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Recipes: Keeping Cucumbers from turning slimy when sliced

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defoecat
Pleasureville, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 11, 2007
3:37 AM

Post #3843177

My niece called last night, she has been doing part time catering , and asked if I knew of a way to slice cucumbers in advance of an event to keep them from turning slimy.

She had been slicing them like on Thursday or Friday night for an event on the weekend. She says that she slices them, puts them in zip lock bags but by the time the weekend rolls around they "feel" slimy.

I don't have a clue, but if anyone has any ideas about this, I would appreciate telling me.

Maybe, she needs to take them from the bag and rinse well, pat dry and proceed to the event?

This message was edited Aug 11, 2007 5:05 PM
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 11, 2007
6:38 PM

Post #3844945

I haven't really tested this with sliced cucumbers, but here's something I did recently that might be worth a try... I had several larger cukes earlier this week that I peeled, seeded, and diced up, thinking that we could use them in a salad. They were't as crispy as I'd have liked, so I decided to put them in an ice brine (a technique I learned from Linda Z's recipes in Joy of Pickling).

I had, hmm, maybe 4 cups of chopped cukes, added a heaping tablespoon of kosher salt, then dumped in a couple handfuls of ice cubes. After maybe 2 hours, I drained, rinsed, drained again and put them in the fridge. We've been munching on them the past several days (I'm eating some right now, in fact, with bruschetta spooned over them), and so far I havne't been noticing any sliminess. They are slightly salty from the brine... in fact, I'll bet the salt inhibits any bacteria that might cause that slimy feel.

The only other things I can think of is not to do them in advance like that... I know there must be so many last-minute preparations already, but if she's got a mandoline it only takes a couple of minutes to whiz through a whole pile of cucumbers.

defoecat
Pleasureville, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 11, 2007
6:45 PM

Post #3844956

Thanks, I will pass this along to her.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2007
7:57 PM

Post #3845213

i have placed slicerd cukes on a dish and placed them uncovered in the fridge and have eaten them for several days without any slime on them.

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 11, 2007
11:48 PM

Post #3845949

So maybe it's the baggies that are the problem? I've sliced and bagged cukes and other veggies the night before a gathering, never noticed a problem... but I generally poke a couple of holes (with a fork) in any baggie I'm using for veggies, seems to help the same way the vent does on my fancy/pricey tupperware veggie keeper.
HERBIE43
Rutland , MA
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2007
12:17 AM

Post #3846047

whenever i use one of those zip lock bags i always press all the air out before putting it in the fridge.

Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

August 12, 2007
12:23 AM

Post #3846068

Jill is right - poking holes is the way to go. Also, rather than just putting them in the ziploc bags, have her wrap the sliced cukes in slightly moist paper towels and then put them in the forked bags. The very slightly moist paper towels will wick away the excess moisture that the pre-cut cukes produce. The air flow in the forked bags will alleviate condensation which creates the slime.

Dea
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2007
11:28 AM

Post #3847129

Thanks, Dea! I'm going to start using the paper towels. I put them around half a cut pepper on on the end of a half-sliced cuke before putting it back in the crisper (secured with a rubber band), but somehow I never thought of using them inside a bag.

BTW, a number of years ago the baggie folks marketed veggie bags, which had teeny holes for ventilation, but they must not have caught on. They worked, though!
Joyous
Himrod, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2007
8:18 PM

Post #3856930

I always put my cut cukes in dry paper towels and they wick the moisture out and they stay crisp for days...well until we eat them but some times it can be 3 maybe 4 days.

I do this especially in the winter time with boughten seedless cukes. They almost taste homegrown.

Joy
gardenwife
Newark, OH
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2007
10:25 PM

Post #3857240

Does anyone have tips for keeping uncut cukes fresh?
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2007
10:38 PM

Post #3857275

Good question! I just keep them in the fridge in the chill section. What do you all do?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2007
10:53 PM

Post #3857322

Same trick with the plastic bags -- put a few fork holes in them. I also have a fancy tupperware container with a little vent for keeping veggies fresh, and it really works well (on basil, peppers, lettuce, cukes, etc)... but I probably wouldn't have "shelled out" for it if I weren't at a friend's tupperware party!

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