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beauties from the wild

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

As the weather has been so miserable and my garden looks beaten up by violent showers, hails and nasty chilly winds, I decided to dedicate my time for a while to organizing and naming my pictures and found pictures of wild beauties.

As there is no forum for wild flowers I didn't know where would be the best place to start a thread about them and finally chose for this one, although the wild beauties from the whole planet would be more than welcome.

Although wild flowers are not as showy as many of our cultivated garden plants, they often possess a more subtle and noble beauty.

At a close examination these beauties open up an enchanting world .

So here we go;

I start with Daucus carota (Wild Carrot)





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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

In the stage of making seeds;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

A whole field of them;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Its an attraction for many insects

Don't know what these guys are up to on this one

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

having a sip from its nectar

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Centaurea cyanus (Cornflower) with its intens vibrant blue

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

another view;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Dipsacus fullonum (Teasel )

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

The whole architectural plant after its blooming peak

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Lychnis flos-cuculi (Ragged Robin)

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Lamium album.(White Deadnettle);

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Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Some ancient native woodland in spring in the Cheviot Hills, Northumberland.

Resin

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Lamium maculatum (Spotted deadnettle)
Don't they look like Chinese on a carousel ?

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Very enchanting forest scene Resin!

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Another view of the same;

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Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Another; same location

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Lovely Resin! I love the carpet of Pteridium aquilinum .
here is a scenery taken in a Belgium forest;

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Castelnau RB Pyrenée, France(Zone 8a)

Those are lovely photos thanks bonitin, just what's needed in this weather.
.....and beautiful to see the Northumberland woods thanks Resin, so refreshing

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Now that we are in the forest: Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove)

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Thanks Philomel for the encouraging words!

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

A closer view;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

and all the way into its heart;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

I have more, but I'll stop for today. Good night!

Lincoln, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

Beautiful pics bonitin!

I love both of the wood settings too, they look magical.

One from me for tonight, Cichorium intybus or wild Chickory. I grew it I think in 2004, then it disappeared and a couple have grown again. This is a tall and gangly plant but the flowers are gorgeous.

The first flower opened today, thankfully we only had a light drizzle of rain even though it was cold.

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Castelnau RB Pyrenée, France(Zone 8a)

Yes, aren't chicory flowers magical wallaby? They look far too exotic to be a 'weed' and the shade of blue is so beautiful - lovely photo.
I was abroad on a nature type trip, still in europe, when we came across some and people thought it was something really rare. Easy to be fooled when you come across something thet's under your nose at home, but you just aren't expecting to see it in a different setting.
I was really pleased to find that they grow well here and brighten up some of the 'uncultivated' parts of the garden.

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Marvelous picture Wallaby of the lovely Chickory!
Its blue is so intense and vibrant, that one doesn't even notice the 'shagginess' of the plant when its in bloom.

The next one I want to put in the spot-lights is the very 'common' dandelion; Taraxacum officinale. I must confess I'm not too fond of its bold and plump flowers in that screaming yellow colour, although I can appreciate them in a meadow. But I am really enchanted by their lovely fluffy seed heads. I must put out of my mind that this means a real invasion of new dandelions to be born!

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

A whole group of them together with the pretty forget-me-nots.

Aren't they lovely ?

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Next pictures are from one of two Verbascum thapsus (Aaron's Rod), I have rescued from being destroyed by bulldozers on a fallow in front of my house where they were building a justice palace.
That was last year in late summer. One of them I have planted in a pot on my little terrace where it can get a reasonable amount of sun, the other I planted in the small front garden of a friend gallery-owner. The one I have in a pot is blooming and is about 50 cm tall, while the one I planted in that garden reached a height of 2.17cm; a real record as the books speak of a maximum height of 2 m. I've never seen such a tall and happy one before, its really impressive and looking rather exotic.

first picture shows it in early spring;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

second one later in spring;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

And the third one 3 weeks ago and its is still getting taller.

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

and a detail of its flowers;

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Tampa, FL(Zone 10a)

Bonitin, the Verbascum thapsus is used as a garden plant here. In nature gardens.

Florida native orchid, Encyclia tampensis>

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Castelnau RB Pyrenée, France(Zone 8a)

More great photos bonitin, and thanks for the orchid dale

Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Thanks Philomel.

That's a generous orchid Dale! Interesting to hear that the Verbascum thapsus is used as an ornamental plant in your area in natural gardens. Problem is that it is a bianual and dies after blooming, but in a natural garden of a reasonable size, it can self-seed. The name 'thapsus' seems to originate of a Greek island where the plant occurs in abundance.



Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

The tender delicate looking Campanula rapunculoides (creeping Bellflower) I find irresistable.

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Specially with a background of blooming dreamy grasses

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Another humble charmer is the Cardamine pratensis;

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

the friendly little faces of the Veronica chamaedrys (Germander Speedwell);

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Gent, Belgium(Zone 8a)

The lovely star-flowered Stellaria holostea

Sheffield, United Kingdom(Zone 7b)

What lovely collection of flower photos. I took a seed pod from one of those huge woolly verbascums about thirty years ago and sprinkled it in the garden. I forgot all about it as nothing came up until a few years later when a couple of plants appeared, and odd plants keep coming up in different places around the garden every year. They haven't invaded the garden, but it is quite nice to discover a new seedling here and there, and my style of gardening is to leave things where they seed if they aren't in the way and just thin them out a bit if there are too many. I did have to move one that wanted to grow in the middle of the path though.

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