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Brugmansias: Datura bonanza!

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Forum: BrugmansiasReplies: 11, Views: 179
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JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 9, 2001
12:33 AM

Post #10367

I dug up five datura plants today (with permission) from a neighbouring home and brought the babies home! One is quite large, with 8 buds over two inches long, one on the verge of opening. The rest were smaller, most with no buds.

This is pretty exciting stuff, seeing as I just planted my first seeds a few days ago and now have blooms ready to open!

I hope they'll survive the transplant OK seeing as I have no experience with these. They are the plain white blossoms.

I am very open to any and all advice from experienced datura growers.
arlene
Newberry, FL
(Zone 8B)

August 9, 2001
12:37 AM

Post #107688

i don't think you could kill them unless you are me.. i like to use the schulz starter plant transplant stuff on larger plants i transplant.
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2001
12:40 AM

Post #107690

I didn't do anything special to them, and I've had great luck. You will too!!! Be ready to take pictures.
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 9, 2001
12:51 AM

Post #107697

Thanks, this is encouraging.

Pictures, eh? A digicam is moving ever higher on my wish list.

The big one went in a container in standard potting mix. That way I can move it around the patio to see what light conditions suit it best. As is, it will be getting sun till about 1:00 pm.

The rest got planted in in my heavy, cold soil, in different beds, so I can know for next year where they're happiest. Might go lift a couple more to try other corners.

BTW, just how toxic are they? I didn't put any out front as several neighbours have pre-schoolers. I'm in a town house with tiny front yards along a common walk, and kids in the yard are a common occurence. Don't care to take chances.

The strangest thing I discovered while digging them up is that they smell like peanut butter...
Brugmansia
FSH, TX

August 9, 2001
1:21 AM

Post #107705

Hmm, do you grow Oleander? The list of poisonous plants in the average yard is staggering...The truth of the matter is if someone eats a leaf, flower, etc from one of these plants they aren't going to like the taste believe you me. I have chewed a leaf from one of these trees before as I knew a lady who grew Brugmansia and was petrified to touch them without gloves with all the rumors going on. Fact versus fiction...Yes, Brugmansia are poisionous, but so aren't tomato plants. You don't see kids eating the green from tomato plants do you? They eat the tomatoes. I can assure you if someone eats a leaf or flower the taste is so bad they will spit it out unless they are eating it intentionally ie they have an alterior motive. Chewing a leaf up did not affect me in the slightest besides making me want to vomit from the taste. Swallowing this, as if one would after tasting one...I can just see the trouble I have getting my kids to eat spinach much less something that makes spinach taste like sherbert...Need I say more?
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 9, 2001
1:33 AM

Post #107714

LOL! Thanks, Brug. Yes, as a matter of fact, I have a pot full of oleander out front. I married into an Italian family, and oleander is obligatory. ;o)

OK, so maybe I'll stick one out front...
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 9, 2001
3:05 AM

Post #107762

Oh MY! First bloom opened less than 12 hours after transplantation! I mean, the leaves are still hanging limp!

I'm thinking in exclamation points here.

My kids can't believe all the fuss for a flower.
tiG
Newnan, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2001
3:08 AM

Post #107764

ain't life great????
MsBatt
Florence, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2001
12:18 AM

Post #108244

Janet, while they should set plenty of seeds for you, and MIGHT come back from the roots for you, (if you mulch heavily and if you have either D. innoxia or D. wrightii)I have been told you can take them up and store them overwinter just like you would dahlia tubers. My D.innoxia comes back from the roots here, and gets better and better each year, so you might want to try it with one or two.
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 10, 2001
12:35 AM

Post #108256

Oh, how interesting! Thanks Judith. No clue which one it is. How can I tell? I thought it was a Datura meteloides, but that was an uninformed guess. Not jimsonweed, for sure, seeing as it has rounded leaves.

The largest one, in the pot, is looking pretty pathetic today, in our continuing heat wave. Leaves are all wilted. But the flower buds look quite unaffected and I should get a second bloom opening any minute.

In the meanwhile, I've moved the pot to total shade. Our temps have been in the high 90's plus very humid. Severe thunderstorm and tornado warning was issued earlier this afternoon, but it looks like we're not going to get so much as a sprinkle.
JanetR
Ottawa, ON
(Zone 4a)

August 13, 2001
5:11 AM

Post #109615

Update:

Transplanted daturas are all doing fine and have perked up now that the heat wave is over and we're back to hot weather as opposed to firing kiln. However, they dropped all the medium-sized buds so it will be a while before I get any more blooms. Got five altogether before the large buds were "used up".

Also, saw the first seedling from my double purple seeds today, 8 days after sowing. This is from the batch soaked in water for a number of hours before sowing.

Now, question.

Which white datura do I have? The blooms are about 4 inches long and just as wide but could probably get bigger with more attention. These had been totally neglected before I grabbed them. Each bloom has five ribs, with a curly tendril-like protrusion at the end of each rib. Anyone know?
MsBatt
Florence, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2001
6:35 AM

Post #109641

Real good question. I'm in pursuit of a definative datura info source. E-mail me privately and I'll forward to you whatever I find out. There are nine species of datura, but apparently a LOT of varieties within each species!

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