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Soap and Candle-making: New and interested in making soy candles

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Forum: Soap and Candle-makingReplies: 34, Views: 254
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RuralGal
Neligh, NE

September 27, 2007
5:23 PM

Post #4023672

Hello everyone!
I'm in the research stage of learning to make soy candles. So saying hello and will just sit back and listen for now!
RuralGal
ellesgh
Humansville, MO

October 22, 2007
6:17 PM

Post #4111066

hi new here
am i too late
Amber_lee
Seminole, OK
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2008
1:00 AM

Post #5220782

Hello, I know this thread was started nearly a year ago but I am new to DG and I make soy candles.

I didn't have to do all the research because I bought my aunts business and inventory.
However I do try new things. I am big on using many different kinds of containers.

Soy wax is expensive. I believe it is a healthier candle though. Where I live the wax has to be shipped a long ways and this adds to the over all cost of the candles which is disheartening. I still make them, I don't make a huge amount of money but just making them is soothing for me. Just smelling the wax melting is enjoyable. Also it is fun checking out new fragrances.

I would like to chat with anybody making soy candles as I always have new questions.

Amber
ellesgh
Humansville, MO

July 8, 2008
4:07 PM

Post #5223814

hi elle here
i made candle
i made wax bear too
i live in mo
humanville is the name of the town
tell me more about you
elle
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

July 8, 2008
9:26 PM

Post #5225669

I've made soy candles for my own use and prefer it to wax. It cleans up easier and you can use the melted wax as hand balm. It seems to make clearer and stronger scents. The color comes out a bit milky though. I think I like best that it is a renewable resource.

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

July 8, 2008
9:46 PM

Post #5225754

I make soy candles and have a website. My candle making room smells like a candle shop. There are several different places to get the wax. I pay $29. 75 for 20lbs. How much do you pay if you don't mind my asking.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 11, 2008
3:51 PM

Post #5241166

I'm fortunate enough to have a local supplier of soy wax--no shipping!! *whew*
Amber_lee
Seminole, OK
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2008
3:21 AM

Post #5244742

I buy the Enchanted Lites soy wax. I haven't bought any since before Christmas. It was 49.50 for 50lbs but the shipping was 49.00.

There is a place in Oregan and Florida that sell Enchanted Lites but I have only dealt with the one in Oregan. The price is probably higher now with gas prices.
flightnurse9
Ellery, IL

June 18, 2009
12:33 AM

Post #6702963

Hello everyone! I am brand new to this site as of today, but have enjoyed greatly all the different topics available! Wow!
I have been making & selling soy candles for the last 3+ years and then branched from that into developing therapeutic & healing body products, that save money, the environment, support USA farmers & have multi-functionality. I developed the first & only massage oil candle/body butter on the market, that has healing & pain relieving properties. But I am wanting to start to phase out the soy wax, candle scents, etc. I have hundreds & hundreds! For anyone not wanting to invest a huge amount and just dabble this might be an option for me to reduce inventory & you to save some money as well. Just an idea! I found testing wicks was a HUGE issue, finding the right wick for the right container is crucial! ALOT of testing is necessary, if you want a quality finished product & not have wax built up on the walls of the candle & allow it to burn to the bottom.
I could go through all the benefits of soy, there are several!
*One it's a renewable resource, its cleaner burning & virtually has no soot production, so it won't leave the black nasty on your ceilings/walls & LUNGS! I am a nurse by profession and working on masters, so research is key for me, I wanted to know all I could about it before jumping in..:) Paraffin is a by-product of oil production, with that being said, it also has been linked to carry carcinogens, which are cancer causing agents. So I stay clear from ANY paraffin was, petroleum oil (vaseline), etc. products, for this very reason. The studies are not all conclusive & ongoing, but I believe in time it will show candles from paraffin could be linked to various respiratory problems. Asthma triggers, emphysema, COPD, etc.
Soy also lasts 1.5 x LONGER than paraffin.
Melting point of paraffin is HOT! Don't quote me..but I was thinking like 160-220F
Serious significant burns! Soy does not, it's melting point is around 120F NO significant burns..important for everyone, but more so around pets, children, etc. JUST in case there were an oopsy!
Once you find a container & wick that works stick with it! I used all different containers, when I started and it was a learning curve. I can save you alot of time and money! lol Learning from my mistakes! lol When you change depth & diameter it affects what type of wick you should be using to get the best burn.
Someone mentioned on double & triple scents..? You add to much scent/oil the candle WILL NOT SET UP right. So in order to be able to have it handle that much scent there are additives you must put with your wax.
Stearic acid can also be added to make the wax harder & not so soft, which will also give you a bit longer burn hours. I started messing with the chemistry and developed my own formula. I can get in an 8oz candle about 110-130 burn hours typically, where as some may only get 80-100hrs. I dont' have the info with me now, but my tea lights were 4-6 hrs! If I remember right, they were well over double the typical paraffin. So I was pretty proud of that:)
I would be happy to help anyone who wants it. I have been tempted to put together a candle kit of the necessary things needed, without having to dump hundreds of dollars into getting started. The shipping is what really will come back to bite you on wax! I have hundreds of pounds still left.
Another thing someone mentioned about keeping wick centered. Here's what I did for an economical version of the expensive versions. Take popsicle sticks, drill small hole in center of stick. Then feed wick through center and rest stick across the top of jar! Easy & economical!
Later All!
K
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

June 18, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #6705194

flightnurse, your post is fascinating. I am brand new to soaps & candles, and doing as much reading and researching as I can before I jump in. But it will be my "extra cash" endeavor when I retire early next year. I agree with you that wicking will be the most serious challenge. Everything I've read about it so far has confused me. Why are there so many different wicks? Most candlemaking sites will just advise you to "experiment, experiment, experiment". Doesn't this get expensive? How much wax and fragrance, how many wicks and jars will I have to go through to get it right? Sheesh.
I found a site a while ago that did give some specific recommendations, based on the size of the jar, but I neglected to bookmark it and LOST IT! How dumb. Do you have any advise on WHERE TO START?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 18, 2009
2:42 PM

Post #6705362

I would recommend the excellent articles at Bitter Creek North, and Aromahaven/Rustic Escentuals. Candletech is another good forum.

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 18, 2009
3:33 PM

Post #6705692

I use www.candlesandsupplies.com, their selection of FO are wonderful.
planolinda
Plano, TX

June 18, 2009
6:10 PM

Post #6706386

purpbutfly i love your candles! you should list your website for anyone who wants to purchase your wonderful work--or is that against dave's garden rules?
flight nurse i would like to read more about what you are doing now and about your massage butter

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 18, 2009
7:25 PM

Post #6706688

I wondered the site-posting policy as well. I'm the admin of a large soapmaking forum that has an active candle section, too.

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 18, 2009
9:17 PM

Post #6707330

Linda,
I don't have my website anymore, but I plan on putting them on the Marketplace. So glad you are enjoying them ^_^

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 18, 2009
9:27 PM

Post #6707374

There is some place here where you can advertise your website's. I think, you will have to ask others that know more than me.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2009
4:14 AM

Post #6783083

Ok, I think I hit the mother lode on this discussion. Ya'll all sound like experts, and I need expert advice.

First off, I live in the Self-Contained Veggie Gardens forum. I'm into growing veggies, not making candles. But, I'm working on a new design for my 5-gallon grow buckets and I need ya'lls advice based on your experience, if you all don't mind.

Part of my design incorporates a "cookie" made out of pegboard, which is a pressed board composition. It's sort of like particle-board, and, like particle board, will crumble and break apart if it gets wet. This cookie will be sitting inside the bucket as the base for my potting mix. The potting mix will stay consistently moist (and sometimes wet) during the time it takes to grow my veggies from seeds/seedlings - approximately 7-9 months. Below the "cookie" is the water reservoir. There is a space between the cookie and the water in the reservoir so the cookie will not sit directly in any water. The moisture it encounters will come from the moist/wet potting mix draining down through the pegboard holes into the water reservoir.

My dilemma is that I need to waterproof the cookie. The Home Depot guy recommended a product called KILZ (the stuff used to waterproof wallboard against mold) and I bought a gallon. He said I could dip the "cookie" into the KILZ which will dry leaving a plastic coating on it. It will also go into all the little holes in the "cookie" and seal them, too.

The other option I researched online (re: waterproofing) utilizes paraffin. The recipe was for waterproofing tents. It calls for "melting" 1 lb. of paraffin in 1 gallon of white gasoline, then painting it on and into the fibres of the tent. The gasoline acts as a solvent and allows the paraffin to penetrate into the tent fibres. Then the gasoline evaporates leaving only the paraffin which has saturated into the fabric.

My question is whether, from your experience with candle waxes, this could work as an adequate waterproof process for my pegboard "cookies?" I was thinking of making the concoction, dipping each "cookie," and hanging it up to drip dry, leaving a coating of the paraffin as a waterproof sealer. The paraffin would coat all the pegboard holes, sealing them, too.

More questions:
Would more than one quick "dipping" work better? (adding a thicker coating?)
Is there a better coating you know of that would do what I need done?
Where in the world do I buy paraffin?

Just another bit of info for you. Once the "cookie" is in place in the bucket, it won't be disturbed in any way, so little chance the coating would be scratched off.

Thank you, in advance, for any guidance you could provide. I need to do this ASAP. I've included a picture of my "cookie".

Thanks, again.

Linda

This message was edited Jul 5, 2009 11:14 PM

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flightnurse9
Ellery, IL

July 11, 2009
7:48 PM

Post #6807304

Interesting concept:) Well I have experimented with paraffin & let me tell you this...it's melting point is MUCH greater than soy, I'm thinking off top of my head somewhere like 160 to 220 F..VERY SERIOUS burns if you splash & believe me it does happen even to the most careful. So have a bowl of ice cold water, even with ice cubes as a back up to dip in for a beginner. I wish I had! lol
Paraffin is a HARD wax. So if you so choose that may work for you, but I'm wondering how long term it will be for you, in the long run? How warm the soil gets & if its setting outside? I don't know much on the growing side, so if it get's really hot, theoretically the was could melt. But given MP being so high, who knows? I think if given those 2 choices I would go for KILZ personally, or some kind of polyurethane. As far as your candle making...don't expect alot of money making:) It is fun & a great hobby, but it can get expensive! There are some very reputable companies, however they say experiment, experiment for a reason! Alot of them don't know & that way they can sell you more product to experiment yet again!:) lol
The recommendations they give do help! Word of caution..I have not always had the best luck with all of them. The diameter of your container is ESSENTIAL! I have found it to be more accurate by the sites that give the oz, along with diameter of container, otherwise you will have unburned wax hugging the wall of your jar. When I first started experimenting I used whatever container I could find. BAD IDEA! It throws WAY to many variables into your mix of conclusions & final product. KEEP IT SIMPLE. Find 1 or 2 different sizes, with appropriate wicks & stick with them, finding the correct wick for them. My personal recommendation to start is to use the 8oz mason jar or even 16oz. Just remember you will need a larger wick to burn a larger well for your 16oz. I will try to look up some of the sites I have used & it could save you alot of experimentation & money in the long run. Why re-invent the wheel when you don't have too?! lol
Later!
planolinda
Plano, TX

July 11, 2009
8:10 PM

Post #6807399

i have a hot plate type thing made for melting candle wax without using the wick--you've all seen them i am sure--
that is what i use for candles that leave all the wax on the sides or that the wick somehow gets buried or whateve

as for not making money for the hobby-i don't make candles but i do make soap and over the years lots of other items and you really don't make it for the money since mass production will always cost less--but i do like to sell enough to keep in supplies --

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2009
2:36 AM

Post #6808712

Thanks for your replies, guys! Much success on your hobby!

Linda
MShaffer736
Loganville, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 12, 2009
6:27 PM

Post #7055726

My daughter and I would like to try soy wax in container candles. I read somewhere that you need to use larger wicks, or perhaps multiple wicks. We use 3 and 4 inch containers. What are your suggestions?

Thanks!

Martha

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

September 12, 2009
8:28 PM

Post #7056123

You only need 1 wick for that size container. Regular size wicks are fine. I find that hemp wicks work best.
MShaffer736
Loganville, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 12, 2009
9:00 PM

Post #7056230

Thanks, Cindy. By the way, my daughter is Juanita (rvnsbrk). Maybe you have met on other forums.

Thanks again,
Martha

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

September 12, 2009
9:05 PM

Post #7056248

Aw yes, Well nice to meet you "mom" ^_^ I could give you some of the websites that I purchase my supplies from if you are interested. I haven't made any candles in awhile busy doing too many other things. Soy is really good to work with cleans up with hot soapy water and makes your hands soft if you get it on yourself.
MShaffer736
Loganville, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 12, 2009
9:29 PM

Post #7056326

Juanita has been purchasing most of our supplies from Peak. We only do this in the winter, for our own use, and have a great time doing it. I like the fact that soy does not produce as much smoke and soot. We tried it before, but they did not burn well, and I guess it was because we did not have the proper wicks. Can't wait until I tell Juanita that we have been communicating.

Thanks again, Cindy.

"Mom"

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

September 12, 2009
9:42 PM

Post #7056384

Peak is good I like them alot. I really need to get busy and make some for Christmas I have a lot of scents that need to be used up. Nice talking with you too.
candlechic
Edgewater, FL

March 25, 2010
6:10 PM

Post #7656034

I'm also new to Soy candle making...about 3 weeks into it & I really love it. I made a bad batch of votives today which has left me frustrated. I used mold release and the votives woudn't come out of the molds and the wax seemed to crack. I ended up taking the wax out with a knife and when I did I noticed the wax seemed sort of mushy even 4 hours after pouring. Can anyone tell me what happened? This was my 5th batch of votives and the first time this has happened.

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 25, 2010
7:05 PM

Post #7656254

Did you use straight soy? If so that is why. Who do you get your soy wax from? There is usually a list of waxes for votives and pillars.
candlechic
Edgewater, FL

March 25, 2010
8:01 PM

Post #7656404

[quote="purpbutfly"]Did you use straight soy? If so that is why. Who do you get your soy wax from? There is usually a list of waxes for votives and pillars. [/quote]

I got the wax from Candlescience.com. The strange thing is i'm using the same wax I did in prior batches that came out fine. I'm wondering if somehow I didn't put the dye and scent in at the right temp. I guess it's all part of the learning process!! LOL!

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 25, 2010
8:12 PM

Post #7656444

Hm well I know you can put the dye in when the wax is hot but the scent towards the end but I don't think that has anything to with them turning out mushy unless you put too much scent in. And Candlescience is good but I've never ordered wax from them. However I did order from Peak once and never again.
kindredscents
Millburn, NJ

March 26, 2010
8:04 AM

Post #7657480

Flightnurs this was excellent information. i never gave much thought the depth and different wick sizes. thank you!

winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2010
11:21 AM

Post #7780694

Hello again, all. One year later and still experimenting. Trying to get that wick thing down. It's been frustrating to say the least. Even wicks that are expressly made for soy wax do not always work well. If it says "for 3 inch diameter candles", (such as Simple Soy 3 or Eco Soy 12), rest assured it will just about burn a 2 inch votive. I gave up, and started double-wicking almost every jar. TWO Eco 12s in a 3 inch container will almost always give a good melt pool, all the way out to the sides of the glass, and 1 inch deep. Almost always. Sometimes, even this double wicking will just sit there with weak flames and end up drowning in the wax. The fragrance oil and the dye have an effect on the burning, so even more experimenting is necessary. It gets expensive.

purpbutfly

purpbutfly
(Cindy) Marysville, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 10, 2010
11:32 AM

Post #7780726

I too was having problems with wicks. I have finally found a good one and use it for all size containers. They are made from Hemp, and burn really well. A nice even burn, hardly any soot at all after blowing out.

Here is the link. I use the Hemp-60048

http://www.naturesgardencandles.com/candlemaking-soap-supplies/item/wk-c/-Hemp-Wicks--100-count.html
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2010
11:14 PM

Post #7782458

Thanks for the recommendation! I just bought some CD wicks but the candles are still curing so I don't know the results yet. I'm going to try the hemp wicks next. The reviewers at the website give them high marks for soy wax..
craftsmaster
Manila
Philippines

June 6, 2010
6:35 PM

Post #7865194

Well I'm Carmel I live back in my hometown in City of Pines. A mother, a wife, a sister and a friend. I have 1 kid that is now teenager and have been married a couple of years ago. I started my online candle making business way back 2004. Now, I have my own business platform that brought me success for years.

Soy wax has been part of the candle making family now for a little more than a decade. But in those 10 years or so it has filled a void. More candle makers are searching for natural materials with which to create candles. The only material up until this point has been beeswax -- and that type of wax can be expensive if it's the only type of wax you use.

craftsmaster

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