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Article: The History and Uses of Winter Squash: Fascinating!

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Forum: Article: The History and Uses of Winter SquashReplies: 20, Views: 151
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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2007
5:09 AM

Post #4113479

Thanks for all the info and links! I was just admiring a pretty squash today at the grocery store, in a display of "fall decorations", and wondering if you could eat them, and what they'd taste like. I didn't know they were so nutritious. If I don't buy some, I may find myself hungrily eyeing my neighbors' fall displays...LOL
Dyson
Rocky Mount, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 23, 2007
9:36 AM

Post #4113604

Excellent article, and experimenting with squash will ensue forthwith.
McGlory
Southeast, NE
(Zone 5a)

October 23, 2007
12:51 PM

Post #4113955

Yummy, yummy, yummy! I love winter squash, but have never grown any. You mentioned some varieties I'm going to have to look for. Maybe I should grow some next year...

Thanks, melody!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

October 23, 2007
8:33 PM

Post #4115550

Great article! I'm contstantly looking for excuses to serve my family squash, and you have just given me black and white proof of its nutritional value. Thank you! And to make the information so interesting to read was a pleasant bonus. Great job!,
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

October 23, 2007
9:29 PM

Post #4115725

History, recipes, nutrition, growing, pests... wow, you packed a lot of great information into your well organized article! I really enjoyed the photos... "Still life, with squash." :-)

I just bought a "neck pumpkin" that must weigh 10 pounds, probably more. It's enormous! Most of it is "meat," too... the seed cavity is just a little thing at one end. And from the one I bought last year, I know it'll be great for eating/baking. Now I'm inspired to put it right into the oven!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2007
12:14 AM

Post #4116300

I LOVE squash; winter squash, summer squash, and I'll bet I would love spring and fall squash tioo! Sadly, my DH has been cooking for many years and he HATES squash. He doesn't even like pumpkin pie! I've just had the idea that I could make spaghetti squash because DD#1 was diagnosed with celiac disease and cannot eat pasta! Hmmmmm thanks for all the ideas! Yummmmy yummy.

xx, Carrie
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 24, 2007
1:19 AM

Post #4116580

Carrie, just don't tell him it's squash! LOL, just say it's "vegetable pasta", which is true, ain't it?? ;)

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2007
1:49 AM

Post #4116692

I love butternut squash and also pumpkin.
Thank you for the lovely article,
Josephine.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 24, 2007
1:54 AM

Post #4116706

I never ate pumpkin except in pie--how do you prepare it, just boil, butter and salt?

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2007
2:00 AM

Post #4116728

You can do it that way, I also like to cut it in small cubes and saute it in oil with garlic salt and pepper, no water, until tender, very delicious.
Josephine.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 24, 2007
2:54 AM

Post #4116966

Ooo, sounds yummy! Thanks!

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


October 24, 2007
12:52 PM

Post #4117787

Thanks ya'll...I love squash...and it's such a misunderstood veggie.

Here's another recipe that I love. We make this one every Thanksgiving.

Chunks of winter squash about the size of your thumb (1 butternut)
Slice up an onion
A tablespoon of frozen orange juice concentrate scooped out of the can (apple juice works too)
Olive oil (2 tablespoons)
Salt and pepper
Dried ground ginger

Put veggies in a baking dish

Mix other ingredients and pour over squash...toss to coat
Bake uncovered at 450* for about 35 minutes, or until squash is tender.
Stir a time or two during cooking.

This is my favorite winter squash recipe. Just didn't have a good spot to include it in the body of the article.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

October 24, 2007
12:57 PM

Post #4117801

I've done a similar dish, but without the ginger and orange juice concentrate... and, good as it was, I knew it was missing something! Thanks!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2007
1:46 PM

Post #4118003

Ky, my plan exactly! He knows some funny things are going to be on the menu these days.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 24, 2007
5:46 PM

Post #4118899

LOL, funny, but healthy, Carrie!
girlgroupgirl

October 29, 2007
1:58 PM

Post #4135176

Great article!
I learned one thing about squash this past week. Time is it's friend. The refrigerator isn't. Two butternut squash were set for the baked butternut and almond soup for a squash cooking competition. I kept one out of the fridge, but refridgerated one. The one kept cold was yellow and not so sweet inside. Still good, but nothing compaired to the squash kept at room temperature. It was like SUGAR inside, and a deep, golden orange. So delicious!

One very large butternut type squash (which are borer resistant here in the South, so easy to find fresh). Sliced and on a baking sheet
Cut 4 onions in half and place on a baking sheet
3 carrots
I clove of garlic, entire top cut off, drizzled with oil and placed in a foil pouch

Drizzle everything with oil and bake until squash is golden (rest will be done then).

Cook 1/2 cup whole grain brown rice (not instant!) in some stock until done.
Toast 1/2 cup sliced almonds in a dry pan on the oven.

If you have some celery you can slice 1/2 cup, cook this until soft in some olive oil in a soup kettle.
Skin the squash, take of the dry layer of the onion, squeeze the garlic and chop the carrot - add to the soup kettle. Cover with water. Throw in your rice and your almonds. Heat up until very hot. Add a few tablespoons of soy sauce (for salt), some pepper to taste. Whirl it all up with an immersion blender. Let cool a bit (to eating temperature. The soup is going to be VERY thick. Add some apple cider vinegar for kick (and your health) at least 2 tablespoons per large soup kettle (up to a 1/4 cup). A few tablespoons of raw, local honey is also great to add.

Now, call your family to dinner and fight over every last drop. My squash hating husband consumes this soup for breakfast, lunch and dinner! However, it did not win the contest. Still is good!!

girlgroupgirl

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 29, 2007
6:30 PM

Post #4136109

What's wrong with those judges?
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 29, 2007
8:14 PM

Post #4136482

I agree, sounds like that contest was rigged!
Maudie
Harvest, AL

October 30, 2007
5:13 AM

Post #4138386

I enjoy all the squash
and pumpkin recipes.
Does anyone know how to
roast the pumpkin seeds?
I would like to know how they are prpared?
Someone please help!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

November 26, 2009
3:01 AM

Post #7310526

Pumpkin seeds:
Two ways;
I have fixed them;
One:
boil them in salt water, drain, mix in oil, spread on a greased cookie sheet and bake 350 degrees untill brown.

Two;;
Skip the boiling. The slime of the pumpkin is just pumpkin that you eat in a pie anyway. Mix it with oliveoil, salt, chili powder if you like, cumin if you like, then spread it on a cookie sheet at 350 degrees untill brown and crispy.

Nothing is easier than that.

I raised all kinds of pumpkins, butternuts and huge kettle gourds this summer. All the best crops I have had in a long time. Pumpkins came in early because I might have planted them too early but that was okay I froze them. Still have lots of little packets of pumpkin seeds for snacks too. The pumpkin makes the best soup. My son's favorite. The butter nuts were great too, as a matter of fact I think I will forgo the pumpkins next year and just plant butternuts instead. AND I am forgoing the kettle gourds too, just so I will have more room for the butternuts.

Carrie the secret to getting good spagetti out of the squash is to pierce it with a fork and then put the squash in WHOLE, bake it till soft. Take it out, cut it open , and flake it out with a fork. I have tried lots of other ways and you can get it too soggy real soon, I never failed once this year - that is a change.

I grew my butternut next to the kettle gourds. My neighbor said I would get some butternuts that were crossed with the gourds, but they all were sweet. He said he planted his next to cucumbers and got some that looked like and had a taste of cucumber. Do you think he is right??


irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

November 26, 2009
4:58 AM

Post #7310782

Butternut squash for Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow. I discovered it as an adult & both DH and I are fond of it.

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