CLOSED: I. D. help needed.

Anchorage, AK(Zone 4a)

I just returned from a five day field trip, with the Alaska Native Plant Society, to Nome, in the northwest part of Alaska. From a distance everything appears to be a barren wasteland. Close up it is an endless floral garden, at this time of the year, teaming with life, and colorful blossoms. I got a few good photos of birds, I had never seen before. I took these pictures on July 1, 2007 near the summit of Anvil Mountain above Nome, Alaska. I can't seem to locate it in any of my reference books.
This is the only shot of an adult I got.
Thanks in advance:
Gary

Thumbnail by Grasmussen
Anchorage, AK(Zone 4a)

The telephoto lens captured more details, than my eyes saw at the time. Turns out most of the pictures were of freshly fledged juveniles jumping in and out of view on the rocky slop. Look closely, there are two well camouflaged juveniles in this shot.

Thumbnail by Grasmussen
Anchorage, AK(Zone 4a)

A single juvenile from the back.

Thumbnail by Grasmussen
Anchorage, AK(Zone 4a)

After addition study, I have concluded they are Northern Wheatear. The first picture is a female. Description in "Birds of Alaska" by Robert H. Armstrong: "Habitat. Above timber line, rocky fields in the tundra and rocky mountain ridges. Nests in crevices under rocks or in rubble." His description is, perfict for the place I observed them.

Northumberland, United Kingdom(Zone 9a)

Yep, Wheatear. Your first pic is actually a male, the females are pale sandy brown above, not grey, and with brown, not black, flight feathers. I get to see plenty of them over here ;-)

Resin

Marlton, NJ

Very nice pics Gary! Congratulations on sighting & getting pics of a new bird for you!

Anchorage, AK(Zone 4a)

Thanks, Resin and Pelletory. Actually, on this trip, I added several new species to my list of birds I have photographed. I also added dozens of new tundra flowers to my photo library. It is going to take a while to sort, identify, and label the hundreds of photos from the trip. I also saw herds of Musk Oxen, large wild ox, native to the arctic tundra of Alaska, Canada, and Greenland.

Marlton, NJ

What a great trip Gary! Can't wait to see the rest of your pics!

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