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Beginner Flowers: tree groundings

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Forum: Beginner FlowersReplies: 18, Views: 111
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planolinda
Plano, TX

July 20, 2007
9:02 PM

Post #3760070

had a huge tree cut down today due to rotting --now they are going to grind the stump--they said i will have lots and lots of hard wood shavings (grindings?--) and that people love to use them in their flower beds--is this right?
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2007
9:14 PM

Post #3760100

Some people do use wood shavings for mulch, but if the tree had some sort of fungal disease and that's why it had to be cut down I don't know that I'd feel comfortable using the shavings in the garden. Maybe if they were composted first, but even then I don't know if I'd feel 100% sure that composting killed all the fungus.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 20, 2007
9:44 PM

Post #3760195

it did not have a desease but was rotting in the trunk due to its age --the tree man said it was just old -very old--thanks for the advice --
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 20, 2007
11:34 PM

Post #3760516

I would be a wee bit hesitant about the tree shavings, maybe these guy's just dont want to be bothered getting rid of them, but if you have a large area to store them, you could ask them to pile them for you so they can rot down over a long, long, period, but you would have to be prepared to keep turning them as while piled high, they definately will get a fungus from the rotting wood, so ask the guy's for advice and what way to treat them, good luck, WeeNel.
gardenerme
Orange, CA

July 23, 2007
3:48 PM

Post #3768885

I would strongly suggest composting the shavings first as they will use a lot of nitrogen from the soil to decompose. If you must leave them in place, add bloodmeal or some other source of nitrogen to speed the decomposition and supplement the lost nitrogen.

I would also add some compost so that the soil can become rich and ready for planting. That's what I would do, maybe someone else has better ideas.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 27, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #3783578

well your advice has gotten me to do something i wanted to try and hadn't gotten around to--i am now a composter! i mixed the wood shavings with peat, garden soil, some sand, coffee grounds, a little mulch, lots of docomposed leaves and maybe am leaving something out--i just cleaned out the shed and raked and put it in a big pile and covered it with that black weed control stuff that lets in water --i am hoping with our hot weather it will decompose somewhat quickly since i have lots more shavings to use--didn't want too many of those in the mix
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 27, 2007
11:06 PM

Post #3787068

You can add shreaded news papers (not the coloured mags) grass mowings, all uncooked greens/peelings, banana skins, tea bags, weeds so long as there are no roots or seed heads, salat trimmings, all vegitation, anything that is NOT man made will give you good compost so long as you turn it every few months and keep it covered due to your large amount of wood shavings, so good luck with your compost, it will be so good for your garden in about a years time. WeeNel.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 28, 2007
2:31 AM

Post #3787759

why do i need to keep it covered due to my wood shavings? also i need to keep it damp is that correct?
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 28, 2007
7:25 PM

Post #3789856

No you dont need to keep it damp, but you do need to check it now and again to make sure it aint all dried out, add some water IF required, the dampish dark and warm conditions from the cover, will help speed up the rotting/composting prosess, I would feel that if you leave it UN covered, then every weed in the neighbourhood will make it a nice cosy place to germinate it's seeds into and then you will have that as another problem, also you need to turn the heap over so that the moist hot stuff on the bottom is brought to the surface and the cooler top stuff goes to bottom so it all gets rotted down together. if you go to the librery/book store, you will find a book with hints and tips on composting and what, why and wherefore, that will explane all the different prosesses that the items for composting will go through, you cant have anything better for your garden than home made compost as you then know all that went into it and what chemicals you avoided putting on your garden soil. Good luck. WeeNel.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 29, 2007
4:15 PM

Post #3792719

i did get some books about the composting and it is very interesting--my pile is very big (well by my standards at least) and i also got the book about lasagna layering and am going to try that also--a whole new obsession for me!!!
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 29, 2007
10:17 PM

Post #3793842

you will turn into the family scavenger with your obsesion he he he, good for you, it always seems a shame that more people dont compost as you throw away such a lot of comostable stuff that can be reused into the garden, but then again, a lot of people think composting is a lot of trouble, too much hard work, or smelly, some just dont have the room for a heap or bin, but you will really enjoy the end results, most important, your garden will reward you, so good luck and happy composting, WeeNel.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 29, 2007
10:36 PM

Post #3793898

thanks for the encouragement!
nickeler
Catonsville, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 30, 2007
7:13 PM

Post #3797260

planolinda,
How exciteing another composter in the world!! There are plenty of resources on-line also I started with a pile I started for my mother in law and now that I have a home of my own I've started a pile this year. Also WeeNel I really don't understand why more people do not compost it's such a great easy way of reducing your trash you are soooo right!
nickeler
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

July 31, 2007
12:18 AM

Post #3798511

Wish everyone could get the composting bug Nickeler, just think of the money that would be saved on buying compost from the stores, the expence of the trashman taking it away from our houses and the environment that would be bettered because we would not have to use landfill sites or incinerators to burn it all and our gardens would be far more naturally protected for the wildlife and from all the chemicals that are used to feed, weed and green up the place, but you know what, I do believe a lot more people are seeing composting at home a better/cheeper and environmentaly friendlier way to do it, thats how it was done just one generation ago, we forget our parents did'nt have the money we had, so they made do with all the household things they could reuse again and again, cant say I suffered in any way from that method and it made all our food taste better too, good luck with all your composting and gardening, Weenel.
daphnecat
Mays Landing, NJ
(Zone 7a)

July 31, 2007
12:37 AM

Post #3798609

I have been composting for almost as long as I've been gardening, about 25 years now. I started when I developed the "zero budget" plan. Just as it sounds, I have more dreams than money. Composting fits right in with growing from seed, propagating cuttings as well as general organic gardening. After years of make-shift composters, this year I built my "ultimate 3 bin composter". I'm so proud of it, I just had to share it with all of you here.

Thumbnail by daphnecat
Click the image for an enlarged view.

nickeler
Catonsville, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 31, 2007
1:44 AM

Post #3798941

Wow daphnecat that's awsome! I can't say I've been composting for that long but I do love the results for sure. I am currently on the "zero budget" plan, so thrown pile of debris is pretty much the state of it. I haven't even had the money to get a turner yet.
daphnecat
Mays Landing, NJ
(Zone 7a)

July 31, 2007
2:00 PM

Post #3800529

nickeler: If you have a shovel, you have a turner.
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 31, 2007
2:06 PM

Post #3800569

daphnecat--that is a great compost bin==i notice it seems to be in the shade--mine is in the sun--what are the pros and cons of shade vs sun for compost locations
daphnecat
Mays Landing, NJ
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2007
12:24 AM

Post #3802883

planolinda: The photo was taken in the morning. Otherwise it gets full sun from midday til dusk. In the sun is better. This is only place I could put it where it's convienent but out of the way.

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