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Aroids: Overwintering elephant ears

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rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:56 PM

Post #4002197

The following has been compiled by rox_male from posts made by DGer members who have been so willing to help their fellow Aroid enthusiasts.

I will ask that this be posted as a sticky for future use.
Feel free to add appropriate questions and answers. Alternatively, as the orginator of this post I can edit/add information as appropriate if you Dmail me.

Sources of info:
Overwintering
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/544755/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/650875/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/644585/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/663413/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/770930/

Pests:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/675054/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/699720/
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:56 PM

Post #4002200

1. Which can be stripped of their foliage and lose roots in the winter [bare-rooted]?

Excerpted from BWilliams response:
I will start with the hardest ones and go from there. The ones below labeled hardest; well they are just picky. They like very warm temps nothing under 55F and they should do well. Also they do not like too much water. Just let them dry out between watering. If it does get chilly keep them dry, but they cannot handle it for to long a time.

Hardest to grow for most:
A. brancifolia
A. bullata (guttatta)
A. sinuata bullata
A. amazonica 'Polly'
A. amazonica ‘Purplee'

Fairly easy and all these forms can be put out in the ground for summer:
A. crassifolia
A. culculata
A. Frydek
A. macrorhiza
A. odora
A. Robusta likes it warmer than most and can rot if cool
A. sinuata, large form
A. 'William's Hybrid' [My hybrid of amazonica with macrorrhiza]

Easiest bulbous forms meaning you can store these no leaves no problem
A. cucullata
A. macrorrhiza
A. odora
A. 'William's Hybrid’
A. crassifolia
A. sinuata, large form
A. Frydek
This list is from easiest to hardest. They can all be stored this way but the bottom ones might be harder to wake up. Sometimes they can take some time to come out of a dormant state. Also A. Portdora should be mentioned. It is a very good grower fast big and can take a lot of abuse.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:57 PM

Post #4002204

2. Which EE are relatively easy to care for and which are more difficult? [more complete list than above].

Excerpted from BWilliams response:

Easy = means they do not rot extremely easy and can take some cold and can usually go dormant. Idea conditions for storing up north 38F to 60F; cool humid area kept fairly dry. Watch out for fungus and mold air movement can help; so can Sulfur powder.

OK = means the temps may need to be a bit warmer around 45F to 70F. Rot can get these much easier; they need to be monitored in the winter for this. All of the forms in “easy” and “OK” can be grown in rich soil outside during summer months. Watch for spider mites on leaves and fungus. Bugs can create rot and weaken the plant. Spray a few times during winter months.

Hard = these are not really hard; they just ask for something that is difficult to give them in winter, and that is heat. They do not like their feet to get cold. Most of these will rot from the bottom up. In greenhouses the coldest area is the floor and most plants are sitting or close to the floor. These plants are about as picky as we are. Keep temps 70F to 95F water; regularly watch for bugs. They do well indoors, but do need some bright light. They can rot easily, but usually this is all due to temps being to low. I recommend not putting these in the ground. The temps up north do not stay warm long enough and the ground will cool off. The best they can be grown would be in a greenhouse, in a raised bed with radiant heat.


Easy
C. esculenta 'Burgundy Stem'
C. esculenta var. antiquorum 'Illustris'
C. esculenta 'Violet Stem'
C. esculents 'Red Stem'
C. esculenta 'Black Runner'
A. sinuata, large form
A. 'William's Hybrid'
C. antiquorum 'Illustris'
C. esculenta
C. esculenta "Fontanesii"
C. esculenta 'Big Dipper'
A. odora
A. odora 'California' [aka gageana]
A. plumbea 'Metalica'
A. 'Portora'
A. macrorrhiza
A. macrorrhiza 'Borneo Giant'
A. crassifolia
A. cucullata

OK
Xanthosoma jeoquinii linetum
Xanthosoma sagittifolium
Xanthosoma violaceum
C. fallax
C. esculenta 'Bloody Mary'
C. esculenta 'Black Magic'
A. macrorrhiza 'Lisa's'
A. macrorrhiza 'Lutea'
A. macrorrhiza 'New Guinea Gold'
A. clypeolata 'Green Shield'

Hard
A. Robusta
A. sinuata bullata
A. cuprea
A. Frydek
A. longiloba
A. advincula
A. amazonica ‘Purplee'
A. amazonica 'Polly'
A. 'Bako Park'
A. brancifolia
A. bullata (guttatta)
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:57 PM

Post #4002208

3. How do I store other EE not mentioned above:
Excerpted from Tropicanna response:
X. Lime Zinger: I stored my Lime Zinger in a pot in the basement, on the dry side by a sunny window. It never did go dormant, just grew slowly. It did very well when I planted it out this year and is nearly 3 feet tall.

Excerpted from Henryr10 response:
I just let these go dormant. They stay in their pots, dry, till Spring.
A. amazonica 'Polly'
A. 'Bako Park'
A. longiloba
A. plumbea 'Metalica'

These I do in a 55 gallon vivarium w/ lights.
A. sinuata bullata
A. cuprea
Alocasia clypeolata 'Green Shield'


A. Odora and Macros we have in a GH w/ temps around 60 at night.
They sit on 1 1/2" Styrofoam blocks so their feet stay warmer.
I also don't water until the leaves start to droop. Then VERY lightly.

Exceprted from BWilliams:
A. Hilo Beauty: Well Alocasia Hilo Beauty I am 100% sure is not a Alocasia. It is most likely a Caladium. If not a pure caladium, it could be crossed with a Colocasia or Xanthosoma. I have always over wintered the plant in the greenhouse in a pot. I usually let it get fairly dry. It seems to never really go totally dormant for me but does tend to slow down in winter. I would treat it similar to a fancy leaf Alocasia, but it can handle lower temps and more neglect than most.


This message was edited Oct 3, 2007 9:24 AM
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:58 PM

Post #4002211

4. When should I bring in my EE?
Excerpted from BWilliams response:
The fragile alocasias need to go [come in] first, then Caladiums and Xanthosomas. Colocasias and cannas and bananas can take a frost.

Excerpted from Raydio response:
Stop watering now [posted Sept. 8 in reference to Colocasias in Wichita, KS Zone 6a] (if you haven't already) to help them go dormant. When they have pretty much yellowed out and maybe before the first frost, dig the ones you want to move and let them finish drying in a warm dry airy place. Let the foliage shrivel and dry.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:58 PM

Post #4002213

5. How do you prepare the EE for storage?
Excerpted from Henryr10 response:
Don't wash the bulbs. Knock of the majority of the dirt. After they dry out gently brush off the excess dirt. You want them dry before storage.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
5:59 PM

Post #4002217

6. How do I store bare-rooted EE?
Excerpted from BWilliams response:
If it is a dry area you will see them dry rot as the moisture is pulled right out of them. I would suggest something around the bulbs tubers or roots to help prevent this. As you notice stores sell tubers in plastic bags with sawdust this is for the same reason. The plastic holds in moisture and the sawdust keeps the bag from sweating too much and causing wet rot. It’s a fine line we have to walk here, and everyone has different situations. I have done well with plastic containers with powdered sphagnum moss over the tubers. Sometimes tubes can touch each other and sweat and cause rot. Sulfur is a good preventive; so is cinnamon (yes I said cinnamon).

Excerpted from Tropicman response:
I have been successful with the alocasia, Xanthosoma and the Colcasias, overwintering along with my cannas. I buy those clear blanket boxes, with the plastic lids, fill with peatmoss, and just bury them [EE] under the peatmoss. About every month or so I give them a check to see it there ok. If they are a little on the dry side, take a spray bottle of waterand give a few squirts. If it seems to be to moist, then I leave the lid off for a while.I store them in the garage, unheated, but covered with old blankets and quilts bought at garage sales.
Now these have been nice size bulbs a couple inches across in diameter; can't say with the smaller bulbs, which I always keep growing on.

Clarification:
Those large clear blanket boxes allow at least 6 inches of peat moss.
I dig the bulbs, let dry under shade tree couple 2 or 3 days. I remove as much as the dirt I can shake off, cut stems about 4 inches above the bulb. I sink them down in the peat moss as If I were planting in the ground top up. Peat moss is dry, as it comes right out of the package.
Remove the roots, for they are no longer any good anyway. When EE starts to grow again,it will grow new roots. Keep lid tight. I stack boxes one right on top of another;stack as many as 4 high. Keep in the garage, in a corner. As the temps get colder, or if it looks as the gargae will get below 32F, I then cover with the blankets and quilts. Check monthly. If they seem to be getting lighter in weight, as if they might be starting to dry out, I squirt the peat moss with water from a spray bottle -not real wet but moist enough to stop the drying process.

Make sure you keep a eye on them at least once a month, and if you see any soft spots or mushy spots, rub or cut them off immediately, for they will take over the entire bulb, if you give them enough time.

Excerpted from Tigerlily123 response:
I cut off almost all the leaves (maybe all but the newest ones) cut off the roots to about an inch from the corm, set them in large pots that had slightly damp peat moss, semi-buried the corms in the peat moss, and set them under the house in the crawl space. I don't know how cold it gets under there, but I do remember that in late November the temps dropped to 17 degrees a few nights in a row. At the same time, my heater broke and I had to wait a week for them to get a new one and install it. So it must have been pretty cold under there, and yet the corms didn't look like anything cold happened under there at all. I can tell you that it was pretty cold in here! I have an inset in the fireplace, so I was able to keep parts of the house fairly warm, but I bet it was a lot colder underneath the house. In January, I brought them out and into the greenhouse to start growing them out, and they grew fine all spring. I also kept some in pots in the greenhouse thru the late fall/winter and they just sort of sat there until Feb or so when they started to kick in. I stored both very large and very small corms and they all grew.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
6:00 PM

Post #4002220

7. At what temperature should I store my EE?
The area should be cool, not hot not cold but cool to chilly. This keeps the plants in a dormant state and saves them from using energy, and that keeps the tubers healthy and large. 38F to 60F is perfect.

If you cannot do this keep them growing. But keep them growing hot around 65F to 80F at least and feed some.

Now if you have a greenhouse or a structure that gets cool at night and heats up a bit during the day like a greenhouse, water every few weeks and allow drying between. I water early in the morning and by night when cool temps come it is dry or close to it. This helps prevent rot. Another problem with rot is bugs. But this is a whole other story but keep a eye out for white fly's and spider mites a lot of you might have them and not know it they can drain energy out of the plants not to mention the larva on some eat tubers. OK well hope this answered the questions. So yes you can store them dry but the roots must be covered or protected.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
6:00 PM

Post #4002223

8. What do I do if my EE get rot?
Excerpted from BWilliams response:
Clean the tuber out use some deluded chlorox and remove infected parts. Place sulfur on it and allow it to dry for a day or two, then put back into container. This is used in extremely hard tubers like Amorphophallus.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
6:00 PM

Post #4002224

9. What do I do if my EE have pests?
Excerpted from Henryr10
I use Safer Insecticidal Soap on everything but Succulents and Cactus and never had a problem. Just be VERY sure you keep them out of the Sun [until the soap dries – Added by rox_male]. Scale, Mites and aphids all gone.

Excerpted from Grow_Happy
One of my Alocasias grown indoors got spider mites and the leaves looked like that. I used Neem oil over the course of several weeks and those critters were never seen again.

Excerpted from rox_male
Colocasia leaves are super sensitive to many chemicals.
If you use Safer Soap, use it at night or protect the plant from light for several hours.

If things get really bad, I also like to take the plant into the shower (for water sensitive plants you can cover the pot to prevent too much watering). Dowse the leaves with lots of water. Then spray the leaves with Safer Soap and use a paper towel to clean each leaf. Then spray more Safer on and let sit in the humid room overnight. Repeat in 7 days, every 7 days until infestation is gone.

1. If protected from light, Safer seems to do a good job w/o leaf burn.
2. Individually washing each leaf helps ensure you get all surfaces.
3. Spraying additional Safer ensures no hiding in the nooks and crannies (especially at the base of the leaf stems)
4. The humidity also heps get rid of the pests and the EE love humidity.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
6:01 PM

Post #4002228

10. Do I have spider mites?
Excerpted from Mike_Freck
They are [spider mites] almost microscopic but you can see the effects. Slight cobwebbing on bad infestations and yellowing of the leaves as if they had been pricked with a tiny pin all over. If you have sensitive fingers when you feel the leaf it will feel gritty or dusty.

Excerpted from Grow_Happy
Have you tested the plant by holding a white piece of paper underneath a leaf and giving the leaf a firm tap? If you see little dots fall to the paper and start moving around, you do have spider mites. One of my Alocasias grown indoors got spider mites and the leaves looked like that. I used Neem oil over the course of several weeks and those critters were never seen again.
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 21, 2007
6:02 PM

Post #4002231

11. How do I wake up my EE?
Excerpted from Henryr10

I give my EE's, Caladiums and other 'warm' bulbs a jump start by putting them in the furnace room. Once they peak out or the soil I throw them in the GH (which has great sun but minimal heat).
Forget any new significant EE growth (at least w/ the most common Colocasia) outdoors until you're getting temps in the mid 60's at night. They will pretty much just sit there.

Excerpted from Tropicman
[If storing in boxes with peat moss]
St. Patricks Day, I pot them up for an early start. There kind of like a potato, so why not plant at the same time as you would your potatoes? Cover with a foot high of straw as a mulch, then a layer of plastic over the straw to help warm the soil. A reminder, when you plant in the ground that early in March, you best have a good draining soil or they might rot. If you have a clay soil do a lot of amending.

Excerpted from LariAnn
When I prepare a tuber for planting (which is almost year round where I am), I use a product called Pro-Tech; the link is below:
[HYPERLINK@bio-plex.com]

This is also a great product for cleaning/sterilizing pots, trays, and other areas that might accumulate pathogens, such as your potting bench, plant benches, greenhouse floor, and tools. Unlike Clorox, it can even be mixed to use as a soil drench if you think something might be rotting but don't want to unpot for fear of disturbing the roots.

After treating with Pro-Tech, I will dust any raw areas with cinnamon; it is important, BTW, to remove any rotted tissue material so you have only good solid healthy tissue before treatment with Pro-Tech and application of cinnamon powder.



This message was edited Sep 25, 2007 5:06 PM
AuntB
NE, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2007
6:50 PM

Post #4002386

This is good stuff, Rox. THANK YOU! I know it took a lot of time to organize all that information. I appreciate your effort! Thanks to everyone for offering their experiences/techniques! And I think this should be a sticky up there with Brian's "How to Identify!"
sticks_n_stones
Crosbyton, TX
(Zone 7a)

September 21, 2007
7:48 PM

Post #4002600

thank you thank you:)

now could you do one for gingers?? (grin)
Tropicman
Bushland, TX
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2007
4:19 AM

Post #4004172

Excellent...I see the makings of a great book here!!!!
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 23, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #4008248

Rox, this is absolutely excellent. I think this thread itself shoud be a sticky, I am going to request it. Thank soooo much for compiling/sharing
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

September 25, 2007
6:44 PM

Post #4016054

Thanks so much. I was just starting to think about how I would overwinter things this year. I've tried several different methods for various bulbs that I need to lift, and while some make it...others don't. This will help immensely.
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

September 25, 2007
8:42 PM

Post #4016402

The idea of using cinnamon powder to dust cut or raw areas to fend off rot is an excellent one. I use it and it also smells nice!

When I prepare a tuber for planting (which is almost year round where I am), I use a product called Pro-Tech; the link is below:
http://bio-plex.com/protech.asp

This is also a great product for cleaning/sterilizing pots, trays, and other areas that might accumulate pathogens, such as your potting bench, plant benches, greenhouse floor, and tools. Unlike Clorox, it can even be mixed to use as a soil drench if you think something might be rotting but don't want to unpot for fear of disturbing the roots.

After treating with Pro-Tech, I will dust any raw areas with cinnamon; it is important, BTW, to remove any rotted tissue material so you have only good solid healthy tissue before treatment with Pro-Tech and application of cinnamon powder.

LariAnn
AuntB
NE, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 26, 2007
11:25 AM

Post #4018373

Thanks LariAnn, I use peroxide sometimes, directly or diluted and poured on the potted plant... I'll check out the bio-plex link, though.
Daisy12
Sumner, WA
(Zone 8a)

September 29, 2007
4:09 AM

Post #4029552

This is a great help! Thank you for all the information.

Sharon
chatnoir
Downers Grove, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 7, 2007
10:10 PM

Post #4058563

Outstanding information -- and just when I need it. I appreciate the amount of effort that went into collecting this in one spot for easy reference. Thanks for your hard work!
hj1
ipswich
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2007
3:03 PM

Post #4283954

Do aroids benefit from a winter hibernation, or do they do better if they are kept growing all year around?
shadowpaige64507
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

December 11, 2007
4:39 PM

Post #4284193

I would like to know that answer also.

I have been growing some Alocasia's in my spare bedroom that has one window facing the Southwest. I've had good luck so far growing in this room. Plants have been in there since late September. The room stays the same temp as the house, around 68 during the day and 65 at night. I've kept the soil pretty moist. I also have one 40 watt grow light at the top of the window.

My question is am I setting myself up for rot? Or does it sound like I'll be fine? I get new qrowth weekly from these plants.

Here are a list of some of the EE's I've been growing in that room:

A. Calidora
A. Gigantea
A. Polly
A. Argentea
C. Illustris
C. Midnight
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

December 11, 2007
4:57 PM

Post #4284240

In my experience, Alocasias do best if you keep them growing rather than making them go dormant. When keeping them growing, two important considerations are to keep them from being too moist, and to hold up on the fertilizer. If your daytime temps are not in the upper 70s/low 80s, the plants will not grow very fast, so they don't need fertilizer to any extent. My familiarity with Alocasias tells me that a forced hibernation offers no benefit to them; the benefit is to the grower who doesn't have the space or the means to keep them growing. That you can do it doesn't necessarily mean that you should do it.

When space is tight, I slow mine down by withholding most fert and watering less. This keeps them "awake" but encourages slow growth. In Spring, when you can turn them loose in the garden, you'll have a great head start on the season.

LariAnn
http://aroidiaresearch.org
glen74
Effingham, IL
(Zone 5b)

February 7, 2008
11:52 AM

Post #4506397

I've been growing my A. 'Brian Williams' all winter in my kitchen. It's sitting in front of a 6 foot wide sliding door and has done fine for the most part. It has started losing most of its leaves due in part I think to the extremely cold weather we had here in IL about two or three weeks ago. The leaves look like they got burned but overall the plant is still alive and doing better than I had actually hoped. All of my other plants like my philos and "Walmart" pine have been growing leaps and bounds in this same spot. But my 'Brian Williams' was closest to the window and the cold glass may have burned it I'm guessing. I've always had some trouble keeping the more finicky Alocasias growing all winter except for the really tough types like 'Portodora' and odora. Looks like I can add A. 'Brian Williams' to that list. It's one of my favorites too! And I hate storing elephant ears for the winter. If I don't keep them growing I usually lose them, no matter if it's Alocasias or Colocasias.
shadowpaige64507
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 8, 2008
1:36 PM

Post #4511084

glen74,
I would also like to know that answer. I have some Brian Williams Hybrids that I keep in room that stays around 80 degrees with lots of light and I just started having the same problem. Only with the Williams, not any other of my Alocasias. I think mine might of been a result of to much watering. I've cut back on the water and they seem to be doing better.
Areephanthu
Hartsville, SC

May 18, 2008
7:25 PM

Post #4969481

What a wonderful wealth of knowledge this thread has been for me.

thanks to everyone.
PerennialGirl
Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 4a)

September 7, 2008
11:07 PM

Post #5521772

Awesome thread, Rox_male!! Fantastic collection of everyone's tips! Thanks!!
:) Donna
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 8, 2008
1:15 AM

Post #5522285

Some comments:
The following overwintered well for me last year as bareroots in peat moss:
Colocasia Fontanesii; Pink China
Alocasia gageana, macrorrhiza
Xanthosoma Saggitifolia, violaceum, robusta

The following did not do well as bareroots in peat moss:
Colocasia Red Stem, Chicago Harlequin - the corms were small (< 1" diameter); I lost most to dry rot.
Most of my Hawaiian taro; C. miranda - the stems/corms had too much moisture and I lost many due to "wet" rot

ROX


AuntB
NE, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 8, 2008
2:57 PM

Post #5524415

Donna thanks for reviving this thread.. Rox, so appreciate your continued dedication and sharing your trials with us. I stored P.China just laying "naked" in a cardboard beer flat in the basement with some amorph bulbs... stayed above 50 all winter down there, and I covered the flat with a newpaper to keep the bright light from them.
morrigan
Craryville, NY

October 20, 2008
9:27 PM

Post #5696034

One question now: Do I cut down the stalks and leaves before storage? How far above the bulb should it be cut to? Many thanks!

Thumbnail by morrigan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Joyous
Himrod, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 20, 2008
10:42 PM

Post #5696295

Oh Morrigan thanks for asking that question. I too need to know.
Joy
brseaton
Chesapeake Beach, MD

October 20, 2008
11:31 PM

Post #5696479

I usually cut mine back, leave them in their pots and put them in the basement, watering sparringly.

Gigantea
Macro...
Xanthosoma S.
Macro.. Thailand Giant
Tea Cups
Sarian

Is this ok?
Joyous
Himrod, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 21, 2008
12:39 AM

Post #5696803

Super! But how about the ones we planted in the ground.? Last year I just threw them in a tub with some soil and tried to water them once and a while but I don't remember what I did to their tops.

thanks,
morrigan
Craryville, NY

October 21, 2008
4:58 PM

Post #5699589

Joyous: thanks I need to know that too, since all my EE's were planted in the ground!
rox_male
Athens, OH

October 23, 2008
5:30 PM

Post #5708493

I plant mine in the ground.

See Sept. 7, 9:15 post.

Basically I uprooted the EE just before a hard frost. Took off the dirt and threw them on the garage floor for several weeks until the leaves and stems dried up. Them I chopped off the dead foliage and put them in plastic containers with shredded peat moss.

A problem was that it warmed up and the uprooted colocasias (not Xanths or Alos) tried to grow again. I had issues with fungus and moisture in the plastic containers.

I think the container methods works if the EE really are dormant and the residual moisture in the stems is gone.
For most colocasia, where I had problems, I think storing them bare rooted in an open container or in a pot with dry soil would be better.
Joyous
Himrod, NY
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2008
9:16 PM

Post #5709224

Rox, thanks so much! Just dug mine today about 2 dozen. We are expecting 25 degrees tonight!

Not sure about our garage floor but that I can figure out. The ones in pots DH is taking to his shop because he says it doesn't freeze in there. I will let the frost get them and then worry when it begins to get real cold like it can and does here.

I do have an Alocasia from Annaz and I am trying to keep that alive in the house in our washroom.

Do have an Africian mask that I dug, not too worried about that...it didn't do anything really out side. The most I had was 3 leaves on it.

thanks again,
Joy
rox_male
Athens, OH

October 24, 2008
4:16 PM

Post #5711794

In my experience, the African masks are sensitive to fluctuations in temperature and watering.

This is one that I overwinter routinely in a pot. Don't overwater!

Here is an interesting article on container plants. I use the potting soil recipe and this year I am trying the wick to prevent wet feet.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/527353/

ROX
trinawitch
Canton,IL &Dent Coun, MO
(Zone 5b)

September 11, 2009
10:53 PM

Post #7052758

ok...what if mine's grown in the house all year long? they both sit in front of huge picture windows...No drafts cause the house is practically air tight...didn't realize that until the brugmansia and datura started blooming (they were promptly moved outside), and my Black Magic does not like to be dry at all...it starts getting even a little dry and it starts falling down
rox_male
Athens, OH

September 15, 2009
5:36 PM

Post #7067280

Trina-
What's the specific issue?

Some EE grow perfectly happy as house plants. Others need air circulation or higher humidity.
ROX
trinawitch
Canton,IL &Dent Coun, MO
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2009
9:02 PM

Post #7067920

I guess since I've always grown them as houseplants, i didn't know there was such a thing as "overwintering" so not really an issue

hollyhocklady

hollyhocklady
Shepherdsville, KY

September 30, 2009
7:03 AM

Post #7118921

I am so thankful that this post is here.
I have a mickey mouse who is very picky about its roots. When I planted this little guy he struggled but made it. He didn't grow very much for me like all the others I have. Anyone else have this trouble?
littlenettie
Booneville, AR

December 28, 2009
6:29 PM

Post #7404301

hi im new to daves garder, i got 6bulbs for elephant ear at atwoods in ft smith they were different long and fat they look like over size carrots. they made real nice plants only get about2 ft. tall. they were no names. i dug and put them in the green house i was afraid they would be hurt by freez can you tell me anything about these.even a guess might help. thanks
rox_male
Athens, OH

December 30, 2009
7:35 PM

Post #7410374

Holly-
My MM are very picky too. I keep mine in pots during the winter and outside (in the ground) in summer. Make sure you use sharp draining potting soil. I like a mix with lots of bark fines and peat moss.

Nettie-
If you post pics of the leaves that would be helpful with the ID.
ROX

littlenettie
Booneville, AR

December 30, 2009
10:25 PM

Post #7410918

thanks i will do that. post a picture.
Tropicman
Bushland, TX
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #7410994

sounds like a malanga to me!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2011
9:49 AM

Post #8438290

sigh..my thai giants got HUGE last yr..but didnt overwinter.. :( have to start over with small plants..
question then..? my macrorhiza did great..even have side shoots already..
i kept all EE bareroot.. cut them down..rinsed off(last fall) dusted with cinnamon too..(worked wonders on
my bananas)
? is this my problem.. with the thai giant.. i need to keep them potted up..on dry side..but in soil?
thing is..they are huge.. truely..LOL.. i should be thrilled on this..LOL right.. :)
i was so anxious to see how big these plants would get this summer.. sigh..
hope you all have some ideas,experience..
thanks...
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

March 20, 2011
10:42 AM

Post #8438367

You can keep them over winter two ways as far I can tell. One is potted up in warm greenhouse and just slightly keeping them moving. The soil should drain well and only watered when needed then allowed to dry back out.

The next is to keep them chilled and dry If they freeze they rot if the humidity in the air is low they will dry out if to wet they rot. You have to find that perfect situation were the tuber or plant stays in suspended animation. A cold cellar is usually perfect. I had a few in warm greenhouses that were not in near as good shape as a unheated greenhouse.

As I usually tell most people it is similar to storing potatoes. Dry soil humid air cool temps best situation for storing tropicals.
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8439454

thanks brian.. thai giants were yours.. i was so anxious to have them make it overwinter..sigh..
overwintering...do u cut right down near the root base? my plants last fall were easy 12- 13" across at the base..
the stems were huge as well...
i didnt cut them back alot.. i left several stems on... 2 feet or so in length.. onto the base of the plant...
i kept them in same area as bananas.. and macrorhiza.. storage area was around 55F...
do u find overwintering thai giant more difficult than other EE ? hoping the thai giants i have this yr.. very small plants..will grow like crazy like last yrs..
fingers crossed..
then again..try to overwinter them...
thanks.. i appreciate your experience and insights...
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2011
5:40 PM

Post #8441586

Hello everyone; I am new to this thread . I overwintered about 30 Alocas. Xanth. Piloden. Orinoco banana pseudostems 10-12' and Colocasias, including Thai Giant.

Brians' first example was how I got through this past winter unscathed. Luckily, I have two nice size windows in the garage and used a Ceramic heater to keep it around 70F . With all the plants in there and misting 2-3 times a day, I have been able to keep the humidity ~ 75-80%. I have basically watered when the plants let me know they were thirsty. Soil for the most part has been slightly moist . I also try to keep the plants in a smaller rather than large pot I would use for the summer. With my 6' or so Caildoras, Xanthos. and Portoras; I just placed 3-4 plants in a 45 gallon Nursery pot. And left them alone watering about once every 2-3 weeks. Philod. hardly grow at all unless it's hot so I have maybe watered them a total of three times since November, allthough they have really started to wake up as has everything ele in these 70 + temperatures.

I need to take a pcture of the Xanthosoma Sagit. blooming right now. I will post it tomorrow. Been up since before 5AM

Later!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2011
12:23 PM

Post #8443165

thanks homer.. i dont have greenhouse to keep thai giants happy.. thus i did the dryroot way.. but..im guessing that
the thai giant isnt an easy overwintering EE.. i doubt the thai giants i have now..just small plants..will get as big as last yrs..
sigh :( i know they really pop in growth with summer temps..
thai giant may be one i wont be able to grow sucessfully here.. sigh...
thanks again homer..
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 22, 2011
6:15 PM

Post #8443859

Pictures of Alocasia Odora blooming (did not see that until this AM), and of the Xanthosoma Sagittifolium will be next.

Thumbnail by homer1958
Click the image for an enlarged view.

homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 22, 2011
6:17 PM

Post #8443862

Sorry it is in reverse!



Thumbnail by homer1958
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bwilliams
Louisville, KY

March 22, 2011
8:30 PM

Post #8444192

I would suggest trying to over winter a tuber or root mass with leaves removed in a plastic bag with mulch or sawdust and placed in a very cool place. It would be worth a try if you have luck getting them big again this season.

homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2011
3:08 AM

Post #8444411

Brian,

Do you have access to Alocasia robusta, or Alocasia robusta "Sarawakensis"?

These are a couple I do not have for my collection of Aloc. I have heard of all the Horror stories about trying to grow them. I need to give it a shot (you guys understand).

bwilliams
Louisville, KY

March 23, 2011
6:27 AM

Post #8444684

I have not had Alocasia Robusta for sometime. I would like to try it again myself but it was removed from Tissue Culture due to all the problems growing it. I think the future of growing Robusta is in the hands of Lariann. It maybe years before it will be available and if so only the crazies will try it sense it has shown to be such and tough one to grow.
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2011
11:05 AM

Post #8445264

Thanks for the information.Yes; you and me and about a thousand other people in the U.S.
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2011
7:44 PM

Post #8446340

thanks brian.. ya..i too am willing to try almost anything.. guess its the
science interest in me..
took all the plants out today in the sun. .. actually had a moderately warm day..but sun
was great..
good luck home if ya do get a robusta.. nothing wrongwith wanting to try something
new..and as i understand..very challenging..
id be willing to try extremely difficult plants..but i have to get a greenhouse first.. :)
i think some of these plants just dont like to be disturbed.. like thai giant..
i heard from a friend..she calls it.. a pain in the #*($& LOL
but my plants last yr.. wow.. guess thats why we try..
:)
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8448139

Exactly 777 It's like the mountain to the climber. Who knows... You may be the next person to get one to bloom before it takes a knife across the throat!

LOL
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2011
3:34 PM

Post #8584906

well its "almost" summer like weather here.. sigh..enough on the rain though...
my tropicals are going strong!! yea
my EE's .. are going well..
i got a few macrorhizza from brian..maybe 3 yrs ago..last yr one was really big.. 2 of them overwintered great.. solid
stems,good roots.. potted them a few months ago..they just sat there.. but now putting them out on sunny days (to soon to plant
out in garden).. they have sent out leaves!! yea..the 2 biggest plants had side pups..which i separated..overwintered..and now
they are getting really big.. 2 have leaves over 18" !! those are the pups...
? i know ive chatted about it before.. but anyone testing fate with robusta??
i dont even know where i could even get a plant??? let alone keeping it alive...
thoughts?
thanks.. hope to see more discussion on EE's here...
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 24, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8585395

Yo 777,

Got two of LariAnn Garners Robudoras a few days ago. They are less than a foot tall and the latest leaf is over a foot long.

I am currently growing about 30 different Alocasias Colocasias and Xanthosomas, either in pots or in the ground.

My ensete maurelii is 4' tall and rocking and ventricosum about the same. Glaucum jamming with the base as big around as your wrist but only 1'-6'' tall.
Also have a Superbum that I just purchased on e-bay that is very healthy looking.

Here's a picture of one of my three Borneos

Thumbnail by homer1958
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

May 25, 2011
1:57 PM

Post #8586909

homer.. wow..that is a super boreno !! you sure are doing something right !! :)
tell me about the Robudoras...??? is it a sport of robusta?
i saw the superbums on ebay.. was thinkin about buying one.. so you like what they shipped you??
you grow your EE and nanners outside mostly?? how about your winters.. are they very cold there?
i see you are just north of charlotte.. so im guessing you do get some winter there then..??
its addictive isnt it..?? EE's, bananas.. LOL
i have almost 80 plants..between EE,bananas,gingers.. thats not counting in the tons of cannas
i winter over and put in..
its all good huh...:)
how would i buy plants from lari ann garner? off aroids.org?
thanks.. hope you do well this summer...
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2011
2:38 PM

Post #8586959

777,


It is a hybrid of Odora x Robuta

It's the typical 2'' plug that has been growing in a 4'' pot

I can cover with about 18'' of shreaded leaves the regular ee's Odora, Portora etc.,etc. Bananas I usually bring inside in the garage; most offsets make it unless unusually cold! Most winters we are in the 20's and 40's we are protected by the lake(Google Lake Norman North of Charlotte). We usually get one snow a year average; but you can go east or west 10 miles and it may be 3-4 snows. Yeah; we have a little winter we are famous for ice! http://aroidiaresearch.org

Thanks, and you also! Let me know if you have any other questions!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

May 25, 2011
7:52 PM

Post #8587584

im sure the ice makes winter treacherous.. 1 snow day..lucky U !!!! :)
so how big is the Robudoras expected to get? anywhere as large as robusta?
so you bought them via aroids.org?
im always wanting to try something new.. and a challenge..
thought of trying a few palms.. not sure yet..they dont transplant easy like bananas..
is the Robudora more tender than most EE's then? do you plan to take it in to overwinter?
thanks homer !!!
i appreciate your thoughts on this...
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2011
3:39 AM

Post #8587830

1 snow day on average; had 4 this year and very cold for us! A lot of 10's nights and low 30's days

LariAnn said between an odora and robusta maybe more; I am thinking 15-20' in a place like Miami, with 8-10' leaves. Charoltte 12-15' with 5-7' leaves.

http://aroidiaresearch.org

Take them in overwinter and next year plant outside in ground. I want to make sure I don't end up without any plants. I am sure they will offset this year, however, I want them to have a full season in the ground to overwinter outside!

tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

May 26, 2011
7:56 AM

Post #8588221

thanks homer..
thats a big plant.. my thai giants dont get tall..of course..but leaves last yr were super.. i have 3 really strong thai's this yr.. that i am hopeful
that will get to same size or bigger.. last yrs thai's got 64" i was very pleased.. got them from brian williams (great guy!!!)
would be fantastic to have a taller plant with huge leaves too.. :)
? so you bought them from lari ann off aroidresearch.org??
do they sell the robudoras regularly? i see they ask for a dont sell in the trade..totally understand.. protect what theyve done...
for me..the plants will be for my own enjoyment.. :)
thanks again homer !!!!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

October 22, 2011
4:35 PM

Post #8859537

that time of yr again for me.. dig everything out and store away..sigh
was a good yr..some of my A.macrorhizza got woody trunks.. and 1 bloomed..
my X.robustas got really big !!! and my thai giants did pretty good..but no way as large
as last yr..
im taking brians advice on alocasias and potting up and keeping on dry side and growing..but
in a cool room..
im planning to keep colocasias and xanthosomas bareroot.. and just spraying occasionally
with kelp water..
others have thoughts on xanthosoma overwintering..inside..no greenhouse.. (YET) LOL
thanks
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 22, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8859630

Keep the Xanthos going 777!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

October 22, 2011
6:32 PM

Post #8859658

homer..so do u pot yours up and keep inside overwinter??
do u keep on dry side too?
im going to have to get some more big pots..LOL
its a trap isnt it.. herhehhe..
my X.robustas got over 5 ft tall.. in just one summer..
mmm..maybe its time to put in a sunroom.just to keep things overwinter..
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 22, 2011
7:58 PM

Post #8859724

They tell me how much water they want!(yea,right!) Seriously, inside, in a big picture window with 4-5 hours of sunlight with 68 F. They will suck up some water in a small pot! Hence; they like it moist inside given these parameters.

My Glaucum is 22'' in Dia. at the base with a pseudostem height of only 6'.

Musa Rajpuri was 17'' in Dia. with pseud. at 7.5'!

Red Portora in ground was 8'- 10-1/2''! It was a bad year for growth also.

AeAe 16' with 4-pups.

Take care 777
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

October 23, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8860578

thats great homer!!!
my glaucum got the biggest of my bananas ..this yr..
i dont have any rajpuri..i'll have to check that one out..
lol..like i need more bananas.. :) i cant say no.. LOL
good luck on your overwintering homer!!!
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 24, 2011
4:52 AM

Post #8861155

and you as well my friend!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

October 24, 2011
6:37 PM

Post #8862272

thanks homer.. :)
omaching back..LOL i have to brag.. i guess.. ive been digging all the tropicals for
winter storing ..
one of my big thai giants (didnt get huge like last yr..but). had.. no kidding.. 11 pups
off the mother plant. and all are good sized.. tons of roots..
i potted up a ton of EE's today for winter..
has anyone had that many pups off their thai before???
im thinking this is why it didnt get huge leaves like last yr.. all the energy went into
all those babies...
?? am i nuts??
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

November 14, 2011
4:55 PM

Post #8890403

well everything is in and finally potted up.. geesh..LOL
i think i need a greenhouse..:)
my thai giants are doing fine from being dug..so far.. :)
im doing several community big pots (for space sake).. with many EE in them..
im using a good mix of my compost and ground leaves..its nice and fluffy..
i''ll do as brian williams suggests..some watering but let dry out between..
i dont know what i'll do next fall.. everything hopefully will be alot bigger next yr..
and all the pups will too.. i have a big house. but this is getting crazy..
LOL
but..i love it...
thanks to all for insights...
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 12, 2012
7:59 PM

Post #9040388

so far my EE are doing good..YEA !! i hauled in several HUGE tubs..i dont know what the volume
they are 4 ft across.. i buried alot of my EE with leaf mulch/well decayed compost..
i checked it every so often..and watered..if it felt dry..
reading on another site.. expressing trouble with overwintering thai giant..
much thanks to brian..u the man!!! :)
this other poster..is overwintering their thai giants in buckets of water..
in a chilly garage,no freezing.. changing out water ..
??? what is everones thoughts on this???
my thai giants did fine.. in fact i had so many pups last yr..i dont need to buy any EE this yr..
unless of course i get tempted to buy a hybrid of some MONSTER EE lari ann is working on...:)
hope to see some thoughts on storing thai giant in water overwinter ...
much thanks
getting real anxious for summer..
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 20, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #9050290

Whatever works for you 777. I would think as long as the water stays oxygenated and changed very frequently(and I'm talking filtered water) I don't see why it would not work.

I am ready for a good summer myself. Hopefully warm, humid and wet!
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9050481

me to homer !!!
i wondered if anyone has tried this method..?? i did really well this winter..
i kept my thai giants in mixture of shredded leaves and compost.. kept slightly
,very slightly moist..
it snowed last 2 days..today..sun..sun..tomorrow.. mid 60sF
YEA
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

April 26, 2012
7:38 PM

Post #9099366

well im very pleased with my results overwintering my EE..especially thai giants..
i have a TON of them for this yr..YEA !!! :)
last fall (late oct) i loosely potted them deeply in shredded leaves..
i lightly watered pots maybe every 5 weeks..
i dug them out this week.. and wow..great roots,firm stems..
thanks to all for ideas/thoughts ...
im especially glad to have some good sized thai giants for this yr..
now..hopefully summer will be a good one..and maybe i can get a few monsters :)
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

August 13, 2012
8:11 PM

Post #9240720

well ive got probably 60 days to go for this growing season..
i have to say..im overall pleased with my EE's..
my jacks giants are the biggest ..so far.. i have a few thai g ..that arent to
far behind.. and everything is pupping...
enough.. LOL
for overwintering this winter 2012.. im going to do similar with a bit of a twist..
i used shredded leaves as potting mix overwintering..especially the thai giants..and they pulled thru
fine..
the alocasias.. i left most bareroot.. but the ones that did best were the ones i just threw into a pot with
leaves.. so im going to do that again..
i dusted everything with cinnamon..that worked well. i do think i need to water the colocasias just a bit more..
im starting my searching for HUGE pots for overwintering now..
smurf428
cullman, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 17, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9244468

depending on where you are placing them, have you tried rubbermaid big bins, they are pretty cheap compared to pots.. I stored all my roots in them for years and never had a problem.. But like i said it wouldnt be something to put in say the living room lol.. Although you could wrap it in something say bamboo screening, or picked fence pieces, but with that extra cost you could just buy a pot lol

I have a 4 seasons room, well its more like a hallway about 6 feet wide and maybe 30 long.. Its heated or cooled just as the house is and one whole side of windows.. Not sure how much hubby is going to like this but i want to do a few tubs in there.. if i do them in the green like the furniture it cant look that bad right haha oh the things we do for our plants
jen
tropicalnut777
Provo, UT
(Zone 5a)

August 17, 2012
4:52 PM

Post #9245020

thats a great idea jen..i do vermiculture..and use on sale rubbermaid 37 gay tubs..
i hadnt even thought of that..thanks !!! :)
even the so called dollar stores pots (big ones) arent that cheap.. homedepot has rubbermaid tubs
on sale frequently..thats when i got last ones.. like $7 so not bad at all..
i could overwinter alot of EE in a 3 or 4 of those big tubs..
always learning something from you all !!!!
thanks...:)

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