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Seed Germination: Germinating Wisteria

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capaula
Lehavim
Israel

June 18, 2007
6:00 PM

Post #3629911

I have just got some seeds of wisteria sinensis and Wisteria floribunda and would appreciate to have some instructions for germination. How long does it take to germinate? Is there any specific time to transplant the seedlings? I live in a equivalent of zone 9 (south of Israel)

Thanks!
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2007
2:05 AM

Post #3631722

I don't know anything about getting the to germinate, but I will warn you that they will take many, many years to flower if you grow them from seed. If you want flowers anytime soon, you're better off starting from cuttings.
Ursula
Santiago
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 23, 2007
11:20 PM

Post #3650140

I agree with ecrane3. I was told by a nursery man that they take up to 12 years to bloom, whilst from cuttings it only takes 2 or 3 years.
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 6, 2007
6:19 PM

Post #3703590

I had a cutting and it bloomed within 3 yrs. I soaked some seeds in H202 for a couple of weeks and WS in Jan. and all four seeds germinated for me this spring. 12 years to bloom WOW! lol
lcosden
Pawling, NY
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2007
6:52 PM

Post #3751136

I don't know about Capaula, but the thing is that some of us are newbies like myself. I tried ordering plants online, got royally screwed there.. So through the generosity of some people, I got some wisteria seeds too, just not cuttings. But, if any of you are willing to give us cuttings, we won't turn them down... :)
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2007
2:50 AM

Post #3753204

Have you found the Garden Watchdog yet? That's the sure way to buy plants online and not run into problems, places that are rated highly there are unlikely to let you down.
lcosden
Pawling, NY
(Zone 5b)

July 19, 2007
3:05 AM

Post #3753270

Ecrane3, my purchases were from last year and I didn't find DG untl this year.. No surprise they are ranked abysmally low. 20 something out of 100. Live and learn...
WillowandSpike
Ballintleva
Ireland

July 20, 2007
9:09 PM

Post #3760085

I bought 6 seeds last year, three germinated and made 6" plants within 6 months.

At the end of the summer I found a "bargain" in the Sale dept of the local garden centre - a 6" Wisteria, with a broken cane support (Nothing at all wrong with the plant!)
Planted at the back of the cottage...with no idea whether it was blue or white or if it woould ever flower - I had been told that it takes seven years to flower - if they do so at all...some never do!

This spring it flowered...lovely blue shades...I was so relieved, but even more so after I was told that my, (now 12" seedlings) would never flower - that they have to be grafted to flower.

Love to know if this is true...has anyone ever managed a flowering wisteria from seed?

Sue
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2007
9:21 PM

Post #3760127

They will flower from seed, it just takes a really long time (I've heard as much as 10 years) A lot of people probably gave up on them before the 10 years were up, that's why you've heard they won't bloom from seed. And they definitely don't need to be grafted, I think most of the wisterias that you see for sale have been grown from cuttings. Ones that are grown from cuttings can flower within a couple years. Grafted ones would behave the same way, I'm just not sure if anyone does that with them since they grow easily enough from cuttings.
WillowandSpike
Ballintleva
Ireland

July 20, 2007
11:00 PM

Post #3760447

Ah ha...I'll be out with the secateurs in the morning !
Thank you for clarifying.
Sue
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2007
10:56 PM

Post #3807014

I have some wisteria seed, but haven't planted them yet because I was told that they are invasive. Any thoughts on that...what is yall's experience out there?
I plan to keep them in a container for awhile anyway. Thanks!
LeBug
Greenville, IN
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2007
3:48 PM

Post #3816825

I can't imagine keeping a wisteria in a container but I have seen bonsai (sp?) plants of them and they were beautiful! Yes they are very invasive I planted some not far from the house and not far from a flower garden and inbetween both I have shoots coming up everywhere on the ground just hoping they don't come up in my flower bed! I need to take this one up but from what I hear that will be a job too I'll never get all of the roots and they will still shoot up from the ground!
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

August 4, 2007
4:33 PM

Post #3816939

If it's the Chinese or Japanese wisterias (W. sinensis or W. floribunda) then they are invasive. However, there are some nice American native wisterias which are less common in the trade but much nicer and better behaved (W. frutescens is one, I think there are a couple others as well). I think this was mentioned earlier in the thread too but it bears repeating--wisteria from seed can take a very, very long time to bloom (about 10 years), so if you want a nice blooming vine anytime soon I'd get some cuttings from someone or go buy a small one from a nursery, those are also grown from cuttings and will generally bloom within a couple years.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 5, 2007
4:02 AM

Post #3818955

Thanks, but maybe I'll reconsider. I don't need anything invasive. I'll choose a different kind of vine. Any other vines out there that aren't invasive? Thanks!
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

August 5, 2007
4:13 AM

Post #3818978

In zone 9, there are probably about a million ones you could grow...if you go to Plant Files advanced search, you can search by things like flower color, bloom time, evergreen vs deciduous, fragrant flowers, etc to help spark some ideas.

If you like Wisteria, you can definitely consider the America Wisteria, W. frutescens, it's much tamer and better behaved than the Asian varieties. Or if you want something with a similar look but evergreen, there's evergreen wisteria Millettia reticulata. If you want fragrance, there are several different jasmines you could consider. Or Solanum jasminoides (despite the species name, I don't think it actually has a scent) is a nice vine with pretty white flowers that blooms for a really, really, long time. It's vigorous but not invasive (at least it isn't here) and it climbs pretty well on its own (it still won't climb the cedar posts without help, but if you give it a bit of wire or something to climb up it'll do great without much extra help from you). Or there are Passifloras, Clematis, roses, cross vine (Bignonia), and many, many more.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 5, 2007
6:28 PM

Post #3820866

I think I'll plant the banana passion fruit instead. I have a trumpet vine started also. Thanks for all of the info. It is sincerely appreciated!
wonderearth
Santa Cruz, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 24, 2007
11:56 PM

Post #3896791

Texasgall77,
You could try some annual vines that are fast growers if you don't want it to be invasisve. Like Black eyed susan vine, another called "exotic love" from The seed company rene's garden. These I've tried. I'm looking forward to trying cup and saucer vine, but I heard they smell kind of bad. Maybe plant far away from the house. These all die back in winter in my zone 9. Benifits are that they're, not invasive, no difficult pruning, and clean, no habitat for rodents, Always new and exciting
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 25, 2007
4:22 AM

Post #3897786

Thanks! I'll have to do some research on that...what kind of a flower does it have?
Agnis
Ridgefield, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 15, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9709739

It's probably too late, but do not plant trumpet vines!! There was one here when I moved in 10 years ago. It took me nine years to get rid of it. It sent out long running roots, which sprouted plants all along the length. The roots are very brittle, so if you dig them and leave a little piece, it will grow. The worst one was 75 feet away from the mother plant, which had been removed five years earlier.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 15, 2013
3:03 PM

Post #9709825

Is that the same as an "Angel Trumpet" plant...tree? I have pink ones. So far they are ok.
wonderearth
Santa Cruz, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 19, 2014
8:02 AM

Post #9751122

No , "Angels Trumpet" tree is not the same. Those are called Brugmansia, and they are amazing!
Hope you found something good!

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