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Propagation: Top 10 Easiest to Grow from Cuttings

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kmom246
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2001
2:49 PM

Post #10220

I'm just curious, what are your Top 10 Easiest to Grow from Cuttings? I chopped up 6' of golden pothos a few weeks ago, and they are all nicely rooted now and starting their first new leaves. I also chopped up 6' of phylodentrum, and, though a quick grower, it is somewhat behind the golden pothos. My baby spider plants are taking over! I've done all sorts of ivy's in the past. Just curious what other "fool-proof" (read karla-proof) plants I could try? My cube at work is near a window and seems to be a good environment for rooting things...

Thanks. Looking forward to hearing your recomendations!

PS Put in your "favorite(s)" also, even if they aren't "easy" -- someday I might could call myself a real gardener & I might get arround to trying them out!

Karla
tiredwabbit
Point Pleasant Beach, NJ
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2001
5:57 PM

Post #106931

Wandering Jew, roots form over night for me
Pothos, In water they grow pretty quick a day or two to see roots
Angelwing Begonia,Grew very well in water and the roots were huge
Kalanchoe-Mother of thousands, never seen anything easier to root than that..lol
bridal veil
Assorted succulents
Hmmmmmm can't think of anything else at the moment
Holly
CindyM
Agawam, MA

August 7, 2001
6:14 PM

Post #106939

These are the easiest for me:
In water - Aluminum plant, philodendron, gynura, ivy, swedish ivy, pothos
In soil - AV leaves, peperomia, jade plant

My favorite - rex begonia leaf cuttings in soil. I'm only successful about 1/4 of the time, I guess that's why I keep trying.

Cindy
brommom
smithton, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2001
12:16 AM

Post #107126

boy i feel terrible...i can not get my pothos to take in potting soil...a lady gave me 2 cuttings she had rooted in water(nice long strong roots btw)...i brought them home and put them in potting soil...they look shriveled but still alive...they are not wet but just moist...now what did i do wrong?...i can root all sorts of stuff in water and propogate other plants, but i can kill a pothos in a heartbeat...i have before...cindy
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 8, 2001
2:47 AM

Post #107224

Diefenbachia - just stick in the soil and keep moist

Oleander - same thing with green stems

Marigolds, believe it or not. Stick a broken branch in water and it will root. Have no idea why you'd want to...

Geraniums, directly in potting soil
Dicentra
Philadelphia, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 8, 2001
5:38 AM

Post #107258

I just found out that the dried out stick from mom's visit to Hawaii is Plumeria! It looked like firewood but it was a dried out cutting. I stuck it in soil and the thing actually started growing..lol.
Trish
CindyM
Agawam, MA

August 8, 2001
11:56 AM

Post #107315

Brommom,
I have read that when cuttings are rooted in water, they grow roots suited for water, they have to adapt and grow new roots when put in soil. Because of this, I always root in soil whenever I can, but still can't resist the excitement of watching those roots sprout in water!

I have had the same experience with pothos - if you have patience I think they will do OK. Also, Golden Pothos is much easier to root than Marble Queen. HTH
tiredwabbit
Point Pleasant Beach, NJ
(Zone 7a)

August 8, 2001
1:58 PM

Post #107389

Brommom,
I have also found that when I finally put my pothos cuttings in soil, they seem to need a lot more water then they would if they were a full grown plant. I am realizing this with a cutting I have now. It was not accurately watered in the beginning so some of the leaves are shriveled and funky looking. But now that I have upped the water intake, the newer leaves are coming out the way they are supposed to look. It also seems the more water I give it the happier it is. But Mine is in a clay pot so be careful if yours is in a plastic pot, because then the way I water mine may just kill yours!
HTH! Holly
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 8, 2001
2:23 PM

Post #107409

Forgot coleus. Another one that roots very easily in soil.
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 8, 2001
7:10 PM

Post #107541

Brugmansia are so easy. In water for a few days, then in soil. I've only lost 2 out of about 30.
Evert
Helsinki
Finland
(Zone 4b)


August 8, 2001
8:57 PM

Post #107598

Flowering Maple (Abutilon)
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

August 8, 2001
9:08 PM

Post #107600

Tig,
Easier than Brugmansia...African violets are easier, Trichocereus species, Psychotria species,...Mertilocactus Geometrizans...and so much more---but yes Coleus, Jade, etc are all easy as well. Guess everything is easy with the right amount of luck though...
Baa

August 8, 2001
9:27 PM

Post #107608

My Mother has often brought back dried up old sticks from walks, which turn into monster Rhodos, Stags Horn trees etc. When I take a fresh cutting it seems to curl up and die LOL.

African violets and fuchsias seem to root (and sometimes rot) well as do Dahlias, petunias and pelargoniums. Felicia is a little blue daisy from South Africa whic also takes well but I don't often root in water, as said above they do much better in soil.

killerdaisy
Dallas, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 8, 2001
9:30 PM

Post #107609

I wish I had the luck with pelargoniums that everyone else seems to have! I am constantly taking cuttings from a well-established peppermint scented pelargonium, but they always rot for me!
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

August 9, 2001
12:16 AM

Post #107683

Baa, I'm with you. I rarely root in water...my prefered method is always to root in soil or to airlayer. You can stick a few stems of leaves in water just as easily as you can stick them all in the same pot to root.
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

August 9, 2001
1:03 AM

Post #107699

mexican petunias, fire spikes, morning glory bush start rooting when they hit soil. i just rooted 7 pink pet roses... amazing, since the mama was dug up and sat in the shade for a few days, finally cut her all the way back, left her siting in water for a week before i planted. she is now covered in blooms and even the foot tall piece with several branches is putting out pretty new purple growth.
Deanne
Franktown, CO
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2001
3:48 AM

Post #107780

My strobilanthus (persian shield) rooted easily in potting soil outside. I just kept it moist and in about 10 days they all had roots. Weigela is easy if you cut it at the right time, if not, forget it. Red twig dogwood is really easy. Hibiscus isn't too difficult. Forsythia is easy.
Lilith
Durham
United Kingdom
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2001
12:03 AM

Post #109123

i use vermiculite for cuttings, its free draining, but keeps them moist. i recently rooted some pelargoniums, rosemary and oregano in three days this way.

lil
lantana

(Zone 7a)

August 14, 2001
1:12 PM

Post #110230

Brugmansia, forsythia, geraniums, pothos, aloe vera, spider plants, kalancho, sedum, begonia, hibiscus.
crutland
Lynn Haven, FL
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2001
3:18 AM

Post #111598

My #1 easiest is Gardenia.
lavenderblue27
Shreveport, LA
(Zone 8a)

August 18, 2001
2:12 PM

Post #112270

Bay Leaf, was so easy!
Gaitten
Hamilton, VA
(Zone 6a)

August 20, 2001
2:33 PM

Post #113024

My Top 10 for Easiest to Propagate from Cuttings

1) Mums - start new cutting in June, you'll have beautiful flowering plants for Fall.

2) Pyrocantha - Break off a piece and stick it in the ground... no rooting powder required.

3) Mexican Sage - In Zone 6 this plant is not hardy. Bring a few pieces in to overwinter and start taking cuttings around January. By spring planting, you'll have plenty to go around the garden.

4) Rosemary - Snap off a piece and stick it in the soil.

5) Thyme - Most thymes root easily.

6) Geraniums - Break off a piece, stick it in a pot. Keep moist.

7) Hyrdangea - Most root easily. Keep cuttings moist and cool.

8) Buddleia (sp?) - Butterfly bushes start easily from softwood cuttings.

Ok... couldn't think of ten... but these are fun and will add greatly to your landscape. -S
Lazydaisy
Central, LA
(Zone 8b)

August 20, 2001
2:51 PM

Post #113041

Impatients root easily in water or soil.
Gardenias root easily in water or soil.
I have good luck with hybiscus in soil
Hydragneas root well in water or soil.
Most of my others that I thought of have already been mentioned.
Bloomer

(Zone 9a)

September 1, 2001
11:11 AM

Post #119608

Rooted in soil and with no special care, I've had luck with:
Dracena marginata
Altheas and Hibiscus
Mexican Heather

Dicentra: You had such good luck with your plumeria because you are actually supposed to let the cutting sit out for about a week (long enough to callous) before planting. Be careful not to overwater, though, as they can rot very easily.
CindyB
Carlinville, IL
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2001
12:00 PM

Post #119629

Did someone mention the ornamental sweet potato vines that are so popular and useful? This year I used the variagated white/pink one as an underplanting along the edges of my butterfly garden. It's just beautiful with the dahlias, zinnias, and asters rising from it. I've done the lime/apple leafed margarita before as well. They root in a day or two in water or like coleus you can just stick them in damp potting soil and they'll take off.

crestedchik

crestedchik
Cicero, NY
(Zone 5a)

September 1, 2001
12:33 PM

Post #119646

So far this year I have failed at hibiscus(hardy) , hydrangea,flowering maple,roses,passiflora,african violet,and lots of others.The things I have rooted are Brugs,fushia,rex begonia,mums,and some plant that I still have not identified.I'm a loser when it come to rooting,seed starting etc... CC
Evert
Helsinki
Finland
(Zone 4b)


September 1, 2001
10:05 PM

Post #119934

Yahoo, I got one passiflora rooted.. Mentha species are very easy too.
bayside
Severn, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 31, 2002
5:41 PM

Post #438733

I have a rubber tree plant and in the same spot I put a few spider plant babies right off the spider plant (mother). They are looking good and growing. I did this so that the spider plant looks like ground cover.
plantsdirect
Old Town (Gainesvill, FL
(Zone 8a)

January 2, 2003
1:38 AM

Post #439501

Here goes my list from down here in fla

1.Dwarf mexican petunias
2.Abuliton (flowering maple)
3.Cassia Tree
4.Firespike
5.Brugmansia
6.Crape Myrtle
7.Viburnum
8.Durante Repens (golden dewdrop)
9.Cape Coral Honeysuckle
10.Blue Ginger
julie88
Muscoda, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 7, 2004
4:16 PM

Post #941463

One more time, I'm surfing for tips on propagation and find a thread that is interesting to me. Sooo, I'm bumping it back to the top of the stack so I can ask some questions. :-D

I'd like to know, in relation to propagation by cuttings,
1) what type of medium (soil mixtures in particular) works best for you.

2) When using soil mix to root cuttings, what do you look for (aside from ROOTS! ;-) ) that indicate a cutting has "taken"?

3) When do you begin feeding the new cuttings; with what; how much; and how often?

4) How long do you wait to transplant cuttings to their permanent environment...in particular outdoor plants, specifically perennials?

At the present time I have Coleus, cotoneaster, pelargonium, impatiens, euonymous, and several cuttings and other "accidents" that would be considered "annuals" in my zone, being carefully watched in my garden shed.

My goal, this year, is not to actually propagate plants for use in my garden, but to learn *how* to propagate them, hopefully to carry them through well enough to get a few plants that I really like for *next* year.

Any help would be appreciated.

~julie~
clairelise
Pleasant Grove, UT
(Zone 6a)

July 7, 2004
9:24 PM

Post #941804

Oooh, I can't wait for everyone's answers! These are questions I've been wondering myself.

Claire
julie88
Muscoda, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 7, 2004
9:48 PM

Post #941819

THANKS for joining in here, clairelise! Maybe this would be as good a place as any to announce that I HAVE ROOTS!!! :-D

I checked my pelargonium cuttings today *again* when I realized that one of the cuttings had a flower bud on it. I took the cuttings 6-24 and had only occasionally checked on one of them (the largest of 3). After having read this thread again, I hurried outside to the shed to check the other 2.

YIPPEEEEE!!! ROOTS!!! and LOTS of them. OH DUH.

But the best part of all is that upon reexamining the larger cutting, I found that it, too, was trying with all its might to make roots. All kinds of little white protrusions on the stem. :-D I immediately pinched of the bud...just want to see if it roots faster now.

And *now* I know where to look for roots on pelargonium!

Now...on with the OTHER questions. LOL
MaryinLa
Marshfield, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 7, 2004
10:18 PM

Post #941848

If the shoot starts to send out new growth, that's a good sign the cutting has taken.
kcherest
La Plata, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2004
4:10 PM

Post #942813

1) I use 1/2 perlite & 1/2 peat moss mix.

2) after about 2 weeks of the plant sitting in the rooting media, I give a gentle tug. If there is resistance, that is a good indication of rooting. (also new offsets like maryinla said).

3) i've only used water...I'd like to know the answer to this too!

4) I usually give them as much time as possible. Once the new growth is somewhat substantial, I'll transplant. Or, if it has evidence of having roots for more than 3 weeks...I'll transplant.
julie88
Muscoda, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 8, 2004
4:42 PM

Post #942854

Thanks MaryinLa and kcherest. I honestly *do* appreciate *any* input here. kcherest, I'm glad I'm not the only one in the forum who has questions about handling the feeding of the new 'offspring.'

~julie~
Keyring
DC metro, VA
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2004
2:30 AM

Post #943501

Well, it depends on the plant, but:
1) 50:50 perlite, or sometimes with a little added vermiculite. If I root in water, I move them into a mix that has even more perlite before moving up to their standard mix. For some plants, I might use long fiber sphagnum.

2) new growth - leaves etc. blooms I pinch off.

3) a week after new growth is visible, with really dilute (like 1/10th strength) seaweed fert. Low feeders just get the one shot. High feeders might get a weekly, increase dose in a month or so, depending on the plant.

4) I don't do outdoor plants much so no idea...

The AHS has a great book on propagation (the hard cover one) - nice reference material for people who are obsessed with propagation.
julie88
Muscoda, WI
(Zone 4b)

July 9, 2004
3:24 AM

Post #943564

Thanks Keyring...very helpful info there. Thanks for taking the time to write a reply. I'll have to check into the AHS propagation book. I think the last book I bought on propagation was sometime in the 70's...and I *know* a lot of things have changed since then. In fact, I think DDT was still "ok" in that book. :-)

Thanks again.
~julie~
judycooksey
Pocahontas, TN
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2006
4:57 PM

Post #2797091

bump
dmj1218
west Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 8, 2006
5:18 PM

Post #2797141

Angelonia--I don't think I've ever a had a cutting in soil that ever failed to root.
biscombe
Orgiva, Granada
Spain

October 12, 2006
8:42 PM

Post #2811132

Not taken many cuttings but here's my top 3
Mint!!!
Aloe Vera, has loads of babies!!
Rosemary

Great Post
JanetS
Braselton, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 13, 2006
4:01 AM

Post #2812466

Crutland,
You said gardenia..may I ask you how you rooted the gardenia..in what medium, what type of cutting, softwood, semiripe, ripe? Thanks for the info...JanetS
tonyjr
Union City, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 15, 2006
4:48 PM

Post #2819317

I would also like to know about Gardenias
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

October 16, 2006
10:30 AM

Post #2821292

Here are some more:

lemon balm (and any mint)
St. John's Wort
many spireas
pdkrones
Monroe, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 19, 2006
11:11 PM

Post #2833039

coleus
night blooming cirrus
golden pothos for sure!
brugmansia
hydrangea macrophyla
forsythia


The first four, you have to try hard to prevent their rooting! Hydrangea has always been easy for me; I lost a few this year for foolishly putting a dilute fertilizer in the cutting pot! Duh.

Peter
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 22, 2006
12:27 AM

Post #2838834

For those above who asked about rooting Gardenias, I root quite a few each year (usually over 100).

I have the best percentage using cuttings that are this years growth. You can easily tell because they show green stems. Where the green stem meets the older wood (often more dark green or even brown) is where you want to clip them, just beyond the node. Cuttings can be anywhere from two to 4 or 5 nodes, usually about 3 to 5 inches long.

Keep them in water when you cut them. When you are putting them in the rooting medium (I have great results using MetroMix soil) you can use Root-Tone or a liquid rooting hormone or even household cinnamon if you like.

Put them in your rooting medium and if the leaves are fairly big for the size of the cutting cut the leaves in half to help slow down any transpiration.

I do quite a few in gallon pots so you can put the pot in a plastic grocery bag; the top can easily be closed or opened, as needed, by just loosely tying the handles of the bag.

Although I use heat mats in my greenhouse you could have a great success by keeping the containers in the house if they are in a warm area (on the fridge, water heater, etc) with bottom heat.

Hope this is helpful.

Shoe.
JanetS
Braselton, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 22, 2006
2:10 AM

Post #2839051

Thanks so much for the info!
JanetS
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 22, 2006
2:24 AM

Post #2839098

You're welcome, JanetS.

Reading back I guess I could've gotten more specific but I believe you have the main idea.

Wishing you the best! Have fun! Gardenia's are my most favorite fragrant plant!

Shoe.
JanetS
Braselton, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 22, 2006
2:29 AM

Post #2839120

Mine too! I sent lots of cuttings out to others and was hoping someone knew more about making them work than I do...I love the way they smell...nothing smells better to me!
Have a beautiful Sunday!
JanetS
MzzPool
Pass Christian, MS
(Zone 8b)

September 30, 2007
12:53 PM

Post #4032999

My sister has a HUGE philodendron in the backyard. It just keeps spreading and now is as tall as the roof. I'd like to snag some cuttings. Is it as easy as just cutting a leaf off, dipping it in roottone and potting it up? My brother tried that and said they all died. I didn't see how he did it though, so he may have done something wrong.

Thanks,
Megin
JanetS
Braselton, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 30, 2007
1:11 PM

Post #4033043

Megin, I have never rooted those. I would think if it is large and has low branches, the easiet way to get some to root would be to sratch the underside of the branch and lay some bricks or rocks on the branch and cover it with soil. I know I have other shrubs that really root well using this method and even some magnolia I have done this way.

Wait a minute are you talking about philodendron or Rhododendron? I was thinking Rhodo because you state is is as tall as the roof...a shrub? If so here is another way to root them...again, I use the method above with most of my shrubs or trees. http://www.donaldhyatt.com/ARSPVC/articles/rhododendroncuttings.html

IF you are talking about philodendron, then it does root very easily in soil or water, so just take some cuttings and place them in either and you should be good to go...
MzzPool
Pass Christian, MS
(Zone 8b)

September 30, 2007
1:24 PM

Post #4033063

It's definitely a philodendron. Plants look at my sister and just grow. I have to work at it, but am learning! Okay, I"m going to get some cuttings today and see how we do! Thank you!

Megin
JanetS
Braselton, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 30, 2007
2:55 PM

Post #4033332

LOL...no problem...they are certianly easy to tell apart! You should have no problem getting the philo to root. I used to put about six small cuttings in a ten inch hanging basket and before long it is lush and beautiful! Same goes for wandering jews etc. they are so quick to fill a pot!!
planolinda
Plano, TX

October 21, 2007
4:01 AM

Post #4106195

wandering jew is so easy to grow from cuttings--i cut mine and throw the cuttings under the trees on the ground and let them set roots!! no digging, no special dirt etc and no watering--honest!!! sometimes i do stick the ends in dirt too but now i mostly let them just do their thing--i learned to do this when a friend said she had set some aside intending to give them away and forgot --when she remembered they had already set roots!
bigcityal
Menasha, WI
(Zone 5a)

October 21, 2007
4:07 AM

Post #4106206

I don't do much of this, but have done coleus and dahlias(initial shoots off the tuber) with ease.
charlenesplants
Buffalo, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 21, 2007
4:27 AM

Post #4106259

I'd like to know, in relation to propagation by cuttings,
1) what type of medium (soil mixtures in particular) works best for you.

I use straight perlite on anything that I haven't had luck just sticking in the mothers pot or a cup of water. I put holes in the bottom of a styrofoam cup and set the cup in a container with at least 2 inches of water in it so that the roots and perelite will wick the water up to the plant as needed.

2) When using soil mix to root cuttings, what do you look for (aside from ROOTS! ;-) ) that indicate a cutting has "taken"?

When using anything other than water, you just give a slight tug on the plant. If it hangs tight, that usually means it has roots.

3) When do you begin feeding the new cuttings; with what; how much; and how often?

I don't feed them until I pot them up.

4) How long do you wait to transplant cuttings to their permanent environment...in particular outdoor plants, specifically perennials?

If I have had experience with the plant being "easy" I pot it as soon as it has a few roots. If I don't know the plants hardiness to this system, I wait until I have lots of roots. You know this when a firm tug is resisted when you pull on the plant. To ease the plant from the perelite filled cup when the roots are large, just add lots of water to the cup and the plant will come right out.

To answer the question about Gardenias rooting habits, I have used water only with great results, perelite only with great results and sticking the plant right in the mother's pot with good results.

1.I have never had an Angelonia fail to root no matter how I did it.
2.Brugs are also very easy for me.
3.Coleus plants root very quickly.
4. Gardenias may take a little while but seldom fail to root
5. Snygoniums are just dying to be broken off and potted up
6. African violets just put a short stem in water and in a couple of days you got roots
7.Gerianiums will root in the mother pot
8. impatiens will root in the mother pot
9. pothos are a piece of cake
10. all ground covers will take off in a hurry with any medium

I take a set of plastic shelves that I bought with a 3" rim on them and turn the whole set upside down.
This gives me a place to pour water in. I place my cups with holes in the bottom on the shelves filled with perelite. I dip my cuttings in rootone and place my cuttings crowded in the cups on the shelves. I fill the shelves with water and try not to think about it for a while. I keep the trays filled with water and after a week I get antsy and start to tug on a cutting or two on each shelf. I have been Known to holler out loud like a kid when I pull a cutting out loaded with roots on it.
Charlene
RainbowRider
Brunswick, GA
(Zone 9a)

October 24, 2007
4:37 AM

Post #4117251

Cassia
Gardenia
Spiders
Ivy
Hydrangea
Succulents
Begonia
Caladium, pieces of tuber
Jade Plant
Strawberries
Layering is easy on lots of plants, even some hardwoods and softwoods
Air layering above ground is also easy on many plants

This message was edited Oct 23, 2007 11:42 PM
plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

January 21, 2008
7:11 PM

Post #4433678

My new favorite to propagate is Salvia uliginosis, bog salvia. The leaves stink to high heaven, but the flowers are a beautiful, clear blue, and it looks great in the middle of a bed. I just stick cuttings in water, and within 2 weeks they have ample roots for potting up. Then, just water the daylights out of them until they've put on some good growth. I've also done cuttings in soil, again with tons of water.

Azaleas are pretty easy: I have tons of cuttings of R. 'Stewartsonian' that I just stick in soil.

Pelargoniums are soooo easy. I take cuttings and stick them in 50/50 peat and sand into tiny pots, and then use them as gifts.

I've actually rooted an Echium candicans (Pride of Madeira), but Echiums grow very easily from seed- they germinate in about 3 days!

I also took a cutting of Euphorbia amygdaloides 'Helena's Blush', and not only did it root within a week, it's flowering after 3 weeks!

Any Oenothera (Evening Primrose) is easy from seed as well.

plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

January 21, 2008
7:43 PM

Post #4433816

Here's that Euphorbia I mentioned:

Thumbnail by plantaholic186
Click the image for an enlarged view.

StonoRiver
Johns Island, SC

January 31, 2008
3:08 AM

Post #4476500

Impatiens walleriana
Clerodendrun ugadense
Pothos
Key Lime
Cestrum nocturnum
Grape Ivy
African violet
Plumeria
"Cane" begonia
Various Salvia
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 23, 2008
5:37 PM

Post #4852707

Does anybody in warm zones start cuttings outside instead of in a heated environment?
wcgypsy
Fallbrook, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 24, 2008
1:54 AM

Post #4854733

What I've been rooting in water lately:
These are all salvias...
s. involucrata
s.involucrata x Kathy
s.involucrata x pulchella
s. Antyhony Parker
s. elegans Tangerine
s.neurepia
s.confertiflora
s. chamaedryoides
s. lemmonii
s. mexicana 'Omaha Gold'
s. mexicana 'Russell's Form'
s. mexicana 'Huntington Gardens'
s. guaranitica 'Costa Rica Blue'
s. mexicana 'Raspberry Truffle'
s. chamaedryoides x microphylla
s. Texas Red
s. microphylla 'Red Velvet'
s. microphylla 'La Trinidad Pink'
s. pennellii
s.guaranitica 'Purple Majesty'
s. guaranitica 'Jean's Purple Passion'
s. corrugata
s. dorisiana
others that I don't remember off the top of my head, but I'm trying all salvias in water now.
All of the available room in my shaded area is taken up right now, so while I have things growing on to move into the sun, I can have tons of stuff rooting in water in the house.

This message was edited Apr 23, 2008 7:21 PM
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 24, 2008
4:27 PM

Post #4857596

I'm just beginning to learn how to do cuttings and found out that any kind of succulent is SUPER EASY.
I just let them dry up for a week or so and stick it in regular potting soil. Piece of cake!
planolinda
Plano, TX

April 24, 2008
11:10 PM

Post #4859459

really? would that work for a aloe?
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 24, 2008
11:13 PM

Post #4859470

I would think so. I've only tried with the small succulents though...it works every time!
planolinda
Plano, TX

April 24, 2008
11:21 PM

Post #4859527

thanks --it is worth a try
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2008
1:55 AM

Post #4860236

Yea, I was wondering, what do you do in a warmer climate, w/o greenhouse, use the outside right? Or the workshop? Or inside? What's best in a warmer climate? Michelle
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2008
6:02 PM

Post #4862974

Thanks everyone, you have given me lots of ideas!
dispatcher1
Seymour, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 25, 2008
6:56 PM

Post #4863193

There's a relatively new plant at all the nurseries now in mixed planters call "Diamond Frost" Euphorbia. It is a white "filler" type of plant. I learned by accident that it roots readily in water. It was used as a filler in a live bouquet I got for my birthday last year. I didn't dump them out as soon as I should have, and when I did, The Diamond Frost already had 2 inch roots. So if you see it forsale, just buy one and put some pieces in a vase and wait about a week. LOL lou
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 25, 2008
7:18 PM

Post #4863284

I was never successful in getting anything to root in water. Actually, not successful with ANY cuttings so far! lol! But seriously, succulents are 100% success for me, so anyone can do it. I got hooked...everytime a see a succulent now I want to snip a little piece...
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 25, 2008
7:19 PM

Post #4863287

Oh and they of course go direcly outside in our warm climate. But I would love to know what I should do with all the other stuff...
acfrancis
Trenton, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 26, 2008
5:16 PM

Post #4867309

I keep a bunch of empty jars and 3" pots around for when a plant gets too leggy or I break off a stem by accident. It goes in one of the jars with water and I forget about it for a few weeks until it develops some beautiful thick healthy roots. Then it goes into potting soil for a week or so and then makes a great gift. I have an over twenty year old silver queen aglaonema (my first plant - a break off stem from my mom) which has generously provided gifts for years, my other common propagators are poinsettia, any of the tradescantia (wandering jew, purple heart, moses in a basket), philodendron, and african violets.

When I moved here from Oregon last summer, I moved my most precious plants with me, and cuttings of others. One of my most precious crown of thorns, however was way too big and fragile to put in the back of the moving truck. I broke off a few bits before hitting the road and set them to dry in a planter of jade, misted them each day with the other plants during the seven day trek across the continent, and thankfully they rooted just fine when I got to Florida. One plants was bearing flowers by January!!! I was so excited!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 27, 2008
5:02 AM

Post #4870074

WOW! THAT'S REALLY AWESOME! I REALLY WANT TO LEARN THIS (NOT ONLY YOU SAVE $$ BUT MOST OF ALL, IT'S SO SATISFYING...) OOPS SORRY FOR THE ALL CAPS!
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2008
7:14 AM

Post #4870371

So what are some of the easier to root? I find Purple Heart very easy! Michelle
planolinda
Plano, TX

April 27, 2008
5:07 PM

Post #4871680

coleus is my easiest
shokami2
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2008
3:33 AM

Post #4874783

hebes, buddleja, ajuga and lungwort... easy peesy!

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 28, 2008
3:49 AM

Post #4874875

Elderberry, Schefflera, anything from the mint family including perilla, euyonomous, red twig dogwood,clematis,wandering jew.
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2008
11:14 AM

Post #4875668

Is Carnaby Clematis easy? (I think it's a vine) Michelle

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 28, 2008
1:09 PM

Post #4876056

any of the clematis are easy if you put the cuttings in water and use an bubbler system on them. I learned that method on DG and it works!
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2008
3:23 PM

Post #4876717

Hi. What's a bubbler system? I might want to learn... might! Do you buy it, or can you make one? Is it cheap or not cheap? Thanks, Michelle
shokami2
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2008
3:36 PM

Post #4876783

lately... all a bubbler system is you get an air stone (or however many containers your doing) from a pet store, some tubing and an air pump. you just hook it all up and put a stone in each container and leave the cuttings in there until they root! this one guy here somewhere on DG has a huge success rate with cuttings. some people add a 1 part peroxide to 9 parts water to the solution too.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 28, 2008
4:09 PM

Post #4876939

that is right, cheap air pump and air stone and some t connectors for the tubing so you can do several jars at once. search the propagation forum for bubbler and I am sure you can find it. In fact there was a recent posting so you could probably find it on the main page of the forum.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

April 28, 2008
4:37 PM

Post #4877045

Creeping Charlie is so easy! I know I know it's "invasive" even, but I have them in pots around larger plants, and all I have to do is snapp a piece and stick it in the next pot...
pagardener61

(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2008
3:55 AM

Post #4899483

Flowering Maple (Abutilon) how do you get this to root? I have no luck.
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 3, 2008
3:24 PM

Post #4900923

Wow that's interesting, thanks. I had no idea about this way of starting rootings! It still sounds like a lot of parts though...Maybe next year!
planolinda
Plano, TX

May 3, 2008
4:33 PM

Post #4901147

so i broke off a large thick leave of an aloe type plant--i stuck it into dirt --is that enough to start a new plant? do i keep it wet or let it dry?

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2008
1:18 AM

Post #4902950

zinnia I found this on rooting abutilon http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/175446/
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2008
7:30 AM

Post #4903853

My easiest are
dahlias,
Impatiens
Coleus
Marguerite daisies
Mums
asters
Sedum
willows and curly willow (you can buy a start of the curly willow from any florist at any time of year)

And they are all pathetically easy.

I am hopefully going to add annual begonias to the list in a couple weeks, but they haven't rooted yet ;)

Suzy
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2008
1:53 PM

Post #4904400

I'm going to try Begonias too! I hope they are as easy as Coleus!
planolinda
Plano, TX

May 4, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #4905620

i am going to try again--will just sticking my broken off aloe type leave into dry dirt be enough--or do i keep it wet?
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2008
11:19 PM

Post #4906280

I would keep it damp, but never over-watered. (not good for roots)
planolinda
Plano, TX

May 4, 2008
11:40 PM

Post #4906392

thanks--
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 5, 2008
6:11 PM

Post #4910054

Agreed. Water enough to keep it alive, but not wet!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 5, 2008
6:14 PM

Post #4910068

Thanks for the info on Abutilon, Lavender! I have 5 cuttings now and the info is just what I needed!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 6, 2008
12:20 AM

Post #4911563

Rob, you asked about rooting in warm weather. Texas is warm, much warmer than San Diego. Texas really doesn't have that long of a growing season because it gets so hot the plants go dormant and kick into survival mode in Summer. I do cutting in Spring and Fall. So here is how I handle the heat. As long as the plants are actively growing or putting out new growth my success rate stays high.

I watch the weather. Take advantage when a few overcast days are in the forecast, it helps. I take my cuttings early in the morning and place them in water while gathering .

I use plastic picnic cups with hole cut in the bottom. They hold a bit more soil than 4" pots and I think thy hold moisture better.

I keep my cuttings under a large tree, on the East side, it has the least direct sun. If they need water... I only water them early in the morning or late enough that is soil is not soggy by nightfall (roots grow at night and need oxygen)

This may be more then you wanted to know. I am always looking for tips to beat the heat :) good luck, have fun

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2008
3:35 AM

Post #4912684

I keep a large Nursery pot and just pop cuttings in it all summer. I keep the pot in the shade and let nature take it's course. When something roots I pot it up.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 6, 2008
4:30 PM

Post #4914378

Cocoa_lulu, thanks so much for the info! It is never more than I want to know! : ) What kind of medium do you use? I hear so many different things I get confused! Lavender, what do you use?
latelybloomin77
Kilgore, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 6, 2008
4:49 PM

Post #4914474

yes, very good info. Thank you!

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2008
7:09 PM

Post #4915053

i use miracle grow to start all my cuttings...nothing fancy...that and water and a bubbler...the moisture control potting soil in the summer stays moist with no mold.
Colquhoun
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2008
7:13 PM

Post #4915064

my short list is..
Elderberry
Willow
Pothos
Wandering Jew
DILLY
Jesup, GA
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #4921677

I just read this thread from beginning to end. Thank you all for the good information.
I am a really old lady who has been gardening for years and years and years. I didn't know before why some of the plants I rooted in water 'kicked the bucket' when transferred to a pot of soil. Just some kinds.
Either I read somewhere and had forgotten it, or maybe just dreamed that if you have a cutting that roots in water but you have experienced that plant not taking to the transition to soil, keep adding soil into the jar of water every day until it IS potted in soil. Then get it out and pot it. Sounds pretty crazy. I'm going to try it for fun. :-)
planolinda
Plano, TX

May 8, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #4925460

sounds like a plan! thanks for the idea
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2008
12:57 AM

Post #4926166

Rob, I use the MG too. Not for for any specific reason...I just seem to always have some on hand.
vjbuffy1
West Des Moines, IA

May 9, 2008
2:32 AM

Post #4926817

Has anyone had any success rooting lilac? How did you do it? Thanks.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 9, 2008
4:37 PM

Post #4928962

Thanks Lulu!
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 11, 2008
4:13 AM

Post #4935258

Yup, Add Begonias on to the super-easy list:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4903853

Suzy

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 11, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #4937840

vj, just read an article on rooting lilacs from cuttings. It said you have a two week window right after flowering for good rooting of cuttings. Otherwise use suckers or layering. Lay over branches, bruise and cover with soil and weight down. If you use suckers cut them free from the mother pant in the fall and leave them alone then pot them up in the spring.
TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2008
4:13 PM

Post #4940937

Lulu - good to see you!

As for begonias - I over wintered a couple. They really broke dorancy in February. I cut them WAY back in Mar and rooted in water. Petted up in early April and by the beginning of May I didn't have to purcahse any this year for bedding plants. I think I got about 40 plants form the 2 mommies.

I also did the same for coleus and the bedding salvia.

For propogating cuttings, I will use water, but have found (just this year) that if you cut a 2 liter plasitc soda container in half, it makes a perfect terrarium (sp) for cutting starts. I have started lantana, angolina, coleus, begonia, brugs, licorice plant, cuphea. I will continue to experiment. For easy rooters I do not add hormone, but if I dont' know I will use rooting hormone prior to putting in soil. These work great. I keep in kitchen window with only morning sun. I haven't had a failure yet. At any one time I have about 15 soda containers going. DH is teasing me that I need to stop as I ahve run out of contianers.

Ahh, but I have jsut started lining baskets iwth cocnut mat and now have lots more containers!
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2008
4:20 PM

Post #4940973

I do the same thing, only with milk jugs! It does work great, but I have trouble growing all these things as house plants, even scraggly or dormant houseplants. We just have an extra 3 months of winter you don't have, so it's a lot longer proposition until we can plant out in spring.

INteresting on the bedding Salvia -- I guess I knew they could come from cuttings, but I forgot.

Lavender, Interesting about the Lilacs. I really want just an old purple one with a long panicle of flowers, a PLAIN LILAC. :) They are sort of hard to come by, although when they are for sale, I am ot in my garden, not shopping. It seems to me that this year and last year, Sensation has taken over their place at places like Lowe's here.
vjbuffy1
West Des Moines, IA

May 12, 2008
6:34 PM

Post #4941423

Thanks so much Lavender, I will give it a try soon. They are blooming right now here. I wonder if I should put the cutting in water, or in soil. vj
mothermole
Deer Park, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2008
12:52 AM

Post #4942835

I like to use "root tone" for my cuttings-it seems to raise the percentage of rooted plants by at least 50% for me. My geraniums would never start without it (I was surprised to read that so many of you have luck just putting some into the ground). As far as lilacs, (someone asked this) I took a cutting from a friends yellow lilac last summer and it is happily growing this spring. It took a while for roots and yes I used root tone.

Anyone ever take a cutting of Magnolia? I have a very, very large magnolia that needs some trimming and the branches I need to remove are in the 3-5 foot range. I read in a book about cutting it half way, apply root tone type product, wrap cut area in soil mix and wet heavily and overall wrap the cut in plastic wrap. It is supposed to take a few months to get roots but the tree is so gorgeous and is about 30 years old. I'd love to have some smaller babies in other areas of my property.
wineaux
Tucson, AZ

May 13, 2008
4:32 AM

Post #4943887

I grew up with purple and white lilacs but did not know there were yellow lilacs.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2008
5:03 PM

Post #4945682

vj I would use soil and rooting hormone. Although you could try water. I would tent them with plastic. Try a few in garden soil in the shade somewhere too. I did that with my grapevines and black lace elderberry and they are all sprouting.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 14, 2008
3:10 PM

Post #4949975

Hi, Liz. Are enjoying DG? Silly question, I know you are.lol

I know what you mean about containers. I bug everyone I know for milk jugs, cardboard and newspaper. I wonder if i could apply with the State and have them put a recycling drop off center at my front gate.lol
TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #4950170

fortuantely my neighbors drink a lot of coke and DH drinks a lot of cranberry juice - so I have an endless supply!

And yes - I love this site! DH teases that I have another man in my life - DAVE!
wonderearth
Santa Cruz, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 15, 2008
6:03 AM

Post #4953551

I've had success with brugs, morning glory, salvias, potato bush, thyme, strobilianthus, abutilon, mints, anything that is kind if invasive, philodendron (house plant) Most of these I did outside under a porch overhang with large vases over potting soil. Right now I'm trying ascarina, hebe, salvia, clystoma. Also, I have a book called "gardening for free" with a pink flower on the front that talkes about when to take cuttings of certain things, with plants strike well and at what rate and whether to take soft, semi-soft, or hardwood cuttings. I started using the high domed cold frames that I can use over and over they aren't that expensive and they are very handy. I've had a lot a failure but enough success to get me addicted to taking cuttings.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 15, 2008
5:02 PM

Post #4955430

I'm "jealous"! : ) Where do you get those domes?
I SO want to learn this. Especially for sharing, you know? How long does it usually take you to see roots? I think I need to be more patient too...
wonderearth
Santa Cruz, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 16, 2008
12:56 AM

Post #4957370

I got mine in the propagation section of the big nursery in town. Every plant is different as to when the roots start to show. The book I mentioned before has the number of days different plants take to root. They are just like the little seed starting trays with the clear plastic covers but a couple inches taller. I'm still learning alot about cuttings but I would love to know everything!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 16, 2008
4:51 AM

Post #4958389

I hear you...must be nice!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 14, 2008
9:20 PM

Post #5258958

For everyone watching this thread and willing to learn about propagation...I bought a FANTASTIC book by the American Horticultural Society...I can't tell you guys how much I've progressed in my skills! Here's a link to this book on Amazon. Enjoy!

http://www.amazon.com/American-Horticultural-Society-Propagation-Plant/dp/0789441160/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1216070240&sr=8-1
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 14, 2008
10:23 PM

Post #5259268

does it tell if you can grow new mums from the seeds of a mum plant? i have saved the seeds (thousands!) from my big mum but have never heard of anyone growing mums from seed
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 14, 2008
10:25 PM

Post #5259275

You can search by plant name and it will tell you all the alternatives to propagate it!
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
2:28 AM

Post #5260573

Rob, thanks for sharing that info!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 15, 2008
4:08 AM

Post #5261030

I felt it was such good info, I HAD to share!
Planolinda, I checked the book on chrysanthemums for you and it says you can grow them from seeds! Sow in spring or fall, depending on your climate. Hope this helps!
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 15, 2008
4:13 AM

Post #5261043

thanks--i think i will give them a try!
asdesign
Houston, TX

July 15, 2008
9:43 PM

Post #5264602

I want to root Duranta. How long of a cutting do I get? Do I put it in rooting soil or water? Do I strip all the leaves off the stem after I cut it off the shrub?
Thanks
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 15, 2008
10:49 PM

Post #5264897

I will check for you tonight when I get home!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2008
10:53 PM

Post #5264916

Rob, why would we buy the book when we have you? JK, lol.

Does the book cover anything about misting systems? Was considering putting in a small scale misting system, just not sure if it's worth it.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 15, 2008
10:55 PM

Post #5264926

LOL!
No, it doesn't mention a misting system...but I did find out (in the book, of course!) that just placing a plastic dome over your cuttings will preserve the moisture all day long...
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2008
11:05 PM

Post #5264958

Thanks Rob. I've tried the baggie methods and it gets too hot here in the Summer for them...seems to steam cook my cuttings.lol I was thinking the mister might cool the surrounding air too. I may need that book anyway:0)
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 16, 2008
6:36 PM

Post #5269435

Lulu, I always keep my cuttings in the shade. They will cook in the sun, you're right! Are you putting your cuttings in the sun?
TexasLizzy
Southlake, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2008
11:47 PM

Post #5270680

I keep all my cuttings in the shade - an even with close to 3 digit temps - I am still able to propogate. Having GREAT success with persion sheild - a true shae lover here in TX.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2008
1:00 AM

Post #5271118

Wish I could too, Liz. I do my cutting in the shade, but once the temps start getting this hot my percentage goes way down, hence a mister. It's funny tho, the more I talk to local propagators/gardeners, one thing will work in one yard and not the next...you got to find that "magic area". lol
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2008
12:52 PM

Post #5272929

I have my cuttings in my basement under lights - quite cool and very humid!
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 17, 2008
1:31 PM

Post #5273094

Magnolia Grandifloria. from Christmas decorations into trees.

At a historic house here the local clubs decorate for Christmas. The open house is around December 10. The women love to decorate with Magnolia leaves, broken off at about maybe 10 inches, and stuck together with a red plastic bow. The magnolia branches were stuck in cement planters bordering the front steps. The dirt in the planters have been there for years.

By the time I got around to cleaning up all the Christmas decorations - Maybe by the end of January I found the magnolia branches had roots.
I potted them up and they are now little Magnolia Grandiflora trees!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2008
1:48 PM

Post #5273186

Thank Seandor, that's one place I haven't tried...great idea.

Congrats Gloria, My first thought was what a great fundraising idea for the Historic groups! Or Christmas presents!
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 17, 2008
2:05 PM

Post #5273264

I wasn't allowed to sell them (State property) but I gave away most of them.
JeanK
Deland, FL & Hot Spr, AR

July 17, 2008
2:59 PM

Post #5273465

I'm a real amateur at this, but have what I call my nursery beside our bedroom window in FL. It is shaded. If I am trimming my gardenia, brugmansias, or hydrangea I always put a few cuttings in pots by this window. We have an automatic watering system that takes over until the summer rains come. When we return in the fall, I always take a look to see what has rooted -- perhaps I have lost some mostly due to curious raccoons knocking the pots over, then comes another dilemma -- where do I plant them. I also recycle my ziplock bags by using them as mini-greenhouses in the sunroom in AR during the winter. Soil dries out pretty fast and when you can't be there for a couple of weeks to tend to your cuttings the bags can be a lifesaver. Make sure the soil is moist, not soggy, put your pot the bag, place in a shady area, zip up the bag and when you return, you will usually find your cutting rooted and happy. I know all of you experienced and professional gardeners will probably groan and roll your eyes, but it works for me.

robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 17, 2008
4:50 PM

Post #5274064

Cocoa-lulu: my bad, the book DOES talk about a misting system! I guess in my eaguerness to go straight to the plants I wanted to check out I skipped a couple pages!
I told you that book had EVERYTHING! LOL!
Hemhostaholic
Scranton, PA
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2008
9:06 PM

Post #5275241

Not sure if anyone mentioned this or not, but my favorite thing to propagate from any sort of cuttings (pups) are any of the Aroids.

Alocasia, Colocasia, Zanthosoma--all of the Elephant ears, if given enough space in your garden, or in a large enough pot, will create a "pup." Store these some place, after you slice them off, and replant the following spring. I live in Winter Wonderland...I usually save any shoe boxes I get, or will ask Dominos/Pappa Johns if I can have a few unused pizza boxes for the smaller pups...sawdust/perlite/vermiculate, and store in a nice cool (not cold) place for all the pups.

I usually pot these up, for me, about March-ish, in ProMix BX (I swear by this stuff)...I have been using the same method for Elephant Ears for a few seasons now. I pot them up, keep them well watered (not moist), usually the roots take a few weeks to form, and after about 3 weeks or so, you will get a leaf popping up out of the soil. I place these near a window in the house, and let the leaves unfurl. To date, no nursery, garden center, or home owner has Elephant Ears as big as mine. At the moment they are HUGE outside.

Plecanthrus are really easy to propagate also. I have clipped them back, and pieces have falled on MULCH and they rooted.

Same thing for any of the Russian Sages, I have clipped these guys back, did not pick them up, and the following spring had a virtual thicket of Russian Sages.

Variegated Dog Woods, same thing, left cuttings on the ground, and had about a dozen or so rooted V. Dog Woods the following spring!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
12:19 PM

Post #5284199

hummmm . . . I think I will go on the hunt for a Russian Sage!

I have found that lavender is easy to start, and currently, I have three little hydrangia from cuttings this spring.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

July 21, 2008
1:54 AM

Post #5293285

I had forgotten about epiphyllums, they are so easy. you just leave them laying around for a couple of weeks and then put them in a pot in the shade and keep them moist. Next thing you know you have a new orchid cactus! Oh so easy!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 2, 2008
3:50 AM

Post #5356948

Propagation by Cuttings makes a great Science Project for young kids. We showed how to root a pineapple "crown" from a store bought pineapple, a cutting from Begonia which can be either vertical or horizontal in the soil, and some things will even root from a leaf. We also showed the hibiscus. This was done for a private Christian school and their rules prevent the plants from going to school, so we took a lot of photographs of the process from beginning to end. We posted some on the backboard, and then made two photo albums to put on the table, one on each side of the "Report". My granddaughter won First Place for her 2nd grade class. She learned alot, plus it was a lot of fun!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 2, 2008
4:02 AM

Post #5357009

My 7yr old son loves propagating! This month I transferred one of his experiments to he ground: purple sage, and it's a foot tall now!
But wouldn't the school allow plants? I didn't get that.
Rob
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 2, 2008
4:06 AM

Post #5357041

It's just one of their rules. I guess due to the fact that some plants are poisonous...
The photographs worked well tho.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 21, 2008
5:05 PM

Post #5447417

I have something to add to our list! BRUGMANSIAS. I have never seen anything so easy to propagate from cuttings! I've done it in water and in potting soil...100% rooting in all cuttings everytime!!!
Roberta

Thumbnail by robcorreia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 23, 2008
2:27 AM

Post #5454969

I've definately had good luck with Brugs, as well. Love em!
MickeyAz
Cave Creek, AZ

September 9, 2008
5:07 AM

Post #5528055

Anyone hav any ideas for the desert? We have lots on land but not lots of water. I love the sages but I don't know how to propigate them. I wn on the look out of more phoenix bird f paradise seeds too. They seem like the only plant that can take our heat and get along with out water once they are established. Thy put out a lot of nice color too.
Mickey
Arizona
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 9, 2008
4:25 PM

Post #5529504

Mickey,
Sucullents are the easiest thing to propagate on earth, you are in luck! I don't know much about sage, but succulents all you do is let the cutting dry for a few days, stick it in vermiculite, and water sparingly until it roots!
Good luck!
GreenEyedGuru
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 9, 2008
6:38 PM

Post #5529981

Echiums are amazing. I had a few month old planting that was torn out last summer by a contractor who was doing my front lawn. The plant sat out on the lawn (roots exposed) on the south side of the house in full sun all day until I got home at around 6:30. It was completely wilted. I repotted it in a 6" plastic pot with some regular potting soil and set it in the shade under my plum tree, where it was watered daily by the sprinklers. It recovered and is now approximately 5 feet tall and about as wide in my front yard and put out an amazing display of flowers this year.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 9, 2008
6:46 PM

Post #5530012

Have you ever propagated Echiums by cuttings? I love echium candicans, and they grow wild here. I always wandered if a cutting would work.
GreenEyedGuru
SF Bay Area, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 9, 2008
7:40 PM

Post #5530256

I haven't tried, but I'd imagine it would be pretty easy. I bought a variegated one at a local garden sale that was propagated by cuttings.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 9, 2008
9:33 PM

Post #5530723

That's good to know. If it's feasible, I'll do it! : )
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 10, 2008
9:07 PM

Post #5535207

Hey you guys, what are those? I looked in the PlantFiles and there weren't any in there. Echiums??

Jeanette
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 10, 2008
11:20 PM

Post #5535716

Jeanette, here they are! You can also go to the top where it says "search plants" instead of just browsing that list. Have fun!
Rob

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/search.php?q=echium
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 11, 2008
12:54 AM

Post #5536176

Thanks robcorreia!! This is fun. I'm having trouble getting any of my outdoor plants to root in water. I just got some dip n grow from a co-op today. Maybe that and soiless mix will work.

Thanks for the headsup.

Jeanette
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 11, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #5538621

Jeanette, some plants are easier in water than others. Just keep experimenting with it! If you're really into it, get the Propagation book by the American Horticultural Society. It's totally worth it! : )
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

September 11, 2008
8:34 PM

Post #5539664

Hey, Those echiums are gorgeous. If you have good success with the dip-n-grow, please let me know. Also does anyone know where to find clonex? Thanks, Ibartoo
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2008
5:36 AM

Post #5545660

I will look for it on Amazon. Jeanette
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2008
5:39 AM

Post #5545669

I was just told that when you try to propagate, or root cuttings, you are suppose to remove all the leaves, side shoots, blossoms etc. except the top 4 or so. I have been gardening all of my adult years and have never heard that. Where have I been all my life? Is this the way it is suppose to be done?

Jeanette

This message was edited Sep 12, 2008 9:39 PM
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 13, 2008
6:08 AM

Post #5545703

That's correct.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2008
6:13 AM

Post #5579307

Green Eyed, it was so thankfull to be alive that it blessed you! Good job!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
6:57 AM

Post #5583622

Ibartoo, did you find Clonex? I googled it and there are a lot in there. One even had free shipping. And, it looked like the cheapest price. It looks like it is around $20 for 2 or 3 ounces. They all say 100 ml and when I google that it is hard to get an exact amount but it looks like 2 or 3 oz.

Jeanette
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

September 22, 2008
1:06 PM

Post #5584189

Thanks Jnette, I went off on a different tangent this week. LOL, I will search it today. My morning glory tree is blooming for the first time so I will definitely be wanting to root some of those.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
4:59 PM

Post #5585171

Oh wow!! Please post a picture. I have seeds but haven't started them this year. Definitley will next year.

Jeanette

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 22, 2009
9:21 PM

Post #6724514

bump!

Illoquin - I got a "free" curly willow from a floral bouquet given to the company where I worked. When all the flowers were "gone" I found the curly willow was rooting. It overwintered in Winnipeg! In a pot, I might add, cuz apparently it's invasive and I didn't want it to take over my yard lol.
When I moved to Calgary, I got a stick for free from a florist just for asking!
It DIDN'T overwinter here, likely because of the chinooks!

I never had to propogate Daturas because they're self-seeding. Don't do anything at all, just sprinkle them around the garden, and they pop up like nobody's business! They don't over-winter, but last year I got 40 babys and gave away a bunch, while keeping 3 for myself, at work. 2 of them are in my garden (one in my boss' office) and one of my garden ones has a bud on it :-)

I had to use cuttings for Brugs because they don't self-seed. I guess I'll have to bring it in, in the fall!

-Susan-
echinaceamaniac
(Clint) Medina, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2009
1:59 AM

Post #6725723

Coreopsis - I have been rooting them in water in the window all spring. I've rooted Jethro Tull and several others. They root 100%.

Penstemons - Husker's Red, Mystica and Dark Towers - All root very easily in water in the window too!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 23, 2009
6:16 AM

Post #6726411

Coreopsis! Wow, that's a new one to me, I'll try right away!

Salvias - totally easy in water

Fuchsias - as my propagation book puts it, "it's impossible not to root them"...
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

June 23, 2009
2:30 PM

Post #6727213

does anyone know about candy corn vine, or blue sky vine?
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 23, 2009
5:52 PM

Post #6727995

I don't know...but I haven't been lucky with vines so far, even with the ones that are supposed to be easy such as passiflora...
DanKistner
Winter Haven, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 24, 2009
3:27 AM

Post #6730248

CrepeMyrtle! Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus, brugmansias. I have also found an easy method to root Bougainvillea cuttings (water first then soil)

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 24, 2009
5:22 PM

Post #6732451

Yes, Brugs are easy to root, and right now I have one newly planted in my garden that I got last fall, and rooted in water.

-Susan-
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 24, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6732650

Brugs are definitely a no brainer!

Now bougies?! Tell us the secret!!! I've always had the hardest time!!!

blomma

blomma
Wyoming, WY
(Zone 4a)

June 25, 2009
5:01 AM

Post #6735437

As mentioned above, a mix of perlite and peatmoss will root anything. The trick is once rooted and potted, put the potted cutting into a plastic bag. Leave the top of the bag partially open and make a ventilation holes in the plastic.

The roots that have formed in water are not the same type when formed in the soil. Once planted it is harder for the roots to obtained moisture, sort of got spoiled in water. The plastic bag will prevent the cutting from wilting while it forms new roots. Keep out of the sun, they don't need it until growing.

After 2 weeks, open the plastic bag a bit more, and continue to do that until the rooted cutting will not wilt without. It is a sort of hardening off.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 25, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #6737943

I have rooted tons of plants in water and they have thrived just the same when they went in the ground.
echinaceamaniac
(Clint) Medina, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2009
8:00 PM

Post #6737975

Rooting cuttings in water works for me too. I haven't had any trouble at all. In fact, I have more trouble out of plants NOT rooted in water. I root tons of plants in water and they go immediately in the soil with no problems. My Penstemons were planted directly in the yard in full sun after rooting them in water. They didn't even wilt at all. I also root Coleus, Coreopsis, and several other plants in water and they take much better than any other method. Gardenias seem to root better in water than any other method I've tried.

I think that is a myth about the roots not being good when rooted in water. One good thing about rooting in water is I can root the plants in the kitchen window and they are already used to the sun when planted outside. Some plants don't root in water, but many will and will do so every single time with no problems.

This message was edited Jun 25, 2009 3:09 PM
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 25, 2009
8:06 PM

Post #6738003

Yes, it's a myth, I agree.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 25, 2009
10:05 PM

Post #6738486

Sometimes I think it depends on the time of year. The plants seem to be more receptive to growing such as in the spring vs winter. Altho, I have had a brug in water now for the last 4 or 5 weeks. It has gotten the nubbies, but no roots. Would you suggest that I plant it?

Jeanette
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 25, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #6738697

If it's got the white stuff in there the roots will come very soon! I would just wait until strong roots are present before potting up.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

June 26, 2009
12:17 PM

Post #6740678

I agree, I have never had any problem with things I have rooted in water. The things that I have babied the most are the ones I have lost.
DanKistner
Winter Haven, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2009
2:04 PM

Post #6741024

Yes I take maybe 6" cuttings from a mature bougie. I snip it off just below a node and then scrape a little skin off of the cutting at the bottom. I dip it in rooting hormone, then wrap it in this green fibrous material that aquarium plants come in. Put it in a shot glass full of water and put it in a zip lock bag in the window sill. 3-4 weeks later you can see roots wrapping around the inside of the glass. Just take the material off carefully and plant outside!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 26, 2009
10:10 PM

Post #6742752

Wow! I gotta try that! What exactly is the stuff aquarium plants come in? (sorry I've never seen this!)
DanKistner
Winter Haven, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2009
12:40 AM

Post #6743332

If you go to a shop that sells fish, usually they have aquatic potted plants. I don't know what the stuff is called but it is a green fibrous material like a mix between the stuff flower arrangements come with mixed with a sponge. I love it. With bougies though... be careful once the roots have grown because they are very fragile so when you remove this material, handle it with care!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 27, 2009
1:41 AM

Post #6743641

OK. Thanks!
50glee
Huntersville, NC

July 19, 2009
11:57 PM

Post #6839216

let me get this straight.
coleus can be put into soil without roots, watered and will grow?
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 20, 2009
4:12 PM

Post #6841846

Yes!
caitlinsgarden
McGregor, IA
(Zone 4b)

July 31, 2009
5:14 AM

Post #6888134

I was interested in learning about Elephant Ear "pups". I tried to overwinter the whole plant in the basement the way I do dahlias, but no luck at all. I had several gorgeous ones in the garden one year, but they are too expensive to buy new each year.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 31, 2009
5:50 AM

Post #6888232

I am trying to root fuchsias. They should be real easy. But, not sure. We used to grow them in the house as house plants in the winter. I think my house is just too dry.
smileymom343
Kenmore, NY
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #7037464

Jnette, how do you do the fuchsias? I have one that got all leggy. I was looking at it wondering if I could lop off the tops & root them. I'm in zone 5, so have to do something for the winter anyways. They are in a pot outside right now., but I have an unheated sunroom for the winter they can go in.

Any ideas are greatly appreciated!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 7, 2009
9:45 PM

Post #7037504

Are they trailing, or uprights? I guess it depends on if you want to keep them growing and blooming over the winter or go dormant for the winter. If dormant, I would just cut them back and hold back on the water, with just enough to keep them from dying. (inside of course) If you want to have them continue to bloom, since they are leggy, you could cut them back a ways, depending on how many you have in a basket or pot, and then just treat them as normal. If you want them to fill out, cut them back and fertilize.

I have found they do good on triple 20 if you can find it. Peters. Either Scotts bought them out and then sold to Miricle Grow or vice versa. Miricle Grow bought and sold dto Scotts. Sometimes you can still find it in some stores. Otherwise I would say the All Purpose in Miricle Grow. I think MG wanted to cut out the competition.

Jeanette
smileymom343
Kenmore, NY
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #7037668

they are kind of "arch-y". but I would say upright. I think I'll cut them back and let them go dormant. Thanks for the advise!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 8, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #7038031

You know, there are some hardy fuchsias if you mulch them good that can stay alive in the ground in your zone. I don't have any of those, but have seen them and they are nice.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 8, 2009
1:03 AM

Post #7038419

LOL, must be ESP. I just happened to see the new fuchsia forum listed. Started the 7th of this month!! Today!! And the first post was on cold hardy fuchsias.
smileymom343
Kenmore, NY
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2009
9:59 AM

Post #7039467

yes, I saw that. congrats to them, they worked hard to get it going. this one is not cold hardy, but I like it. anything to save a buck, I'll try to keep it going over the winter.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 9, 2009
5:55 AM

Post #7043176

In the area I live now there are hardly any new varieties. Mostly the old tried and true, Swingtime, Dark Eyes, etc. That is why I try to keep them over. I get them from the Fuchsia Lady in Seattle but they are expensive to ship. She doesn't charge much for them in the spring.
DIRTYGIRL71
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 19, 2009
3:02 AM

Post #7079875

how hard (or easy) is it to propagate crown of thorns??
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 19, 2009
5:04 AM

Post #7080153

I don't know about that one.

Jeanette
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 19, 2009
7:03 AM

Post #7080296

It's a succulent plant, so it shouldn't be too hard...I've rooted one in sand. You just have to make sure it doesn't get too wet until it has real roots...
DIRTYGIRL71
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 19, 2009
12:51 PM

Post #7080643

ok...thanks
Pagancat
(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN
(Zone 6b)

September 19, 2009
2:48 PM

Post #7080930

I don't want to hi-jack this thread, but it looks like Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii ) is pretty easy to propagate - here's a quick reference: http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/enabling_garden/15583 . Here's one that gets into more than just cuttings: http://www.tropicanursery.com/euphorbia/propagation.htm

HTH and good luck!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 19, 2009
6:36 PM

Post #7081554

Both are awesome links, thanks! (makes me want to get more different colors, lol!)
DIRTYGIRL71
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 20, 2009
1:44 AM

Post #7082681

They really are awsome links.. . alot of great info!! THANKS A BUNCH!
Pagancat
(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN
(Zone 6b)

September 20, 2009
5:58 PM

Post #7084508

So welcome!
DIRTYGIRL71
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 12, 2010
5:45 AM

Post #8207689

I want to bump this thread as a refresher & to get any new updates!!!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 13, 2010
9:40 PM

Post #8210364

This is a great thread. I went back and reread the whole thing!

Most things will root. The thing is to just try it...Most of what I have has already been mentioned.

Good luck with your efforts! I have some Jasmine cuttings in water that I need to check on. They probably need more water!

Jeanne
kmom246
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2010
9:09 PM

Post #8228060

OMGosh, it's been over 9 years since I started this thread! I've just been reading it all through, and I'm amazed how it has flourished and grown. How fun! - Karla
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

December 3, 2010
10:51 AM

Post #8242377

Wow, so what have you learned in the past 9 years, do tell!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 8, 2010
2:09 PM

Post #8250486

What I have learned...ALL OF THE ABOVE! LOL! What about you?

Happy Holidays Everyone, esp. Karla!

Jeanne
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 8, 2011
5:07 AM

Post #8298597

What a great thread! plantaholic186,,,I have that same azelea..can you give more details on how to do the azeleas? Nobody has mentioned Tall garden phlox and how that is done and when is best time. Let's hear from the Tall Garden phlox gardeners.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

January 8, 2011
10:52 AM

Post #8299105

Pippi21 I only have one of them and have been trying to get rid of it for years. I love them but this one just isn't very pretty. However, I just can't seem to get all the root out. I think it is in a place with very poor soil. I have been adding compost etc. but in my sand the additions just disappear.

I think you almost have to start them with a piece of the root.

Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 8, 2011
11:34 AM

Post #8299163

You all have really got me looking forward to spring and summer so I can try my hand at taking cuttings. How long will it take for a cutting of Hydrangea to get to good size where I can take it to a plant swap and give away? Like in May? I have 8 or 9 mature hydrangeas on the side of my house.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 8, 2011
9:12 PM

Post #8299935

Usually with any plant in general you only need about six inches. You want to cut it just below a node...a little bump or growth where the plant put out the new growth.

Dip it in rooting mixture and stick it in the dirt.

You can put them in water. Be sure to refreshen the water a couple of times a week. My past experience as far as I can remember it was several weeks. You would have to read thru this thread...I'm sure it mentions somewhere. Some people have had things root in water pretty quickly...but that's just not my experience. I would give it at least two mos.

westie42
West Union, IA

March 5, 2011
10:40 PM

Post #8409442

Last September I cut off basil and some smaller tomatoes at about 6-8" and some stivia about 10' then put each in water they all took off and rooted well. Now all are growing in my window seat. Could have a couple tomatoes ready shortly, have snipped basil since Christmass and the stivia will be nice sized plants for spring planting and have snitched a few leaves too.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2011
11:08 AM

Post #8410262

Westie, Good for you!! What growing conditions did you have them in over the winter? I.e. light, heat, etc.


edited to add: What kind of tomatoes are they? Hybrid or heirloom? And, did you use lights on them, and if so, what kind?

This message was edited Mar 6, 2011 12:13 PM

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2011
11:35 AM

Post #8410300

I see some familiar faces on here and I have gone back to the beginning to review what you all start from cuttings. I may have missed it and forgive me if I have, but I want to cut some camellias, not the kind that grow outside, mine are potted. Has anyone ever tried to start them from cuttings? Thanks in advance. JB
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8410464

JB, Look here and it should help. One of the posters up above posted it. : )

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8702.html



JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2011
2:22 PM

Post #8410585

Thanks Jen, that is very good information and I did not see that particular one before. In the research I have been doing there was mentioned of one way was to use a " propagator box". I guess my question should have been, " Has anyone been successful in propagating Camellias and if so, what method did they use?". I had never heard of the "box" before and although it is described, I am curious to hear from someone who has actually had success using what methods. JB
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2011
2:48 PM

Post #8410649

Where did you hear of the propagator box? I don't know what it is. Would love to see it.

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 6, 2011
3:36 PM

Post #8410752

Jen, See if you can get this link to work and it is mentioned under cuttings. It describes how to make them, etc.

http:www.camellia-ics.org/culture/propagat.htm

This is really good information. I found it in Feb. of this year.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2011
7:05 PM

Post #8411073

comes back "not found".

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
5:48 AM

Post #8411542

It is a paper by Klaus Peper, called Camellia Propagation. I will see if I can find it when I have time today. I print them out and then I do not clutter up my bookmarks. I will get back to you later. JB
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 7, 2011
8:58 AM

Post #8411931

I tried a lot of combination and the only time I got a response was to drop everything past camellia. But that didn't tell me anything about boxes.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

March 7, 2011
9:14 AM

Post #8411976

I just looked up camellia propagation and this is what I have found

http://camellia-ics.org/_ics/culture/propagat.htm

I had the same problem when I went to the site. I hope this one works for you.

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 7, 2011
9:55 AM

Post #8412067

That is the one, and had not been so tired when i wrote the link, I would have done it properly. I am sorry. I was having vision problems yesterday because of straining my eye to fix my sewing machine. I finally put it away and gave up. That is when I misled you Jen. Sorry. Please forgive me...Please, Please, Please. JB
wingsandblooms
Saint Matthews, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 8, 2011
7:43 AM

Post #8414186

My husband likes to pick up the large blueberry muffins from the grocery store and they come in clear plastic 4-packs with a snap down lid. When empty, I fill each compartment with potting mix and put my rootings in, moisten, and snap the lid down. They work pretty well as a small "hothouse"! I have fairly good success rooting my cuttings in those - have even gotten a couple of camellias to root this way. I do not have much luck with camellias, though, because I don't really know what I'm doing, it's all trial and error and most of mine die. But I'm going to keep trying.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 8, 2011
8:27 AM

Post #8414290

Do you try different parts of the plant? Like maybe fresh/new growth, some of that and then maybe a little farther down the stem to firmer wood? Might try different types of cuttings.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

March 8, 2011
11:36 AM

Post #8414588

The trick with camellia cuttings is to make sure you have a growth bud. I had a man show me cuttings that he used and they only had 1 leaf and a short piece of stem. I was amazed, but he had acres upon acres of camellias and azaleas rooting. He was somewhere over toward orangeburg.

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 8, 2011
2:16 PM

Post #8414888

Oh my, now I have to learn what a growth bud looks like. Help Ibartoo. Draw me a picture.
I think there is a picture on one of those papers we printed out. Maybe. LOL I can not wait to try but I am still worried I will hurt the blooming for this year. It already bloomed once but it looks like it is growing now.

I read somewhere you can cut them anytime, but summer is best. Is that right Ibartoo?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 8, 2011
2:54 PM

Post #8414974

Put it on here Linda 'cause I want to know too.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

March 9, 2011
6:01 AM

Post #8416056

As soon as I get my computer online again, I will post pics for you both. ( mine still isn't completely restored). A growth bud is basically a bud that will grow into a new leaf at the joint of the older leaves and stems.

I have really only taken cuttings during the summer months so I don't know about cutting them anytime. One of the men who taught me about them said that july and august were the only times to cut them. Others have told me that as long as the cutting isn't brand new wood, it should be ok.

If I can get Burk to set up my propagator today, I will cut some and try several different ways. ( heaven help me, I love experiments!) In the meantime, i will look to see if I can find other info for you.

sea ya.

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2011
8:53 AM

Post #8416337

Linda, thanks so much for the info. How is your weather. Ours is a mess today. Cold and windy. Wind coming off the cold ocean makes it worse. Talk later. Have a doctor appt. today that I need to get over. JB
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 11, 2011
6:17 PM

Post #8421189

I will have to go and look at the info on camelias also. I picked a camelia from the plant in the back yard. It had a bud under the flower so my Mom put it in water hoping the bud would open up, and maybe it will take root...hopefully it will. If so I will take cuttings from my other plant as well. One is pink and one is red. I do not remember the names of them. I have had them for years but they are only about 2 1/2 ft tall. They are close to the banana trees so in the summer they don't get much sun.

I will have to call Mom and see if it has rooted yet! Cool!

Jeanne
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

March 12, 2011
7:29 AM

Post #8422062

Jeanne, my uncle told me once that he rooted camellias in water, but I have never been successful with them in water. Hope it works for you.
Yeah, it doesn't help that they are slow growing plants.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8422429

ibartoo,
That would be great if it does! Mom has a green thumb...I just use Miracle Grow...haha.

My friend has a camelia that is over 40 yrs old. They planted it in their front yard when they moved into their house. It must be over 6 ft tall and huge around. It's much taller than me. It is in full bloom. It is soooooooooo pretty. It gets alot of sun. It is just beautiful!
Jeanne
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8423969

Soooo much good info here. There's several plants I am going to try to root that I hadn't thought about rooting. I have about 50% luck with my propagtion--so as a retired teacher I guess that's flunking! :)
My Question: I have a couple of Royal Pelargoniums that are way over grown in my house. I know new growth ends root better, but how successful is rooting 10 inches from the tip??
After reading this thread, I believe I am going to try the soda bottle method with half perlite and half sand. I really want these to root.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2011
11:57 AM

Post #8424422

Whatever takes is an "A+". You have to treat each one indivually! HAHA! It's something gained!

I don't know about that species but it is worth a try. It doesn't hurt the plant, so why not?

I think it's great. It's like getting a free plant!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2011
1:32 PM

Post #8424600

Birder, aren't they like geraniums? If so, I will tell you a friend of mine just takes a half a dozen or whatever amount of cuttings, she takes them right off the main trunk, not sure what you all are calling them, and then she just sticks them all in a 6" pot together and lets them go. Don't know why it is, but that always works for her, and I can baby things and lose them. Oh well.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2011
2:19 PM

Post #8424686

Jeanette: They are a type called Martha Washington Geraniums. I think they are usually grown as houseplants.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2011
3:13 PM

Post #8424763

Birder, that is good. They should work. I was looking for a post earlier I thought Linda, Ibartoo, had tallked about it, it is where you take it right off the main trunk and kind of get some of the trunk with it.

I bet one of the others can describe it better than I can. Anyway, that is what this friend did. And they rooted and bloomed in that pot every time. Now I watched her do it. But, she had them in my sister's greenhouse. So, maybe you would want t put a bag over them or something.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2011
4:42 PM

Post #8424921

I think I will try a soda bottle. I think it would make it a mini greenhouse. Do you think I should put it in my heated upstairs or in the unheated downstairs garage?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2011
7:55 PM

Post #8425343

Hard for me to say, not knowing anything about the temps or light. I would say where it warm but not to warm and light. If it is too warm they might rot before they root.

Maybe there is someone on here that knows better than I do.
Dirt_Lover
Gainesville, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8462595

This is one of my favorite things to do now, experimenting with cuttings and seed starting. A partnership with God I call it. I do a little hand work and He does the rest. Amazing seen "up close", the whole process. So the most success I've had is Azaleas and Gardenias. I had one holly to root and one crape myrtle so we'll see what happens with them. I have decided to keep them in pots until this fall instead of trying to plant them now, figure it will give them a better head start. Here is a link I use all the time to decide what to root at what time of year and how to keep it going. Lots of good information and explained simply and thoroughly http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8702.html If I need more advice than that I call Kellie Bowen from Full Bloom Nursery on her Saturday morning radio show and get all the other advice I need.
MyRee
Brigham City, UT
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2011
10:23 PM

Post #8479789

I just ordered the American Horticultural Society Propagation... I would really like to try some of my Hardy Hibiscus. I have one that is electric pink, just beautiful.
Thank You for all the help and advise. Marie
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

April 8, 2011
6:57 AM

Post #8480241

I have propogated hibiscus by layering. It worked well.

kb
TriciasArbonne
Tulsa, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2011
9:15 PM

Post #8486578

Here is a great video of taking cuttings from trees:

http://youtu.be/DXNqfXH0pKc
DIRTYGIRL71
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2011
1:31 PM

Post #8488081

Has anyone had any success with Magnolia Tree? I pulled a 12 " limb off a tree .. immediately put in in a plastic bottle (put hole in lid just large enough to force limb through)... 3 inches of water then slipped a couple of my sons socks. ( only one of each cause dryeR monster must ha ve ate the other half) *LOL* It is sitting outside in full sun..but no light reaching water to grow algea...I plant in checkinG it in a week or so for growth...but wonderinG if I should be doing it different.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

April 12, 2011
9:03 AM

Post #8490131

I have only ever rooted magnolia in soil. Let me know if the water method works please.
Lisatx1966
Mexia, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2011
11:50 AM

Post #8552461

What about roses? WE have tried several things and not much luck.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2011
1:00 PM

Post #8552620

Lisa, have you read and tried Taylor's rose starting instructions? It has been a long time since I have read them, but she had a really good instruction thread. There might be a special thread on roses in the community menu. Take a look.
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2011
7:36 AM

Post #8584055

I doubt anyone will read this because the thread is so long but as far as easily rooted house plants
Swedish ivy
heart leaf plant
wandering Jew
Jade
Aloe
burro tail

Outdoor perennials
Gardenia
hydrangea
Red dragon
acuba
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

May 24, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8584100

I read it. Thank you.

Is red dragon the same as dragon fruit? I know my dragon fruit cuttings root easily as do other epis.

kb

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2011
2:52 PM

Post #8584848

I keep watching this thread, hoping someone will mention something I can grab a snip of, that I want more of.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8584913

Is that all you do Corey, just go from one thread to the next asking for cuttings?

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

May 24, 2011
4:31 PM

Post #8584995

Jen. do you pick on everyone? Go read the post I just put up on Pugh's forum.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2011
6:47 PM

Post #8585321

LOL, Corey and I have been writing for a while. Yeah JB, I do.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2011
6:30 PM

Post #8587368

Indeed, teasing is no problem.

But it was confusing at first, because when I said:

>> "hoping someone will mention something I can grab a snip of,"

I meant "name a plant that I have or my neighbors have, that is easy to root from cuttings, so i can grab a snip of it and do something other than make it rot".


I thought the whole point of "cuttings" was to lurk and sneak around the neighborhood at night with a pair of shears, a jar of water, and a maniacal expression, like the "Dumpster-Diving Divas".

(still kidding)

Corey

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2011
6:27 AM

Post #8588077

I think I just added a new "favorite person" to my list. The only one on my list now is Jen.
I think Cory just made the cut...get it...cut! Off for coffee. Don't feel like working today. JB
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 26, 2011
7:34 AM

Post #8588196

LOL, Corey that is a good definition. Think Webster will add it? Have to send it to Melody and Terry and see what they think of it. Used to be in Daves it would be called "stealing". Think things have loosened up a bit.

Corey, I see you are showing a zone 8. I suppose that you are close enough to the water that you pretty much maintain that rating. Doubt it ever gets down any lower there. Are the azaleas and rhodies all blooming now? This is the prettiest time of the year on the coast. 'course after a long winter I suppose most places can say the same.

JB, go drink your coffee and watch your mornin' Joe show. Even getting up by 5:45 I miss it. Who in the world would get up at 3 o:clock in the morning to watch them? Not me. Would have to be someone who works weird hours.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2011
10:21 PM

Post #8589964

>> Are the azaleas and rhodies all blooming now? This is the prettiest time of the year on the coast.

OH, YEAH! You timed it just right. One week ago, they were just starting, it has been a slow, cold spring.

>> Corey, I see you are showing a zone 8. I suppose that you are close enough to the water

Yup! One and a half miles from the Sound. "Sunset" used to say that you could change a whole USDA zone in one block (or words to that effect). When i checked their website recently, they put me a cooler "Sunset Zone" than they used to.

>> that you pretty much maintain that rating.

Well, remember that "10-15 degrees" is only an AVERAGE minimum temp. A few rare winters will go down to 0 ... but not all go down to 15.

It ain't so much the winter minimum that limits gardening along the coast: it's the summer maximums. Days stay mild and nights stay cool ... pretty much all summer.

And a "hot" summer day here (as you must know) is like a "cool" summer day in NJ. I've lived in Clifton and Monsey (NY), and worked in Ramsey and Mahwah ... and sweated like a pig every summer.

The frost-free period is long ... but the warm period is short.

And we have NO mosquitoes! Take that, JB from NJ, for cutting my feet off and sticking me in water until I turn moldy! Or thank you for the compliment, whichever!

(I have become a PNW chauvinist: better beer, better coffee, better climate, and I have "bikini baristas" on the street where I live! I admit: NJ has better pizza, baegels and diners.)

Corey

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2011
10:31 PM

Post #8589971

True, the Neighborhood Cutitngs Ninjas are 'stealing', but those threads back in 2002 or so, where the Dumpster diva Divas explained thier philosophy, converted me to their cause.

They did make apologies like "we never take enough that they NOTICE". And they admitted shame about stealing cuttings from a CHURCH ... until the pastor saw them and couldn't stop laughing at how guilty they looked.

I think my favorite story was the grandmotherly lady who went into a dumpster at ? Home Depot ? one night, to rescue some potted plants that were being assasinated for not selling fast enough. She knew all the dumpster-diving tricks by then, so she had her stool for getting in and out, and wore old clothes so she didn't mind getting dirty.

But ... RATS! This guy sees her and walks over to her. She's red-handed, in the dumpster up to her chin, but at least hasn't yet started pulling potted plants out. She thinks he's a security guard there to drag her off to prison.

But he amazes her by shaking his head, patting her arm, giving her $2, and walking away.

She was so spooked that she didn't figure it out until later. The old clothes: he thought she was homeless and looking for something to eat.

Who could send her to jail?

Corey

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2011
7:45 AM

Post #8590499

LOL, missed that one.

Corey, did they Everett close down, or make that mill clean up their smell? Everett used to smell as bad as Tacoma with the smell from the mill. Tacoma cleaned theirs up years ago. Surely Everett has too. The rotten egg smell. No tourism then.

How long have you lived there? Maybe you missed it.

You say it is cool there but you know, that is what keeps the flowers blooming nice. When it's hot it wilts them right down. Roses last so long too if you can keep them from mildewing from the cool.

You don't sound like you are heading back to NJ to live any time soon.


JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2011
3:44 PM

Post #8591330

If he is smart he won't come back.

This is the only state in the USA that you can live any way you want. You can be a beach bum, a hermit in the mountains or just a stupid farmer like us. You can live like a piney in the pinelands or up north like the city slickers. There is something for everyone and you will find every nationality in the world here.

Taxes are the highest in the USA and they tax everything except urine samples.
That will be next if the Democrates have anything to say. ( ducking and running so Jen does not hit me).

So, my new friend, stay where you are! Nothing will ever change this Jersey Fresh Garden State. JB

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2011
4:39 PM

Post #8591425

JB:

Oh, wow! You live in the nice part of NJ. Drove through it once ... after getting past the refineries (or whatever those were) and "pharmaceutical row", it turned nice.

I used to live in the urban mess. They had a big toll station on the highway to PA. They would let anyone in for free (after all: it's New JERSEY!) But they charged around $1.50 to get OUT ... and there was always a long line of people trying to get away at any price.

Corey

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2011
4:44 PM

Post #8591437

J,

>> Everett used to smell as bad as Tacoma with the smell from the mill. ... The rotten egg smell

I assume they cleaned it upo, but would I even notice?

Once, I was driving around NJ smoking a cigar, and thought "Man, NJ really stinks - like burning plastic!"

I rolled up my window and it got worse.

Then my right elbow got warm.

I had put down my cigar lighter with the flame not fully extinguished, in the plastic divider, and some paper caught fire.

Then the plastic divider caught fire.

By the time I realized it wasn't NJ, it was me ... I had quite a merry car fire going on.
It was already exciting enough when I realized that Ihad a propane cyclinder in the back seat ...

So, next time you're in NJ and some total maniac driver is weaving around wildy at high speed, screaming from inside a cloud of toxic smoke ... just smile and wave ... it's a Jersey thing!

Corey

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2011
4:49 PM

Post #8591451

JB:

Can I remember this whole joke? I forget which governor it was: the one who bought three heicopters, two for emergency medivac and one for himself, then had to save money by returning the two medivac copters and keeping his own. This was long before Christie (is that her name?)

The US president, the VP and the NJ Governer were in a helicopter over NJ.

The VP threw out a $100 bill and said "I made someone in NJ happy!"

The NJ Gov tore a $100 bill in half, threw the halves out, and said "I made TWO people in NJ happy!"

The President threw the Gov out of the copter, and said "I made EVERYONE in NJ happy!"

(Propagating NJ's reputation is very easy!)

Corey
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2011
9:05 PM

Post #8591981

Well, I gotta say you haven't done any better with your new gov JB! LOL Take that, and that!!

Gotcha

O BTW, they tried taxing that pee and decided it wasn't worth as much as it was to collect it. tee hee hee

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2011
6:53 AM

Post #8592434

ROFLMAO...I am originally from the Amish Country in Pennsylvania. Very much into horses and when I retired I came to NJ to help a new Standardbred Horse Farm set up their books, manage their office and get things moving. For fun you may want to see what it has turned out to be. Check out http://perretti.com/cms/ or google Perretti Farms in NJ. This was in 1987 and they were just finishing the office and I worked out of the lab with a computer and a phone until the office was finished. We had all Mexicans working for us and the manager was a Mexican American, I was the only female in the place.One of three who spoke English. Bob Marks, the Marketing Director,. Perretti and I had to learn how to communicate with the lads in the barn. Perretti owned Toyota dealerships in Peramus (sp) and a restaurant at the Meadowlands plus dealerships in Florida. He was my boss. What a fun time we had and I learned how to breed horses from scratch. So, RJ I got my Amish feet wet early when it comes to learning how to survive in NJ. I was then in my 50s and completely changed professions. I was in Health and Human Sevices prior to retiring in PA. The area around Peramus made me crazy, that was the North part where traffic is bumper to bumper and the smell is horrible. LOL. Thanks for the memory. Have a good day. JB My website is JBsBirdsandMore if you want more information about my life in NJ.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8599760

>> The area around Peramus made me crazy, that was the North part where traffic is bumper to bumper and the smell is horrible. LOL.

That's what I remember best.

Once I was on a business trip to Ohio, and the lady at a Subway shop was clearly noticing my accent. So I admitted I was from New Jersey.

She put on the kind of tone you would use to pity someone with a loathsome disease:
"I KNOW!"

Corey
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 31, 2011
6:48 PM

Post #8600247

LOL, that is funny. Poor Corey. I can't tell you and JB have an accent. How come you don't write with one? : )

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2011
7:34 PM

Post #8600360

Whaddayawannaknow fer?

Yatalkin' a me?

Yeah, yeah, I gothcher accent! Right here! (obscure gestures)

Itsa Joisey ting!

:-)

Corey

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 31, 2011
9:20 PM

Post #8600571

Yeah, I went to a conference with a guy from Joisey and all he could say was bada bing.

JBerger

JBerger
Wrightstown, NJ
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2011
5:53 AM

Post #8600954

Jen, You would laugh at my accent. No one has a clue where I came from because I have some PA Dutch, where I was raised, Philly and Jersey, where I spent years around people who lived there, and last but not least, when we were in the Marines, I lived in North Carolina. Y'all come back JB
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 1, 2011
9:03 AM

Post #8601353

JB, you forgot "now, ya hear?"
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2011
5:12 PM

Post #8602503

Ah, yes...my grandma was from Atlanta...y'all come...t...suppa', ya hear?

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2011
5:36 PM

Post #8602572

"bada bing bada boom"

Music to my ears!

If I'm right, the literal meaning of that friendly salutation is something like "I'mgonna poppacap in you face, buddy!"

I've been trying to fiogure out how to say, in a family-friendly forum, how our junior mechanic and I alsways greeted each other.

"Good $%^&* Morning!"
"Good $%^&* Morning to you to, *&^%$#@$%^&*!"

Trust me, that was friendly.

Another fond Joisey memeory was a sweet young lady in an oncoming red car ... leaning out her window, screaming UNfriendly imprecations and vigorously flipping the bird at me ... for doing what she was trying to do, before she get there.

Ahh, Jersey!

The most predictable drivers in the world. No matter what happens, they are going to press their pedal to the floor and try to cut you off.

I ALMOST miss it.

But this cutting has been successfully transplanted and put down roots in the PNW. I do miss the pizza and bagels, though.

Corey
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 1, 2011
7:42 PM

Post #8602938

Sorry Corey, I hate rude drivers. Every once in a while we run into some on the East side of the state. Normally in the summer when people are hot and irritated by the weather. But that doesn't excuse it.

I think we have hijacked this thread and I am very sorry about it. Speaking of rude!! Sorry.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

June 1, 2011
8:31 PM

Post #8603039

I have been re-reading this thread. Echinaceamaniac: you mentioned rooting Penstemons in water. I have Husker's Red that I purchased this Sp. on the clearance rack. It is doing well. Do you cut the top off of the plant to get it to root? Maybe, I should wait until next year to try to propagate it?
klstuart
Simpsonville, SC
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
6:52 PM

Post #8611606

Hmm, that's an interesting thought. Hadn't thought about trying to root penstemon, but I have one that I would love to propagate, instead of waiting the 2 years to get more flowers from seed! Might have to try that!
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

June 5, 2011
8:37 PM

Post #8611839

Can you root bee balm in water? or coreopsis, mine is spreading like wild, but I would love to fill in some bare areas.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

June 6, 2011
8:56 AM

Post #8612633

I have read this thread a couple of times. I don't think Nepeta has been mentioned. I would like to increase my Nepeta. Has anyone tried to propagate Nepeta via cuttings? Water? Soil? Vermiculite? Please advise.
flowerchik1
Guyton, GA
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2011
7:22 PM

Post #8614125

I had a little luck with bee balm in water. Out of five two managed to root. It took about three weeks. The two things that seem to root the quickest for me in water are mexican petunia and verbena. They have all made the transition to soil without any problems. I do alot of experimenting to try to figure out which way will work best for me...water, perlite or just potting soil. Salvia seems to do really well in straight perlite. No luck with the bee balm in perlite though.
ibartoo
Pawleys Island, SC

June 6, 2011
11:14 PM

Post #8614519

Thanks clyoung1, I will try some tomorrow. I have had no luck with mexican petunia either way, but I will try it again.
atalanta
Sherman, CT

June 13, 2011
9:12 AM

Post #8627625

Does anybody know if it's possible to root tricyrtus in water?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2014
11:20 AM

Post #9934321

LOL, been a long time on this thread. I have a couple petunias that I would like to have plants off of next summer. What and how is the best way to do that. I am thinking cuttings. Thought I would try both cuttings and holding the mother plant over. I have found with Coleus etc. that the new plant from cuttings is usually better than the mother plant the next year.

Can anyone give me some advice on this? Thanks
mlmlakestevens
Lake Stevens, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 6, 2014
2:57 PM

Post #9934441

Jnette- Several years ago in the fall, with the first frost scheduled to arrive that night, I made a little bouquet of the last flowers in my garden. I put it in a glass of water in a south facing window. This included "Tidal Wave' Petunia, maybe 8-10" long, with a bloom or two. The petunia took root in the water. Months later I potted it up, and planted it outside in a pot the next spring, and had a huge blooming shrub Petunia that year! I think I broke the law if it was a Patented new variety.
Good luck!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2014
7:53 PM

Post #9934623

LOL, shame on you Mlm. ok, I will try it. Good idea. I sent for these 'cause we can only get them from Parks etc. as plants. No seeds. Maybe we will be looking thru the bars together. And not the whiskey bars.

valal

valal
Natick, MA

September 7, 2014
5:38 AM

Post #9934723

Great Topic with lots of good info...thank you for posting! This newbie will take all info in and process!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 7, 2014
11:01 AM

Post #9934867

Well, hello Valal. Welcome to our world. Lots to learn on this site. You could spend the rest of your life on here and never read it all. That is if you tried >grin

valal

valal
Natick, MA

September 7, 2014
4:36 PM

Post #9935070

I have found this SOOOOO true, Jnette!
Thanks for the welcome!
Val
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 12, 2014
8:36 PM

Post #9939174

Well Mim, We have had 30 degrees the last 2 nights, and so far nothing appears to be hurt by them. Even the tuberous begonia. Amazing. But the temps are going up again and should be like this for another month if it is the normal here. So, I am not going to push my luck tho, will go out and take cuttings of a lot of stuff I would like to have for next year. Thanks so much for the push.

But,with winter coming on, I suppose I need to have a couple of pots ready to go huh? Jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 12, 2014
8:42 PM

Post #9939177

Would anyone mind if I started a new thread? This is getting really long. OR, if someone else wants to start one I would love that. Jen

This was started a long time ago and think it is really worth saving.

valal

valal
Natick, MA

September 13, 2014
4:17 AM

Post #9939225

I was thinking the same thing jnette!

Please do...
Can you add the linkto this thread for reference. LOTS of great info!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2014
11:07 AM

Post #9939451

Yes Val, it has been a while since I have done this so please be patient with me. Jen You know, better than me trying it on here and getting my frustration level up this early in the morning, I am going to get someone else to do it. jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 13, 2014
12:52 PM

Post #9939486

believe I was asked about this ; New thread;;

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1375705/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1375705/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1375705/

Same thread , just shorter
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

September 13, 2014
12:55 PM

Post #9939489

Aw, come on Jen. You can do it. You have spent as much time on here as anyone. If you REALLY can't, I will do it for you, when I get the time.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2014
1:19 PM

Post #9939498

Neve rmind Evelyn. Right now I am too tired and too busy to think about it. Yes, I am sure I could do it, but not for a bit.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

September 15, 2014
4:54 PM

Post #9941025

I wonder if anybody has tried their luck rooting "Rozanne" hardy geranium and how do I do it?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2014
6:06 PM

Post #9941092

Pippi21 we started a #2 of this thread because this was so long it was taking forever to for the computers to respond. Go to the next one and they will answer I am sure. Such good info on here that we hated to let it go. Jeanette

Here is the new link:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1375705/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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