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Recipes: Shepards Pie

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phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 19, 2007
11:04 PM

Post #4102263

Shepards Pie any one?

Thumbnail by phicks
Click the image for an enlarged view.

threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

October 19, 2007
11:06 PM

Post #4102270

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm
shune
Burien, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 20, 2007
12:12 AM

Post #4102492

I noticed some threads have an asterisk next to YES on the left side there. I was wondering what that means?
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

October 20, 2007
12:22 AM

Post #4102513

I think it means there is a picture in the first post.
katym
Deatsville, AL
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2007
4:19 PM

Post #4104301

Phicks, What is your shepard's pie made of? I have heard of it but dont have a recipe.
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 20, 2007
6:48 PM

Post #4104653

ground beef and oions cooked salt peper garlic poweder i can cream corn one can whole corn drained. mashed poatoes beef and cooked onions on the bottom the the corn then the mashed on top i bake mine till the top is lightly brown . the salt and spices do to your taste you can use instant poatoes or real i use a bit of white peper to Paul . PS some people use other Vegies Peas carrotts but the real resipe is corn
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

October 20, 2007
6:55 PM

Post #4104665

I make mine similar...I leave out the corn and add to the burger..parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme(like the song), a bit of onions and celery.
My Gramma was British and she said the corn is a North American additive...I never could adapt to the taste of it with corn in.
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 20, 2007
9:52 PM

Post #4105074

The Beef is to As its a Irish Dish was Made With Ground Mutton Lamb
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

October 20, 2007
9:54 PM

Post #4105080

hmmmm...glad Gramma left that out!!!

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 21, 2007
6:00 AM

Post #4106391

i add 2 cans of vegetable soup to my browned meat and onion mixture..salt, pepper to taste with a dash of worcestershire sauce...add grated cheese to the potatoes for the topping..the soup gives a more concentrated flavor to the mixture.. do not dilute the soup.

Larkie
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

October 23, 2007
9:31 PM

Post #4115734

Paul you cook too???
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 23, 2007
9:59 PM

Post #4115882

i was a Chef For 35 Years
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

October 23, 2007
10:00 PM

Post #4115887

Geez you have the best plants and you can cook.
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 23, 2007
10:47 PM

Post #4116047

LOL
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

October 26, 2007
11:34 PM

Post #4127119

I love Shepherd's Pie, but my husband doesn't so I hardly ever get it. Ummmm. Your picture makes me hungry.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2007
5:29 PM

Post #4143538

Cottage Pie uses Beef, while Shepard's Pie uses Lamb/Mutton.

Shepard's Pie

1/2 lb. lamb, minced (225g)
1/2 lb. mutton, minced (225g)
1 1/2 lbs. potatoes (700g)
large onion, chopped
2 oz. mushrooms, sliced (50g)
bay leaf
2 carrots, diced
1 oz. flour (25g)
1 Tbsp. tomato puree
1 oz. butter (25g)
4 Tbsp milk
8 oz. lamb or beef stock (300ml)
2 oz. Cheddar cheese (50g)

Method:
Dry fry the mutton and lamb with the chopped onion, bay leaf, sliced mushrooms and diced carrots for 8-10 minutes. Add the flour and stir for a minute. Slowly blend in the stock and tomato puree. Cook, stirring, until the mixture thickens and boils. Cover and simmer gently for 25 minutes. Remove the bayleaf and place in a 1.7 litre (3 pint) ovenproof serving dish.

At the same time, cook the potatoes in boiling water for 20 minutes until tender. Drain well, mash with the butter and milk and mix well. Spread on top of the mince mixture and sprinkle over with the grated cheese.

Bake for 15-20 minutes in a pre-heated oven at 200C/400F (Gas Mark 6). Serve hot with green vegetables.

katym
Deatsville, AL
(Zone 8a)

November 4, 2007
11:36 PM

Post #4157798

I really like the idea of adding the vegetable soup to this. When I made it, we thought it was kind of a bland dish. I also like the cheese on top idea.

KatyM
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

November 7, 2007
5:43 PM

Post #4168005

I bet it would be good with the veggie soup, thanks for that idea. I always put cheese on top of mine and paprika. I used to use only instant potatoes, but now I only use real potatoes :)

Kathy
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 7, 2007
9:41 PM

Post #4168770

try the yellow potatoes

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 7, 2007
11:12 PM

Post #4169029

The concentrated soup adds so much flavor...gotta make one sometimes this week..

Larkie
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 7, 2007
11:15 PM

Post #4169034

I had some left over scalloped potatoes the other day I put on a shepherds pie---sure was good. Now, every time I want a shepherds pie, I'm gonna have to make scalloped potatoes the day before to put on top of it---lol
art_n_garden
Colorado Springs, CO
(Zone 6a)

November 14, 2007
10:30 PM

Post #4193464

Mmm love Shepherd's Pie. I have a recipe for it in the slow cooker too (not the mashed potatoes part). I can look it up when I get home if anyone would want it.
Moby
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

November 14, 2007
10:46 PM

Post #4193502

I grew up with the well-seasoned beef, corn, taters recipe. For a change of pace I like to add a can of sliced carrots, whip up (pkg.) brown gravy then top it all off with the mashed potatoes.
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 15, 2007
12:30 AM

Post #4193835

try fresh or frozzen carrotts Art And Gardens id like the Recipe for that one
Aguane
Phoenix, AZ

November 15, 2007
4:00 AM

Post #4194531

... back to time on the job...
so that makes you 36 yrs old?
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 15, 2007
3:26 PM

Post #4195813

whos 36
kayef
albury
Australia

December 11, 2007
5:48 AM

Post #4283195

hi from aussie, proper shepherds pie is made from leftover roast leg of lamb, minced up with onions, tomato sauce, just a dash and a gravy to bind it together, then covered in mashed spuds with dobs of butter on to help browning in the oven
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 11, 2007
6:29 AM

Post #4283242

I made your Shepherd's pie, maccionoadha, it was outstanding and my husband loved it and he has always told me that he hated Shepherd's pie. I will make your recipe again!
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

January 11, 2008
10:20 PM

Post #4388893

I love shepherd's pie. We make it with leftover roast lamb (it's easy to get fresh local lamb around here), assorted veggies, yukon gold mashed potatoes, and herbs from the garden.

The big difference I see with my recipe is that I make it with a bottom crust. I use Julia Child's savory piecrust recipe (no sugar and a little more salt) baked by itself beofre it's filled and it is so good. I'm not a big fan of piecrust but Reese and I have to keep each other from nibbling on the baked crust before the filling goes in. The buttery crust really complements the savory filling.

We served this to our friends and they loved it, though their eight year old daughter wouldn't touch it. We told her to help herself to as much salad as she wanted (since it was the only other thing served with dinner). Grown-ups are so mean!
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

January 15, 2008
8:38 PM

Post #4406357

I was wondering if this pie had a crust, like a pot pie. But then it seemed to me that the mashed potatoes made the crust. Is that right? All sounds good to me. I like the idea of using lamb because we can get some locally.
MistyMeadows
Payneville, KY
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2008
9:00 PM

Post #4406404

When I make my shepherd's pie, the potatoes are the top crust. The meat and veggies are the bottom :)
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 15, 2008
9:10 PM

Post #4406436

Same here. I made the recipe posted by maccionoadha above. It was delicious. Mashed potatoes on the bottom might be good, as well.
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2008
9:27 PM

Post #4406494

It's kind of like lemon meringue pie, crust on the bottom, gooey stuff (meat and veggies in gravy) in the middle, and fluffy stuff (mashed potatoes) on the top.

That reminds me, I need to call our favorite butcher and order some more lamb. Yum!
kayef
albury
Australia

January 20, 2008
4:58 AM

Post #4427729

a shepherds pie with a pie crust on the bottom is called a meat pie here, also we have pastry on the top as well on
most of our pies, the bottom crust is made as a short crust with dripping and top is puff, our pies are made as single serves and we love them at the footy and any sporting venue usually serves up a good pie ans sauce
bedouin
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 21, 2008
3:11 AM

Post #4431244

I've never understood why English Pies have not become a staple here in the States. Cottage pie, Shepherds pie, Cornish Pasties...The Egyptian Sanbusak and the Russian Piroshki - all could and SHOULD be a hit here as single servers! How I miss them. My home-made ones are never the same as when one walks into the shop, makes a major decision on which type to select, and then munches them with bliss - ah! the fragrance...makes ones mouth water!!!

Piroshki, Russian meat pies: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLJ,GGLJ:2007-43,GGLJ:en&q=piroshki+pies
Sanbusack, Egyptian meat pies: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=242089
Cornish Pasties: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLJ,GGLJ:2007-43,GGLJ:en&q=cornish+pasties
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 21, 2008
3:17 AM

Post #4431275

Maybe Americans don't want to spend the time making these items. Making crust is not something most of us are good at. Ah for the little shops that would sell them! But we don't have any around here. We have a small restaurant here makes empanaditas at Christmas, which are little meat pies, but that is the best we can do.
Moby
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #4432851

Thanks for the links, bedouin. I think most ethic groups have their version of a pocket sandwich. I used to work with a fellow from Kenya whose wife sent in the most fantastic, little trianglar snacks. Oh, they were good! Here, we have runzas available as fast food, but don't get Terry and I stared on that ~ it's a whole 'nother thread. :)
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

January 22, 2008
12:30 AM

Post #4435193

My D.H. sometimes makes piroshki. They're pretty good. They do take time to make. I wish we could buy them in a little shop. At one time we had a "gourmet" type market here (Standard Market, it was called). They sold home-made chicken pot pies that were heavenly.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 22, 2008
3:06 AM

Post #4436081

They have frozen ones at Trader Joe's but they can't be as good as homemade.
bedouin
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 22, 2008
5:22 AM

Post #4436587

roybird, was your Piroshki pastry make with yogurt? I was rather surprised when I first read of the use of yogurt in pastrymaking. I havent made any for a while - really must get myself organized to make them again, as they were delicious. I found that after removing all the horrible fat at the top of the can of Dinty Moore, it made a very respectible filling! Add a little garlic, onions and coriander etc, and its quite delicious!
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

January 23, 2008
4:33 AM

Post #4441557

I tried to respond but ran in to computer trouble. Hmm. Anyway, D.H. says no yogurt.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2008
2:59 AM

Post #4492519

Anyone ever tasted the Shepherd's Pie at the restaurant "The Cheesecake Factory"? It is incredible,,, very mushroomy and i think there is zucchini in there too. No flour crust. (It's on the gluten-free menu, that's why we were there in the first place.) x, Carrie
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 4, 2008
5:00 PM

Post #4494441

if you put the potatoes on the bottom they will pick up all the fat {Greese} from the meat and spoil the taste Paul
bedouin
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

February 4, 2008
7:07 PM

Post #4494923

Ah, but its just not the same if the mashed potatoes are not over the complete bottom of the pie plate, well seasoned mincemeat mix in the middle and a high piling of mashed potatoes on the top, browned well and so crusty! I also add frozen veges to the meat when I'm mixing it up with the bread, milk etc.
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 4, 2008
7:25 PM

Post #4494992

all i can say is Yuck
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2008
8:46 PM

Post #4495308

Bedouin,
where does the milk and bread go? In the meat? If so, is it added before or after the meat is cooked?
bedouin
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

February 5, 2008
12:11 AM

Post #4496161

Katlain I don't fill the centre with just pure mincemeat as in a regular Shepherds/Cottage Pie. I use a modified 'Bobotie' recipe(a meat loaf) for the meat mix as its much more interesting! I'm giving the complete recipe for Bobotie, but it's modified as described below.

BOBOTIE MEAT LOAF RECIPE used as a meat base for the Shephards Pie.
I chop the onions but don't braise them & I don't add the eggs, merely mix all ingredients together as my meat base. Sometimes I mix in frozen veges as well. (frozen, only 'cause I've not defrosted them...2 lbs meat would make a couple of S. Pies)
2 medium sliced onions. Diced
2T butter
1T curry powder
1t salt
1T sugar
1T vinegar
2lbs mincemeat (cooked or raw) ( I always buy lean meat - the less fat the better)
1 thick slice bread
1 1/4 c (1/2 pt) milk
2 eggs

1. Sprinkle curry powder over braised onions, add salt, sugar, vinegar & meat & mix well together.
2. Soak bread in milk, drain, (retain drained milk). Mash soaked bread with fork & add to meat mixture, together with 1 beaten egg. Turn into a pie dish. (For the Shepherds Pie, I layer this over the mashed potato base. This is the extent of my use of this recipe for the S. Pie.
3. Add sufficient milk to the retained bread to make up to 3/4 cup. Beat remaining egg & mix it with the milk. Season with salt & pepper & pour this over the meat mixture in the pie dish.
4. Dot with small bits of butter over the top & stand the pie dish in another pan of water.
5. Bake gently for 30-40 minutes at 350.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2008
12:24 AM

Post #4496210

Do you think it would work without the bread? My daughter has celiac disease. x, Carrie
ladybug70
Ione, WA
(Zone 5a)

February 5, 2008
12:31 AM

Post #4496240

My Grandfather had a pair of horses he drove for the mines in Dillon Mt. In the late 1800 and Grandma would make a sandwitch called pasties and send it with him for his lunch. My mom kept up the recipe and now I make them, very good. They are round peices of pie crust (as big as a saucer) with made up meat, potatoes, and gravey in them then folded in half the edges crimped , several fork holes poked in the top and baked like a pie. The filling is made before being put inside the pastry.
Maria
Rehoboth, MA
(Zone 5a)

February 5, 2008
1:56 AM

Post #4496579

My daughter's college aged children, my grandaughters, are vegetarians, she makes a vegetarian 'Shepards pie', I had a slice of it it was very good, it was topped with mashed potatoes covering peas, carrotts, spinach, onions and mushrooms have to ask her for the recipe.
bedouin
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

February 5, 2008
2:09 AM

Post #4496628

carrie, the bread really is there to add bulk and with the milk, moisture. Absolutely no problem eliminiating it.
Ladybug I'm going to hunt for the thread on 'Pasties'. I'll add the link when I've found it.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2008
2:37 AM

Post #4496763

Thanks, Carrie

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 17, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9127324

You can buy meat pies online at BritishSupplies.com. I can atest to how good they are. We get them all the time. They carry a lot of British foods Here is the link for the meat pies: http://www.britishsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=BS&Category_Code=MPBAS

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 18, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9128110

I love shepherd's pie but the French version is very nice, too. This is from Dorie Greenspan's book, Around My French Table, courtesy of NPR. I usually make the quick version, at the bottom. You can use beef or deer meat. Great comfort food!

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=130921453

Hachis Parmentier
Makes 4 generous servings

Hachis Parmentier is a well-seasoned meat-and-mashed-potato pie that is customarily made with leftovers from a boiled beef dinner, like pot-au-feu. If you have leftover beef and broth from anything you've made, go ahead and use it. Or, if you'd like to shortcut the process, make Quick Hachis Parmentier (see instructions below). But if you start from scratch and make your own bouillon, and if you add tasty sausage (not completely traditional), you'll have the kind of hachis Parmentier that would delight even Daniel Boulud, a chef from Lyon who lives in New York City.

You can use chuck, as you would for a stew, but one day my stateside butcher suggested I use cube steak, a cut I'd never cooked with. It's an inexpensive, thin, tenderized cut (its surface is scored, almost as though it's been run through a grinder) that cooks quickly and works perfectly here. If you use it, just cut it into 2-inch pieces before boiling it; if you use another type of beef, you should cut it into smaller pieces, and you might want to cook it for another 30 minutes.

For the beef and bouillon

1 pound cube steak or boneless beef chuck (see above), cut into small pieces

1 small onion, sliced

1 small carrot, trimmed, peeled and cut into 1-inch-long pieces

1 small celery stalk, trimmed and cut into 1-inch-long pieces

2 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled

2 parsley sprigs

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns

6 cups water

1/2 beef bouillon cube (optional)

For the filling

1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 pound sausage, sweet or spicy, removed from casings if necessary

1 teaspoon tomato paste

Salt and freshly ground pepper

For the topping

2 pounds Idaho (russet) potatoes, peeled and quartered

1/2 cup whole milk

1/4 cup heavy cream

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus 1 tablespoon butter, cut into bits

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1/2 cup grated Gruyere, Comte, or Emmental

2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan (optional)

To make the beef: Put all the ingredients except the bouillon cube in a Dutch oven or soup pot and bring to a boil, skimming off the foam and solids that bubble to the surface. Lower the heat and simmer gently for 1 1/2 hours. The broth will have a mild flavor, and that's fine for this dish, but if you want to pump it up, you can stir in the 1/2 bouillon cube taste the broth at the midway point and decide.

Drain the meat, reserving the broth. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and discard the vegetables, or if they've still got some flavor to spare, hold on to them for the filling. Traditionally hachis Parmentier is vegetable-less, but that shouldn't stop you from salvaging and using the vegetables. Strain the broth. (The beef and bouillon can be made up to one day ahead, covered and refrigerated.)

Using a chef's knife, chop the beef into tiny pieces. You could do this in a food processor, but the texture of your hachis Parmentier will be more interesting if you chop it by hand, an easy and quick job.

To make the filling: Butter a 2-quart oven-going casserole a Pyrex deep-dish pie plate is just the right size for this.

Put a large skillet over medium heat and pour in the olive oil. When it's hot, add the sausage and cook, breaking up the clumps of meat, until the sausage is just pink. Add the chopped beef and tomato paste and stir to mix everything well. Stir in 1 cup of the bouillon and bring to a boil. You want to have just enough bouillon in the pan to moisten the filling and to bubble up gently wherever there's a little room; if you think you need more (a smidgen more is better than too little), add it now. Season with salt and pepper, especially pepper. If you've kept any of the vegetables from the bouillon, cut them into small cubes and stir them into the filling before you put the filling in the casserole. Scrape the filling into the casserole and cover it lightly; set aside while you prepare the potatoes. (You can make the dish to this point up to a few hours ahead; cover the casserole with foil and refrigerate.)

To make the topping: Have ready a potato ricer or food mill (first choices), a masher, or a fork.

Put the potatoes in a large pot of generously salted cold water and bring to a boil. Cook until the potatoes are tender enough to be pierced easily with the tip of a knife, about 20 minutes; drain them well.

Meanwhile, center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil or a silicone baking mat (you'll use it as a drip catcher).

Warm the milk and cream.

Run the potatoes through the ricer or food mill into a bowl, or mash them well. Using a wooden spoon or a sturdy spatula, stir in the milk and cream, then blend in the 3 tablespoons butter. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Spoon the potatoes over the filling, spreading them evenly and making sure they reach to the edges of the casserole. Sprinkle the grated Gruyere, Comte or Emmental over the top of the pie, dust with the Parmesan (if using), and scatter over the bits of butter. Place the dish on the lined baking sheet.

Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling steadily and the potatoes have developed a golden brown crust (the best part). Serve.

Serving

Bring the hachis Parmentier to the table and spoon out portions there. The dish needs nothing more than a green salad to make it a full and very satisfying meal.

Storing

It's easy to make this dish in stages: the beef and bouillon can be made up to a day ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator, and the filling can be prepared a few hours ahead and kept covered in the fridge. You can even assemble the entire pie ahead and keep it chilled for a few hours before baking it (directly from the refrigerator if your casserole can stand the temperature change) of course, you'll have to bake it a little longer. If you've got leftovers, you can reheat them in a 350-degree-F oven.

Quick Hachis Parmentier. You can make a very good hachis Parmentier using ground beef and store-bought beef broth. Use 1 pound ground beef instead of the steak, and when you add it to the sausage in the skillet, think about adding some finely chopped fresh parsley and maybe a little minced fresh thyme. You can also saute 1 or 2 minced garlic cloves, split and germ removed, in the olive oil before the sausage goes into the skillet. (The herbs and garlic help mimic the aromatics in the bouillon.) Moisten the filling with the broth, and you're good to go.

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