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Tropical Zone Gardening: Papaya 101 "My Experiences"

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:16 AM

Post #4025006

For my fellow Texan, Texasgal77

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:17 AM

Post #4025011




This a a papaya from my tree FEB 2006-
I however started off with purchasing a papaya the store.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:18 AM

Post #4025016

Cut Papaya
Cut Papaya in half - length ways.
Usually a ripe papaya will not have much green on the skin. I only have experience with this variety which is a Central American variety and a hermaphrodite. Papaya's are usually male and female with some varieties having the ability to morph their sex to the what is needed- ie too many males - some will turn to females- while others like this Central American variety is both sexes- I have had as many as 10 trees in the yard and all of them bore fruit. So my first pick in the Papaya realm was a lucky one.

This message was edited Sep 27, 2007 8:14 PM

This message was edited Sep 27, 2007 8:15 PM

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:18 AM

Post #4025018

Remove seeds
Seeds are usually pulpy. Take a small spoon that fits in the cavity and scrape the seeds out on to a paper towel. I usually use a paper plate lined with a couple of paper towels. You can also put the seeds in a strainer and wash off the pulpy stuff. I figured mother nature has the pulpy stuff around to help her seeds out- so I leave them on. Put the paper plate in a high dry place- in my house that is above the cupboards in the kitchen.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:19 AM

Post #4025022

Picture of dried seeds
This is what the seeds will look like dried. They loose about 1/4 of their mass. The seeds should be hard at this stage. Time for drying varies- About a week to two weeks. Try to remove as much of the organic material from the papaya- this may slow drying and attract unwanted critters.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:20 AM

Post #4025025

Picture of Papaya fruit, fresh and dried seeds
This is a picture of the Papaya fruit, fresh seeds and dried seeds.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:21 AM

Post #4025028

Planting
I've always waited until around may to plant them when it's very hot- But this year I've learned about H202, seed mats..and a whole new world of propagating seeds. I will say- that I was rather surprised by the high propagation rate. It was a good thing because there was a road of trial and error to be traveled.. I leave the seeds in the pot until they reach about 8 inches. The less repotting- the better. They are much easier repotting younger than older. They do not like their roots messed with. As a rule of thumb- l let the papayas get root bound.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:22 AM

Post #4025032

Re-potting
I usually will pot the plants in an 8 inch nursery container with large holes. Good drainage is imperative- This variety of Papayas are not forgiving when they have "wet feet". I treat Papayas like an anual. I start my crop for next year this season. If the winter is bad - I have my new trees in the green house to replace them. The growth rate is extremely rapid! Overwintering I leave the Papaya trees in the 8 inch container root bound- where they stay in stasis. When stored in the green house - I do not water them hardly at all. I will mist them. The Papayas are about 4 feet tall at this stage- and remain root bound. This gives them the good drainage advantage.
I have a rule of thumb - not to repot the papaya more than 3 times before going into the selected location. Keeping them in pots gives you the advantage of climate control ..you can move them out of the rain etc. I will upsize and repot for the last time into a 20 inch or so pot. The tree will start growing rapidly again. Papayas like to be in the ground. I was successful in growing 1 that bore fruit in a large pot- but as a rule of thumb- after about 5-6 feet they do not fare well.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:24 AM

Post #4025041

Fertilizing your Papaya
I killed alot of trees trying fertilizers on them. I scoured the web, but it was mainly for industry and not helpful at the time. I had thrown in the towel - listing them as not liking any fertilzer - Until last summer I discovered thru DG thread - about Hibiscus Fertizer. We were discussing this in the Brug forum, and the place that sells it is here in Houston- So I bought some...and I did try it on the Papayas..At last ..they really responded to the fertilzer which is 18-8-28 combination specifically for Hibiscus. The Papayas really love it. As a matter of fact I use it on most of my tropicals now. This picture is a picture of the left papaya tree fertilzed with the 18-8-28 and the right...well not! See if you notice a difference. the pots are varied- which must be taken into account- still, it must be the perfect blend for the papayas.
This product is made by Houston Fertilizer, and can only be found there.
http://yardgeek.com/

This message was edited Sep 27, 2007 8:03 PM

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:26 AM

Post #4025044

Finding a location
This unknown strain seems to prefer a part sun very well drained location. I would say these Papayas prefer to be dry by the end of the day. Once you've chosen a good location..the tree will really take off.
I have tried these trees in full sun, and they do not do well. These trees like a good half day full sun, the rest shaded. It doesn't seem to matter to them whether it's afternoon or morning half of the sun. It seems that the largest trees I have get morning sun, midday shade, afternoon sun.
This tree is 3 months old

This message was edited Sep 27, 2007 8:05 PM

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #4025057

Fruit
Usually the tree will start flowering and turning into small Papayas. As I mentioned this strain all bore fruit. Fruit usually remains on the tree over winter ripening in late winter early spring. If it is a warm winter the fruit may mature in early fall late winter.
The tree pictured was planted in august at 4 feet tall. It is now about 11 feet, you can see it was growing so fast that longer spaces appear from the bottom fruits to the top. This was an "overwintered" tree which I will explain for Sub-Tropical or Non Tropical areas.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:33 AM

Post #4025064

The tree will bloom it's first year provided the conditions are right. 2007 was a bit of a wet year for Papaya trees, never the less, if the location is WELL DRAINED, it will thrive.

Picture of blooms

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:37 AM

Post #4025069

As soon as the blooms close, you will notice that the fruit begins to form.

Keep in mind, this is only 1 type of Papaya out of many strains. I pretty much hit the lottery in buying this particular type from the grocery store and it being a hermaphradite, neither female or male. Judging by the length of the leaves, I'd say this is a type from Central America. I've seen these in Costa Rica, liking similar sun exposure.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:39 AM

Post #4025075

More blooms/fruit

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:50 AM

Post #4025116

Sub Tropical or Non Tropical Locations.

Face it: It's going to freeze, and if you want Papayas, the best thing to do is plant alot and treat them like annuals. Start a fresh crop every year, set aside a good 10 to 20 that you will over winter. If the planted trees survive then it's a bonus!
I started seedlings this year that will overwinter 2 winters before I plant them in the ground. I did start this ritual with only 1 over winter which works just fine.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
12:57 AM

Post #4025146

The advantage of overwintering 2 winters is maturity and growth control. This is what the trees look like that I will over winter this year. They were overwintered in the green house last year. If this winter kills any of the papayas I have that are mature, these trees will be planted in early spring and be huge by the end of next summer, and bearing fruit.

Again, this also works over one winter, and the trees will grow very fast as well.

I've saved the seeds from that one papaya 5 years ago and have had hundereds of Paypaya and Papaya trees all from that one fruit. The key is to treat them like annuals. Papaya tree life span is not usually very long perhaps 5 or 6 years on average. There are always exceptions of course.

If there is one piece of advice I had to select above all others...it's water. If there is a side to error on, then let it be the dry side, other wise they will rot right down to the ground while you helplessly watch.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4025159

Growing in Pots.

Papaya are great looking in pots, but if you expect fruit, you will be disappointed. Again, I was lucky in my first dabbles to actually get one to grow fruit, which turned out to be lucky as it was the last tree to grow fruit after all my experimenting the first year I tried all of this.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
1:20 AM

Post #4025221

This year we actually got a hard freeze the day before Spring started, and the first freeze since I've lived in this house over 8 years. It was death and mayhem..but you know..this tree came back, and actually grew 2 tops...with papayas growing as we speak.

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
1:32 AM

Post #4025268

This is how I prefere them to look.
Notice how long the leaves are on this type of Papaya. You will notice a difference if you've been to Hawaii in the size and shape of tree trunks and leaves. I have since started some Hawaiin Papayas, the leaf stems are much shorter and the leaves very much broader then the ones in these pictures.

I took this data from my diary that was over a couple of years, so some of the comments and captions my seem inconsistent, but I think it's enough to get started.

RJ
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
1:33 AM

Post #4025269

This was suppose to go with the caption above...!

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Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

September 28, 2007
1:39 AM

Post #4025301

Said it before, and I'll say it again! Wow! Randy, thank you so much for sharing all this wonderful info! Outstanding!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
1:54 AM

Post #4025346

Sure,
Thanks for letting me know about my new favorite forum...Tropical Gardening!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

September 28, 2007
3:00 AM

Post #4025596

Yippee!!!! I knew you'd like it here!
LeePerk
Zolfo Springs, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 28, 2007
3:21 AM

Post #4025668

I was so excited to find this forum. I am sure it was not meant just for me (ha) but i think it was as i am just now starting to try growing papayas. Great to learn about the hibiscus fertilizer. I used to live in Victoria,Tx south of Houston but I am back in FL now. The weather is much the same.

Thanks for all the wonderful info!!!!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
3:39 AM

Post #4025732

Randy, Wow! Thank you so very much. It is sincerely appreciated! I have my seeds drying now. If I start them now, and overwinter them in the garage, would they be OK? Guess I should wait until spring. I have enough to overwinter as it is! I'm sure they would grow better their first few months in sunlight and fresh air!!

Again, thanks so much for all of the information!

This message was edited Sep 28, 2007 8:45 PM
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

September 28, 2007
3:55 AM

Post #4025756

I LeePerk! Welcome to Tropical Gardening! We have a great time here...lots of friendly folks, great info, great fun. Our only problem is staying on topic...don't seem able to do that much, but we sure have a lot of fun trying!
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

September 28, 2007
4:24 AM

Post #4025804

Aloha and welcome! So glad you are both here on Tropical gardening!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
7:48 PM

Post #4027865

So Welcome,
It definately was a trick getting there...but after that they are surprisingly easy to grow
fancyflea
Wharton, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
8:09 PM

Post #4027954

WOW... is all I can say. Your information is so precise and easy to follow Randy. I will be moving to Texas next Spring so this is very exciting.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 28, 2007
8:48 PM

Post #4028065

Really? coool. Where in Texas are you moving to? It's great for gardening here...Although I must admit..I think this is the first year in many that I'm looking forward to cooler weather as I've sort of bitten off more than I can chew this year ...trying to keep up is nearly full time job, and I already have one of those!
Rj

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 28, 2007
9:07 PM

Post #4028147

Applause!!
Wished I had known then how to grow them when I was living in Lafayette, La. Your pictures brought me back to South East Asia, where neighbours guard their papayas more than their "rambutans" and durians!!
IThank you very much being so generous with your growing tips.
fancyflea
Wharton, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
12:05 AM

Post #4028668

I will be moving to the Houston area near my brother and his wife. I'm from Cape Cod Mass. but had to be in NC for the past year. I had a great cottage style garden which I loved and really miss. Some of my very favorite plants will not grow in Houston and I had to morn for them for awhile. Now I am ready to learn about and fall in love with some tropicals ...and papayas will surely be one of them.
LeePerk
Zolfo Springs, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 29, 2007
12:07 AM

Post #4028676

thanks for the welcome all. I am fairly new to Daves gardening. I joined sometime back but have just now gotten enough time to enjoy it. I am still learning my way around. rj you did such a wonderful job with the papayas do you know anything about pomegranites? I am trying to grow them also.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2007
12:58 AM

Post #4028847

We have 2 papayas growing at work and I forget what ones they are. lol. Just found out we had them today. One is fragrant and the other one isn't and has mountain in it's name. It grows outside year round in our heavy clay.

In this pic it is to the left. That one is the fragrant one. You can barely see it.

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fancyflea
Wharton, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4028861

Pepper, Do the plants produce fruit?
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2007
1:02 AM

Post #4028870

Here is a full view of that bed.

This a papaya? If so this is the non fragrant one.

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pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2007
1:03 AM

Post #4028876

I think they do though I forgot to ask the woman who takes care of them.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
1:06 AM

Post #4028891

So your moving to Houston...!!! We'll have to meet up when you get settled. I have quite a few plants, and your welcome to come and see if there is anything you like to add to your new place. I'll have a papaya tree waiting for your arrival!
I know what you mean about cottage style. I really like cottage style..and I think we can achieve that in very early spring here, like feb thru apr


I must admit I haven't tried pomegranites. I've started some kumquoat trees...I don't even know how to spell them.

.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
1:09 AM

Post #4028902

Those are cool leaves...very leathery looking.
I've not heard of fragrant Papaya trees... I think I forecast trying a whole variety of species in the future..that would be fun.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #4028913

I will get more details from her this weekend. I will bug her and if she doesn't have enough info our Direc of hort is a walking encyclopedia and I can bug him. lol. I love bugging them about the plants there. I sometimes drive them nuts with my questions but I tell them I am also asking for other people. lol
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

September 29, 2007
1:38 AM

Post #4029019

That's our Pepper!!! Pestiferous to a fault, and all for our benefit! Love ya kiddo!

"Quite a few plants", Randy? I'd say so!!!! More like "quite a few jungles"! His pictures are gorgeous, so if you haven't seen them go check out U/W Gardens # (most recent - I lose track).

I can just hear all the philosophical discussions taking place amid the pretty lights and beautiful jungle flora. I'd take him up on the offer Fancyflea...it would make a great start to a new garden!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
10:03 AM

Post #4029835

This is the recovered tree in post Post #4025221

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fancyflea
Wharton, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2007
4:05 PM

Post #4030585

Thanks Randy. I would greatly appreciate that. I'll make a point to meet up sometime "next year" and get my papaya. I feel welcomed already!! I don't know much about tropicals but love the lush gardens they produce. Your garden looks like a tranquil place to be. I've been doing a lot of research on what grows there in the Houston area and planning a new garden is always exciting and challenging.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 2, 2007
12:30 AM

Post #4038615

Randy, thanks for these tips. I'll be trying one of these in the spring. What was it you learned about H202? Any tips on the actual seed sprouting process?
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 2, 2007
1:01 AM

Post #4038752

Never heard that papayas are fragrant either, ours are too tall to get my nose up there!
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2007
1:10 AM

Post #4038803

lol. I haven't had a chance to ask if they fruit yet. They were setting up for a photo shoot and we were all running around. Typical Monday.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
1:45 AM

Post #4038952

Yes, I've written a few things about H202 Hydrogen Peroxide with some links as well. You'll have to scroll down a ways.

The blog is called OFF THE SHELF GARDEN TIPS H202/ASPIRIN AND...

Basically it is using items that are intended for one thing, but work great in other things like our gardens.

http://davesgarden.com/tools/blog/index.php?tabid=1923
lovetropics
Scottsdale, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 2, 2007
4:01 AM

Post #4039402

Hi,
thank you so much for posting the info. I find it very helpful. Is there any way I can tell if I buy it from store--whether or not it is a hermaphrodite?Papaya are available in our grocery stores but they are not labeled as any variety.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 2, 2007
4:57 AM

Post #4039508

Thanks a bunch, Randy!

Ooops, getting that "Access Denied" message again.

This message was edited Oct 1, 2007 9:58 PM
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
5:02 AM

Post #4039518

Yep, me too! Access denied...are you charging an entrance fee to get this info RJ? Like a toll road...LOL????
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
5:45 AM

Post #4039566

I know...what's up with that...hmmm...let me figure somethings out.

One more try
http://davesgarden.com/tools/blog/index.php?tabid=1923

I don't believe there is a way to tell about the tree from the fruit at the store.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
6:10 AM

Post #4039592

Nope, still access denied...
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
8:53 AM

Post #4039650

okay...do this..go to the top of this thread and you will find communities...click on blogs...and then search for
rjuddharrison blog...it's got a weird search, or rather I'm not familiar with it.
Just to be conistent lets see if my Diary home page can link...this the place I found by the above directions.
http://davesgarden.com/community/blogs/m/rjuddharrison/

and if it doesn't work...then just search thru all the names for rjuddharrion
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
4:52 PM

Post #4040901

This link worked! Thanks! I'll have to go back and read more later. There sure is alot of info there! Facsinating! (sp?) !!!!
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 2, 2007
5:16 PM

Post #4040963

My goodness, Randy, what a lot of information in one place! Thanks for sharing your research.

Kathleen
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
11:35 PM

Post #4042306

Oh your welcome...it's interesting what you can find out there
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 2, 2007
11:37 PM

Post #4042314

And this is all just one more reason to love this site! So many people willing to share their trials and tribulations! Thanks so much for sharing Randy!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2007
11:45 PM

Post #4042340

Your welcome...my blogs are my articles so to speak! The H202 thread has a readership of 19 people watching it so far.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
12:43 AM

Post #4042628

and growing! Love the pictures of your garden! So beautiful and peacefull! To think its in the middle of Houston!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:12 AM

Post #4042753

Thankyou!.
I was up early and trimming . It seems impossible for me to grow small plants...everything gets giant. After several loads of branches, the garden really looked nice with humming birds buzzing through.. It was one of those days where I could have spent the whole day out there.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:27 AM

Post #4042822

It was nice out today...I was out in the garden this morning and lost track of time.It was cool and pleasant, not too humid...just really nice!

If you're going to be pruning for the fall...think of me...would love some cuttings to root!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #4042833

Oh my goodness, bring your truck...forget cuttings, I have full size plants, potted and ready to go.

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 3, 2007
1:36 AM

Post #4042856

There you go Rj these little babies are from a store bought pomegranite...very easy to germinate...I just sucked the juice out of the pips and planted them into a sandy mix and ...thats it...(warm shade)...I have made dozens and and dozens this way.

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Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #4042857

Oh...the truck's not running...how many can I get in my back seat or trunk? Or promise you'll keep some, and I'll really push for DS to get the truck ready!!!!
I'll go tell him NOW! LOL
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:39 AM

Post #4042866

Chrissy...nice baby plants! I have baby daylilies, but no pictures yet! Did you survive all the cooking and company? Hope so!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
1:45 AM

Post #4042888

Oh we can fit stuff in your car. several times!
Really plan an excursion.

Cool Pomegranites...I have loquoat trees started now...

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 3, 2007
2:01 AM

Post #4042933

Love Loquat trees ...not that crazy for the fruit ..but I find the leaves exotic and love the shadows cast by them...as they play over the cutains etc...to me they look Egyptian.Sadly they harbour the fruit fly over Winter so I had to get rid of mine...I only grow organic and although I use baits that catch a lot they are almost always a problem even for folk that spray...so mine had to go ..sadly...do you have fruit fly in the US?
Hey 77 sure I am doing fine ...how are you? did you enjoy your little visit?...this time of the year it starts to get very busy...twixt gardening and visitors...and the *grumbling* heat! gets to me ...I envy you going into the cooler weather ...but if I want Summer Tropicals... I have to grin and bear it...scary that we have bushfires this early in Spring.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
2:24 AM

Post #4043008

We do, but they don't bother us too much here.
Yes they are nice looking trees.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
2:52 AM

Post #4043086

Randy you have Dmail!

Chrissy, yes, all went well. It was a nice little get together. Granddaughter and daughter were very happy with their gifts. I survived. Rested Sunday. Re-potted a few things yesterday, started some amaryllis seeds. Rested today. The weather was very nice this morning...so cool, not humid, just beautiful.

I am sorry that you have those brush fires. Will keep you in my prayers! Those are so dangerous.

We are excited about getting cooler weather. It is still in the low 90's here, and will be for the rest of the week. Take care!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
3:16 AM

Post #4043156

Ha Ha Ha...I just had visions of me coming to Randy's place and toting plants on the plane up to Colorado, then back to Hawaii then adding to them what I plan on getting from Carol, and trying to convince the airline to let me on with my cloak of many plants! Somehow, I don't think that will go over real well...darn the luck...so Jeanne, you will have to enjoy the bounty for me as well! Get some beauties!

Chrissy - cute little pommies! Well done!

Loquats - one of the fruit I will be writing about!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
3:29 AM

Post #4043192

Shari, yes...remember what Randy was telling us about weights and balances...don't think they would let you fly with all of those plants! I'll take good care of them for you! Don't leave out the pineapple in your article...eat one, plant one free! Just potted two more Monday. The one was the top of the one we had grown!! Neat, huh?

Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
3:35 AM

Post #4043215

Very neat! And that is exactly the way to do it! Pretty soon you have a grove of Pineapples! ☺
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
3:38 AM

Post #4043222

Ya never know Shari, you might just get to visit the plants in their natural habitat soon.
Send me link to articles..

Jeanne, Dmail...after several foiled attemps!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
3:51 AM

Post #4043248

Randy - can't believe you don't get them! Sign up under "preferences". Meanwhile - see if this works...there is some great info to be had!

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
3:57 AM

Post #4043263

Yes, pineapple grove to go with my Banana tree grove!

When I was at Lowes today they wanted $23 or $27 for a fruiting banana tree...Good grief! The highest price I paid for mine was $10 for a couple, $5 for a few, $1 each for many, and was given about 6 for free...Now we have over 80!

By the way Randy, do you want another Banana tree? I'd be glad to bring you one.
Sago pups, amaryllis seedlings? Most of what I have are still little, except for the nanners...then we have small, med, and large trees!

There is a small airport near our house and as the planes fly over I'm sure they refer to our yard as the Banana Grove!!!!! They totally line the backyard!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
4:11 AM

Post #4043299

What ever possessed you to acquire so many banana trees??? I mean, I like bananas - but 80+ trees!!! Wowzers!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
4:20 AM

Post #4043319

We started with 5. Then we added 5 more free. Then were given 3. Then we bought 16 for $1 each...OK 29 two or three years ago...and they multiplied. However, when they bear bananas then they die...so last year we lost 5 to having fruit, and a few to the freeze. So, we had about 90, now we have 80 as of last week, that is. There may be more pups by now!

I had originally planned to give some to my daughter, but now she doesn't want any. Eventually we will have to find an outlet for some of them. I will see if our local nursery needs a supplier. Only fair, 5 came from there originally!!!! LOL
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
4:26 AM

Post #4043339

I think it would be only fair that you charge them a good bit for the care and upkeep for the past few years!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
4:31 AM

Post #4043349

Yeah, (rent): board, room, lots of water, TLC...how can you put a price on that?
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
4:34 AM

Post #4043353

Can you post a picture?
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #4043370

This picture is back in Sept of 06, but you can see how tall they were. Since then they've been cut back some.

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2007
4:50 AM

Post #4043371

Wow! I can't imagine that many 'nanas! I guess we have about thirty plants and we were told that there were seven different varieties, although I don't know what they are - forgot to ask that!

Because of our climate they are replacing themselves even before we harvest off the mother plant. Our 'nanas average 35 - 50 pounds per hand and they ripen year long. Sometimes it becomes a problem - freezers full, friends run away from you, and we are all get sick of eating them fresh!

There is an old time saying in Hawaii that if you give someone unripe bananas you are truely a friend, ripe ones not so much because you are trying to get rid of the excess...

Many sailors here will not allow bananas on board ship, considered bad luck!

Bananas are also used here by friends from Micronesia as a medicine. Their nephew got caught between a rock wall and a backing truck, severely hurting and bruising him. They chopped down one of my plants and crushed the trunk in a bathtub of warm water and made him lie in it for a couple of hours three times a day. He also had to drink crushed trunk water. Believe it or not he had no aches and pains after two days! This cure came directly from their Mom in Micronesia, who is well versed in local herbal remedies, via telephone! They also use poltices made from coleus leaves for cuts, to avoid infection!



Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
4:53 AM

Post #4043375

We only get a dozen or so bananas at one time...I wish we got more. Some of the trees do vary in type. Some of our bananas are not very good to eat. Some we only get 3-5 per tree. Do you know how to pollenate them?

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
4:57 AM

Post #4043385

We use aloe vera for cuts or blisters! Here is a picture of my hut...I think I have posted it before...

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:02 AM

Post #4043393

No thanks..no nanners. no room.
But have you ever seen a banana tree like this? My friend has this tree down the street in his green house.

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
5:02 AM

Post #4043395

You Texas Tropikids just keep amazin me!

Jenny! You cheated! You looked in my Word files and found my next article! Micronesian Medicine!!!! That is just too weird! I'm serious, I have the Kamani and Banana paragraphs already done! Aren't they amazing?? I am meeting with several of the "aunties" on the 8th to get some more info...
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:03 AM

Post #4043397

Love those cheater gals...heheh
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
5:04 AM

Post #4043399

What a cool looking naner!!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:04 AM

Post #4043401

Even more banana trees...with my Grandson...tallest...and the little boy from next door. My Grandson helped my son plant the banana trees. We were even given some by his other Grandmother, so he calls them his banana trees. It has about 12 good size green ones on it now. I'll have to get more pictures of the bananas.

I wish we had more fruit!

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:06 AM

Post #4043404

I still haven't learned the secret about bananas..except they don't like staying wet.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:09 AM

Post #4043406

me either!
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2007
5:22 AM

Post #4043417

Lovely stand of 'nanas Jeanne! Do you have to baby them during the winter? Nice looking hut too!

RJ, I hope your friends greenhouse is going to be tall enough!

Ah Shari! You know what they say about great minds think alike (they also say foolish minds seldom differ, but we won't go there!) You didn't know I have little elves who get into other peoples computers and trump their articles before they are published did you?
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:27 AM

Post #4043423

No, we don't baby them whatsoever!

Elves, huh? Is that what the E stands for in ESP? Elves stealing property...
I got it! LOL

What are they called in Hawaiian?

You know that old saying about not carrying pork over the Pali mountain...well maybe not, that was on Oahu. (It predicted that evil would get you)
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2007
5:32 AM

Post #4043429

LOL! That was a really good one!

Don't know about taking pork over the Pali, sounds like a crazy Oahu one to me - now have I told you about our Menehuni (see, we are sane on THIS Island!)
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:36 AM

Post #4043433

I though it was Menehuni! LOL Yeah, see, I remember a few things...that's surprising...and I haven't even taken my herbal remedies for that this week...
What are they called? LOL
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2007
5:48 AM

Post #4043446

Bananas ! Acually I think it's mai'a...don't quote me - I could be saying something off color for all I know!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
5:52 AM

Post #4043455

It might be earlier in the day for you two, but it's really early here...12:51 AM, and I have errands to run later in the day...so as Chrissy says "Have a good one!"

It's been fun girls...see ya later!
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2007
5:58 AM

Post #4043464

Sleep tight!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
9:55 PM

Post #4045674

Jenny, as long as the elves are nice, they are welcome. Gremlins on the other hand get et by my pooter dragon. I'll warn him your guys are there, so they don't get et by mistake!☺
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
10:07 PM

Post #4045731

LoL. That is my cats nick name...Pooter..
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
10:41 PM

Post #4045855

Lol!! Mine are Bogie and Cagney. Cagney is the laziest cat in the world, he even lays down to drink!

Thumbnail by Islandshari
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
11:09 PM

Post #4045929

I think I must have upset my kitty when I was busy sweeping the deck, and cutting the hole around the tree bigger, because an offering lay on the front door step in the form of a dead mouse. He takes it so personally sometimes...LOL
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
11:12 PM

Post #4045940

Felinem caticus sleeperondom pooter kitty (the latin name)

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
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Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
11:13 PM

Post #4045944

I think that generally means that they are "thanking" you...bringing food to the family. You must have done something he liked!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 3, 2007
11:15 PM

Post #4045948

Oh look! Pooter and Cagney look much more like brothers, than Cagney and Bogie do! Bogie has black markings, while Cagney has the ginger like Pooter!

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 3, 2007
11:40 PM

Post #4046033

Very cute kitty cats...Our bananas take 18 months to fruit ...don't know if that helps anyone...they like moist but well drained conditions and are usually grown on the slopes for that reason.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2007
11:44 PM

Post #4046050

Okay...aaaaah...that is the first good tip I've heard on bananas! Thankyou, I knew there was something to it. I don't even water mine here because they're not happy..
Do they like any sort of particular nutrient...?

Cagney and Pooter...tonight on NBC...hehehehe

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 3, 2007
11:55 PM

Post #4046070

We have a product called "banana special" but ...someone told me that is the same as citrus food...me I only use manures ... I try to be organic!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
12:01 AM

Post #4046083

Good enough for me...(black gold) the name of the cow manure and mulch I buy..
Which reminds me I have to get busy..and start mulching for winter.
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4046300

Not NBC...DGTV! We don't have any local manure, but I keep thinking that the marina - especially where they clean the fish, should provide a wealth of nutrients. Unfortunately, they throw all the detrius to the nurse sharks that hang around the marina when the fishing boats come in. Whadayathink? It the idea worth persuing?
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
1:07 AM

Post #4046327

Shari, taking food from a hungry shark? What are you thinking? LOL

Sure, go for it!
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 4, 2007
1:09 AM

Post #4046343

Do you have seaweed? We have to buy it by the bottle! Fish would surely be good if properly used, I guess, but how to control the smell? Definitely worth investigating, I think.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

October 4, 2007
1:18 AM

Post #4046396

Curly loves holes that are full of potting soil or have little niches to play in. We had a rock pile on the property line that I took apart to use them to line the iris bed and he was in the acting like a dog. He was rolling around and sticking his face into crevices and attacking the grass everytime it moved. And the rocks too. If I threw them out of the way he would jump over to them and sniff and pounce. LOL. He's crazy sometimes. Whiskers is just plain lazy and loves to sleep the day away.

Shari, it can't hurt to ask for fish leftovers for the yard. They might be nice and say yes.
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
1:34 AM

Post #4046470

Jeanne - those nurse sharks are about as tame as Pepper's Curly! But, I still think I would try to collect it before they got it in their jaws! I've been concerned about the smell too.

K - no seaweed here, darn the luck!

Pepper - I can just see him! My Bogie used to be like that, but they are both getting so old that they are "too cool" to play much anymore. Cagney not at all, and Bogie only when he thinks no one is looking, if you laugh, or he realizes he's been caught playing, he stops immediately and assumes the "Mr. Cool - meant to do that" stance. I miss the kitten in them. Enjoy Curly while you can.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

October 4, 2007
1:36 AM

Post #4046480

Curly gets bored easily. lol. Eats bugs, hummers, mice, birds, whatever he can catch. He has bad breath because of it too. LOL. I think he will always be an active cat. Probably not as active as now but still running around. Whiskers always was somewhat lazy. lol
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #4046482

Shari, really? WOW!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
1:43 AM

Post #4046501

What????
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
1:46 AM

Post #4046508

The nurse sharks as tame as Pepper's cat...Are they real sharks? Or is that a name for a particular fish...got a picture?
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
1:50 AM

Post #4046520

I've done homework again...this article suggests that the fish leftovers was the ticket.

Article is called: Terra preta: unearthing an agricultural goldmine

This is a link about a man made soil composition made in the amazon some 1000 years ago that scientist are trying to unravel it/s composition. It emphasises charcoal and fish products which continues as a theme throughout the article. Apparently the soils have survived through the years continuing to retain its viability.

Link
http://deltafarmpress.com/news/051114-terra-preta/

Some fast quotes

-Among the most important properties are high nutrient concentrations (especially for calcium and phosphorus). Most likely, this is linked to a unique utilization of agricultural and fishery waste products
We believe that fish residues are an important portion of the high phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus is really the number one limiting nutrient in the central Amazon.

“Another interesting aspect of terra preta’s high fertility is the char (charcoal) content of the soil. This was deliberately put into the soil by the Indians and doesn’t only create a higher organic matter — and therefore higher fertility through better nutrient-retention capacity — but this special type of carbon is more efficient in creating these properties.

“You can have the same amount of carbon in terra preta and adjacent soils and the infertile soil won’t change. Terra preta’s abilities don’t just rely on more carbon, but the fact that its char and humus is somehow more efficient in creating beneficial properties. That’s the truly unique aspect.”
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
1:58 AM

Post #4046547

Well there you go Shari...better get some fish! Yum Yum for the plants!!!!!

Wow Randy, you are really good at that research stuff! From now on we'll just ask you, cause you are so quick to find the answer! Now calling Prof. Randy...do you have any experience with avacodo seeds?

Have you tried to grow any other trees from seeds from the grocery store, or plants in general?

Question...how on earth do you water so many plants?

This message was edited Oct 3, 2007 8:45 PM
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
2:42 AM

Post #4046766

Jeanne - here's a nurse shark, its not a great shot, but will give you the idea. They are real sharks, they're just scavengers...they prefer to sit on the bottom and wait for food to fall to them, rather than go out and get it. Fairly timid...will leave the area if anything they are threatened by is near. That's why I called them "tame".

Randy - what great info! If I could just figure out what to do about the smell, I'd have a wealth of fertilizer! Maybe mix the fish with charcoal briquets? Hmmmm...

Thumbnail by Islandshari
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #4046788

Interesting that you say that...charcoal and sulpher are nulifying agents
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #4046790

ooooh, it doesn't look tame to me! That's scary!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
2:54 AM

Post #4046813

Randy - please elaborate ... nulifying? the benefits of the fish? or the smell?

Nah, Jeanne - she's the least scary of the sharks.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
3:17 AM

Post #4046895

LOL...
You know the theory behind lighting a match in the bathroom. It is because sulpher cancels other smells out...in theory...charcoal absorbs oders...

Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
3:21 AM

Post #4046919

Aha...that's where I was going with the thought. Glad to know I was on the right track.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 4, 2007
3:31 AM

Post #4046936

Hey, Chrissy, so the "Choot" works well on the 'nanas' and so does the Papaya? Hi JR, great thread, I've been lurking your thread from day one. Thought, I'll finally come out and say hi to everyone. :-)

I'm not the purish of organic gardener, but this year I skipped the fert. and this is how my flowering vine responded to just compost, and little water. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 4, 2007
3:35 AM

Post #4046946

Oh Pardon, it's not JR. RJ, forgive me, not to change the subject, but I've my very first Papaya this summer. I'm hanging out here hoping to get some tips to overwinter it. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 4, 2007
3:38 AM

Post #4046953

Gorgeous Lily_love! Some things just want water, dirt and an occasional "gee you're pretty" to flourish. Welcome...no need to lurk, all voices are welcome in the Tropical Gardening Forum...and as you can see - so are all topics!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 4, 2007
3:46 AM

Post #4046967

I've been away since the day you've got the Forum initiated. It's really up and running, we owe this one to you. Thanks Shari. Also, I've enjoyed your articles.
RJ, you pics. reflect a subtropical oasis! Way to go. I've seen your various posts, all beautiful lust planting. Congrats.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2007
3:52 AM

Post #4046976

Thankyou very much!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 5, 2007
1:05 AM

Post #4050003

This forum is a labor of love, and we have a great time! I'm glad you are finally able to join us!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2007
1:27 AM

Post #4050086

This tropical Hibiscus does so well here year after years. So, I thought, growing papaya would be just the equivalence? I'm trying to sow some seeds at present, so hopefully they will sprout. RJ, may have to call on you for support here. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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lovetropics
Scottsdale, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 5, 2007
2:09 AM

Post #4050270

texasgal,
I love your yard. It is very tropical.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
2:14 AM

Post #4050281

you bet,
get them started asap while it's still got a couple of average long warm days left.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
2:40 AM

Post #4050373

lovetropics, thank you!!!!!! We love it too! It's very relaxing. You really can get lost in time out there. It's very theraputic (sp)! I put on the Hawaiian music, light the tiki torches...so nice!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
2:49 AM

Post #4050397

I'll bring the wine
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
3:14 AM

Post #4050466

OK!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2007
1:02 PM

Post #4051160

Ahhh, so romantic, lovely, lovely. :)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
3:13 PM

Post #4051518

That's cool looking..is it a dogwood?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2007
7:36 PM

Post #4052267

No RJ, it's a Fall blooming perennial. Quite charming as you can see here. They begun to bloom around end of July, early August this year due to our drought. One of our hardy Autumn's mainstay in our garden. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/77290/
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
8:03 PM

Post #4052326

Oh wow..I did not recognize them at all. I love those, but we can only grow them in Feb and Mar here. I don't know if they will grow from those fuzzy seeds, but I saved the seeds from blue ones I had a couple years ago.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2007
8:26 PM

Post #4052397

Some literature indicated that devision is best in the Spring for those Japanese species. I found out that's true. I've a small clump of this way back 2000, now I've them all around the garden. Plus extra to share with friends. Just shared some with LaRU DGers, they are taking off nicely, but slowly. Blue? Ah, now that's one of my fav. color!
RJ, you've mentioned that Papaya seeds germinate pretty easily. I'm trying them out with the coffee-filter method. Not sure I'm doing it right. But how "easy" is it? Care to share?
Here is another pink; Tickled Pink plumie. All you need is a lei's necklace to offer the lovely Texas beauty when you knock on her tropical garden gate. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2007
9:15 PM

Post #4052523

Yes, they were a vivid royal blue. I wonder if the seed sill grow...

I've not germinated papaya seeds in coffee filters before. I'd start some l with the coffee filte, and try others in a seed try. That should increase your chances. it's going to need the hot humid conditions. What is the coffee fliter method anyway?

Let me know how that goes...I would throw some seeds in seed try..Ideally bottom heat and a cover over the seed tray.


These smell like peaches...mmm

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
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Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 5, 2007
9:35 PM

Post #4052555

Very pretty - both of you. I often use the coffee filters...out here a heated bottom is not really needed...our weather is always warm.

How about an adenium obesum?

Thumbnail by Islandshari
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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 6, 2007
12:49 AM

Post #4053087

I have used them too, and baggies with papper towels,...but not on Papaya seeds.

Yes most of the time don't have to use bottom heat either, but Papayas really respond to higher heat it seems. I'm not sure what the temps are for her location right now..but I'm guessing it's cooling quite a bit.


Wow...very impressive...adenium obesum...but I call, and I'll raise you a Strophanthus preussii - Poison Arrow Vine

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
12:54 AM

Post #4053103

Shari, Those are beautiful! Adenium or Desert Roses second to Plumies only in fragrance. But the colors and beauty I rate the two size by side. :-)
RJ, thanks I'll transfer some of the Papaya seeds into pottings, temp. remains on the 90'ish outdoor, so try them without the heated mat? Maybe?

A darker pink version of plumie?

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4053119

Now the above vine is exotic looking! Very nicely done, RJ!
Back to fragrance; Phillipine Jasmine (?), the mild but allure fragrance is so very lovely. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 6, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4053120

Lily_love yes get them into the pot noe they shuld sprout pretty quickly...needing only warmth and humidity (if it is very dry make sure they stay moist)
Fish is a great fertilizer! bury it about a foot under anything you are planting...throw a little manure on it so as to deter any likely diners ...and anything you plant above it will leap out of the ground
as soon as the roots hit what the worms have done to it!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 6, 2007
1:06 AM

Post #4053139

Those are beautiful Lily_Love! Plumerias have always been one of my favorites. We had two HUGE trees out in our front yard in Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii for about a year and a half before we got base housing. We made leis for all the occasions at school. It was so much fun. I was the official lei maker for the family. I was 13 and my sisters were only 6 and 4. We had a ball. I know it was better for my folks to take base housing, but I sure hated losing access to those plumeria trees.

I have several small trees, but not enough at one time to make even one lei.

When I graduated from high school in North Carolina in 68 my folks ordered me a double orchid Moana Loa Lei from Hawaii! It was so gorgeous!

Plumerias will always be one of my favorite flowers, of course the orchids, hibiscus...even more so than a rose. Just because of the thoughts of Hawaii.

Oh for the memories...

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 6, 2007
1:15 AM

Post #4053173

Phillipino Jasmine ...beautiful...could you please tell us the botanical name? if you know it?...it looks wonderful.
Love Japanese windflowers too...yours are just lovely

All of these tropical beauties are making me just green with envy...
77...we made leis too as children ...I grew up just a few mins from Botany Bay and there were many beautiful frangipannis...we played with them all the time...they are Summer!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
1:15 AM

Post #4053175

Texasgal; you've been so blessed to have lived in Hawaii, one of the tropical Paradises. Ever decide to go there for a visit. Can you pack me in one of your suitcase? I'd love to go there too. lol.

Unnamed Hoya, while we're talking about the beautiful tropic.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
1:19 AM

Post #4053192

Aloha to Chrissy from Australia! Long time no "type", I'll look the Jasmine up in mins. Chrissy, hang on.

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 6, 2007
1:32 AM

Post #4053244

I have the lovely hoyas too ...not flowering yet though

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
1:42 AM

Post #4053278

Ok, Chrissy here I believe this is the Jasmine. One of my friend is from the Phillipine, and once told me that the Jasmine is their National Flower, and that's the reason I called it Phillipino's Jasmine. :-)
Some also refers to them as Arabian Jasmine, so I'm not certain if the identity is absolute. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55234/

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 6, 2007
1:52 AM

Post #4053320

Thanks L_l...I thought it may be what we we refer to as Sambac jasmine here I have three different ones in very warm sheltered positions...Love them
Have a good one mate :)
chrissy :)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
2:28 AM

Post #4053409

Right back at ya. :-)
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

October 6, 2007
3:01 AM

Post #4053489

Just read this thread...WOW...what great information.

rj...the only thing better looking than your garden is YOU!

What a neat bunch of folks...!!!!

Carol
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 6, 2007
11:34 AM

Post #4053969

blush
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 6, 2007
4:25 PM

Post #4054678

For those of you starting papayas from seed remember to let them dry out first as was suggested in Randy's first postings. I have heard this is the key. I've never had much luck with the seeds until I bought some this year. My dogs "helped" by opening the packet and "planting" them in my bed!! Luckily I was able to find many of them and have a number of them growing in ppots, waiting for thier permanent homes on the hill I am terracing. I also gave some away. Papaya do well here. I bought seeds for two kinds from India and I have seeds for three Solo varieties (the small Hawaiin ones). We only get the larger Mexican varities in stores here but they grow well here so I'm hoping to get some of the smaller, tastier ones growing here.

I should also add that I'm lucky that none of the seeds that the dogs scattered in my bed have sprouted and grown. I'm not much of a housekeeper!!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2007
4:54 PM

Post #4054736

LOL, thanks for the tips on the Papaya seeds. Mine was dried out before I tried to germinate them. Hopefully I'll have some seedlings to overwinter in our zone. 1st Frost hits us around third week of Nov. So I'm hopeful that I'll have some time left.
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 7, 2007
2:20 AM

Post #4056378

So many great posts with fascinating info and beautiful pictures! Randy - that vine is very interesting looking! Why is it called Poison Arrow?

Katiebear -LOL!! I have visions of Papaya trees growing up from a big bed! People trying to sleep around them, like the big tree in Randy's deck!

Thought I'd show you all my prodigeously blooming orchid: This one is right in front of my house, and is a real show stopper!

Thumbnail by Islandshari
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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 7, 2007
2:49 AM

Post #4056493

That is so pretty Shari ...does it take a full sun position or morning shade?
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 7, 2007
2:52 AM

Post #4056509

It gets shade until around 11:00 am...then sun the rest of the day. I was suprised...I had always been told that orchids preferred shady areas, but ours bloom best when given lots of sun. Do get a bit of a problem with black spots on the leaves though.

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 7, 2007
3:00 AM

Post #4056535

Just lovely ...sigh :)
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 7, 2007
4:41 AM

Post #4056758

LOL,
I was told that the headhunters in faaaaaaaar away Borneo used those flowers for the poison in the poison arrow darts.
Are those buckets of orchids! very nice.
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 7, 2007
8:33 PM

Post #4058347

Well, I certainly don't ever want to make you mad! Ha Ha... The orchid I posted is all one plant in a large basket, placed by some driftwood. But I do have orchids all over the yard...and I guess you could call their pots "buckets"...
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 7, 2007
9:59 PM

Post #4058528

The orchids are wonderful Shari!

Got a question for you...I was in Lowes the other day and they had some orchids...don't know what kind marked down for 50% off...I think they were $8. They had no blooms on them. They looked kind of rough. Wondered if they would rebloom...I'll have to go back there and see if they have any more and find out exactly what they were.

Jeanne
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 7, 2007
10:01 PM

Post #4058540

I have seen orchids that looked completely dead rebloom with a little TLC. As long as there is green on the leaves and the roots look fairly healthy, there is hope. That sounds like a pretty good price. I couldn't mail any to you for that. So go for it!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 7, 2007
10:15 PM

Post #4058584

I might, between what I have already spent this month on this and that I may have to wait awhile. I may go over there and see if they've been reduced any further.That was a week ago.

Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 7, 2007
10:16 PM

Post #4058591

Good luck...if you get them, post pics for me, okay?
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 7, 2007
10:19 PM

Post #4058600

OK! It'd probably be tomorrow...
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 7, 2007
11:35 PM

Post #4058818

My sister in Oregon is a real orchid buff. She's always picking up cast-offs at the big stores and bringing them back to health. You do need a good light source and some humidity indoors (gravel trays, etc.). Oh, and she quarantines them until she's sure there is no disease. Most are just suffering from neglect. Good luck!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 8, 2007
12:40 AM

Post #4059056

These are going to have to stay outside. We definately have the humidity out there! I will bring them in for the freezes. But we'll see. Maybe one.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
1:17 AM

Post #4059245

Orchids!!! Ooooh, should we ever lay eyes on orchids! They're so beautiful who could resist those beauties? Only, they're so darn addictive! LOL, or is that just me? I've found this at local HD, believe it or not. I haven't got the name down yet.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 8, 2007
1:23 AM

Post #4059274

That is gorgeous! When did you get that one at HD? Maybe I'll forget Lowes and go to HD!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
1:28 AM

Post #4059301

Many of us gardeners probably don't think of Lowes or HD, but most of my rare plants that I collected are from these two sources.
I've got this one Friday, so hurry. lol.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 8, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #4059307

Yeah...I hate to ask how much it was...it's so huge! WOW

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
1:35 AM

Post #4059337

I think it was reasonable, it's in a 2.3 gallons pot. $25.00 Most their plants in this size fall into this prize ranges.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 8, 2007
1:55 AM

Post #4059417

As big as it is that is reasonable. I've already spent most of my flower money for this month...so may have to wait until later. I hope they still have one. That is nice!
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 8, 2007
3:22 AM

Post #4059791

Lily_love, that is a beaut! What a find for that price.

My problem here is a definite shortage of humidity (for instance, today it was 13). I have a couple that bloom each year, but they don't thrive. Good luck finding something special, 77!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
11:42 AM

Post #4060273

karperc;
It sounds as if your climate would be ideal for plumies, it's so humid here. Growing plumie is a real challenge for me. It's so humid that ...growing cuttings out in the open ground is feasible most of our growing season...
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 8, 2007
4:43 PM

Post #4061381

Yes, I'm trying with plumies again, thanks to Clare on the Plumeria forum. Mine were zapped in the weird freeze we had last winter. Clare sent me some of Brad's cuttings and I found one at Wallyworld for $6 and another from a local grower. Should have some blooms next year. We're having a heat wave now, but the nights are under 50, so they will probably be going dormant soon. This year I am prepared if we get any really low temps!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
4:57 PM

Post #4061446

Great plan for the plumie, karperc. Good lucks with them. When comes to gardening, I believe raising Orchids (certain types of orchids) are easier than Roses, and Plumie, or brugs. But as we learn of each plant's unique cultural requirements. The reward is so, so sweet.

Today I'm repotting my Papaya. For shortly a few weeks, this plant has gained 4-6" in height. :-)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
5:01 PM

Post #4061461

Looking down at the plant. Likes RJ, mentioned this isn't a type of plant that can tolerate windy sites. It's got wind whipped pretty bad, before I moved it into a more sheltered location. Thanks RJ. for the tips.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

October 8, 2007
7:15 PM

Post #4061917

I was going to try a papaya in the spring, but if the wind bothers them that much, I might have to pass. We call our house Breezedale for a reason. :-(
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 8, 2007
9:49 PM

Post #4062353

Lily Love - what a fantastic orchid! Just gorgeous! Good luck to all of you growing such wonderful plants - papaya, orchid, plumies...keep up the good work!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2007
9:58 PM

Post #4062387

Shari, thank you for the well wishes. This is my 1st Papaya, having found RJ's thread on this topic was/is a treat. My plumies going on its 3rd year, so far so good. My orchids collection is random. But, over all, I'm enjoying the fruits of my labor of love. Sharing them too, is a joy. :-)
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2007
12:02 AM

Post #4062871

That is a beautiful orchid. I have one opening up I haven't seen before.. A friend gave me the orchid as it was languishing in her house. I think it will be open enough to photograph tomorrow. The flowers are tiny little guys. I certainly enjoy the length of time they are opened, but they make you pay for it as they take a while to open. I've been watching this one for weeks now, watching it form from the stem and see little future flowers form
I started re-potting my papayas too this weekend. One thing I think I didn't mention, is that if you take off the lower leaves the plant will grow super fast. I don't think I would take any off yours though it looks about right. Looking at the leaves, I would say that is from Hawaii. I need to learn the different types...so much to learn..so little time...:)
I had a good year with plumies thank goodness...I just ignored them...mabe that's why!!!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2007
12:12 AM

Post #4062917

Thank RJ; I'll see about defoliage some of the lower leaves on the Papaya next spring when I'll be ready to give it yet a bigger pot. But, I'm keeping the helpful info. in mind to apply later.
Waiting for our flowers to unfurl is something really fun, but require lots of patience. For instance; this Starfish's buds have taunted me for weeks. :)

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2007
12:32 AM

Post #4062994

Those are the coolest looking blooms..I would use that in a movie featuring alien plants..That is what I love about plants, just when you think you've seen the most bizzare looking life form, you see anothe even more strange and beautiful
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 9, 2007
1:31 AM

Post #4063262

I agree, and add the strange and wonderful things we see in the ocean, and my goodness what a wealth of wonderment and beauty we have!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #4063287

That's for sure!

Shari, I got the orchid. I'll have to get the tag and take a picture of it! I think it will be OK. A customer at the store who owns a nursery in Dayton, near here, said that she thought that it would be OK and to get some Orchid plant food from Lowes. I didn't get it today, but I'll go back and get some later. I'm sure it will be OK for a couple of days.

While I was there I told three people about DG! They were really excited about checking it out!

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 9, 2007
2:43 AM

Post #4063504

Looking forward to seeing your orchid 77 :)
L l your little buds don't say "feed Meeeee" do they ...:)
good luck with the papayas eveyone!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2007
3:09 AM

Post #4063576

LOL, as a matter of fact...

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2007
3:18 AM

Post #4063605

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2273
LOL, Chrissy; it may pop any minute and who knows what it's about to do. lol. For those of us that would like to learn more about this plant. I thought I'll demystify them. Enjoy reading. :-)

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 9, 2007
8:35 AM

Post #4064046

Thanks for that ...I inherited a planter box of them in the 70's and while very interesting at the time I was into all things fragrant in a nice way...well it was out on a deck and when the french windows were open we thought something had died out there...it took a while to figure out where the smell was coming from and I think I was turned off anything that looked remotely like them for decades...I would most likely put up with the smell now because it is so interesting ...thanks again L l :)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2007
1:27 PM

Post #4064593

Pinwheel of white brug. Second flush this season. It has not been a good year for brugs due to high temp. and severe drought. Many gardeners even thought of giving up on them. But I can assure you; once the blossoms begun to unfurl, people will fall in love with them brugs all over again. :-)

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

October 9, 2007
1:56 PM

Post #4064671

Love the angels! nite all ...the witching hour is upon me ...almost midnight ...sweet angel dreams everyone ...ooooops ha ha ha ...good morning!...well whatever it is ...have a good one!

La la la la la la la la la...there must be an angel ...playing with my heart yeah...la la la la

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2007
1:59 PM

Post #4064687

Sweet dream, Chrissy!

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LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 10, 2007
1:17 AM

Post #4066722

Night, night all...I'm on my way to dreamland.

Just in case I haven't told you lately...I love you all.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2007
1:21 AM

Post #4066732

We love you too Christi, and everybody!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2007
1:25 AM

Post #4066751

Nighty night! xxooxxoo..
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2007
1:27 AM

Post #4066761

You too RJ

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 10, 2007
1:33 AM

Post #4066786

Nite. Sweet dream to all my gardening friends around the globe.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2007
1:37 AM

Post #4066809

Good night Lou C Bob,
Good night Jeanne Bob,
Good night Lily Bob...


lights out
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2008
6:10 AM

Post #5330777

After all of this time I finally planted those papaya seeds that I got from the papaya from the store. They have germinated and I am the proud Mother of baby papaya seedlings! Yeah!

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
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Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2008
6:14 AM

Post #5330782

More papaya seedlings...

And yes...for tonight it is "lights out"...


Night Randy Bob!
Night LouC Bob!
Night Lily Bob!!!!!
Night Shari Bob!!!
Night Chrissy Bob!

Night to all and to all a "Good Night"!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thumbnail by Texasgal77
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lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 28, 2008
12:05 PM

Post #5331255

Hi, all.

I have purchased a very ripe papaya at our neighborhood fruit stand 2 days ago thinking: "Now that I can plant whatever I want, I'm going to use the seeds to start me a few papayas".

Then I discover this thread this morning, almost a whole year after it was started. I am happy to report that the work inside the new house is finished. It's now time to work outside the house. Today, I will be opening a bed on the western side of the house. The papayas will go on one corner. They should grow here: sub-tropical, no hard frost in 30 years, MiracleGro to the rescue, etc. etc. I'll keep you all posted.

Sylvain.
oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 28, 2008
2:53 PM

Post #5332074

Randy
Last year I tried the Tainung #1 F1 Hybrid and got some fruit before the first frost. I germinated the seeds in February and by late October I was harvesting fruit. I managed to get about 30% of the fruit before the first frost in late November.
This year I purchased 20 seeds of the Red Maradol but only one out of the 20 germinated and then it died. I will research the H202, seed mats but what size containers are you using to germinate the seeds?
Oldude

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2008
3:03 PM

Post #5332118

Hi oldude, thanks for 'bumping' this thread back up. Special thanks to Randy for initiated such helpful topic here on raising Papayas in our mild climate.

oldude; what zone are you in? Is it a frost-free region? For Papayas to promptly make fruits within a year. It's worth looking into. Currently I'm nourishing two young NOID papayas in container culture. I'm a novice at seed-sowing, these were seedlings that were generously shared from DGer's gardeners.
Kim
oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 28, 2008
4:44 PM

Post #5332671

Kim
I am in Zone 9 not very far from the Gulf but still not frost/freeze free. I still would like to try the Red Maradol ,because it is supposed to set fruit quicker. I am going to try it again using Randy’s method but I don’t have my greenhouse completed. Maybe I can get a few started this fall and bring inside as frost threatens.
Here is a picture of the Tainung #1 F1 Hybrid about a month before the first frost. It was less than one foot tall when I planted it in the spring.
Oldude

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LeePerk
Zolfo Springs, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 28, 2008
5:50 PM

Post #5332993

I am in zone 9b and i planted this one from seeds in Sept. 07. Does anyone know if the cold kills thems are the root stumps hard to dig up?

Thumbnail by LeePerk
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oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 28, 2008
6:49 PM

Post #5333289

Lee
My papayas were Hawaiian variety and are less cold hardy than the Mexican varieties. Still any low temperature without protection is going to damage or kill the plants.
Digging up the roots is very easy since the roots are soft. I dug up three of them in about fifteen minutes.
Oldude



katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 28, 2008
6:49 PM

Post #5333291

The roots are not hard to dig up. The papaya is a short-lived tree, in many ways more like a shrub than a tree. I don't know how frost-tolerant they are. I think it varies a lot by species.

katiebear

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 28, 2008
6:52 PM

Post #5333299

Thanks katiebear for your input. That helps us here in the US to learn more about this tender plants.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

July 28, 2008
7:09 PM

Post #5333367

How short-lived?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 28, 2008
7:57 PM

Post #5333599

I think 2-3 years. After that i think production dropsoff even if the tree doesn't die.
kb
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2008
8:08 PM

Post #5333645

Oldude, I started my seeds in 3-4" pots outdoors. No heating pad needed as it's in the mid to high 90's here! They germinated quickly!

I sure hope my little plants grow as fast as yours did! To think they could be that tall in one year would be something.

Polarbear, be sure to dry those seeds out thoroughly.

Jeanne

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rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 28, 2008
8:54 PM

Post #5333826

Oh wow..surprised to see this thread..I'd forgotten about it. Nice plants Jeanne!

I start the seeds in a very shallow seed tray, about 1 inch deep. I usually wait till around June to start the seeds, as they really respond best in very hot temps. This year I started them at the beginning of this month and they sprouted within a week. Best performance is when the seed tray can be almost dry by the end of the day, Papayas are really not fond of dampy wet. Knowing all of that I still lost alot of my seedlings last week when I upgraded them to smaller pots from the seed tray, mixing a good drainage soil..when it rained last week, they stayed too wet. That has been my number one issue with the plant, is keeping it happy with the right amount of water.

I've experience about 50 percent of Papaya plants coming back after a freeze. My oldest tree is about 4 years, and was fried a couple of years ago during that easter freeze.. It was just a stick in the garden..but it came back, and it grew 3 different tops. Again the biggest problem it faces trying to come back is too much water, as the spring days usually aren't warm enough to dry out the soil to avoid root rot. The roots are tap roots, like carrots. In general they do not like their roots messed with at all, so if you really love your tree, better not move it. This can work to your advantage, because the older it gets, the tougher it gets and can weather freeezes and tolerate more water than it's younger counter parts. This is the reason I treat them like anuals. Like you experienced, they can grow so rapid and produce fruit in one season, why not treat them like anuals? I usually stock a few 2 year old trees in small pots, keeping them fairly stunted until I need them. If it's a warm winter, then your friends will love you, as you have lovely gifts to give away. It really is a popular plant, in fact was the most request plant at a round up I had at the house this weekend.
I've read that the papaya seeds aren't viable very long, so I always save the seeds from the fruit. I've grown them for 7 years now, all from one original Papaya I bought at a grocery store.
LeePerk
Zolfo Springs, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 29, 2008
12:10 AM

Post #5334918

Thanks all it is good to know if they do freeze it will not be difficult to dig them out as mine really love where they are located. Seems to be the right amount of sun and extremely good drainage. This is the first time i have ever grown them but have found they also make a nice plant.
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

July 29, 2008
12:26 AM

Post #5335011

Hi, everyone! I am a papaya lover from way back. One comment about location: Don't plant them up against fence posts or right next to a building foundation. Their tap root can be like a giant carrot, and it creates quite a hole when the root quickly rots away.

I tend to call a papaya a plant, not a tree, because they're not woody. "Trunk" very juicy and crispy-fibrous, easy to chop anytime, no matter how big.

I bought seed from a California supplier, and have sixty or seventy little ones, I'll have to take some photos to share tomorrow when the sun's up. The seed seller was all out of the big types, some can have huge fruit! My seed from a fruit made thirty guys and two girl plants, and really small round fruits. OK, girl photo:

Thumbnail by Molamola
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

July 29, 2008
12:31 AM

Post #5335039

Yes, they're very ornamental!

Boy flowers, sometimes on long racimes. A little fragrant, up close, and hummingbirds like them.

Thumbnail by Molamola
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

July 29, 2008
12:37 AM

Post #5335066

Hum, I need a better 'girl' photo... The bud does open, and when the fruits are properly pollenated, they're green, not like these little ones that didn't have a male plant anywhere near. This was a wild papaya in a ditch.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
1:15 AM

Post #5335341

Yes, in fact the tree/plant is hollow inside. If it should freeze, I've read that cutting the top of the tree off and then stopping up the trunk with something (since it is hollow) and the tree has better chances of coming back. I've tried this a couple of times without success. I think it might be definition of "cutting off the top" as I've cut some of them in half, and they came back. I decided not to do that on the oldest tree for which I'm glad as it came back on it's own. The very tip top of it rotted, but grew 3 other tops instead.

Actually the picture is posted in this thread
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4025221

Here is what it looks like now...actually looked like there were 4 tops to it..

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LApalms
Redondo Beach, CA
(Zone 11)

July 29, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #5335429

Hey Buddy, Houston Dude.
Wow what a great shot and the size of that thing!!

Great shot!...I assume you are the one on the right.
Take care my friend!!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
1:29 AM

Post #5335437

yep..tis me
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
1:35 AM

Post #5335469

Another tip to accelerate the growth of the tree is to continuously trim off the lower leaves, and much like the palm tree, it will really speed up the growth, also will divert energy into growing papayas...that is how the tree in the first picture of this thread got so big, and had so many papayas.. That and fertilizing it with that Hibiscus fertilizer.
When they have so many papayas, I tend to let some of them fall to the ground. I have 4 trees (I'll refer to them as trees for lack of a better term) in the front growing from dropped papaya fruit.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
2:05 AM

Post #5335749

Cool! I can't wait for mine to get that big!
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

July 29, 2008
12:43 PM

Post #5337301

This photo is SO Caribbean. My neighbors are very nice people, just not obsessively tidy.

The Papayas seem to be birdfood. Or, how would you pick them?? The tree is a little too far from the shed roof.

There are papayas all over St Croix like this.

Thumbnail by Molamola
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
7:46 PM

Post #5339276

WOW! That is a really TALL tree!!!!!!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 29, 2008
8:45 PM

Post #5339577

In W. Africa we would rig up a wire loop at the end of very long bamboo poles..someone else would catch them.
raggins
Paris, TX

July 29, 2008
9:24 PM

Post #5339752

Looks like I may have a papaya after all. I started it from a seed 5 yrs ago. It is in a pot and I take it inside in the winter. From what I have read they will not live long in a pot but I just keep babying it so who knows.

Thumbnail by raggins
Click the image for an enlarged view.

oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 30, 2008
1:20 AM

Post #5340942

Randy
I don’t get the hydrogen peroxide H202 connection to germinating papaya seeds, I do know those Potassium nitrates (KNO) soaked seeds will reduce and maximize germination sooner than untreated and planted. Is this how you are using the hydroponics H202?
Thanks Oldude
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2008
1:50 AM

Post #5341129

I don't recall saying or suggesting using h202...I've never used h202 on my papaya seeds
oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 30, 2008
2:30 AM

Post #5341477

Randy
Maybe misunderstood what you said in this quote,

Planting
I've always waited until around may to plant them when it's very hot- But this year I've learned about H202, seed mats..and a whole new world of propagating seeds. I will say- that I was rather surprised by the high propagation rate. It was a good thing because there was a road of trial and error to be traveled.. I leave the seeds in the pot until they reach about 8 inches. The less repotting- the better. They are much easier repotting younger than older. They do not like their roots messed with. As a rule of thumb- l let the papayas get root bound.
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

July 30, 2008
11:50 AM

Post #5342694

Can't resist. This is offered in a 4 inch pot for $30 from Logee's Nursery. I think something stinks here, everything is too pretty and set up looking. Carica Papaya, "TR Hovey"

What do you think?

Thumbnail by Molamola
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #5345353

aah...I was simply writing about all the new ways I had learned about propagating seeds in general. I think my point was that one might not have to wait until may to plant because of these techniques. If I hadn't written it though, I would have thought other wise! As it is, I still wait till may or later, because the seeds like hot..very hot. Here, the papaya seeds need no coaxing to sprout except heat.

Very cool on that papaya tree...! Now there looks to be a species that will produce in a pot!
oldude
New Iberia, LA

July 31, 2008
3:38 PM

Post #5348619

Randy
Thanks for clearing that up on the Hydrogen peroxide.
By the way I just ordered seeds for the Improved Solo and Red lady. As soon as I get them I am going to germinate and keep them in small containers as you do. Thanks for the advice.
Oldude
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
8:17 PM

Post #5349656

Remember, you can go to your local supermarket - buy a papaya..scrape out the seeds on a paper towel...plant...grow...
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
8:43 PM

Post #5349773

That's what I did! There are so many things that you can do that way. But this is the best success I've had so far!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
10:01 PM

Post #5350103

true, from what I hear the fresher the papaya seeds the better they germinate
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
10:23 PM

Post #5350166

I have been following this thread with great interest ( I love papayas and they sell for $3.50+ at the grocery store here!)
Do you think ANY papaya seeds will germinate, or are there any vendors out there that sterilize the fruit?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 31, 2008
10:48 PM

Post #5350241

While living in No. Cal I was never ablt to get papaya seeds from store fruit to germinate.

I've had good success with seed from http://www.goldenvalleyseed.com (papaya seed specialists!!) and with seed from http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net.

katiebear
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
11:11 PM

Post #5350313

I have always been able to get the papayas from the store to germinate.
To do so though, required a drying period...seeds spread out on a paper plate and put high and dry area in the kitchen.
If the seeds are planted while goopy from the papaya they generaly rot. That is not to say some won't grow as I have several "wild" papayas growing from dropped fruit...what process happens for them to grow is not known to me, but I imagine they germinated after drying out somewhat.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
11:11 PM

Post #5350316

Thanks Katie...
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
11:12 PM

Post #5350320

Ok, then maybe it's worth a try!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
11:29 PM

Post #5350366

It might be worth a google to see what California may do to fruits to protect the produce intustry..but..I have to think they import as many papayas from Mexico and Central America as we do...
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
11:30 PM

Post #5350372

My goodness. I have a bazillion seeds...if you want some..mine are the way to go...every tree produces..I really hit the Papaya lottery picking that one.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
11:36 PM

Post #5350401

Awesome! Let me give it a shot first for the heck of it (worst case I still get to eat the papaya!). If it doesn't work, I'd love to have some of yours. How long does it take for germination?
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
11:38 PM

Post #5350410

it took mine about 7-10 days...
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
11:54 PM

Post #5350471

OK! Then I'll give it a try and after a couple weeks or so, if nothing comes up...I'll know the fruit has been sterilized!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2008
11:56 PM

Post #5350479

sounds good
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

July 31, 2008
11:58 PM

Post #5350487

Roberta, I get the Solo (strawberry) papayas from Hawaii at Major Market and they germinated for me. I lost them as seedlings, though, and need to try again.

Kathleen
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

August 1, 2008
1:51 AM

Post #5351078

Earwigs eat the seedlings.

To dry seeds, I scoop a half a million seeds out of a fruit, put them on an unfolded newspaper, put a few layers of newspaper on top, then kind of gently rub around in circles. This pops the little water sac that's around each seed. The newspaper will get sodden and need several changes.

I read someplace that they won't sprout with the water sac still on. What is that anyway??
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2008
2:00 AM

Post #5351159

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4025018

this is picture of seeds with watersack/pulp/gel/ gooey substance..the actual seed is about the size of a pin head. If you dry them so they are hard on the outside - they will germinate

dried
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4025022

you can actually wash of the water sack via a strainer, as the strainer will keep the pin head sized seeds in the container...I have not tried this yet, because I figure mother nature puts the stuff around the seed for a reason, and for which I've had such good success, not needed to try it.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2008
2:02 AM

Post #5351170

all phases of the papaya are extremely susceptible to root rot...alot of us loose seedlings because they are too damp...one cannot stress enough that your potting mix must be as such that they are dry - nearly completely each and every days end
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

August 1, 2008
2:14 AM

Post #5351306

I don't have any to photograph right now, but the seeds that I've fooled with are sizeable, between 1/4 and 1/8 an inch long. Hmmm, I wonder if the hybrids and new varieties have smaller seeds??

Yes, a strainer would be easier than newspaper squashing.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2008
2:15 AM

Post #5351315

I suppose they vary, but the ones I have are as small as a pin head to B B sized...
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

August 1, 2008
2:19 AM

Post #5351334

Amazing. I'm trying to think of something the same size, maybe apple seeds. I guess these Caribbean dudes just eat too much rice and beans and fried chicken!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 1, 2008
4:02 AM

Post #5351884

That's really cool. I hope they have papaya at the store tomorrow!
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2008
4:37 AM

Post #5351964

I think I may have overwatered mine tonight. I hope they do not rot.
If they do, I have more seeds still that I can replant.

I will have to be more careful in the future!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 2, 2008
1:31 AM

Post #5356281

They're really tough as seedlings, that's why waiting until it's roasting hot works out best, because if you do over water them then they have a greater chance of drying out. Even knowing this, I lost at least 13 seedlings when it rained a couple weeks ago.

Next papaya that I get, I'll wash off the gel and photograph them.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2008
1:35 AM

Post #5356298

The one you brought to me is now about 4 feet tall, Randy. Everything is struggling in the 104+ temperature. The ee's are 3x4 feet but the edges are burned like a torch. The water evaporates before it can hit the ground. Will the papaya need to be dug and put in the garage or somewhere for the winter?

Christi
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 2, 2008
2:10 AM

Post #5356451

Are you home?
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2008
2:58 AM

Post #5356711

yes.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 2, 2008
3:01 AM

Post #5356720

Where did you think I was?

Surgery is Aug. 12th.
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

August 3, 2008
12:53 AM

Post #5360400

Good luck, LouC, I'll send a prayer for you. I have pretty good Guardian Angels.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2008
1:04 AM

Post #5360441

Thank you. I need all the positive thoughts, prayers and everything you've got.

Christi
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 3, 2008
1:10 AM

Post #5360469

You've got our prayers, too, Christi!

Papaya seedlings look OK so far!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2008
1:16 AM

Post #5360497

I KNOW I can count on you, Jeanne. That's the edge, you know.

Determined to defy the odds and heal the fastest they have ever seen.

Christi
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2008
1:21 AM

Post #5360521

LOL. If you want to heal fast, then keep telling yourself you are better than ever and you will actually be better than ever. Ignore the pain the best you can by finding something else to take your mind off it. It doesn't always work but sometimes it does. :~)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #5360542

You better bet that I am concentrating hard. After the many, many, many, many pre-op tests, they all came back super good. They couldn't believe what good condition I am in for a lady "my age". (hate that statement). I happen to have a very high pain tolerance or I couldn't have lasted this long. The doctors are amazed. I have never smoked and that is way in my favor. And having friends like DG and many others here at my side, I can't loose. God has blessed me all my life. Have you heard: "If He brings you to it, He will bring you through it". I always depend on His Will.

I am blessed and I love you very much.

Christi
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 3, 2008
3:42 AM

Post #5361023

We love you too sweetie! I believe everything will be fine!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 3, 2008
9:53 AM

Post #5361482

I have marked my calendar. You will be in my prayers and we'll look forward to you returning here with wonderful news about how unbelievably well your operation went.

You take good care. We'll talk to you again before the operation. We're all pulling for you.
Sylvain.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 3, 2008
2:46 PM

Post #5362245

Hey, Polar Bear. Been following your nursery adventures on the Florida Forum. Sounds like so much fun. I vicariously took the trip with all of you.

Christi
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 21, 2008
8:34 PM

Post #5448283

I was just browsing at http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net and came upon their papaya seeds. They say that the fresh seeds are dormant. According to them, the seeds must be at least six months old to germinate. This may explain why I could never get seeds from the little Hawiian papayas to germinate.

katiebear

P.S. For those of you not familiar with them, this catalog is fascinating and informative reading.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
8:51 PM

Post #5448329

Thanks Katiebear...that is interesting, and sheds some light on things...
Ironically I had read something similar, but I think I interpreted it to be fresh seeds are the best. I'm so glad I didn't toss my old seeds now.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 21, 2008
10:07 PM

Post #5448595

Oh no..I was all excited because I had sowed my fresh papaya seeds a week ago! Can the experient folks enlighten us here? Rj, how did you get yours to germinate?
Roberta
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
10:39 PM

Post #5448737

Usually I put them on a paper plate and set them above the cabinets in the kitchen...I let them dry out. for several months...My last batch I planted I took them from above the cabinets...I had put them up there last spring. Then I have packages from each year...so I take some old seeds and some new seeds and plant.. ..I really don't know which ones are sprouting to be honest..but they all are about 6 months old as I've not had any new Papayas yet...I'd say the next round will be next month and Oct to rippen.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 21, 2008
10:47 PM

Post #5448765

Oh boy! I misunderstood! I did just like you said, dried them in paper towels over the fridge, etc...but after a couple of weeks when they were dry I sowed them! Bummer...
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #5448843

well no worries..I didn't know about the 6 month thing either..It was another random dumb good luck event, and it does explain why some that I planted may have not come up..
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
11:02 PM

Post #5448845

It kind of makes sense though because of the gelatinis cocoon around the seeds ..I often wondered how they ever get around to sprouting due to rotting first with that stuff around it.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 21, 2008
11:04 PM

Post #5448848

I guess I'll have to try again and sit tight!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
11:25 PM

Post #5448943

I knew the enivitable would happen..and it has...for several years nothing bothered the Papaya's...but something has discovered the delicious taste, and have had two of them munched on the trees this summer.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 21, 2008
11:45 PM

Post #5449053

I wasn't anywhere near your house!! Really!!!

kb
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 21, 2008
11:48 PM

Post #5449067

LOL...
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

August 22, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #5449167

If a bird finds a papaya, look out! Cover them on the tree with a plastic trash bag, or just about anything.

My seeds from a fruit sprouted in a timely manner, a week or so. The mail-ordered seeds took more than two weeks to sprout.

I got the little water sac (??) off the fruit-seed by dumping the seed on several layers of news papers, putting several layers of news papers on top, and rubbed them gently. After several changes of newspapers, most of the seeds were free from the sac. Planted right away in Pro mix, 1/4 inch deep. I think I wrote this before.

No seed from dropped fruit made it past something?? Lots of earwigs there, maybe them, they eat new sprouts, I hear. Or maybe field mice.

Boy, this is a popular thread!
LeePerk
Zolfo Springs, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 22, 2008
3:06 AM

Post #5450125

I threw my papaya seeds in the mulch pile and now i have little papaya trees everywhere. I also have one large tree with about 35 fruits on it.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 22, 2008
5:29 AM

Post #5450727

My papaya seeds were at least 7 mos old when I planted them in the Miracle Grow. I planted about half of my seeds. I just dumped them in several 4" pots, and I believe almost all of them have germinated. They are growing like little weeds. They are several inches tall. I will have to separate them eventually. So far so good!

Thanks Randy for this thread! It really has been fun!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 22, 2008
8:56 PM

Post #5453586

Well see...reports are they grow whenever huh?
stellamarina
Laie, HI

August 22, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #5453906

Maybe the "fragrant papaya" is a male tree. The flowers on a male tree smell wonderful. thanks for the papaya growing tips. It always seems that the volunteer trees grown from seeds deposited by birds grow better than the ones I try and grow. Am still trying though.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 22, 2008
10:41 PM

Post #5454026

LOL...no kidding..I had so many Papayas a couple years ago I just let them drop from the trees...I have quite a few growing from that drop, and like you they are doing quite good.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 24, 2008
6:23 AM

Post #5460074

Does anyone here have any spare seeds for trade? I am so disappointed I still have to wait another 6 months for mine to germinate!

- the beggar
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
8:29 AM

Post #5460157

What seeds are you looking for? Leeflea51
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
8:46 AM

Post #5460163

I'll send you some...I'll send some from various dates including this year..we gotcha covered.
The variety is the one I talked about where every tree produces...

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
Click the image for an enlarged view.

leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
8:53 AM

Post #5460166

Sorry. must have posted on the wrong site and to the wrong person. Thought someone was looking for seed. I see posting from rjuddharrison re: papaya. Was that the question regarding seed? Leeflea51
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
8:56 AM

Post #5460171

Yes, she is looking for seeds...She planted some fresh seeds, and then read that they are dormant for 6 months I think before they are ready...I hadn't heard that before, but...I have seeds from a variety of times...1 yr 2 yr...
I think the info on seeds is rather ambigous as I had read..fresh seeds were the way to go..so...who knows.
Rj
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
10:37 AM

Post #5460231

Sorry about the posting. I can't help with the seed in question as I live in N.E. Mississippi. However, as a child, I did get a papaya to grow from seeds but in zone7a it was killed by the first frost. Warmly, Leeflea51
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 24, 2008
2:17 PM

Post #5460723

While puttering in the yard yesterday I was thinking about this thread and I put some ideas together. I have read that there are seeds which have germination-hindering thingies (a technical term I picked up) in them which are removed in the digestive process if eaten by a bird and then pooped out (don't know if it would work with humans and I'm not about to experiment). The papaya might be one of those seeds since many of those who've had seeds grow say it was the bird-planted ones that germinated.

Just another thought to add to the mix.

katiebear
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
4:25 PM

Post #5461205

Interesting thought Katie, certainly my papaya all over our garden are bird planted! Even all the babies under the trees have probably gone through the birds first as they spend hours hollowing out the fruit!

Edited to add a Bon Voyage Randy, I am sure you will have a great time with Carol on the BI!

This message was edited Aug 24, 2008 6:27 AM
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
7:55 PM

Post #5462125

Thanks! I certainly will. I'm leaving fri morning from LAX.
I spent most of the morning cutting down Hawaiin Wood Rose...the vine managed to cover much of the back garden via the mid ranged canopy...it invaded the big Papaya tree, and that was all I needed...mess with my papaya tree..hmmm...
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 24, 2008
8:13 PM

Post #5462180

Have a great trip, Randy.

katiebear

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 24, 2008
8:18 PM

Post #5462197

I've a roughly 1-year old papaya tree. Does anyone know how old will the tree be likely to yield flowers and fruits? I don't know of its particular kind of papaya. A seedling was giving to me last year. It's now about 5-6' tall.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
8:45 PM

Post #5462283

At first glance, this looks to be quite similar of the tree I'm growing from Hawaii. I think the ones I'm growing from Hawaii are Male, Female types.. I don't have much experience with this variety..this is my training tree!. My tree is about 8 feet, and a year old as well. Mabe Jenny can shed some light?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 24, 2008
9:05 PM

Post #5462342

Thanks Randy, hopefully Jenny will find our posts and share some info.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
9:45 PM

Post #5462473

Here is some reading on Hawaiin Papaya
http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/papaya.html

Unfortuneatly there are 8 types listed, all of which seem to be I.D. by the fruit.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
9:52 PM

Post #5462503

Katiebear...have a look at that link. It has a section about seeds, you may find it interesting.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
9:56 PM

Post #5462518

Aloha, goofing off at work - with our climate we usually have fruit within 9 or 10 months from a bird sown seed, type unknown of course!

Some papaya, as I am sure you know, are male or female and you will not know which you have until they flower. With this type you will, of course, need both sexes to get fruit.

Many Hawaiian papaya are bisexual, so you only need one tree although I believe that having a male tree around is just so much the better. I may have this totally wrong though, perhaps Dave or Carol would know. We have one huge papaya with many branches (a male) which we never completely chop down just for this reason - the tallest branch is taller than the house, so I would guess he is about 25 feet tall. I rather suspect him of fathering many papaya in our neighborhood!

I do have one papaya that everyone calls a papaya on steroids - it is certainly not a mexican variety. I have never seen such huge fruit running around 4 lbs in weight each. I wonder if anyone can name my noid? Bird sown of course! We have to use a bucket on a pole to pick them as they are far too large for the usual pickers to handle. If anyone knows which variety (if indeed it is a variety) this might be, I would love to know.

I am afraid I am not much help as I pay no attention to the papaya at all, except for pulling them up as weeds. I do know that there are certain Hawaiian varieties that are well thought of as far as flavor and the fact they are bisexual (I know there is a proper botanical name for bisexual - but I can't recall it). I rather think that most of my papaya are so cross bred they are types unto themselves!

Jen

katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 24, 2008
10:10 PM

Post #5462559

Thank you, Randy. I guess the question about when the seeds germinate best remains open for discussion and field reports.

There is one error for sure in that posting. We have salty soil here by the Sea of Cortez and papayas do well here. Maybe they have them confused with avacados.

katiebear
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
10:13 PM

Post #5462571

Thanks, that does shed some light. I would suspect that blooming on the 1 year old trees would be soon.

I'm not sure what the large papaya you have is. I do remember in Liberia, W. Africa, the papayas were incredibly large, some as big as watermelons. These particular Papayas were grown on a chicken farm...and yes, the guy heaped tons of Chicken doo around the trees, most likely the reason for the size.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 24, 2008
10:16 PM

Post #5462586

I think for the reason Jenny mentioned, that Papayas are probably fast out pacing the info posted on them!
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 24, 2008
10:19 PM

Post #5462599

Jenny - Do your monster papayas have the same texture and flavor as the small, pear-shaped ones do?

kb

P.S. If the answer is yes, guess who would love to have some seeds?

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 24, 2008
11:05 PM

Post #5462781

I remember a lecturer at Montreal's Botanical Garden telling us about tomato seeds. Before you start throwing holy water at your screens because this polarbear is off-topic, let me assure you that this seems relevant. Read on, please.

He told us that if we wanted to keep your tomato seeds to replant them the next year, we should slice open a very ripe tomato and squeeze out the seeds and that semi-gelatinous stuff that surrounds them into a shallow, wide dish. You left those on the kitchen counter until they got moldy. Apparently, that causes 2 things to happen:
1) The mold destroys the germination inhibitor contained in the goop (as KatieBear said), and
2) Your wife will go ballistic at you and threaten divorce if you don't get your disgusting stuff off the kitchen counter ASAP.

The moldy crust could then be thrown away and the seeds could be washed and dried for use the following year. Wrapping them in a paper envelope was also crucial. I wonder (as did KatieBear) if that is not one way to get the papaya to germinate in less than 6 months. Squeeze the black globules, collect the goop and the tiny seeds, let them get moldy and when the goop is neutralized, sow them directly into the ground.

I have a papaya sitting on my counter. I'll try and keep you all appraised of my progress. The discussion goes on and on. This thread is generating quite a bit of response.

Sylvain.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2008
11:45 PM

Post #5462976

Whoops! Cross posted - sorry!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 25, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #5463062

I've always dried the seeds with the gelatinous part on them...I'll have to try planting some I have saved from a couple years ago.
It seems we are destined to re-write the Paw Paw directory per our experience!
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
2:57 AM

Post #5463786

Aloha, this working sure cuts into my DG time trying to keep up with you all!

My monster has the typical very sweet orange flesh, I will try to take a picture when I get home althought I don't believe we have a ripe one at present...

Of course you may have seeds - have you any idea how many are in the monster? I can't even put the seed into the compost pile because all of them germinate even after a hot pile! Anyone else who might want seeds of the beast let me know!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 25, 2008
2:57 AM

Post #5463787

Randy, thank you so much for coming to the rescue! : ) I'm sending you Dmail.
R
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:04 AM

Post #5464019

Here is the monster - Randy's description of the papaya in Liberia sound just like mine - sans the chicken poo! It is the only monster I have, all the rest are just the regular ones maybe 8oz to 1lb each. All the locals I have shown and who have tasted Big Yellow say that it's definately a Hawaiian type, but none have seen the size before so it remains unnamed...

I haven't got a ripe one at present, these are about half grown. As the plant is way above the roof line I can't really put anything next to them for comparison size wise...

Thumbnail by Braveheartsmom
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 25, 2008
11:28 AM

Post #5464489

BHM, now I understand why you refer to it as "The Monster". How high off the ground are those fruit? I would say about 15 feet. I would love to plant that here because I have a penchant for large plants but I just don't have the space. Thank you for offering, though.

Aloha,
Sylvain, A.K.A. Pu'ole
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 25, 2008
3:55 PM

Post #5465452

Yep, that reminds me of the ones in Africa.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:01 PM

Post #5465474

About 15 feet is right Sylvain although it has lower branches too. We kept this plant in this spot when we saw it growing so that it would shade the windows that I have under the roof line in the living room. It's done rather a good job, the fruit is a bonus!

The papaya grow rather tall in my garden and every now and then we cut the tops off. Here are some in one of the wild corners of the garden, the dark blob almost in the center is my neighbors roof...ridiculous really, but they are my bird feeders!

Thumbnail by Braveheartsmom
Click the image for an enlarged view.

leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:06 PM

Post #5465497

rjuddharrison and Braveheartsmom, I keep getting thread reminders to this site but I'm glad I am.. Reading you talk of Tropicals is so intersting. I'm unfortunately in zone 7a but am lucky enough to be able to grow gardenias. Since, I live in N.E. Mississippi, I suppose it is apropos to have gardenias, Most people associate magnolias with Mississippi but I think it should be the gardenia. Hope you don't mind my butting in but I am so interested in the subject. Leeflea51
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:19 PM

Post #5465549

Aloha lee,

I love gardenia! One of my all time favorites! I have a few here and there in the garden, but they are still small yet. Will you post pictures of yours? Perhaps we can start a gardenia thread - did I tell you how much I love them?

Jenny
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:26 PM

Post #5465568

Jenny, Aloha to you. didn't know you were in HI. How exciting. I order some of my orchids fro HI. Havent't been to paradise since1972 was young then. I'm now 51..Re: photos. I must get a digital camera first. I'm behind on all new technologies. Oh, how I'd love to be able to see the beautiful sights and sounds of the Islands again. I do hop you know how lucky you are. Were you born and reared there? Lee p.s. what's the time there. It's 11:26 am here.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
4:44 PM

Post #5465654

Aloha Lee,

No, I moved to Maui 6 years ago although we had been coming for 6 years before that. We had to wait to move until they lifted the quarantine restrictions for bringing pets in, no baby of mine was going to spend 30 days in a pound! It's 6.45 am here...
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
5:00 PM

Post #5465740

Jenny, didn't know about quarantine. What are your babies? Sorry I had to go eat. Owen, the friend with whom I live brougth in some good Southerm food from Pigg;y-Wiggly( a grocery store), fried chicken, squash casserole,stewed tomatoes and the ubiquitous corn bread. Since I don't know where your are from originally, I think I have to go into detail about things. That' fine. Am kinda quirky that way. He also broought in some fresh scuppernongs, a hybrid of our native muscadine grapes. They are a bronze color and wonderful. The skins are too tough to chew but the pulp is just too good! I saw Rudd's profile. He seems like an interesting person. Would like to chat with him at some time. I just hate to impose. Will end and go take my pain meds. Do be so kind as to respond any time. Warmly, Lee
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 25, 2008
5:24 PM

Post #5465844

Hi Lee,
that's what threads are for, the more ..the merrier...!
Oh my ..Piggly Wiggly..I haven't heard or seen that grocery store since I left Washington State. We had them there...and a target like store called Wig Wom...LOL

My Jenny, that Papaya tree is tall! One of the blokes in the neighborhood was able to grow a tall Papaya like that. I got all whiney when I saw that the tree was peaking in the second story window. I do believe I may bring back more Papaya seeds.
Ironically, most people here have no idea what the trees are.

Rj
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 25, 2008
5:35 PM

Post #5465896

I used to have a huge Papaya tree like that when I lived in Africa!
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 25, 2008
5:44 PM

Post #5465934

Rj, hello. As I mentioned to BHM, you have a most interesting profile posted. I do so get tired of the same old people whom I see and talk to day in and day out here in N.E.Mississippi. Didn't know Piggly Wiggly ( the Pig as we refer to it here) was in Washington State. I see you are posted as living in Houston, TX. Is that correct? anyway, I won't intrude on you two much longer but it's so interesting your being from Africa. Too, I'm curious about your accent, if you even have one but if you do, is it similar to that of South Africans oor Mamibia. I'm sure you think me silly but the people are all the same around here, except for some Mexicans. rsvp at your choosing. Kindly, Lee
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 26, 2008
1:54 AM

Post #5468064

Your not intruding :)
Yes, I am living in Houston now , in fact I've just set a record for living in one place for the longest span so far in my life. I've been in my House for 8 years now, and I really love that patch of earth and house. In fact it's difficult to pry me out of there these days, even though I pretty much have ticket to the world working for an airline.

Our family moved to West Africa, Liberia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberia
when my brother and I were in our mid teens, so we sport no South African like accents. Liberia was founded after freed slaves returned back to Africa. The countries flag is like the US but only sports 1 star, they use US currency, paper dollars with their own coinage, speak english albeit pidgeon english which is a variation. Once one of the most peaceful countries, became a battle ground for one of Africas most brutal civil wars rivaled only be East Africas Somalia. Liberia is now on a very slow recovery after achieving peace with the help of a diverted US aircraft carrier on it's way to the Gulf.under the elected leadership of the first woman president MS Ellen Samuels, affectionately known as Ma Samuels, a Liberian term of respect, and adoration.
My brother and I attended an American Cooperative School, or ACS that provide schools around the world with the intent of maintaining the mainland US education standards. All types of nationalities attended school, and many of us are still in contact with one another, with frequent school reunions.
Living in Liberia was very influential into evolving into who I am today..

Anyway I could just go on and on...so I've written a wee bit on transitioning from the US to a foreign country in my blog. I will continue to write about my experiences there. http://davesgarden.com/community/blogs/t/rjuddharrison/10183/
Rj
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2008
3:55 AM

Post #5468566

Jr, thank for the most intersting posting. Liberia. I got it confused with Namibia or another West African country. I'll go to the links you provided. Is the climate in Houston any thing like Liberia? I was born and reared in MS and am still not used to it. It's particularly difficult with this asthma. So kind of you to inform me. Warmly, Lee
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 26, 2008
6:19 AM

Post #5468805

Ironically, the summers are pretty similar. It wasn't until I moved to Houston that I began recognize alot of the same or similar trees and plants. Similarities end though during winter. In Liberia it's rainy season or dry season. In fact that area is where the Hurricanes start out. It's the rainy season now, and they have the most terrific storms I've witnessed.
Around noon or just after most activity ceases, shops and stores close until the peak heat of the day subsides. At the time, most shops consisted of a network of garage like area mainly operated by Lebanese
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2008
9:50 AM

Post #5468941

Rj, so the climate of Houston is somewhat similar. You know, my ancestors must have come from the very North of Europe as I find it hard to cope with the summer heat. Here , in the South, it seem we only have 2 seasons: Summer and a little less Summer. No, in fact, we can have rather harsh winters. It's thoses that can wipe out my gardenias if the temps. fall below 0F. What's the west African country that I'm thinking of with a female president with close ties to the US. Think the capitol is Monrovia or am I completely confused? It seems the country is in the north-west part. Lee
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 26, 2008
9:17 PM

Post #5471178

Yes..it's Liberia...Ellen Samuels Lady President extroidinaire.

Re the heat, it's amazing what we adapt too. Trust me, until I moved I grew up in the mild Northwest climate.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 28, 2008
3:28 PM

Post #5478486

You are off tomorrow Randy, have a safe flight!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 28, 2008
3:30 PM

Post #5478502

Randy, have a wonderful trip.

Is this a tiny little bud forming on my Papaya?

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ikebana67
Javea
Spain
(Zone 10a)

August 28, 2008
4:07 PM

Post #5478667

Hi RJ,
Very interested to read about your overseas experiences. I believe it is the best form of education you can get. I worked for 6 years in Saudi Arabia, but prior to that traveled all over the Middle East including Lebanon during a gap in the civil war there. Spent 2 years in the British Virgin Islands, then 6 years working in Spain (which is where eventually I retired to) followed by 2 years in the Czech Republic (where I developed my interest in bonsais), but mostly in Russia and former Soviet countries. Now I lead a quiet life enjoying my garden and plants, hill walking in the nearby mountains, enjoying the beautiful indigenous plants of the Mediterranean, painting, Tai Chi and local Spanish politics. So I have had very interesting exposure to plants and trees in the various countries I worked in. More recently have been travelling in Asia, - Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, and last year China. Some fabulous gardens in some of these countries especially Thailand. Hope I haven't bored you all.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

August 28, 2008
4:26 PM

Post #5478724

Aloha,

Lily - sorry to butt in, you got a flower bud for sure!

Welcome Ikebana, not boring at all! What an interesting well travelled life you have led! I hope you will visit again and share your vast knowledge with us, any pics from the places you have been to?

Jen

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

August 28, 2008
4:43 PM

Post #5478781

Thanks Jen. Ikebana, what an interesting life experience. Other can only dream of. Wooohooo, I've Papaya's bud finally! I'll keep y'all posted on how this one does in my zone.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 28, 2008
8:36 PM

Post #5479677

Yes...I'm off today...and am puttering around...will go to lax stay overnight, and then on to the Islands tomorrow ...breaks it up nicely...oh alright...the truth you say!? There are more first class seats available out of LAX...

Yeah, Yekepa was so beautiful. My best friends at that school were from Spain.

Notice my oldest Papaya tree is getting pretty tall!

The double head came after a hard freeze...it actually had 3...but...lost one when the papayas got too heavy!

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
Click the image for an enlarged view.

robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 28, 2008
9:02 PM

Post #5479774

Rj, you papaya seems to be thriving in shade, is that right or just the photo's angle?
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2008
1:52 AM

Post #5488994

It was a bit cloudy, but yes, they all have at least a half days shade.

I'm in Hilo Hawaii right now at Carols Place (alohahoya) - Incredible. I'm going to bring back some papaya seeds from here.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 31, 2008
3:19 AM

Post #5489390

I have baby papayas! From the sapling you brought in April. Oh yea!!!

Christi
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 31, 2008
3:25 AM

Post #5489428

Whooppee!!!

I have guavas. I don't like to eat them but I love their fragrance.

katiebear
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 31, 2008
6:52 AM

Post #5489810

You're kidding, Katiebear! Guavas are my favorite fruit ever! I bought a 4" guava the other day...I think it's going to be a few years until it bears fruit!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 31, 2008
1:09 PM

Post #5490092

Oh, I am so envious of RJH! Enjoy your time on TBI and give Carol a kiss for me. Time spent in Hawai'i goes by so quickly. Have a great time and bring back loads of seeds.

Aloha.
Sylvain.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 1, 2008
6:34 PM

Post #5494735

Thanks, I will.

Congrats Christi...yum yum Papayas!
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 6, 2008
3:16 AM

Post #5514420

Guys...I'm so excited! I have seedlings!!! It NOT correct that you have to wait for 6 months! Now...what do I do? Fertilize, plant in the ground? ...?

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

September 6, 2008
1:29 PM

Post #5515471

Congrats Katiebear on your guavas, Christi on your Papaya and Robc. on your new papaya seedlings. Zone 10b, do you get any frost at all there? Do tell.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

September 6, 2008
3:33 PM

Post #5516012

Hello, everyone.

I'm in USDA zone 10-B. Do we get frost down here? I've been here 3 years and I haven't experienced anything that even closely resembles that. However, we do get some pretty decent drops in temperatures.

Just yesterday, the weatherman said we would be experiencing the coolest temperatures of the season after the passage of hurricane Hanna. The night time temperatures would fall to the high 60s/low 70s. We just put another blanket on the bed and didn't worry about it.

Sylvain.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 6, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #5517493

Over here in San Diego we are practically frost free. Frost ? What's frost? lol
For you guys who plant your papayas in the ground...how do I know the seedlings are good to go to their final spot? This is my first time with papayas and I'm super excited! : ) I also have a 6 inch baby guava tree in a pot and a fig that is bearing fruit right now.
This morning I went to a gardening seminar, where I bought a Brazilian banana tree for 12 bucks! Did I say I'm excited?
Roberta : )
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2008
5:21 AM

Post #5566759

My little baby papaya tree seedlings SURVIVED Ike! I am sooooo HAPPY!

Most all of the plants made it...some of them just looked a little "worse for the wear"! YEAH!!!!!!!!

Randy, how did your Papaya trees do? Are they still standing? Your Carolina Jasmine is still alive...but shows some wind damage but should make it!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2008
8:01 PM

Post #5568980

I lost one tree. It had 10 inch long Papayas on it, so it was already leaning, but a huge branch dropped like bomb in that section. The papayas are on the front porch rippening now. The others look like they will survive. The front garden is looking alot better. Not sure if the banana tree with bananas on it is going to make it. It's looking a bit haggard.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 18, 2008
9:15 PM

Post #5569219

Bummer! At least you can still have the papayas from the tree that fell off!
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 18, 2008
10:49 PM

Post #5569490

oh yeah..I have 6 in the front that are okay and 3 in the back including the big tree. It's getting pretty old, and looking a bit stressed.
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 19, 2008
6:12 AM

Post #5570887

Randy,
One of our banana trees that went down had bananas on it. They are still on their stalk, so they will ripen eventually.

I am still trying to get reorganized. It will take awhile. Got to wash out the Refrig and freezer tomorrow. Take more pictures...many things to do! They just lifted the boil water ban, so now I can clean tomorrow.

Hope you are OK.

Jeanne
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2008
9:33 PM

Post #5581635

Still cleaning out here, waiting on power still. Have a guy coming out tomorrow to look at fence.
Looks like the bananas on the banana tree are still doing okay. The treen looks pretty bad though. I probably should cut off the yellow leaves?
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2008
9:40 PM

Post #5581664

You can, or just let them turn brown and then get them if you have other things to do. Most of mine don't have any leaves at the moment. I posted pictures on Chrissy100's thread on this Forum.

Jeanne
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2008
9:43 PM

Post #5581678

okay..thanks
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 3, 2008
11:35 PM

Post #5748743

Hi Everybody, Thought I'd bump this thread while I'm awaiting the arrival of Jenny's monster papaya seeds.

I wrote to the owners of http://www.jlhudsonseedds.net about our papaya seed germination experiments Received a very nice response today, detailing their experiments with germinating a lot of different papaya seeds. If anyone wants a copy of the email send me a dmail giving me your email address and I'll forward it to you. In short, just as we have discovered, germination is all over the map.

katiebear
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 3, 2008
11:49 PM

Post #5748776

okay..thanks..

I've been discovering that this fall. I have seedlings popping up all over, which blows my theory about needing to be hot.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

November 4, 2008
12:35 AM

Post #5748943

I found the best germination with papaya is when the seed has gone through a bird. Gosh, Katie mail takes a long time to get to you!
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 4, 2008
12:42 AM

Post #5748976

I know. It varies a lot. I'll be going to Ca. in about ten days. I hope they have arrived by then. If not, Sharon can check the mail and open them up if they arrive after I've gone.

kb
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2008
1:06 AM

Post #5749067

Fixing Katie's link. :~) http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 4, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #5749091

Thanks.

kb
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2008
1:21 AM

Post #5749115

No problem. :~)
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

November 4, 2008
4:40 AM

Post #5750008

My best efforts to germinate Papaya is to let the birds eat the fruit and then fly low over some out of the way patch of ground in the garden. Works everytime!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 4, 2008
1:38 PM

Post #5750573

What if one were to own a parrot, a parakeet or some sort of large pet bird...

You could feed papaya seeds to the bird and just plant the sheet of newspaper at the bottom of the cage after the bird is finished "processing" the seeds. It seems easier than training some wild and ungrateful bird to poop in a certain spot. I know for a fact that our Florida birds are just plain untrainable.

Come to think of it, my friend Cassandra has 2 or 3 large birds. I think I will ask her to do that for me. It's so crazy, it just might work.

Aloha,
Sylvain, a.k.a. Pu'ole.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 4, 2008
2:17 PM

Post #5750680

Wonderful idea, Sylvain. Let us know if it works. After reading the varied results the people at JLHudson have had I'm hoping we can come come up a more reliable method for germination. I can see troops of DGers going to pet stores, asking to "rent-a-bird" for seed germination purposes. Maybe someone could have a small home business as I think there are other seeds that must also make this trip in order to germinate. I should have planted the dog poop after the dogs ate some of my papaya seeds. See if a dog's intestines have the some effect. I can see a whole new area of scientific inquiry opening up here.

katiebear

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 4, 2008
3:06 PM

Post #5750845

Oh yeah, I can just see it from here:

Step right up ladies and gentlemen. Here are first quality, pre-digested papaya seeds, at the amazingly low price of $5.00/sheet. Just lay the sheet flat on the ground, cover with 1/2 inch potting soil, keep moist and watch your papaya seedlings sprout. (The crowd claps appreciatively).

Astound your friends, amaze your neighbors, amuse your children. Great for window sills. Makes a great holiday gift. Results may vary. But wait! Order within the next 12 minutes and we'll include 2 sheets for the same very reasonnable amount of $5.00 or 2 easy-pay payments of 2.50. Hurry, quantities are limited; our birds can only produce so much.

Take care
Sylvain.

pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2008
3:09 PM

Post #5750854

LOL!!
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 4, 2008
4:09 PM

Post #5751104

And for an extra $2.00 we'll include an enlarged photograph of your seeds being "born."

kb
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 4, 2008
7:27 PM

Post #5751731

Come to think of it, some of the most successful Papaya's I can remember were at Brother Wrights chicken farm in Liberia. Aside from the digestion, perhaps the bird dooo works almost as well. Have to make a note of that.
I'm about to cut open a Papaya I picked a couple days ago and share it with the office.

Thanks for that info on the seeds! It's pretty consistent with my experience. They sproute when they feel like it and not before then!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

November 4, 2008
10:46 PM

Post #5752595

Sounds like just about all the babies I know of. Ha Ha

Yokwe,
Shari
Texasgal77
Baytown, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 5, 2008
12:19 AM

Post #5752960

Me too! LOL!

I had real good germination with mine. My babies are about 5" tall. They are in the swingset GH. They need repotted.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2008
4:08 AM

Post #5753936

LOL! Pu'ole, you always make me laugh!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 5, 2008
2:58 PM

Post #5754947

The unusual way I look at life and its viscissitudes makes you laugh. There is nothing funny about selling the newspaper sheets at the bottom of the budgie's cage. What's funny is that people might be willing to pay for soiled newspaper. That right there is funny. I'm just the guy who writes about it.

Aloha.
Sylvain, a.k.a. Pu'ole
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

November 6, 2008
4:16 PM

Post #5758924

That's as maybe - but you do have a lovely turn of phrase, and a sense of the ridiculous!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 6, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #5760237

Please don't laugh: Everyone laughed at Ben Franklin when he invented the electric kite. OK, it didn't really catch on but everyone laughed. Hey, I still do.

Sylvain.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

January 8, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #5981115

Bump.

kb
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 8, 2009
6:26 PM

Post #5981932

Yes..it's getting to be that time...all of my trees are full of Papaya...I'm going to do a blog in the Houston Chronicle soon about Papayas.
If anyone wants to read the former blogs they are listed here
http://davesgarden.com/community/blogs/t/rjuddharrison/10741/
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2009
9:48 PM

Post #6632632

Bump
Observing some seeds that sprouted wild in the garden, I noticed that seeds coming up in very loose soil with large mulch grew extremely fast, in fact the same tree that volunteered in very little soil is 5 times the size of others growing from the same time. Sooo...I prepared a loose mixture with quarter sized pine bark mixed in, and the propagation rate is off the hook.

Thumbnail by rjuddharrison
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2009
10:26 PM

Post #6632773

The seedling, more treelike, you brought to me last year grew beautifully and even teased that it was going to bloom and then the frost got it even though I had wrapped it as carefully as I could. This spring, as with most of the tropicals, it came up from the root with 5-6 stems. I cut all away after a few weeks leaving the strongest. It is growing very fast and more like a vine. Thin stem from top to soil level and seems to be attempting to wrap around a nearby banana. We shall see.

PK

Mike is saving a mango seed for me. Don't expect much success but I sure enjoy trying.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2009
10:31 PM

Post #6632798

hmmm, take some pictures...the recovery process on these is kind of unknown for me except what I've experienced here...Each plant seems to re-act differently during the recovery process.
Molamola
Christiansted, VI
(Zone 11)

June 3, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6633189

Bump?? How about death, and a new thread that doesn't take an hour to load.

Love you! Love papayas, will post pics of my ancient babies, in your new thread. Or am I being a jerk? Maybe so.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
12:18 AM

Post #6633249

hahaahaaaaa...no..I hear ya...! Try this one..
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/997032/
stellamarina
Laie, HI

June 3, 2009
9:57 PM

Post #6637838

Just checking in on this papaya theme after a few months. Just want to say that for the first time in my tropic gardening life I have two healthy five foot papaya trees in the back yard with flower buds on. After trying for years on sandy soil, killing with fertiliser, etc...I think I finally have figured out how to do it by accident. I made a wire framed compost in the back part of the yard. A couple of volunteer papaya plants started growing on the edge of the compost from food scraps. When they got several inches in height I transferred them out of the compost to about 1 foot away on each side of the compost...and have been watering them. They are looking wonderful...sandy soil for drainage...me to water them...and roots growing right under the compost heap to nourish them. I have finally have hope of harvesting home grown fruit.
By the way, I just want to make sure you all know that green papaya makes a beautiful vegetable in your stir fry...just cut up small...as well as for eating ripe. The soft overipe fruit also make great jam...just add a bit of ginger powder as well to balance the strong papaya flavor. aloha
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
10:03 PM

Post #6637859

congradulations...that is what I had discovered on the loose soil...is volunteering in compost bin, or on top of the soil of other potted plants...

and...for those of you who live in countries where apples are rare, green Papaya can replace apples in apple pie..you'll never know the difference..we use to make "Papple" pie in Liberia all the time.
greenman62
Kenner, LA

March 4, 2014
9:28 AM

Post #9781662

I have been growing papaya for a few years now.
i had bought a fruit from Wall Mart that said "Carribean Red" which i think is just a type of Maradol. (mexican)

The first time i had lost a papaya it was because of root-rot.
I lost one tree a couple of years ago.
They hate wet roots and need well draining soil, but hate wet roots, especially if its cold.
The roots had bumps on them (root knot nematode) which they get easily if they are susceptible in cold-wet weather. -Also , the roots will turn to mush.


This past year, i had learned my lesson and built up the soil several inches when planted it, about a 10inch plant. it grew to over 15ft in a year and a half.

I had grown several large trees that survived years here in New Orleans until this last winter.
It got down to 25F, and stayed under 30F for a couple of days. Then it rained hard for 2 days, and got down to 25 again.
This time, even with a raised bed, the trees did not survive/
Many of the roots still seemed OK, the raised bed heleped, but the tops of the trees turned to mush.
Papaya is an herb, not a real tree.
It has a very high water content in the cells
If they freeze, they will turn to mush.
The bottom 2ft of the trunk, which was woody, was OK,
but this wasnt enough to save the tree.

I used very little fertilizer on them, mostly chicken poo.
twice i had fertilized the large ones with high N fert, but 1/2 strength.

they LOVE worm castings.
I had added a LOT of coffee grounds to the soil, and while that helped. what it did, was bring in worms. worms LOVE coffee grounds, and papaya LOVE worm castings.

another experience...
I had thrown some seeds in a pot which had lots of rock and sand, and a little organic material.
one papaya took off, and i cut down the others.
i had forgotten about the plant, and forgot to water it,
it was surprisingly healthy with very dry rocky/sandy soil.
(it was only getting 1/2 day of sun)

My large plants do well in full sun, they grow faster, ,as long as they get water.

i try to keep several plants over winter in the greenhouse so i can plant them out in the spring.

They also like Mycorrhizal fungi
especially Glomus mosseae
[HYPERLINK@www.google.com]








Thumbnail by greenman62   Thumbnail by greenman62   Thumbnail by greenman62   Thumbnail by greenman62   
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bellieg
Virginia Beach, VA

March 14, 2014
3:42 AM

Post #9789199

This is a very long thread, had anyone ever pickled green papayas os use green papayas as a veggie with meats.

i wish i can grow them in my backyard.

Belle
stellamarina
Laie, HI

May 10, 2014
4:36 PM

Post #9835252

Hi..there...a few months since I looked in. Just to say that I use green papaya cut up into small bits for stir fries and stews. It is a good extender. If very green...flesh is white in color with not much taste. If getting near ripe then the flesh may get a yellow color to it when cooked and a bit more flavor. Some papayas are not that tasty so if I have a tree like that I will not wait until it is ripe but use it as a vegetable.
rjuddharrison
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 20, 2014
1:48 PM

Post #9873004

That's an interesting idea! When I grew up in Liberia, apples were hard to come by, so we made apple pie, from green papaya, affectionately named Papple pie. Could not tell the difference!

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