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Beginner Vegetables: A spaghetti squash of a different color...

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catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

June 21, 2007
11:33 AM

Post #3640369

Hi again:)
I have an oddball in my patch. This is one of the "normal" ones. It's pretty much white, with a very faint green pattern, that you can see if you really look at it.

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catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

June 21, 2007
11:41 AM

Post #3640387

And this is the unconventional one. It's the only vine (or three or four, I can't remember, and they're going every which way) doing this. It looks suspiciously like the punkin that it is twining around with, but I know that's not an issue this year.
Any thoughts? This is what I get for wanting to grow out crosses next year, and yes, this is grown from commercial seed.
Margo

This message was edited Jun 21, 2007 7:42 AM

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msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 2, 2007
12:02 PM

Post #3685049

Catmad: What do you do with Spaghetti Squash?

I only found a a couple of recipes. One is making it up kind of like layering lasagna in the shell, using the squash in place of lasagna noodles. The other I fixed up a vegetable mix with carrots, peas, onions, tomatoes and stirred in the strings of squash, then topped with shredded cheese and baked it. The original recipe called for broccoli and snow peas, but didn't have either on hand.

Also, how do you store/preserve spaghetti squash? And how long will it keep? This is my first time growing it. I've got 3 in the fridge now and another 12 or so small (not for long) on the vine.

Robin
ZenSojourner
Fairborn, OH
(Zone 8a)

July 2, 2007
10:42 PM

Post #3687506

Looks like cocozelle, or marrow. How big is it?

Sojourner
allysgram
Sedalia, MO

July 2, 2007
10:47 PM

Post #3687526

I have one of those on my spaghetti squash vine vine the rest are normal, weird.
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2007
11:51 AM

Post #3689430

Sojourner wrote;"Looks like cocozelle, or marrow. How big is it?

It's about 10-11 inches end to end. It is now turning yellow, but darker than the ones on the other vines, almost orange, still with the pattern. I'm not sure when it is ready for harvest, and will look into that, today. I don't know if it should be refrigerated or not. I _think_ they should be cured before storing.

I always go to Recipezaar when I'm stuck. You just put in what you have to use, and it brings you lots of recipes. Sometimes they are almost the same, but with 2000+ spaghetti squash recipes to choose from you should find something to your taste:).

This is one recipe I'll try as soon as I have one ready;

Bacon Spaghetti Squash

2 1/2 lbs spaghetti squash
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
olive oil
3 slices cooked bacon, crumbled

Cut the squash in half and carefully remove the seeds.
You might want to use a kitchen scissors to cut around the edge because you don't want to dig into the squash itself (which is easy to do).
Turn upside down in a baking pan.
Bake at 375-degrees until the inside is somewhat soft (about 45 minutes for this sized squash).
Let cool until the squash can be handled and then carefully remove the inside of the squash.
They will come out in threads that look and act much like cooked spaghetti (thus, the name).
There will be a much larger volume of strands than you think!
Cook several pieces of bacon very crisp and chop into bacon bits.
In a skillet, heat some olive oil and/or butter.
Add the spaghetti squash threads.
Toss with spices as desired and the bacon bits.
Heat through and serve.

HTH,
Margo
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 3, 2007
4:14 PM

Post #3690326

Thanks, catmad...hadn't found that website, but will try it. This recipe sounds good! I did find out how to store them for extended periods. Robin
ZenSojourner
Fairborn, OH
(Zone 8a)

July 4, 2007
9:35 PM

Post #3695735

If it's that big already, then it's probably NOT a marrow. A marrow would be more narrow (LOL!, accidental rhyme!) by the time it got that long.

It must be just a weirdly colored spaghetti squash, I can't think what else it might be.

Sojourner
allysgram
Sedalia, MO

July 4, 2007
11:39 PM

Post #3696125

Here's mine it is the same color as yours, just one

Thumbnail by allysgram
Click the image for an enlarged view.

allysgram
Sedalia, MO

July 4, 2007
11:40 PM

Post #3696131

Here is the normal one

Thumbnail by allysgram
Click the image for an enlarged view.

catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2007
10:52 AM

Post #3697459

Yup, they're twins:). I've been looking around, and there's a variety called "Hasta la Pasta" which seems to have this kind of coloring. It's said to be high in beta carotene, so may be this is a good thing. Now of course, it's going to taste wonderful, and there is no way it will come true from seed. Oh well, maybe next shot I'll just bag a blossom on every plant...
Anyone plant winter squash this late? I may try it, these seem to be ripening so quickly that maybe I have a chance at a second crop, and besides, I have some new varieties I'm dying to try.
Margo
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 5, 2007
11:34 AM

Post #3697528

Hi, Catmad

I tried a variation on your spahetti squash recipe and it was pretty good. I used just a tablespoon or so of the bacon grease instead of olive oil, and sauted chopped onion in it, then added the squash, crumbled bacon and garlic powder. I haven't checked out recipezaar yet, but will today.

I am going to go ahead and plant a bunch of different seeds over the next few days. Figure after the strange weather patterns so far, it's worth the chance.

Robin

catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2007
11:41 AM

Post #3697557

Hi Robin,
I'm with ya on the bacon grease :) How could anything NOT taste good with that combination of stuff? I've been browning my patty pans in bacon grease/olive oil, and throwing parmesan on top to melt after I turn off the heat, mmmm mmmm good :)
Margo


This message was edited Jul 6, 2007 7:01 AM
ZenSojourner
Fairborn, OH
(Zone 8a)

July 5, 2007
8:34 PM

Post #3699449

Took me years to figure out why hash browns and home fries at restaurants never taste right.

They don't use bacon grease!

Sojourner
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 6, 2007
9:47 PM

Post #3704339

Today I picked a buttery-yellow colored spaghetti squash with a geen bottom today off the same plant as the regular ones. So what was the verdict on the green one? How/why does this happen?

Robin
daistuff
Cary, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2007
12:56 PM

Post #3727121

I had spaghetti squash come up in my garden last year, volunteer from one I had thrown in my compost heap. Some of them were huge and green, some normal. I thought they must have crossed with something. I made just a simple marinara sauce with my home-grown tomatoes and baked or boiled the squash, put the sauce over it. So good!
daistuff
Cary, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2007
1:30 PM

Post #3727225

Here are some of mine from last year (sorry for the picture of a picture).

Thumbnail by daistuff
Click the image for an enlarged view.

catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 12, 2007
1:44 PM

Post #3727260

Daistuff,
How did you know when to harvest? Mine looked like that, but have now got a lot of yellow to them, and I think they should be taked out and cured. Would you share what you did? I'd hate to lose them to rot because I'm vegetabley challenged...
Also, mine was from purchased seed, but I intend to save seed from these, as I KNOW they've crossed with the other stuff in the "patch". I like surprises, at least this kind.

Margo
daistuff
Cary, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2007
4:12 PM

Post #3727739

I hate to say I had no idea what to do, I kept leaving the green ones on thinking they would turn yellow or something, until they were huge and I knew something was wrong. A couple of times the squash was really hard to cut for cooking, and when I cooked it it just sort of dried out and we couldn't eat it. I can't remember now if I ever even was able to eat one of the green ones.

Finally I started just setting them up on my baker's rack and let them look cute, and then put them back in the compost heap when winter came. Was bummed that I don't seem to have gotten any volunteers this year; it was kind of fun not knowing what the heck would be on those vines!
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 12, 2007
4:17 PM

Post #3727765

Grin. That's about where I stand. I guess I'll just have to go for it.
Thanks,
Margo
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


July 12, 2007
4:25 PM

Post #3727807

Folks all winter squash can be left until the vines die. Some of them can be eaten as summer squash, but other than the butternut types are not too tasty. If you are in a hurry you can pick them when the skin is hard and stem is hard and dry. Winter squash are used in the full maturity stage, They are best layed in a garage, barn or equivalent for a couple of weeks to allow them to lose some more water content and thus sweeten up. Just don't lay them directly on concrete.

Thumbnail by Farmerdill
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catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2007
11:42 AM

Post #3730775

Thank you!! The vines have died, and one of my two pumpkins is rotten, but I'll go get the rest today. Hopefully the rest will be okay. They'll go on my porch to rest before trying to store them. I actually still have a pumpkin there from last year, so maybe they'll be alright.

Thanks as always,

Margo
daistuff
Cary, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2007
12:26 PM

Post #3730869

So if a squash is really hard, does that mean you picked it too early or too late? I guess it sounds like you can never really pick them too late, unless they rot, so I must have picked mine too early. Thanks for the information!
LisaLu
Wildomar, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2007
2:50 PM

Post #3731469

Catmad: Can you help me????? What the heck is this??? I have Japanese cucumbers planted here, then this shows up!?? I thought maybe a honeydew melon? The leaves are the same as the cucs. Is there a gianormous cuc I don't know about? Wonder if I could pickle it!?! Do they even make jars that big!

Could it be a pumpkin?

Thumbnail by LisaLu
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Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


July 13, 2007
3:44 PM

Post #3731646

Not Catmad, but it appears to be a melon in Honeydew class. Can't see the stem but melons have thin flexible stems, Pumpkins will have thick fleshy stems. Vine and and appearance does not look pumpkin. There are giant cukes (Yellow Submarine is one) but they all have the long cucumber shape.
VABackyarder
Williamsburg, VA
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2007
1:33 PM

Post #3761915

Many, many thanks for the pictures of spaghetti squash growing on the vines and for the harvesting advice.
Ed
SueGee1950
Annapolis, MD

July 28, 2007
4:19 PM

Post #3789283

WHEN DO I PICK SPAGHETTI SQUASH? I had one of those green-striped ones, and my husband was dancing around because he thought it was a young watermelon (really did look like the stripe on watermelon) ...but now it has turned mostly yellow with stripe...The rest are light buff and solid-colored. I don't want to pick at wrong time. HELP?
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 28, 2007
7:24 PM

Post #3789852

Is it possible to freeze Spaghetti squash after seeds removed and removed from shell?
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

July 31, 2010
6:40 AM

Post #8008318

Just reading this even though it is old, and am also wondering if Spaghetti Squash can be frozen.

Thanks for any help you can provide.
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

July 31, 2010
9:07 AM

Post #8008651

Wow, this is an old thread and I forgot all about it. Maybe now that it's bumped up, someone will have an answer.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 31, 2010
4:09 PM

Post #8009462

Howdy, All. And wow, this thread goes back a mile or so, eh?

Spagetti squash stores for such a long period of time I haven't frozen any; if you keep it cool-ish it should last a good 3 to 4 months.

However, if you want to freeze it you'll need to cook it first. Cut it in half or fourths, remove seeds, bake an hour or so, then cut it out in large chunks. Freeze it in freezer bags or plastic containers like you would pumpkin or other winter squashes. (I'd recommend freezer bags so you can suck the air out of them; or if you have one of those machine thingies that makes it own bags and pulls out the air that would be good.)

Shoe (who spent a nice day setting out Purple Hulls and Romano-type bean plants today, looking forward to another harvest before fall/winter set in!)
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

August 1, 2010
5:03 AM

Post #8010360

Shoe, thanks so much for the info. I forgot that spaghetti squash is actually a winter squash, as we've always ate it shortly after harvesting in mid to late summer.

I'm putting in more beans too. The first round did terrible.
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

August 1, 2010
5:12 AM

Post #8010365

Yup, it's been a while. I actually ate the mutant squash (which tasted like all the others) the following April, so it lasted a good while unpreserved.
Didn't grow any this year, and most of this seasons spring planting succumbed to something while I was away (did they pine for me and die of broken heartedness?), so I replanted yesterday.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2010
6:13 AM

Post #8010465

The only cool place I would have to store my squash would be my basement area, and it only gets down to 65 degrees in the winter time. Will that work, or will it be to warm?
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

August 2, 2010
5:37 AM

Post #8012696

I'm in SC, so not exactly a cool environment :). This squash was actually in the back of a hoosier cabinet in my front hall. It seems to stay below 86 in the summer, and above 64 in the winter (usually, last year was different). The squash was put there some time in August, I think, after "curing" on the porch for a couple of weeks. It was _lost_ for most of the winter, and found again in April.
jannz2
Pilot Point, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 2, 2010
6:58 AM

Post #8012858

Ahhhh... what a good thread. Thanks to whoever bumped it to current.

Didn't realize that after picking we should let it 'set' for a couple of weeks to get sweeter. I picked mine and ate it immediately...can't honestly say I noticed anything different...however I used it as regular spaghetti noodles with some Italian sausage and other veges so it was covered in sauce.

I'm planting another crop for my fall garden...we really, really like spaghetti squash.
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

August 2, 2010
8:49 AM

Post #8013099

I didn't know about "curing" either until recently when I was searching for butternut squash info. I read that the starches in squash turn to sugar after setting a few weeks. I had two laying on there sides in on the kitchen counter right after picking and they were actually "weeping" a sticky white syrup from the cut stem.
behillman
Plantersville, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 2, 2010
9:10 AM

Post #8013140

Is it possible to bake Acorn Squash whole with the seeds in, because I can't cut it with a knife.
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

August 2, 2010
2:13 PM

Post #8013836

This link has info on cooking it different ways. Says you can pierce the skin in several places and then bake.
http://www.iqio.org/how-to-cook-acorn-squash
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2010
2:45 PM

Post #8035997

Just picked a Spaghetti Squash today from our garden and it is so yummy.

Used chopped basil, garlic, onion, salt, pepper, olive oil, and the scooped out squash. Put all of this in a skillet and cooked.

Wow...this is so very good.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 12, 2010
3:02 PM

Post #8036031

For those of you in a hurry to cook your squash, you can cut it in half then lay each half face down in a flat plate that has about 1/4-1/2" water. Nuke each half for 7-8 minutes then continue with your regular recipe.

I've done Spaghetti squash, acorn, and butternut squashes this way for years...

Linda
KittyKafka
Ely, MN

September 10, 2010
12:27 PM

Post #8091216

I am enjoying this thread! :-) As a new entre into this discussion related to odd green spaghetti squash: I also have little green weirdos in my patch! I was looking at them today, trying to debate whether or not they are "done", or need a little more yellowing-up. From reading this blog, it has become apparent that these will never yellow-up. I think I'll harvest one and see what happens :-)

I am in what I affectionately call "Zone 2.5". I generally have between Memorial weekend and sometime in mid September to grow everything. Mellons have forever been out of the question. Does anyone live in either Zone 2 or Zone 3 who has been able to grow peppers and melons successfully?
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

September 10, 2010
2:36 PM

Post #8091445

Welcome aboard, Kitty! I grew some Minnesota Midget Cantaloupes and Golden Midget Watermelons this summer. They are both short season, so might work for you up there.
KittyKafka
Ely, MN

September 12, 2010
4:11 PM

Post #8095301

Thanks, msrobin! I will try those next year. Did you get the seeds (or starts) online? In a garden store/greenhouse?
wjkgt
Virden Manitoba
Canada

September 13, 2010
10:26 AM

Post #8096714

I planted spaghetti squash for the first time this year, and do I have a crop! It pretty well took over my garden. I too was surprised by several of the green watermelon look-alikes, but they are definitely sp squash. I was wondering when to harvest, and got a lot of good information from this strand.
SueGee1950
Annapolis, MD

June 26, 2011
9:58 AM

Post #8655582

What to do with spaghetti squash? The sky is the limit!

I have found this to best diet aid available. SS has only 40 calories a cup!

Yeah, yeah, you can cook it and fork it up to look like spaghetti and serve tomato sauce over it, but you can do SO MUCH MORE. Did you know that SS with yogurt blends up into a creamy consistency suitable for sauces and dips?

Mix it with cumin, S&P and 1 TBL of peanut butter to make a delicious hummus substitute with many fewer calories than hummus made with chick peas.

Blend half with yogurt and the same seasonings/PB used for Asian noodles to make sauce and serve it over the other half, fork-stranded into "noodles," Asian Peanut noodles.

Add it to frozen diet dinners to extend the amount of food in the package with little calorie increase.

You can make the sauces/dips savory or sweet with seasoning, depending on your need. Cinnamon and Splenda, chili powder, even turkey seasonings or dressing seasonings to serve with turkey. Use your imagination! Maybe I should write a cookbook on the wonderful diet recipes you can make with spaghetti squash. Save the seeds and grow them next year for your own bountiful supply.
yehudith
silver spring, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 27, 2011
6:36 AM

Post #8657282

Kitty
Have you tried doing them the way they do in England? Over there if the temps hit 70 degrees people are dropping of heat stroke. Just build a large cold frame covered with plastic you know like the "garden camps" that Gardener's Supply sells. Put in a nice thick layer of manure covered with good loose soil "et voila". I actually have pictures of a 17th/19th century "melon pit" if I can scan them in I will.
Joannasgarden
Geneva, OH

August 7, 2011
4:23 PM

Post #8742858

What a helpful forum this is! I know part is older, but still very helpful! I was searching for some of these answers when I stumbled upon this site. I think I am hooked:)
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

August 8, 2011
4:06 AM

Post #8743663

That's the beauty of Dave's, the answer is often already there, even if you have to hunt a bit :). And if you can't find it, no-one minds having a question asked again, it gives us time to think about it, and maybe come up with some new ideas...

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

August 21, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8769260

Many thanks for this great thread ...this coming Spring I will be growing SS for the first time and this info has been very good, the recipes in particular.
I have grown pumpkins and squashes before, but this is a new one to me (we are about to go into Spring).
Great to know they can be stored like the other members of the family.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/spaghetti-squash-i/detail.aspx

Thanks again :-)
garden_fairy58
Peel, AR

September 1, 2011
10:01 PM

Post #8789650

Hi,
To the origional poster,
Did you have acorn squash plant close to your spaggetti squash? It looks what I have come up with. I have been experimenting with it myself, cross pollinating them to make a change in the flavor a bit. ;0)
If you haven't, I wonder if a few of you have bought seeds from the same company? Maybe they have cross pollinated there.

As far as fixing the spaggetti squash...
I bake it in the oven, ( cut in half lengthwise ) till done. Then I make my own spagetti sauce and add on top of the spaggetti squash when it is done. Spaggetti in a boat, lol. Makes a nice dish that way.

Spagetti squash when it is done growing should be a nice bright yellow color.
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 2, 2011
3:06 AM

Post #8789744

Nope, no acorn at that time, but this was a "first time" garden anyway, no opportunity for crossing the season before. It did turn out to taste and cook like spaghetti squash in the end:)
RileyTX
College Station, TX

June 1, 2012
5:53 PM

Post #9148312

I add my cooked spaghetti squash to breakfast sausage that has been cooked with garlic, onion, and red bell pepper. Salt and pepper then add in a small amount of either Alfredo sauce OR parmesan cheese...delightful!!!!

daisyannie

daisyannie
Norman, OK
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2013
7:15 AM

Post #9591278

This thread has led me to Dave's Garden--when I started a search to identify this volunteer in my compost bin. Spaghetti squash? It's BIG!

Thumbnail by daisyannie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

July 9, 2013
8:55 AM

Post #9592850

It's most likely a hybrid of some kind. It could be something like a Jack O' Lantern pumpkin. There are only 4 species of squash and pumpkins generally grown. For example all summer squash, acorns, spaghetti, and some pumpkins as well as the small warted gourds all belong to the family C. pepo. They will all freely cross and you'll end up with some strange looking offspring.

daisyannie

daisyannie
Norman, OK
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2013
8:06 AM

Post #9598400

I cooked one of these the other day and it is a type of spaghetti squash but a bit denser than normal. A hybrid, yes. It's tasty!
lindasch100
Chino Valley, AZ

July 23, 2013
11:12 AM

Post #9609551

I know these green SS! Last year I wanted SS in the worst way. I planted seeds and then bought a seedling 6-pack from a community college sale. A funny person had put in 5 SS and one pumpkin. I was so puzzled at the odd SS. Turns out pumpkin and SS cross pollinate like mad. I had a whole range of green, or striped, or spotted, white and gold SS. Some had threads inside like normal SS, some were more creamy. All were edible and good. Now this year I did not plant any pumpkin, but I have some volunteers from last year, so here we go again!
Here are pics of some of my crosses, all from the same plant.
Gardening is so interesting!

Thumbnail by lindasch100   Thumbnail by lindasch100   Thumbnail by lindasch100   Thumbnail by lindasch100   Thumbnail by lindasch100
Click an image for an enlarged view.

luisafernanda
Madrid
Spain

August 13, 2013
12:25 PM

Post #9629710

I'm so glad I found this thread! I, too, have green spaghetti squash like some of the ones shown above...except mine were all planted from a packet of Burpee seeds (it says Winter squash, Vegetable Spaghetti), which shows a ripe, solid-color bright yellow squash on the front. Every single one of mine looks like the photos I've attached, green with darker or lighter stripes and mottling. The plants have a bush-type habit rather than the long vines I usually get with squash and pumpkins. I am wondering how I will know when these are ripe, i.e., will they turn bright yellow? It looks like some of the larger ones are starting to turn a little yellow, but they still have the very noticeable stripes and mottled look. (BTW, I do have acorn squash planted as well, but not in the same bed, and I have hand pollinated all of the spaghetti squash, so I don't think it's a cross-pollination scenario.)

Thumbnail by luisafernanda   Thumbnail by luisafernanda         
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