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Cooking: Lucky me, I have a Rowoco 4-piece card party Valtrompia set

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Equilibrium

August 11, 2007
6:04 PM

Post #3844825

I ran into a photo of a product similar to what I bought while looking for a photo of the Rowoco checkered loaf set. Here's what I have-
http://www.kitchenkrafts.com/product.asp?pn=BP1555

Looks to me as if this is a set for appetizers or fancy hors d'oeuvres. Most of the people who eat over here are more interested in quantity not quality or presentation. I think I made a mistake buying this but maybe it would be fun to bring something I made from these tubes as a dish-to-pass for somebody else.

I'm game to try this. I like little pieces of bread spread with Philly and topped with cucumber slices so that's one recipe I know of. Anyone have any other ideas to try with this?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2007
12:09 AM

Post #3846013

I think I'd be tempted to use them as molds for soaps (slice into bars) or candles!
Equilibrium

August 12, 2007
6:39 AM

Post #3846968

That's exactly what may happen with them because I don't think I have the type of friends who would care about presentation but... they all garden and do need to wash their hands a lot. Soap would be more practical.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2007
11:22 AM

Post #3847119

And if you change your mind, it's easy enough to clean them out for use with food.

I'm wondering if it would work to bake a quick bread in them, like zucchini bread... it would have to expand through the length of the pan as it rose, so I wouldn't fill it more than 2/3 full, and I'd put a pan under it...

I wouldn't mess with them for making shaped regular bread for canapes, but slices of quick bread in those shapes on a big plate for a brunch would look really cool.
Equilibrium

August 12, 2007
2:33 PM

Post #3847601

Yes, they'd look really cool but at those sizes (barely a bite) they'd look cool for all of about 5 minutes before everybody sucked down a work of art. I think the mini soap idea is probably the best.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2007
2:56 PM

Post #3847680

LOL... I didn't realize they were that small, thought they were like 4 inches across!
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 12, 2007
4:07 PM

Post #3847910

We only use those types of pans for holidays. Try baking a Boston Brown Bread in them, then serve with cream cheese or yoghurt cheese on top.

I've also used them to form dough for refrigerator cookies.
Equilibrium

August 12, 2007
4:10 PM

Post #3847923

I have a bread machine but the only recipes I have came in a little book with the bread machine. We've made a cheddar cheese and a sourdough bread but that's about it. My husband bought some bag mixes and made some herb bread of some sort. It was good. I haven't a clue what a Boston Brown Bread is, it's not listed in my little booklet that came with out bread machine. I'd be up to trying a real recipe in these tube things as opposed to soap.I can always fall back on critter's soap idea if there's a problem.
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 12, 2007
4:27 PM

Post #3847983

Boston Brown Bread is a steamed molasses bread. It is often sold in a can along side the baked beans in the supermarket.
When I was a child, it was often served with baked beans (maple sugar beans) or "Beanie Weenie" at summer camp (this is baked beans with slices of wieners in it).

http://tinyurl.com/o7ybq

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/104112
http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-00,boston_brown_bread,FF.html
Equilibrium

August 12, 2007
6:02 PM

Post #3848341

I've never heard of bread in a can before.

I want to try that apricot boston brown bread recipe you found. That looks kinda neat. Have you ever made this before?

Beanie Weenies, eh? Sounds fun for kids.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2007
8:08 PM

Post #3848759

"fun for kids"

Hey! We had beanie weenies for dinner last week... not a kid under 40 in sight! LOL

Thanks for those brown bread recipes... now I want a cute shaped pan! :-)
Equilibrium

August 12, 2007
11:06 PM

Post #3849430

Critter, the odds of me actually making anything in these tube things after the first time I give them a test run are about zip nadda zilch. My family and friends inhale food around here and I can't see sitting around a table making pretty food for all of them when it will be gone in the blink of an eye. If you want, I can send them to you after I use them once. Then you can play.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 13, 2007
12:07 AM

Post #3849674

You might change your mind after you try the boston brown bread... it's not like I need another gadget, LOL, but I admit I'd happily swap you something for them if you decide you really don't want them after all. But play with them a bit first!

I think I'd be tempted to bake two different quick bread recipes in your loaf pan (yes, sorry, I know I'm switching threads)... what can you think of that turns out different colors? carrot cake and zucchini bread? maybe something with cranberries and a recipe with molasses and nuts?

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 13, 2007
12:09 AM

Post #3849682

I got a set of these for a wedding gift 33 years ago.. I bake just about any kind of bread you can think of in them.. The quick breads, also corn bread does great..I have also used cake mix..This is the recipe on my original box..


Valtrompia Canape Bread

(2) loaves
2 hours 1 hours prep
1/3 cup very warm water
1 teaspoon sugar
1 (1/4 ounce) package dry yeast
1 cup milk
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3-4 cups flour

1. In measuring cup, combine warm water, sugar, and yeast.
2. Let stand 5 minutes stirring occasionally until mixture is foamy.
3. In large bowl, combine milk, butter, and salt.
4. Add yeast mixture to bowl and stir to combine.
5. Add 2 1/2 cups flour and stir.
6. Stir in as much of remaining flour as necessary to form soft dough.
7. Turn onto lightly floured board and knead for 7 minutes.
8. Shape dough into smooth ball.
9. Put into greased bowl, turning once to grease top.
10. Cover with plastic wrap.
11. Place bowl in warm, draft-free place to rise until double in bulk.
12. Punch dough down.
13. Divide dough in half, roll into log 3 to 4 inches shorter than the Valtrompia Bread Tube, and insert in tube.
14. Cap and bake in a preheated 400 degree F.
15. oven for 60 to 70 minutes.
16. Remove from tube to cool.

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 13, 2007
12:14 AM

Post #3849701

Larkie, thanks! That's exactly what I was hoping, for somebody to see equil's thread who had these in their kitchen!

Do you stand the pans on their ends during baking, or do you lay them lengthwise?

How far do you fill them when you're using a quick bread or cake batter?

Equilibrium

August 13, 2007
12:38 AM

Post #3849797

That was really nice of you to type all that out for me, I really appreciate it.

And critter, those are really good questions you asked. I probably would have started trying something this coming winter and been sitting there with my tubes scratching my head.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 13, 2007
1:17 AM

Post #3849966

I fill mine about 3/4's full.. lay them down..

Larkie
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 13, 2007
1:22 AM

Post #3849984

Thanks! Who knows, maybe I'll luck upon a set of my own at the thrift shop...

They'd be fun with quick breads, and those would probably be easiest to slice. Not much more trouble than just putting the batter in a regular loaf pan... although I think I'd give them a good shot of cooking spray...

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 13, 2007
1:57 AM

Post #3850129

Grease them well... lol

Larkie
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 13, 2007
3:38 AM

Post #3850443

Well now that you have these wonderful kitchen accessories, perhaps you could boot the volume gourmands out of the house for awhile and serve tea for friends that would appreciate the presentation. I'll bring my knitters group over, shall I?
:D
Equilibrium

August 13, 2007
4:26 AM

Post #3850578

For you, anything. Bring your knitters group over because my friends are into pop, pretzels, and pop tarts. I really have to keep pop tarts here specifically for one friend who walks in my door and heads for the cabinet where I keep her strawberry pop tarts. We don't even eat pop tarts. I have another friend who won't drink anything but Coke- fully leaded. What can I say, I hang with a cheap crowd. I do drink tea in the winter months though and I do know how to quilt and sew and have tried to crochet but failed miserably. Maybe I can fit in with your knitters group now that I have all my new kitchen gadgets.

This may sound silly but I am very happy with my garage sale finds. I want to try out the crpe maker first and then that branding iron rosette deal. I've never been into gadgets and cooking sets before. This is going to be a fun winter.
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 13, 2007
6:05 AM

Post #3850701

I'm now making ratatouille in honour of your crepe maker (one of my favourite savoury crepe fillings).

A very simple filling that you may like to try is to simply saute some mushrooms in olive oil, add a sprinkle of nutmeg, salt & pepper and some sour cream or yoghurt at the end to make a creamy filling. Stuff into crepe and enjoy. A spoonful of port or sherry in the filling mix doesn't hurt.
Equilibrium

August 13, 2007
6:10 AM

Post #3850706

I make ratatouille but my recipe is very very very different than yours and I serve it as a side with chicken.

Now you made me hungry and I'm too tired to go make something for myself to eat and there are no leftovers.
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

August 13, 2007
6:13 AM

Post #3850709

Oops, my bad. The recipe I gave wasn't for ratatouille but rather an alternative simpler filling. I make ratatouille with zucchini, eggplant, sweet peppers, onions, tomatoes, basil, olive oil, salt & pepper and some fresh grate parmesan. Sometimes parsley jumps in there too. Been known to contain flageolet or green beans on occasion as well. Depends on what's growing in the garden.
Equilibrium

August 13, 2007
6:22 AM

Post #3850712

Great, I am so tired I am about ready to drop and I've got to get up early tomorrow before it starts getting really hot out to weed and you're talking about ratatouille which is one of my favorites and I always double the recipe so that I've got left overs for myself.

I, too, have treated ratatouille like a quiche and tossed all kinds of things at hand into it. That's one of those recipes just like a quiche that is a little bit different each time you make it. I like to load mine with parmesan too. Ratatouille isn't ratatouille without a heap of parmesan on it.

bivbiv

bivbiv
Central FL, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2007
9:53 AM

Post #3858599

Ratatouille isn't a side dish in this house. It's the main dish; we love it!
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

August 19, 2007
12:50 PM

Post #3873672


Equi-- LOL whose garage sale did you raid for all these gadgets?!? Sounds like fun! So I want to be invited to your next garage sale! I'd love to have a pizelle baker for cheap after you've tried it!

BTW, you could put your ratatouille or the mushrooms into your timbale shells when you have the knitters over! LOL
Equilibrium

August 19, 2007
10:15 PM

Post #3875524

We don't do garage sales. Everything that is useful gets offered to family and friends and if they aren't interested for what ever reason; I box it up and it goes to the schools, library, Good Will, Salvation Army, and sometimes AmVets. That being said, you fall into the first category so if I the pizelle maker ends up being more bother than what it's worth, it's yours. So far, I suspect this Rowoco 4-piece card party Valtrompia set is going to end up going bye bye to critter but I want to try Larkie's recipe first to see how things go.

The garage sale I stopped at was a fluke. I haven't stopped at one in a while and saw the signs and decided to stop because I had the time. I was poking around and didn't find anything of interest to me until I hit the tables that had the contents from her kitchen spread out on them. I guess the woman passed away. She must have been a good cook based on all the well used tools/bakeware/gadgets/etc. I saw all over those tables and in the bins.
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

August 19, 2007
11:25 PM

Post #3875730


Well, those garage sales can tell a story about somebody, can't they?! I hope when I kick off they just box up my stuff and send it to G W or salvation army and don't let the neighbors have a look at all my crazy obsessions (like a pizelle maker!)

Have a lot of fun with your gadgets. The card party set sounds delicious for the ladies of the club!
Equilibrium

August 19, 2007
11:39 PM

Post #3875767

I think I would have liked the woman who passed away.

I never thought about neighbors being nosey after you pass. I don't see why they'd bother though because most of them have been in my house already at some point in time over the past few years. God bless them if they'd find me that interesting that they'd want to see what products I use. Never thought of it until you mentioned it but I suppose I'd be laughing from heaven. Oh look... Maria always wanted that oil lamp... look at her elbowing in on Jeannie to go in for the kill to grab it. And oh my my my... there's that petty president of the HO association... paleeease... give me lightening bolts or something so I can nail that PITA Mrs. Kravitz from up here somehow... and lordie lordie lordie... there's that Taylor woman from across the street... what ever does she want with my pizelle iron of all things... the woman makes restaurant reservation not meals.

I'm with you on donating everything to include the kitchen sink but unfortunately, it's our heirs who get to make that decision and some people are really into garage sales.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2007
2:12 AM

Post #3876274

I like going to garage sales, but I'm not sure I'd ever hold one... seems like a lot of work, and I suspect we might end up getting more back as a tax break on a donation to Purple Heart or the local charity shop than we'd make at a sale, plus of course the charity benefits from the stuff we don't want! Like Equil, I make a pile of "good stuff" for family and friends to choose from, and the rest goes on the front porch for pickup. Hey, maybe I Perhaps a sturdy potato masher, or a matched set of cow decor coffee mugs? LOL
Equilibrium

August 20, 2007
3:02 AM

Post #3876457

I like garage sales myself but we don't seem to have a lot of them around here. I've helped friends with a few and they are an incredible amount of work. I bet by the time you're done slaving away you end up having worked for $2 an hour and that's without what ever you paid for the original cost of the item. I'd have to agree with you, better to give first dibbs (sp?) to relatives and friends then drop it off for the write off.

I've got a potato masher. I have a few different styles. One is really old and came from my grandmother's house and it's my favorite. Then there's the classic round grid style masher that I use for mashing boiled eggs for salads. None of them get used for potatoes any longer. I use a hand mixer for mashing potatoes. I like my mashers though and can't part with them. I feel for who ever gets stuck going through this house after we die. It's not just the obsession stuff but all the sentimental stuff like my grandmother's potato masher that I can't seem to part with that will be piled up here. Oh woe is the person stuck going through this mess, it will be like an archaeological dig in here with layers of stuff I'm attached to by the time I die.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2007
3:30 AM

Post #3876565

Yeah, I've got the "layers of stuff" syndrome going on around here too. My favorite potato masher also came from my grandmother (very heavy wire in a back and forth sort of squiggle, with a nice wooden handle), but I've come across similar ones and snatched them up to give to friends & family. I do the same with my favorite style of long, flexible metal spatula... There are some gadgets that are just hard to find "new" -- those old designs are just better!
Equilibrium

August 20, 2007
3:50 AM

Post #3876609

You just described my grandmother's potato masher. Amazing what we hang onto isn't it? I remember my grandmother using it which is why I took it home. I also took home her button box and denture soaker. Why, I don't know but when I was little and spent the night I used to use the bathroom and sneak peeks at her teeth soaking in that denture soaker on the back of the toilet over night. I remember me and one brother taking out her teeth and my grandfather's teeth and making them talk to each other behind the locked bathroom door. It was a silly memory. I took it and some day somebody is going to hold it up with a raised eyebrow wondering why???

You know, I have a few other gadgets I got from that garage sale that I need to get photos of and post so I can figure out what they are and get recipes for them. Some look really old and some look newer. All were too difficult to describe so I'm sort of sitting on my hands waiting to post photos. You all will probably recognize what I've got but right now they're sitting on the counter back there awaiting their turn to get identified. I've had a couple people walk in and pick them up and turn them around in their hands making obscene comments and teasing me for having purchased them but I'm convinced these are cooking gadgets of some sort.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2007
4:04 AM

Post #3876651

It took me the longest time to figure out the purpose of my tomato slicer... but I love it! It's shaped a bit like a handheld cheese grater, with perhaps 5 or 6 thin, sharply serrated blades held inside a rectangular frame. You position it on top of the tomato (big tomatoes have to be cut in half first to fit) and saw your way down to produce beautiful, even tomato slices.

Hmm, maybe we need a "what does this do?" kitchen gadget riddle thread... :-)
Equilibrium

August 20, 2007
3:37 PM

Post #3877905

You just ID'd another gadget I bought. I thought it was a boiled egg slicer-
http://www.kitchencollection.com/prodimages/sm1076043.jpg

Mine has a painted (probably lead based paint) handle and the blades are really dull. Is it worth getting it sharpened for $10?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2007
3:42 PM

Post #3877921

Yes, that's it! Try it on a tomato and see if you think it needs sharpening... it's not razor sharp, but the serrations and thinness of the blades are what make it work. I love it... makes nice even slices without squashing the tomato at all!
Equilibrium

August 20, 2007
3:52 PM

Post #3877968

I tried it on a boiled egg when I first brought it home and it worked sort of ok. After I read your post, I ran to go get my toy. I had one little green tomato on the sink so I figured what the heck. Didn't work. That's how I know it needs to be sharpened. What I bought is a dead match for the photo I linked to above other than the handle on mine is wood and painted a weird green. By gosh by golly I done got me a dull tomato slicer at that garage sale too!

Wait till I can post photos of the remaining two unidentified "things" when I get back.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2007
7:44 PM

Post #3878824

Still LOL at the coincidence of your having a tomato slicer (dull or otherwise) among your recent finds...

I'll look forward to seeing your other two mystery items.

Mystery gizmos make fun gifts, too. I gave my dad a Tupperware item, told him he'd have to figure it out... it took him 2 days and a couple of hints before he got it! It had a little shaker chamber for salt and another chamber with a curved opening that was meant to hold a chunk of butter as you slid it back and forth over an ear of hot corn... completely ridiculous looking harvest-orange thingamabob, but it worked!
Equilibrium

August 20, 2007
9:08 PM

Post #3879076

Everything was so cheap, how could a gal resist. I have to tell you it isn't often that people buy something when they don't even know what it is. My husband is still shaking his head over that one.

We have little yellow corns that have spikes in them so that you can ram them into an ear of corn and nibble away until your heart's content but nothing like what you gave your Dad. Who knows, maybe the next garage sale.

I was at Good Will this morning and ran through the appliance aisle. No pizelle irons but they did have quite a few waffle irons. I'll be going to the big flea market when I'm gone. Lots of opportunities to find one there.

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