleaf hydranges is beautiful. this is the first year for mine and georgeous.

Thumbnail by gardenlady123
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Strever
Hiouchi, CA
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2007
5:32 AM

Post #3678205

here is an image of Vancouveria as a pretty nice looking groundcover
and i found out the other plant is Trientalis latifolia http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/129868/

Dick

Thumbnail by Strever
Click the image for an enlarged view.

huggle002
Fort Edward, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 1, 2007
1:24 AM

Post #3680629

Muddbear, I love your deep-shade garden!! Terrific job keeping it all so natural with the beautiful boulder and tree stump! What is it you have growing out of the stump? it is hard to see in the pic.

Gardenlady-your oakleaf Hydrangea is looking mighty happy and healthy. I have one in my backyard, and it has absolutely taken over. Will get a pic of it in the morning...It is definately one of my favorites!

~Dawn
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 27, 2007
12:31 PM

Post #4128349

Does anyone have suggestions for shrubs for deep shade? I have a spot for chris_h's kerrias -- but I need some more. There's the polka dot plant (I don't remember the latin name off hand). I'd especially like something bright or variegated to brighten up the shady spot. I am planting a steep hill -- probably won't be an easy place to grow, especially a plant with a single stem. I also don't want anything that will get too tall. . .
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 27, 2007
5:05 PM

Post #4129110

Acanthus is a wonderful shade shrub. Acanthis Mollis Tasmanian Devil is a variegated form. Get's about 3X3

If the polka dot plant is the leopard plant then it's farfugium aureomaculatum.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 27, 2007
6:19 PM

Post #4129287

My mistake -- I meant Aucuba japonica, gold dust plant.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2007
1:18 PM

Post #4142763

Ky, you mentioned deer resistant. Very few plants are. Our native deer love our hostas and caladiums--I keep trying to protect them with nets and such but the deer eventually find and eat them. The hostas do come back, though.
So far the deer have not eaten astilbes, heucherellas and digitalis.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2007
7:45 PM

Post #4143933

LOL, yep, they call them deer "resistant", but not deer "proof"--if they're hungry enough, they'll eat anything. And the drought this year has been tough on them and all critters.
ThankGod4plants
Moberly, MO

March 15, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #4667216

Wild simulated ginseng would be neat. It has pretty bright red berries in the fall, and after 5 years or so, you can sell it for LOTs of $. THe less you take care of it the more valuable it will be. And it needs shade.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 15, 2008
5:51 PM

Post #4667562

Thanks, I read that ginseng does well in woodland settings, and I did look for wild ones on our property, but didn't see any. Nothing wrong with planting some, though. And I bet the birds and other critters would spread the seeds!
hymenocallis
Auburn, AL
(Zone 8a)

May 6, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #4914287

If you were a little further south I would recommend Buckeyes (red and bottlebrush), Sweetshrubs, Gardenias, Hydrangeas, Alnus sweet sixteen, native hollies, native azaleas, and tea olives(actually a tree but many people grow it as a shrub). There are probably others but I grow all of these in shade or part shade.
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 13, 2008
11:15 PM

Post #4947115

Hi, hymenocallis; great idea! Red buckeyes grow here in zone 6, so I think those would be great for her. I have one in partial shade, blooming right now.

I also have good luck with celandine poppies blooming all summer if I keep the spent stalks cut back and the plants watered.

Let us know how it's going Kywoods,
Toxi
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2008
11:26 PM

Post #4947170

Wow -- toxi -- I have a huge stand of celadine poppies and had no idea that would rebloom if I cut back the stalks. Do they look icky while you wait for them to fill in?

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2008
11:48 PM

Post #4947267

hey do you have to wait until the foliage turns yellow for the celadine poppies to be cut down?? so they will blossom again. or do you cut right after they blossom??? or do i need to wait for them to go to seed??? i know to many questions!!! i really like my poppies and want them to spread so manybe i will wait for the seeds. Ronna
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2008
1:40 AM

Post #4947731

We do have buckeyes in our woods. I never heard of those poppies--I'll check them on plant files. Thanks!

Edit: It's spelled two different ways on several websites I saw. I checked after not finding it on Plant Files, for "celadine", but it comes up under "celandine". I wonder which is actually right? Anyway, here it is, for anyone besides me who isn't familiar with them:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1014/

This message was edited May 13, 2008 9:52 PM
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 14, 2008
2:30 PM

Post #4949800

I bet the correct spelling is celandine -- it is just easy to not pronounce the first "n", so I bet that is the source of the misspelling.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2008
5:45 PM

Post #4950616

That makes sense! They sure are cute, though. I'll have to look for them.
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2008
9:29 PM

Post #4951450

Hi all,
I cut back each flowering stalk when I see lots of seed heads hanging on it. Cut it to the ground. The plants seem happy to send up more. The very best bloom is during the spring, but they keep a few blooms all summer for me.
I have read that bleeding hearts will do the same, but haven't tried it.
Toxi
Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 15, 2008
12:10 AM

Post #4952032

Well, I learned something new today, I was out in the garden this morning and started dead heading my two plants!
thanks!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 15, 2008
10:47 AM

Post #4953728

will certainly try the poppie deadheading ths year!!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2008
1:23 PM

Post #4968133

My celandine poppies are a little rambunctious.
They pop up everywhere and can overwhelm smaller woodland plants, if you're not careful.
But they are really beautiful and add lots of well-appreciated color.
I wouldn't think you'd need to buy more than one or two, since they reseed so avidly.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 18, 2008
3:20 PM

Post #4968560

I have never heard this of the bleeding hearts... but certainly do not want to cut it down to find out... i love the plant to much... would love for it stay around all summer with the beautiful hearts... i know there are some that blossom all summer but really prefer the old fashioned ones... if you dead head the poppies to soon do they die??? i really do not want to loose them either!!! Ronna
Strever
Hiouchi, CA
(Zone 8b)

May 18, 2008
4:45 PM

Post #4968889

i have Dicentra formosa (western bleeding heart), Celandine Poppy (wood poppy) & one of the ajuga's ( they all look alike )
taking over my front lawn
i mow them down on a regular basis starting in the spring and they just keep coming back :-)
the ones around the edge of the lawn of course look wonderful :-)

Dick
Toxicodendron
Piedmont, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 19, 2008
2:32 AM

Post #4971613

Actually, all the volunteer seedlings caused me to start the deadheading in the first place. That's when I noticed that the plants were determined to make some seeds!!!
I don't cut the entire plant back all at once, just a stem here and there as they finish blooming. Then more stems just keep arising and blooming, although not as pretty and full as the first flush.
Good luck!

wonderearth
Santa Cruz, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 19, 2008
2:59 AM

Post #4971767

My ligularia is in spot that doesn't get a drop of sun and it has these crazy orangy yellow wacky looking daisy like flowers during summer. also my variety is purple underneath the leaves for foliage color. Money plant also did well and had cute purple flowers with silvery seed pods to follow.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2008
11:56 PM

Post #4975660

wonderearth you do not like the ligularia flowers??? I love them so do the butterflies!! Call me crazy, but I think they are beautiful...;) I have the big leaf othello I think its called, the brit marie, and a new little rocket... all three get those flowers on them and I love them all.!!! Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2008
12:16 AM

Post #4975769

I found the yellow flowers affronting at first but now I leave them on and they last for a very long time. I've grown to really enjoying daisies in the shade.

Thumbnail by doss
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 20, 2008
12:22 AM

Post #4975786

very pretto Doss... are yours in blossom now??? Why of course you are in zone 9b!!! Mine blossom much later.. Like in July or so... Cant wait... Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2008
12:26 AM

Post #4975805

No they aren't blooming now. That photo was taken in the middle of September. They bloom here starting in early August I think..
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
1:26 AM

Post #4976183

What a wonderful garden, doss! Did you build that stone wall?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2008
1:59 AM

Post #4976393

No I didn't build the wall. I had it built. It's not something that I could ever tackle. It runs in a double layer all around the back of my yard.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2008
2:18 AM

Post #4976497

We need a new retaining wall in our backyard, and I like the way that looks. Good idea to hire a crew to do that heavy work! Looks great.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 20, 2008
2:45 AM

Post #4976648

If it's more than 2 feet tall you'll have to terrace it or put a reinforced wall behind it. That's our county code anyway.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 10, 2008
4:37 AM

Post #5080952

I have trollius, heuchera, daphne, tiarella, azalea, camellia, laurel, rhododendron, aruncus, ferns, bloodroot, hosta, windflower, st. johnswort, astilbe, iris reticulata, monarda, arum, allium, hosta, philadelphus, hydrangea, bleeding heart, primrose, lily of the valley, daffodils, black cohosh, rose of sharon and many others blooming in dense shade Mary.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2008
4:43 AM

Post #5080961

Thanks for posting that list, Stormy!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 10, 2008
6:00 AM

Post #5081113

You're welcome! I think that I still have some hardy cyclamen out there. I'll look tomorrow. If so, do you still want some? I miss my poodle, Madeline.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2008
6:28 AM

Post #5081149

Is it deer-resistant? l'll check the list and get back to you, lol.
Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2008
12:36 PM

Post #5081605

stormy- excellent list! I'm not familiar with camellia - so I looked it up sounds like a neat plant- but I get the impression that it better for a southern garden, so I am impressed that you are able to grow up north, I would love to see picture if you have one. Also I was not familiar with philadelphus, until I looked it up and realized it's a mock orange...I found a pic of the 'Miniature Snowflake' Oh, now I want one!

KyWoods- Have you thought about Kerria? I have Kerria ‘Albiflora’ growing and blooming out in the woods (a little dappled light) and I also have Kerria ‘Pleniflora’ which is a double orange/yellow flower, I just love it. I do have that one planted where it gets about 3 sun and bright light.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 10, 2008
5:35 PM

Post #5083071

Shadyfolks, Greer Gardens has lots of cold hardy Camellias for sale. None of mine are in bloom now. They flower from November through April. The "Ackerman Hybrids" will survive most Ohio winters. I like them because they are also evergreen and have beautiful leathery shiny foliage.

I just planted 6 Kerrias. Got them very reasonably from Forest Farms. They are starting to bloom. It's so HOT I'm seriously behind on my planting. Of couse shade gardening is a blessing in this weather!!!!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2008
9:29 PM

Post #5084073

Kerria? Not familiar with those, but I'm headed to Plant Files to check it out, thanks!

Edit: Oh, noooo, there's no pic of the one you have, Shadyfolks! Do you have one you can post? Here's the link: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/80190/

The others are pretty, though.

This message was edited Jun 10, 2008 5:35 PM
Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 11, 2008
11:00 AM

Post #5086377

Ky Woods,
You know I looked and I don't have a picture of any Kerria. Do a Google search the have lots of pictures of the plenifora (double). I don't know if it's my monitor or what but with my plant the blossoms are definitely yellow/orange and all the pictures to me just look yellow and are about the size of a golf ball. Kerria japonica 'Albiflora' looks like an old fashion single rose.

Also the pictures on the internet. I wished my plants bloomed like those! I am in the woods so mine get much less sun so they are not nearly as prolific in the bloom department, but they still put on a show.

Stormy-- congrats on your kerria, I am surprised they are blooming so late. Mine bloomed like a month or more ago.
As for the Camellias, I'll bet they don't do well around here. We live in a area that has lots of nurseries so I am VERY fortunate to have access to a large variety of plants and no one has it for sale. but I will have to ask around. I just might be passing them by.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 11, 2008
6:03 PM

Post #5088280

Shady, We also have lots of Nurseries and almost no Camellias. I came across these three years ago and they are doing fine. There is quite a lot of information on the web about Ackerman Hybrids. I've heard of them growing in Minnesota! Apparently Mr. Ackerman from DC has devoted his life to bringing Camellias to the world. Nurseries tend to stock what sells the most. If I knew how to propagate one, I'd send you a cutting. Those beautiful blooms in January are worth the risk!!
I've just ordered another red beauty from Greer called "April Tryst". Take the leap!!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2008
6:29 PM

Post #5088412

Blooms in January?? In PA? Gotta check this out...thanks!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 11, 2008
7:03 PM

Post #5088550

Ky, Camellias bloom either late fall/early winter or late winter/early spring. They are divided into these categories in the catalogues. Try one!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 11, 2008
10:50 PM

Post #5089486

Here's an article on camellias that can tolerate cold.
http://camellia-ics.org/_ics/ackerm1.htm
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2008
11:49 PM

Post #5089742

Interesting--thanks, doss!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2008
12:50 AM

Post #5090060

Yeah, Doss, I had read that article too and didn't realize that I owned two Ackermans. There's also a west coast hybridizer and some of their camellias for the colder zones are available at http://www.camforest.com.. I found the prices to be better at Greer. Maybe they'll get cheaper as they become more available.

Shady, I got those Kerria from Forest Farm and they came with buds on them.
Shadyfolks
Chesterland, OH
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2008
12:53 AM

Post #5090077

Doss,
Thanks for an interesting article. They sound like a pretty plant. I wonder if I have the best place for them? I my property is high humidity,moss loves to grow here.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
12:58 AM

Post #5090111

Your place sounds a lot like ours, Shady! We have a lot of interesting mosses here, too. I have actually put some in my aquarium, and they grow underwater! I rinse the mud off, first.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
1:20 AM

Post #5090234

I have several Ackerman camellias (and several other supposedly 'cold-hardy' camellias) that I've tried planting outside in St Louis area. Unfortunately, they really haven't been very successful. The leaves are so ragged through the winter, and the occasional blossom is stunted and deformed, but I'll admit they at least do bloom. The ones I keep in pots in the garage are fabulous (I haul them out on warm winter days and they look truly fantastic). The outside plants are still alive, but struggling, so I'm not sure if they'll acclimate and eventually do OK or not. My suspicion is that they still just can't tolerate our winters, despite zone ratings that suggest otherwise. I'd be interested in other people's experience in the midwest.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2008
1:48 AM

Post #5090360

Weerobin, I was worried when I planted them, so I looked for the most sheltered spot. It turned out to be a bed along my garage & about 40' away from the next building. That whole section is under giant old spruces and is full of moss and virtually no sunlight. It's mushroom heaven!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
2:20 AM

Post #5090569

I've tried to put mine in as sheltered position as possible also.
But, alas, I suffer from the peculiar brain delusion known as 'zone creep',
where I think I should be able to grow things at least 1 zone warmer than mine.
So my 'sheltered positions' are totally cluttered with horrified Zone 7-8 guys,
like edgeworthia, indian hawthorn, elliottia, illicium, osmanthus, loropetalum, choisya, etc.
Some thrive, some fail, and lots of them just survive.
But I still enjoy the endeavor.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2008
2:49 AM

Post #5090798

Weerobin, I've been down that road, but got tired of my "Boulevards of Broken Dreams"! I still lose lots of stuff labled for my zone. I'm wind challenged, and the tags never address that factor. Lots of plants are impulse buys, with no research. We are suckers for beautiful things!!!!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
2:59 AM

Post #5090893

LOL, Weerobin, I got the funniest image of your "horrified Zone 7-8 guys", a bunch of plants with faces, wide-eyed and shivering in the cold!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 13, 2008
8:20 AM

Post #5096858

Ky, Makes you want to give them some scarves and mittens!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 13, 2008
8:25 AM

Post #5096861

Hi All, speaking of shade plants, my Hellebores which I planted 3 summers ago just started blooming last month. This is the 1st time they've flowered. Isn't this very late for them to be blooming? Also, they are over 18 & 20 inches tall. I've never seen any so big. They are one of the never varities with nuetral & peachy tones. Mary
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 14, 2008
6:47 PM

Post #5103866

Trollius globeflower blooming in deep shade!

Thumbnail by stormyla
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 14, 2008
6:49 PM

Post #5103875

Itea spricht "little Henry" in deep shade.

Thumbnail by stormyla
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2008
6:00 PM

Post #5112312

My shade garden is looking depressingly green. Can anyone suggest some silver leafed plants? I'm not looking for ground cover. Last week I planted some ghost fern and they were promptly dug up and eaten by something. I ordered some silver brunnera, but also want something taller. Any suggestions? Had a lovely weekend scrubbing the mold off of the house. Mary
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 16, 2008
7:55 PM

Post #5112729

Stormy, I noticed that some of the plants called "Dusty Miller" call for partial shade. There are so many different ones, maybe one will work.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2008
8:49 PM

Post #5112937

Thanks, Ky. My silver mound does not do well in shade. I know that some people have luck with it in shade, but maybe it's too rainy & humid here.

I do have a large patch of silver king growing in dappled sun. It's worth transplanting some to see how it does. Thanks, Mary
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 16, 2008
8:54 PM

Post #5112954

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/90848/ I have this "Variegated Japanese Knotweed" or "Speckled Mexican Bamboo" ('Variegata'
Polygonum cuspidatum), and it has made some babies. If you are interested I can see if one is small enough to mail. Like the person who posted the photo, I have had this at least 10 years, and it is not invasive (unlike some persicarias).
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2008
12:03 AM

Post #5113872

Thank you Happy! You are so kind. I would love one. I will mail you postage. How tall does it get? Thanks, Mary
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2008
12:32 AM

Post #5114054

It gets about 4' - 5' tall -- a nice height. It spreads out wide at the top, like a wide vase.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 17, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #5114463

Does it have to be silver?
There are several gold or white variegated shade-tolerant plants (polygonatums, tricyrtis, asarums, etc).
And of course beautiful blue hostas, in addition to all the variegates.
And heucheras / heucherellas can also have quite colorful foliage in the shade.
I have a beautiful colony of white-striated disporums, which may not be exactly silver,
but stand out nicely.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2008
3:23 AM

Post #5115113

Thank you, Weerobin! Those are great suggestions. No, other colors will do. I just planted some Toad Lily corms. I have some blue and chartreuse hostas that I can divide and move. I'd love to find some white ones. The Soloman's seal looks nice, I'll try to find a buy on the varigated one.

Does anyone grow Filipendula? It looks very nice for shade. I'd also like to find some golden dicentra.

I had some varigated artemisia limelight planted there, which was bright, but on the advice of other DGers, ripped it out before it could take over the garden.

Believe it or not, I have a spot under evergreens that even Chameleon plant wouldn't grow! I'm now trying ferns and hosta there.

I planted a dozen heuchera yesterday, but could certainly look for some more in other colors. These went into another shady area. My house is bordered with trees on 3 sides. I want some Midnight Rose. What other non-green Hueuchera do you all think would compliment it? Thanks, Mary
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 17, 2008
9:42 AM

Post #5115693

There are a bunch of new heuchera cultivars out now.
They are especially nice for us gardeners in the eastern half of US because they're more heat / humidity tolerant.
Plant Delights has a broad selection on their website (I don't know how to make a 'hyperlink').
Their prices are a little high, but they send nice quality stock.
Or you can at least get good ideas for your space from their website photos.

You might consider epimediums for the under-evergreen shade.
They do pretty well in dry soil w/ root competition.

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2008
4:57 PM

Post #5117419

Weerobin, Thanks, Relative to adding a hyperlink, last night I found this.

Go to any forum
Open any thread
Click on F.A.Q.
Click on "How do I add a hyperlink in a post"

Print out the page so you have it in front of you while trying it.

I'm going to reply to your post and try it out. Mary
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2008
5:33 PM

Post #5117583

Weerobin, Thanks for your help. I just ordered Heuchera Midnight Rose and Pinot Noir. I got them from Wayside Gardens as their buy one get two free sale is still on. I will go to Plant Delights as I'm sure I'll be needing more.

Thank you, I looked at the epimediums, there are a lot to choose from. I'll have to decide which one to try.,

That Filipendula hexapetal flora pena looks great. There isn't a PF page on this exact type. I ordered it from Bluestone Perennials.

Also, in another forum on shade, I found Spigelia Marilandica, which also looks good. There is a PF page on this and I found them for sale at Lazy S'S Farm.

I've also been reading about various trillium and will probably try one. If anyone has any experience growing any of these, it would be great to share them. Going to try the hyperlink on my next post!!! Thanks, Mary
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 18, 2008
12:40 AM

Post #5119463

There are some wonderful trilliums also, some w/ great variegated foliage.
I've got one who's foliage is stunning (I don't remember the cultivar name, but I may be able to come up with it.)
I'll try to get a pix of it this weekend (alas, I have a real job which limits my freedom during weekdays).
You'll love it.
It's not in bloom now, but the foliage is fantastic.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 18, 2008
12:41 AM

Post #5119469

And I'm sure you'll love the spigelias. Easy and rewarding.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 18, 2008
4:08 AM

Post #5120664

Thanks weerobin, I would love to see your Trillium. I went back & read that other shade forum and realized that it was in one of your posts that I read about Spigelia!! So you'll have to send us a picture of that too!!!!! Unfortunately work does get in the way of gardening. It must really be hard if you live in zones 9 & 10! Mary

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
11:59 AM

Post #5121440

Wayside has the dreaded BOGO huh? Im going to have to check that out... Ive always been happy with there plants.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2008
12:21 AM

Post #5125007

Stormy, I took this photo after work tonight - not the greatest photography,
but it gives you an idea of some nice variegated trillium foliage.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Smokey_SC
Piedmont, SC
(Zone 7b)

June 19, 2008
12:23 AM

Post #5125016

Is acuba good for very shady gardens?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2008
12:28 AM

Post #5125039

Smokey, I have an aucuba which has nice rich foliage in shade.
But it has marginal hardiness in our zone, so I've never seen any berries here.

Stormy, I also took a pix of a variegated disporum in deep shade.
It may not look like it, but it's beginning to fill in. I think it will look nice.
I just planted it last year, but it's already twice the size.
I'll have to wait a year or two to see how it develops.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 19, 2008
4:10 AM

Post #5126035

Gardenlady, What is the dreaded BOGO? Should we be forewarned?
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2008
4:29 AM

Post #5126094

Stands for "Buy One Get One"...yep, very dangerous for plant addicts, lol.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 19, 2008
4:45 AM

Post #5126134

Weerobin, Thank you so much for the lovely photos. I looked for one similar to yours and found them with lovely yellow or dark red blooms. I went for the yellow. Ebay seller Clampam has them for significantly less than the nurseries. I've bought many plants from them & have always been pleased. Their shipping fees are reasonable and they specialize in woodland, wild & native plants. He also had some good buys on Turk's Cap Lillies.

Your disporum looks lovely. How tall will it get?

The epimedium search continues. There are some very beautiful ones at Heronswood, but they are pricey. I came across two interesting Heucheras, Autumn bride which is evergreen and has many large white blooms from August til frost and Snow Angel, which has silvery white leaves with tiny green specks. Thank you for all of your time!!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 19, 2008
4:49 AM

Post #5126147

KY, That's too funny! And true!!! I have to stop buying this week or I'll still be planting into July. I'm focusing on my shade bed now, because it's what my deck faces. I have a lot of seedlings growing to go into my sun bed as they get large enough. There's just not enough time in a day!

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2008
1:48 PM

Post #5127169

Try Munchkin Nursery for Trilliums and a bunch of other shade plants. Great service and prices. http://www.munchkinnursery.com/index.html

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2008
10:51 PM

Post #5129688

Does any one have the "dragon tails"? I just bought it today.. Love the foliage and the flowers are so cute. Are they pretty easy to grow. How much shade can they take? It said part sun, is that right? Really cut plant. Does it get tall?? I know questions! Thanks for any remarks. Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #5142560

Ronna, I have a couple Dragon Tails planted last year.
They seem to be doing fine.
I saw an older specimen somewhere and recall being surprised it was as big as it was.
I know it's listed as a 'mini' hosta, but the one I saw was at least 10 inches tall, if not taller.
I took a picture of mine below.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2008
4:15 PM

Post #5142579

And Stormy, the variegated disporum (disporum sessile variegata) should get around 10 inches tall.
There are several clones on the market, some with wider leaves than others.

Ronna, I forgot to mention, the Dragon Tails will grow OK in more shade, but won't be as golden.
Needs at least some sun to bring out the gold.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 22, 2008
6:21 PM

Post #5143062

Thanks weerobin. I really appreciate the remarks. I really like the plant. I think it should be good where I have it planted. I'll keep an eye on it. Move it if nessacery. Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2008
10:22 PM

Post #5143957

Ronna, let us see how it does!
I have no idea whether I planted mine in the right amount of sun or not.
I'd love to compare which exposure works best.
Unless the bunnies or deer get to mine first...
dahicks
Hickory, KY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #5144544

Sorry to read about your poodle.I have 2 males myself,my whole family has poodles.It's real noisey when they all get together.
But about the shade problem, i have the same problem and my area is very dry, clay ground.Grass don't even grow there.I have hostas, ostrich ferns and elephant ears there.But they don't get very big just survive.Got some ideals from reading the replys to this thread.
dahicks
Hickory, Ky
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 23, 2008
2:47 AM

Post #5145027

Welcome to Dave's Garden, dahicks! Thanks for your sympathy for my little Miss Poo. Poodles are sweet, fun dogs. I miss her.

This has turned out to be a very valuable thread for me, too. I have made a long list of plants to try, and have planted some that are doing well. Thanks, everyone!

dahicks
Hickory, KY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2008
4:02 AM

Post #5145356

Thanks,I have been scouting around and find this site very valuable with my gardening.Most of the people seem very helpful and polite.
d
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2008
4:14 AM

Post #5145395

KY, This thread has been great for all of us! Thank You!! Wayside Gardens sent their unpublished fall catalogue out on the web. There is a georgeous new shade plant in their called Thalictrum Hononse. It is purple, green and white.

Weerobin thanks for your help.

Postmandug, Great link, Thanks.

Nice to meet you Dahicks!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 23, 2008
10:40 PM

Post #5149040

Well weerobin. Mine is in a kinda out of the way spot. Some morning sun and mostly dappled shade until around 4 or so. Then shade. Im really looking forward to see how tall it will get. I forgot to read the tag. Will ahve to pull it up and read about it. Really looks great though. For just being planted. I have a question. I was moving some hostas this weekend. I thought i had a large enough hole for the roots and I accidently snapped off a large piece of the one hosta roots. There were still some long roots left but? Does everyone think it will die? I planted the snapped off root perhaps a new one will grow??? I know wishful thinking?? But it was quit large and Im mad at myself! Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2008
12:51 AM

Post #5149821

Ronna, despite our fussing over them, I think hostas are pretty darn resiliant.
Haven't we all done the same thing a thousand times?
I just planted the remnant of a jack-in-the-pulpit that I accidentally broke all the new growth from the root.
Oops! I planted it anyway and I'll be anxiously checking it to see if it survives or not...

You've done all you can, so you'll just have to wait to see how it goes.
It's part of the thrill of gardening, in my mind.
Let us know! I suspect it will be fine.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2008
1:01 AM

Post #5149888

Stormy, I'm very intrigued by Wayside's new thalictrum introduction.
I've never heard of it before.
I LOVE thalictrums for my climate. They do really well.
I particularly like the low-growing varieties, but I've never heard of 'honense'.
Did you purchase it? How is it doing?
I'm trying to recreate woodland groundcover and thalictrums have done really well for me.
Below is thalictrum kiusianum.
But I have many other species of thalictrum that do really well in my woodland.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
1:27 AM

Post #5150055

Weerobin: I may have asked you before, in which case I apologize, but which thalictrums do well for you? I thought some had the reputation of being fussy.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2008
1:41 AM

Post #5150113

No, Weerobin, I haven't ordered it. I'm still considering it. Your thalictrum is lovely. I'm also still drooling over Heronswood's two Epimediums,Wushanense, which is evergreen and Franchetii. These 3 are still at the top of my wish list, because they are all around $20 per plant. I try to keep my purchases under $12 per plant.
Interestingly, another major supplier is selling the two Heronswood varieties for between $40 & $50 each!!!! I've recently learned that Heronswood has relocated their operations to about 25 miles from here. If I can force myself out of the Garden one Saturday, I'd love to go see these in person.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
1:42 AM

Post #5150120

I agree on watching the prices. I wonder about the expensive plants: does that mean they are slow to increase? In which case I am less interested in them anyway, since I want plants that will made a bit of a statement in my lifetime.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2008
1:55 AM

Post #5150169

Happy, I believe that these 3 are all recent introductions. You know how that affects prices. Heronswood's reputation is for quality, not mass production. Many of their items have been developed and grown by them. I suppose that Wayside's price is reflective of their acquisition cost and they may have an exclusive on this.
I find the price of plants to be like the cost of a trip to a beauty parlor. You can get a great "Do" for $40 and a lousy one for $100 and visa versa!!!! Unlike plants, hair always grows back!!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
1:58 AM

Post #5150176

Stormyla: I agree. I do think sometimes that plants are expensive because they are hard to propagate or finicky, though, and what I really strive for is a sturdy unfussy perennial garden.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2008
2:09 AM

Post #5150214

Happy, You are right on both accounts. This is probably what's happened to my beloved Daphne Cneorum. Suppliers don't want to have to be replacing plants. They can't make any money doing that. Maybe that's why new introductions are often expensive. They don't have any experience with the average home gardeners success rate.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
3:43 AM

Post #5150660

I hate to be cynical, but I agree with you.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2008
4:43 AM

Post #5150869

Do any of you Shady gardeners (no pun intended) recognize this? It's growing in almost total darkness. I don't remember what it is and am not even sure that I like it.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2008
11:01 AM

Post #5151253

I used to savor Heronswood catalogs throughout many a long winter.
Then when they were bought out, the remarkable variety of offerings has declined significantly.
But they still have some interesting things.

Stormy, I'm an epimedium fanatic.
And I'm a sucker for the unusual varieties.
I have a wushanense I planted last year. Looks great so far.
Huge spiny leaves. Flowers are nice, but nothing spectacular.
I'm mainly hoping for it to start to fill in as a foliage plant.
If you're interested in epimediums, check out Garden VIsion.
They don't have much of an on-line site,
but they'll mail you a catalog which is the bible for epimedium enthusiasts.
The newer introductions are expensive, but many beautiful cultivars are under $10.
There's one they are offering for $500!!

I'll try to read some thalictrum tags and give you an run-down on the ones that do well for me.
I find them to be very reliable with no special care.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
11:01 AM

Post #5151254

Stormyla: The photo didn't attach.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2008
4:10 PM

Post #5152490

Sorry about that!

Thumbnail by stormyla
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2008
10:59 PM

Post #5154324

Stormy: I don't recognize it.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2008
1:24 AM

Post #5155092

Stormy, I don't recognize your plant either.
But I'm pretty sure someone else can help you w/ ID.

Here's my young epimedium wushanense (planted last year).
I didn't get a shot w/ flowers, just took it this afternoon.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2008
1:29 AM

Post #5155119

And I'm embarassed to admit I'm not sure which thalictrum species are which.
I have several different woodland species (all range from 1-2 ft height).
But I'm not the greatest at keeping track of what I planted where...
Here is an example of what I like about them, but I'm not sure which species.
It forms a nice robust groundcover in shade.
This one is just starting to bloom (lower right edge of clump).
It is very charming when the whole clump is in bloom.
Not super showy, but I like it.
If I ever figure out exactly which species it is, I'll let you know.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2008
4:56 AM

Post #5156104

Thank you Weerobin. They are lovely. I like the blue tint leaves of the Wushanense. Did it stay green all winter?
The other one is charming. I like the coin shaped leaves and the tiny flowers.

Right now, I'm putting a combination Hosta,Heuchera planting in the front of my shade bed. Maybe next season, I'll mix some of these in. I'll look through the catalogue when it comes, and may ask your advice on some. That Honense is calling to me!!!

The new plants are starting to arrive and I'm starting to ponder their placement.

Gardenlady, There is a Dragon Tails in the new group. We'll have to compare notes.

I'll wait a few days & if no one recognizes my plant, I'll post it to the ID forum. I know that I planted them last year, but can't find any notes on them. There are too many of them in one spot, maybe I'll like them better if I move some around.
At least we know they will bloom in deep shade. That photo looks like it was taken at night!!!!!

KY, This is your thread and we're not hearing much from you. Are you too busy PLANTING??????????????
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2008
5:20 AM

Post #5156146

LOL, just soaking in all the great ideas, and staying busy battling Bambi and bunnies out there! I guess it's time for a second thread--silly backwoods dialup...but it's all I can get out here in these Kentucky woods...



NEXT THREAD: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/868183/
PHofer
Warminster, PA

June 26, 2008
12:23 PM

Post #5161727

Heronswood will be having a Garden open in Doylestown PA on July 12th

http://www.heronswood.com/heronswood-news-and-events/
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2008
2:45 PM

Post #5162405

Thank you, PH. I'll put in on my calendar.

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