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Soap and Candle-making: Salt Bars

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renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2007
5:01 PM

Post #3750737

For all you soapmakers who are looking for something new!

I've been making salt bars on occasion lately. I really like them. What you do is you add a pound of salt for every pound of fat and oil that is in your soap recipe. Add the salt slowly as you stir to your traced soap. Sometimes I don't get the entire pound in before the soap starts to harden, but it turns out great anyway! I recommend that you do this with a 100% coconut recipe, since coconut will still lather despite the salt. I tried it once with Palm Kernel Oil and had a mess. You can use 10 -15% of some kind of nourishing oil in the recipe as well, but remember it will cut back on the lather.
This works very well with cold process soap. I found that in hot process soap it moves way to fast and it's hard to get it into the mold quick enough, but it's not impossible. I've never tried it with rebatching soap, but I don't see why it wouldn't work if it works well with Hot Process.
The finished bar is VERY hard. It hardens very quickly!! Don't use a FO that accelerates trace. You need to cut the bars as soon as you can safely get the soap out of the mold or you will not be able to cut them at all!!

A lot of people LOVE this soap on their skin. The salt is gently exfoliating and creates a very slick feeling on your skin. If you find that this soap is too harsh on your skin, it's really great on soap scum!!

Make a small batch and see what you think of them or you can dmail me and we can do a trade (swap a bar of soap).

ETA:
Some soapers bars are not exfoliating, I have made some that are and some that aren't. HP salt bars are exfoliating. I just saw a bar that was only 50% coconut oil. So it sounds like you can really be flexible with your recipe! I noticed that the 100% coconut bars I did cold process got HOT in the mold! So be careful!

This message was edited Jul 18, 2007 10:55 AM

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jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

July 26, 2007
1:58 AM

Post #3780039

This sounds wonderful, do you think epsom salts would work too? What fragrance did you use? I was thinking an ocean or sea breeze. I sell soap every Christmas and think this might be something new and attention grabbing.
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 26, 2007
2:59 PM

Post #3781607

Nope, they make the bar all rubbery for some reason and the big crystals are too much. Table salt works just fine! Citrus fragrances are popular and I bet a water fragrance would smell good too!
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 27, 2007
9:32 AM

Post #3784749

Very nice Renwings.
Toffy
Ramona, CA

July 29, 2007
7:26 PM

Post #3793344

I have been gifted a container of salts in oils, for rubbing on the body, feet, and rough spots, and if I get it on my lips while rubbing it all over; my lips start burning right away. Of course I then remember not to do that, but I have done it more than once. It doesn't burn anywhere else, so it has me bugged. the combination of oils feels wonderful and the fragrance is just delightful. I wonder about the burning of the my lips. I always rinse off the salts in the shower, and my lips burn for just a minute or two. Sometimes I use soap to make sure the salts are really off my lips and face which defeats the purpose of the oils. If anyone knows about this please post a thread. Thank you...
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

July 29, 2007
9:54 PM

Post #3793748

sometimes it's the fragrance oil that causes your lips to burn. I have that problem if I put too much flavoring oil or essentis oils in chapstick also, if your lips are at all chapped, salt will burn.
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2007
11:14 PM

Post #3793974

I would agree! I don't like to use heavily scented products on my face for that reason. Well, my eyes too!
cyra
Central Valley, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 6, 2007
6:51 PM

Post #3944357

Renwings, I rebatch soap around the holidays, and wondered about something.
I stopped making scrubbing salts for personal use, because my hands and arms get cuts and scrapes at work and the salt scrubs would burn them. (Sugar scrubs didn't, though).
Also, I'm doing my best not to add salts of any nature to household water, that is being returned to the municipal water system; our central CA drinking water is already overloaded with agricultural salts and other pollutants...even water softeners contribute to this problem. I realize you're talking about a different form of salt, but wouldn't this type of bar add more salts to the local water supply?
There is so much I don't know about cleaning up my family's life, in the ecological sense...
I wonder if using rebatched cold process soap causes environmental damage, too...
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 6, 2007
8:40 PM

Post #3944697

I've had several cosmetologists tell me that products containing sugar are not good for your skin. But your right, salt is a horrible thing to get in a wound! But despite the stinging, I have found it to have healing properties.

As far as your environmental concerns, I'd take that on an individual basis! I live in an area with very soft water and I'm on a septic tank. I don't consider the small amount of salt in my tank to be a large concern. The salt that is introduced into the water when washing with this bar is not substantial, since the bar is so hard.
I see your concern. I used to have well water in an area of the country with extremely hard water. Downright chewable, at times. So most people used some type of salt softening system in their home or at least in their laundry. I can see that overwhelming the system.

Sounds like a salt bar isn't a good choice for you. Be careful though, there is a fine line between concern and fanaticism when it comes to environmentalism.

I cannot imagine any environmental impact in using rebatched soap. True soap is a better choice for those that are concerned about chemicals on their skin and chemicals going down the drain.
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

September 6, 2007
10:25 PM

Post #3945019

I tried making the salt soaps, but it is still sweating. Did you have this problem? I realise that it is from the humidity, but wonder if it will do it even after it is fully cured.
renwings
Sultan, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 7, 2007
2:32 AM

Post #3945936

YUP!! Salt bars can sweat!! Once they're fully cured they seem to stop it. Problem is, I've had one batch sweat it's fragrance right out. So perhaps making salt bars should be an activity for less humid times of the year!
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

September 7, 2007
3:22 AM

Post #3946139

The scent is holding pretty well. (it's Tide and smells just like the laundry soap) and it sparkles on dry days. I'll just have to wait till the last minuite to wrap it for the shows. It will be cold by then, so it will probably be dry. Thanks for the info!

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