Photo by Melody

Beginner Flowers: What is the name of the tree?

Communities > Forums > Beginner Flowers
bookmark
Forum: Beginner FlowersReplies: 15, Views: 224
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
mtor
Modiin
Israel

May 27, 2007
8:42 AM

Post #3540611

Somebody knows the name of the tree?

Thanks,
Moshe

Thumbnail by mtor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

norska
Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2007
11:50 AM

Post #3540759

It's a Powderpuff mimosa
Mimosa strigillosa
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2007
3:54 PM

Post #3541365

Not if it's a tree--the Mimosa is a tiny little plant.

Could be one of these:
Calliandra surinamensis http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2588/index.html (there are other species of Calliandra too, many don't have leaves quite like yours but it could be one that I don't have a good picture of)
Albizia julibrissin http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1764/index.html (your leaves are not as fine as these, but maybe it could be a different species of Albizia?)
Samanea saman http://www.bio.miami.edu/mimosa/sam_sam_mid.jpg

shannon_g
Center, TX

May 27, 2007
5:00 PM

Post #3541548

mimosa will also grow into a tree,sometimes it can be 20 foot tall.
shannon
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2007
7:38 PM

Post #3542047

The tree that's called mimosa is Albizia julibrissin which I linked to above. Mimosa the genus (some examples are Mimosa pudica and Mimosa strigillosa which norska mentions) is for the most part smaller plants (at least all the ones that are commonly found).
shannon_g
Center, TX

May 28, 2007
7:58 AM

Post #3544043

sorry i got thrown by the latin lol.
mellymass
Metrowest, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 31, 2007
3:15 PM

Post #3557273

We had a huge Mimosa tree in our back yard when we were growing up. Really pretty tree.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2007
6:08 PM

Post #3557935

Rather nasty and invasive in much of the country though.
rebecca30
Cary, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2007
9:39 PM

Post #3558575

Actually if you grow them in an open lawn, away from flower beds with exposed soil, the seeds can be ground up and not a problem as my tree is situated in this manner. They are also know as a Silk Tree. I thought I read somewhere the are native to Turkey or Iran????? not native to the states i think.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2007
4:16 AM

Post #3560179

No, they're an introduced species here. Quite a problem in some areas of the country--you may be able to manage seedlings right next to your tree, but seeds have a way of spreading beyond the immediate area of the tree too, so you probably don't see most of its babies. Unless you're deadheading the flowers before they set seed (quite tricky to do on a large tree!) it could be spreading and you don't even realize it.
mtor
Modiin
Israel

July 4, 2007
5:19 AM

Post #3693217

I found in internet it's Calliandra Haema.

Thanks everybody,


WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 4, 2007
3:27 PM

Post #3694294

Hi mtor, we also call it the Silk Tree, I have to grow it as a conservitory plant indoors, but it has got too large for that so now I have put them (2 from seeds) outdoors for the summer, I will try protect them outdoors over the winter to see if I can grow them that way, I get a wonderful perfume off the flowers also, the seed packet said Albizia Silk Tree, I got red spidermite 2/3 years ago and they lost all their leaves as fast as lightening, but got rid of the mites and they recovered, so far so good outdoors but will keep a close eye on them. Happy gardening, Weenel.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2007
3:28 PM

Post #3694298

I think that's probably Calliandra Haematocephala? Whatever site you found it on must have chopped the end off the species name.
cabrlamo
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 5a)

July 8, 2007
4:03 AM

Post #3709618

My neighbor has this tree in her front lawn. Definitely a Mimosa. WeeNeel, if the Mimosa can live for years here in my zone 5 I am sure that you can keep them where ever you are! I first saw this tree when I lived overseas in Japan. The smell is wonderful when there are blooms.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 8, 2007
8:45 AM

Post #3709953

Hi Cabrlmo, thanks about your zone info, I am going to try leave these two trees outdoors as I just cant keep them inside any longer, I grew them from seed about 8 years ago, and to be honest, they have been restricted due to keeping them in large pots, I may have to give them a bit of protection for the first winter depending how severe it gets, UK winters can have 4 seasons in the one day, my prob is I live on the coast, right on the water atop a cliff, so it is wind burn along with salt icey blasts that burn my plants more than anything, but I am one of these gardeners, if a plant is going to survive, even with a little care, then it will, if it dont, then it was never meant to grow in my conditions, so keep fingers crossed for these lovely trees, they are not common hear so it will be a real experiment. happy gardening. WeeNel.
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2007
5:55 PM

Post #3711362

Moshe, I had to pop in here and say your photo is beautiful. What lovely blooms, and with that backlighting...Just gorgeous. :)

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Beginner Flowers Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Welcome to the Beginner Flowers forum! dave 147 Feb 14, 2013 3:15 AM
snapdragon picture gessiegail 39 Jan 1, 2012 1:04 PM
show us beginners your blooms gessiegail 324 Jan 8, 2012 6:20 AM
Favorite annuals from your 2006 garden! Trish 81 Mar 7, 2007 2:02 PM
Heat Mats Ironsides 6 Nov 27, 2007 1:31 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America